BOOK TEN-3:  The Louisiana Acadian Begats" - continued

The Foundational Acadian Families of South Louisiana - continued

Jeansonne

William, called "Billy," Johnson, a native of Scotland, came to Port-Royal in the autumn of 1710 as a British soldier.  He got into trouble with his superiors, was branded on the forehead with the crow's foot, the sign of a thief, and expelled from the garrison.  Undaunted, Billy sought refuge in the nearby Acadian community, denounced Protestantism, and became a Catholic.  In c1714, he "married" Isabelle, daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie, at Annapolis Royal and "became" an Acadian.  Seven years earlier, in September 1707, Isabelle had given birth to a natural son, Louis dit Beaulieu, by Sr. René Fontaine, "a clerk in M. Raudot's office of the Marine in France," and in September 1713 she gave birth to a natural daughter, Marie, whose father's identity has been lost to history.  She may have borne natural children by Billy before they married.  Among his Acadian in-laws and neighbors, Billy was called Guillaume Johnson dit Jeanson.  Isabelle gave him four children at Annapolis Royal, all sons, who married into the Lord, Aucoin, Girouard, and Granger families.  Each of them retained their father's dit as their surname. 

In 1755, descendants of "Billy" Johnson dit Jeanson and Isabelle Corporon could still be found at Annapolis Royal.  Le Grand Derangement of the 1750s scattered the family to the winds.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported at least two Jeanson brothers and their families to Connecticut.  After the war with Britain finally ended in 1763, they followed other Acadians to Canada and settled at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan and L'Assomption on the upper St. Lawrence near Trois-Rivières.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Meanwhile, two Jeanson brothers and their families, along with a nephew, eluded the British roundup at Annapolis Royal and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  The old soldier's youngest son Guillaume dit Billy became a leader in the Acadian resistance.  In early December 1757, he and his fellow Acadians, along with Mi'kmaq fighters, ambushed and nearly destroyed a party of British soldiers at Bloody Creek on the upper Annapolis River.  By the early 1760s, however, the Jeansons and their families either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the Gulf of St. Lawrence region.  The British counted Billy and his family at Fort Edward, Pigiguit, in August 1762.  A year later, British officials counted a Jeanson and two of his "children," actually his younger siblings, in the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, in August 1763.  Their parents probably had died by then.  A Jeanson cousin also may have been held at Halifax during the final months of the war.  

Now that the war was over, the Acadians being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of the previous February stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, four were Jeansons. 

Billy Jeanson did not go to the French Antiilles with his relatives at Halifax.  The war over, he took his family, instead, to Carleton in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where they were counted in 1777.  Billy died there in December 1806, reportedly at age 95, but he was 84.  

Johnson/Jeansons settled late in Acadia, but they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  Five descendants of William "Billy" Johnson of Annapolis Royal, the soldier with the crows-foot band on his face, came to Louisiana in the 1760s.  When three of them got there is anyone's guess.  Two Jeanson brothers reached the colony in 1765 from Halifax via French St.-Domingue.  Neither appears in the early church records of the Acadian Coast, though one of them certainly married in a the river community during the late 1760s.  Both appear in the Cabahannocer census of April 1766, one in the Cabahannocer census of 1769, and both again in the Ascension census of 1770.  Their sister first appears in Louisiana records at Opelousas in 1771.  All three of her brothers appear with her and her husband at Opelousas in 1774.  Three years later, in 1777, all five of the Jeansons who came to Louisiana finally appear in a single census together, at Opelousas, one of them, a cousin making his first appearance in Louisiana records. 

Though three of the four Jeanson males who came to the colony took wives, the Acadian Jeansonnes of South Louisiana spring from only two of the brothers of Opelousas.  Although the brothers married fellow Acadians, their descendants, who remained on the Opelousas prairies in what became St. Landry and Acadia parishes, tended to marry Creoles and the like, who greatly outnumbered Acadians on the Opelousas prairies.  From 1790 to 1861, in fact, Jeansonnes married only four fellow Acadians, all of them Pitres.  The others took non-Acadian spouses, a remarkable record of exogamy for an Acadian family.  This exogamy rate, and the fact that a number of Anglo-American Johnsons and even a Scandinavian Johnson also settled in St. Landry Parish, considerably complicated the genealogical picture for this family during the antebellum period.

At least three Jeansonnes served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, and one of them paid with his life.  Joseph S. Jeansonne was serving in the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry when he died at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in late July 1862.  The war took its toll on the Jeansonnes back home.  Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valleys, including the Opelousas area, and burned and pillaged many farms, some of them perhaps owned by Jeansonnes.  Thanks to these Federal invasions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the areas where Jeansonnes lived, adding to the family's misery.  In October 1863, Gerasime Jeansonne, age 27, died at Bois Mallet near present-day Eunice, a notorious Jayhawker hideout.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  ...

In Louisiana, the spelling of the Acadian family's surname evolved from Jeanson to Jeansonne.  The family's name also is spelled Janson, Jansonne, Jaunie, Jeanconne, Jeantonne, Johonson.01

.

Only five Acadian Jeansons, four males and a female, came to Louisiana in the 1760s, and they all ended up on the western prairies.  The female Jeanson, a younger sister of three of the males and a first cousin of the fourth one, married a non-Acadian Langlois on the river before moving to the prairies.  Two of the brothers and their first cousin also created families of their own in what became St. Landry Parish.  Two robust family lines came of it, and all of the Acadian Jeansonnes of Louisiana belong to one of those lines:

Charles, fils (c1745-1790s) à William dit Billy, père Jeansonne

Charles, fils, eldest son of Charles Jeanson and Marie Aucoin, born at Annapolis Royal in c1745, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and then to a prisoner camp in British Nova Scotia.  He most likely came to Louisiana in 1765 with three of his younger siblings.  They settled at Cabahannocer and Ascension on what became known as the Acadian Coast before moving to the Opelousas District in the early 1770s.  Charles first appears in Louisiana records at Opelousas in 1774, still a bachelor.  Spanish officials counted him at Opelousas in May 1777; he was still a bachelor and in his early 30s.  He married Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Cosme Brasseur dit Brasseux and Élisabeth Thibodeau of Grand-Pré and Maryland, probably at Opelousas in c1777.  Charles's first succession record was filed at Opelousas in May 1788, years before his death.  He died by May 1796, probably in his late 40s, when his wife was listed in an Opelousas census as a widow.  She remarried to Walter Mills in the late 1790s and followed him to Avoyelles Parish.  Charles and Élisabeth's daughter married into the Clark family.  Three of their four sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Louis-Marie or Auguste-Louis, called Louis, fils, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in May 1779, married Lise, daughter of Jean Baptiste Demaré or Desmarets and Madeleine Fontenot, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1810.  Their daughters married into the Gaspard, Hargrave, and Reed families.  Two of his sons married by 1870. 

 Oldest son Auguste Louis, fils, called Louis, born in St. Landry Parish in April 1816, married Hyacinthe, daughter of Henry McCauley and Marie Louise Fontenot, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1843.  Their son Théodule was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1843, Jean Pierre in July 1851, and Gérard le jeune in March 1858.  Their daughter married into the Frugé family.  Auguste Louis, fils, in his early 40s, remarried to Céline, 22-year-old daughter of Jean Baptiste Frugé and Julie Marcantel, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1860.  Their son Gustave was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1861, Osmin in October 1863, and François Villeneuve near Grand Coteau in January 1869.

Louis, père's second son Cyprien Louis, born in St. Landry Parish in March 1821, married cousin Azema, daughter of Jean Baptiste Desmarets, fils and his second wife Céline Lacasse, at the Opelousas church in November 1840.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1844, and Louis le jeune in December 1846.  Cyprien Louis's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in August 1851.  He would have been age 30 that year. 

Louis, père's third son Gérard, born in St. Landry Parish in November 1834, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Louis, père's fourth son Jean, born in St. Landry Parish in May 1838,  if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Louis, père's fifth son Pierre, Jean's twin,  if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Charles's second son Charles, fils, baptized at Opelousas, age 5 months, in November 1781, married Joséphine, daughter of Jean Baptiste Guillory and Margeruite Hayes of Avoyelles, at Opelousas in October 1806.  Their daughter married into the Smith family.  Charles, fils may have remarried to Hélène Geofriant, Jeanprion, or Jeaufriant in his late middle age.  Four of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Louis le jeune, perhaps also called Don Louis, from first wife Josèphine Guillory, born in St. Landry Parish in January 1812, may have married fellow Acadian Delphine Broussard.  Their son Jean Pierre was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1843; and Louis, fils in March 1848.

Charles, fils's second son Aloyse, by first wife Josèphine Guillory, born in St. Landry Parish in October 1816, married Azéline, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Charles Pitre and his Creole wife Phelonise Joubert, at the Opelousas church in September 1846; the recording priest called Aloyse Florence.  Their son Florence, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1853.  Their daughter married into the Fuselier family. 

Charles, fils's third son Paul, by second wife Hélène Geofriant, born in St. Landry Parish in March 1844, may have married Athanaise Brunet or Billeaudeau.  Their son Prosper was born near Ville Platte in January 1867. 

Charles, fils's fourth son Napoléon, perhaps also called Léon, by second wife Hélène Geofriant, born in St. Landry Parish in June 1848, may have married Marie Charite Ives.  Their son Austin was born near Ville Platte in February 1868. 

Charles, fils's fifth son Apollinaire, by second wife Hélène Geofriant, born in St. Landry Parish in September 1849, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Charles, fils's sixth and youngest son Hilaire, by second wife Hélène Geofriant, born near Ville Platte in April 1855, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Charles, père's third son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Opelousas in September 1783, may have married fellow Acadian Judique Broussard in St. Landry Parish during the early antebellum period.  Their daughter married into the De Ville family.  Jean Baptiste may have died in St. Landry Parish in July 1845.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste died "at age 57 yrs.," but this one would have been closer to 61.  One wonders if he fathered any sons. 

Charles, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born at Opelousas June 1784, may have died young.

Jean (c1746-c1822) à William dit Billy, père Jeansonne

Jean, second son of Charles Jeanson and Marie Aucoin, born at Annapolis Royal in c1746, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and then to a prisoner of war camp in Nova Scotia.  He most likely came to Louisiana in 1765 with three of his siblings and settled with them at Cabahannocer on the river.  Jean married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Préjean and his first wife Madeleine Martin, on the river in the late 1760s.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension, upriver from Cabahannocer, in 1770.  By 1774, they had moved to the Opelousas District.  Jean's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in March 1822.  He would have been in his late 70s that year.  His daughters married into the De Ville, Fontenot, Fuselier, Guillory, Ledoux, and Ritter families.  Only two of his five sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Opelousas in the early 1770s, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Joubert and his Acadian wife Catherine Pitre, at Opelousas in November 1797.  After the death of his wife, Jean Baptiste filed a succession record at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in April 1817.  Jean Baptiste, whom the recording priest described as a resident of Prairie de Langlois, "Captain of Militia and president of the members de l'admistration de cette eglise (of the church administration)," remarried to Marie Françoise, daughter of Allibamonts Henry Fontenot and Marie Louise Doucet of Grande Prairie, at the Opelousas church in April 1817.  Jean Baptiste's postmortem succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in August 1822.  It names his widow, so he was dead by then.  He would have been in his late 40s or early 50s that year.  He probably died at his home on Prairie Ronde.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own. 

The oldest son, by first wife Isabelle Joubert, name unrecorded, was born at Opelousas in c1800 but died at age 2 in October 1802.

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, called Baptiste, from first wife Isabelle Joubert, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in December 1800, died the same day. 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Pierre, by first wife Isabelle Joubert, baptized at Opelousas, age 2 months, in September 1803, married Clarisse, daughter of Joseph Andrépont and Marie Thérèse Langlois, at the Opelousas church in April 1823.  Their son Pierre, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1829.  Their daughters married into the Saucier and Vasseur families.  Pierre's son also created his own family.

Only son Pierre, fils, married Sophie, daughter of Hubert Doucet, a Creole, not an Acadian, and Adrienne Lafleur, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1850, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church in November 1869.

Jean's second son André, born at Opelousas in c1777, died in St. Landry Parish in March 1812.  The priest who recorded his burial said that André died "at age 30 yrs,", but, according to Bona Arsenault, he was closer to 35.  André probably did not marry.  

Jean's third son Auguste or Augustin, baptized at Opelousas, age 2 months, in September 1782, married Marie, daughter of François Guillory and Marie Jeanne Fontenot, at the Opelousas church in March 1810.  Augustin, père died in St. Landry Parish in December 1847.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial said that Augustin died "at age 62 yrs.," but he was 65.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse later that month.  His daughters married into the Lavergne and Pitre families.  Four of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Augustin, fils, baptized at the Opelousas church, age 2 months, in September 1812, married, in his late 30s, Céleste or Célestine C., daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Pitre and his Creole wife Catherine Vigé and widow of Auguste Ledoux, at the Opelousas church in September 1849; one wonders if this was his first marriage.  Their son Bruno Darmas was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1858 but died at age 7 1/2 in August 1866, and Paul Augustin was born in November 1860.  Augustin, fils died "at Plaquemine" in October 1870.  The Opelousas  priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Augustin died "at age 60 yrs.," but he was 58.  His succession record, naming his wife, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse a few days after his passing.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux family, and perhaps into the Whilock family as well. 

Augustin, père's second son Paulin dit Babolin, a twin, born in St. Landry Parish June 1818, married Amelina, Alevine, Aveline, Avelina, or Evelina, 23-year-old daughter of French Canadian Joseph Lavergne and his Acadian wife Augustine Richard, at the Opelousas church in May 1837; the recording priest called Paul Babolin and the parish clerk called him Olin.  Their son Joseph was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 2 months, in May 1838; Babolin, fils was born in October 1839; Gustave François in February 1849; and Louis Ophela in July 1852 but died at Washington, St. Landry Parish, age 11, in December 1863 (one wonders if the boy's death was war-related).  Babolin's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1852.  He would have been age 34 that year.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux and Lebarge families.  None of his sons married by 1870, and one of them may have died in Confederate service. 

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Joseph may have been the Joseph S. Jeanson who enlisted in Company K of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish.  The regiment went on to fight at Vicksburg, Mississippi, from late 1862 into the summer of 1863, but Joseph was not part of the heavy fighting there.  He enlisted in the company probably at Opelousas in April 1862, accompanied them to Vicksburg in late May, and died the following July 28, perhaps of disease, place unrecorded.  Joseph à Babolin would have been age 24. 

Augustin, père's third son Joseph died in St. Landry Parish, age 1 1/2 months, in January 1821.

Augustin, père's fourth son Aurelien, born in St. Landry Parish December 1822, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Pitre and his Creole wife Céleste Symphorose Vigé and widow of Napoléon Frulette, at the Opelousas church in December 1856.  Their son Louis Durel was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1859. 

Augustin, père's fifth son Terence, born in St. Landry Parish in December 1828, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Augustin, père's sixth and youngest son Jean Gerasime, called Gerasime, born in St. Landry Parish in May 1836, married Marie Melina, called Melina, daughter of Creoles Jean Baptiste Rider and Marie Clarise Roy, at the Opelousas church in January 1861.  Gerasime died at Bois Mallet near present-day Eunice, a notorious Jayhawker hideout, in October 1863.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial said that "Gerasin" died "age 23 yrs.," but he was 27.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Jean's fourth son Jean, fils was buried at Opelousas, "a boy," age unrecorded, in January 1793.  He probably died young. 

Jean's fifth and youngest son Hippolyte, born at Opelousas in c1787, died there at age 12 in January 1799.  

Paul (c1755-?) à William dit Billy, père Jeansonne

Paul, third and youngest son of Charles Jeanson and Marie Aucoin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1755, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and then to a prisoner of war camp in Nova Scotia.  He most likely came to Louisiana in 1765 with his three older siblings and settled with them at Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him in 1766 and 1769 on the right, or west, bank of the river, with the family of fellow Acadian Claude-Amable Duhon.  In 1770, still in his teens, he was living with older brother Jean on the right bank of the river at Ascension.  He followed his brother to the Opelousas District in the early 1770s and was counted there, still a bachelor, in 1774 and 1777.  He evidently never married.  

Joseph (c1748-1806) à William dit Billy, père Jeansonne

Joseph, likely a son of Jean-Baptiste Jeanson and Marie-Josèphe Lord, was born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1748.  The British deported membes of his family to Connecticut in the fall of 1755, but Joseph evidently escaped the British roundup and sought refuge with his cousins on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He may have come to Louisiana in 1765 with his cousins from Halifax, but he does not appear in Louisiana records until May 1777, when he was counted as a 29-year-old bachelor at Opelousas.  If he did come to the colony in 1765, he, too, likely lived for a time at Cabahannocer on the river.  He may have married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Léger and Marie Savoie, at Opelousas in the 1780s.  Joseph died at Opelousas in October 1806.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 55 when he died, but he was closer to 58.  One wonders if he fathered any children. 

Labauve

Louis-Noël (de?) Labauve, called Noël, came to Acadia by 1678, the year he married Marie, daughter of René Rimbault and Anne-Marie ____ of Port-Royal.  They settled at Grand-Pré and then at Chignecto before moving back to the Minas Basin.  They had a dozen children, including seven sons, five of whom created families of their own.  Four of their daughters married into the Bastarache, LevronHébert dit Baguette, and LeBlanc families.  One of their daughters, the one who later married an Hébert, had an illegitimate daughter at Port-Royal in 1713.  Five of their sons married into the Lejeune dit Briard, Blou, LaVache, and Levron families.  In 1755,  Louis-Noël's descendants could be found at Minas, Chignecto, Chepoudy and Peticoudiac in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto, and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale in the French Maritimes.  

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family even farther.  The first Acadians in Nova Scotia rounded up by the British in the fall of 1755 were the ones in the Chignecto area, including Chepoudy and Petitcoudiac.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto and trois-rivières Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French regulars, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant-Governor Charles Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto area Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  No Labauves ended up in Georgia or South Carolina.  Most, if not all, of them still in the area escaped the British roundup and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

Labauve families also escaped the British roundup at Minas in the fall of 1755, but some of their kinsmen were not so lucky.  The British rounded up a Labauve family in the fall of 1755 and deported them to Pennsylvania.  Another Labauve, from Rivière-aux-Canards, were among the 1,500 Acadians from Minas transported to Virginia.  The first contingent of exiles reached Hampton Roads during the second week of November and suffered the indignity of being turned away by the colony's authorities.  For weeks, the exiles languished in the lower James River aboard disease-infested ships while the governor and his council pondered their fate.  Later that fall, Lieutenant-Governor Robert Dinwiddie ordered the "French Neutrals" dispersed to the ports of Hampton, Norfolk, and Richmond.  The following spring, the colony's Burgesses debated the question and concluded that the papists must go.  Virginia authorities hired more vessels and sent the Acadians on to England, where they were packed into warehouses in several English ports and treated like common criminals.  The Labauves were held at Liverpool.

Living in territory controlled by France, the Labauves on the Maritime islands also "escaped" the British roundups in Nova Scotia.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadian habitants on the islands and transported them to France.  The Labauves and their families suffered terribly in the crossing.  The few survivors settled in several St.-Malo suburbs and did their best to make a life for themselves there.  In the spring of 1763, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England, including the Labauves, were repatriated to several ports in France.  The Labauve family at Liverpool landed at Morlaix in northern Brittany and also did what they could to make a life for themselves there. 

In 1773, the remaining Labauves at Morlaix, along with their Labauve cousin and her husband from the suburbs of St.-Malo, chose to take part in a massive settlement venture in Poitou.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  After two years of effort, most of the Acadians, including Pierre and Madeleine and their families, abandoned the Poitou venture.  In November 1775, they retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they lived as best they could on government handouts and on what work they could find.  The cousins and their families settled in the suburb of Chantenay, where, between 1778 and 1783, the male cousin buried all of his children as well as his wife and remarried to a French widow in October 1784.  About that time, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  The Labauve cousins and their families agreed to take it. 

In North America, conditions only got worse for the Acadians who had escaped the British roundups of 1755 and 1758 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the fall of Québec in September 1759, the British gathered their forces to attack the remaining French strongholds in New France, one of which was the Acadian refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  They attacked in June 1760.  After a spirited fight in which Acadian and Mi'kmaq militia played an important role, the French commander blew up his larger vessels and  retreated up the Restigouche, leaving the militia to prevent a British landing.  Unable to land his redcoats and lay waste to the area, the British commander ordered his ships to return to Louisbourg with what booty and prisoners they could carry.  In October 1760, three months after the British withdrawal, French officials counted 1,003 Acadians still at Restigouche They included two Labauves and their families.  The British, had captured an estimated 300 Acadians during the fight at Restigouche the previous summer and held them as prisoners of war in British-controlled Nova Scotia.  In the early 1760s, Acadians who had escaped capture at Restigouche either surrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region, who dragged them off to several prison compounds in Nova Scotia.  One of these compounds was Fort Edward, Pigiguit.  The largest was on Georges Island in the middle of Halifax harbor.  Labauves were among the Acadians held in these compounds.  At Fort Edward in July and August 1762, British officials a Labauve and his family of five.  Also counted there in October were two middled-aged bachelor brothers whose brother had perished with his family on the crossing to France.   At Georges Island in August 1763, British officials counted two Labauve families, one of which had been counted at Restigouche in October 1760 and at Fort Edward in the summer of 1762. 

 At least one family of Labauves escaped capture all together and found refuge in a remote area of greater Acadia.  They had escaped the British several times--first in the trois-rivières area in the fall of 1755, after which they took refuge on Île St.-Jean; again on the island in 1758; and yet again at Restigouche two years later.  They evidently did not wait around for the British to strike the remote Baie des Chaleurs outpost again.  In 1765, they were living among other Acadian exiles on lower Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick.  They were still there in 1769. 

The war finally over, the Acadians being held in the seaboard colonies theoretically were free to go, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  In June 1763, colonial officials in Pennsylvania the Labauve family from Minas, called Labos, still in the colony.  The Labauve's wife must have died soon after the counting, and he remarried to an Acadian widow at Philadelphia in April 1766.  One wonders what happened to them after that date.  Did they follow the majority of their fellow exiles in the Quaker Colony to Canada, or did they take up an offer to resettle in the French Antilles.  One thing is certain--they did not join their relatives in Spanish Louisiana.  ...

The hand full of Labauves being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of the previous February stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Chignecto was no longer French territory, and Port-Royal and Minas had been held by the British for half a century.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in Nova Scotia, they could live only in the interior of the peninsula in small family groups and work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the hated oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, no self-respecting Acadian would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in the French Antilles, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they would not remain in old Acadia.  So the Labauves at Halifax gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.

Acadian Labauves, perhaps descendants of Louis-Noël, did go to the French Antilles in the 1760s.  One of them, a 14-year-old girl, died "on [the] farm of M. Gourge à Mariboroux," French St.-Domingue, in October 1781.  The Fort-Dauphine priest who recorded the girl's burial called her an Acadienne.  According the age given her by the recording priest, she had been born in c1767.  One wonders where. 

Labauves settled early in Acadia, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  In 1765, a Labauve, his wife, two sons, and a nephew reached New Orleans from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  The nephew, moved to the Attakapas District in the late 1760s, married, and started a western branch of the family.  Another Labauve and his small family came to Louisiana from France in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but his line did not endure.  Meanwhile, during the late colonial period, Labauves on the river moved up to the Baton Rouge area.  Their descendants settled in what became East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, and Iberville parishes.  Several families also moved to Pointe Coupee Parish, where few Acadians settled.  During the early antebellum period, four young Labauves from the river joined their cousins on the western prairies.  A Labauve from the river created a family line on Bayou Lafourche during the late antebellum period.  By then, the western branch of the family, scattered in St. Landry, Lafayette, St. Martin, St. Mary, Vermilion, and Calcasieu parishes, and even on the prairies of southeastern Texas, nearly rivaled in size the eastern branch, centered in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Emulating their ancestors in Acadia, few Acadian families of South Louisiana were as peripatetic as the Labauves. 

Church records show that no non-Acadian Labauves established families in the Bayou State before the War of 1861-65.  Most, if not all, of the Labauves of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of Louis dit Noël of Port-Royal, Chignecto, and Minas.

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, some Labauves lived comfortably on their farms and vacharies along the river and on the prairies.  In 1850, brothers Jean Baptiste and Dominique Labauve held 11 and nine slaves apiece on their adjacent farms in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Cousin Placide Labauve held a dozen slaves on his Calcasieu Parish farm that year.  A decade later, Jean Baptiste owned 14 slaves in West Baton Rouge Parish.  His younger brother Guy held a dozen slaves on his West Baton Rouge farm.  In nearby Pointe Coupee Parish, the widow of Jean Baptiste and Guy's brother, Joseph Isidore, fils, owned 18 slaves.  Out on the prairies of Calcasieu Parish, Placide Labauve now owned 13 slaves.  In St. James Parish, the widow of cousin Antoine Labauve held eight slaves on her left-bank farm.  Amazingly, in Iberville Parish, a Labauve was co-owner of a huge plantation of 182 slaves also owned by German Creole Alexander Hotard.  Census records for 1860, however, do not reveal the identity of this wealthy Labauve.  In 1860, two of Jean Baptiste and Guy's brothers, Victor and Dominique, held 10 and eight slaves, respectively, in Jackson County, Texas.  ...

In Louisiana and Texas, the family's name also is spelled Labauf, LaBauvre, Labeauve, Labeaux, Labeuve, Laboff, Laboffe, Labouve, Labove, LaBove, Laubauve, Lavauve, Lavob, LeBau.  This Acadian family should not be confused with the French Creole Lebeaus or Le Boeufs.02

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The first of the family to emigrate to Louisiana--a small family with two sons and a teenage nephew, four Labauves in all--came to the colony from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1764-65.  They landed at New Orleans in 1765 and follow dozens of fellow exiles to the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river below New Orleans.  The only Labauve family lines to set down roots in the colony came of it.  The older Labauve and his sons remained on what came to be known as the Acadian Coast, and his nephew established a western branch of the family on the prairies west of the Atchafalaya Basin:

Antoine, fils (c1726-1779) à Louis-Noël Labauve

Antoine, fils, perhaps also called Antoine-Zénon, younger son of Antoine Labauve and Catherine Lejeune, was born probably at Minas in the mid- or late 1720s.  Antoine, fils followed his family to Île St.-Jean but may not have remained there.  He married Anne Vincent in c1756.  If they were still on Île St.-Jean in 1758, they escaped the British roundup there and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  During the late 1750s or early 1760s, they were either captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area and held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia until the end of the war.  British officials counted Entoine, as he was called, his wife, and five children on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, in August 1763; one of the "children" may have been a son of older brother Charles.  In 1764-65, Antoine, fils, Anne, their two sons, and their nephew emigrated to Louisiana via Cap-Français and settled at Cabahannocer, where Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766 and 1769.   Anne gave Antoine, fils more children in the colony.  He died at Cabahannocer in March 1779, in his early 50s.  His daughters married into the Doiron, Legendre, and Vincent families, one of them to a first cousin.  Three of his five sons married on the river and established a center of family settlement there.  Two of them settled at Baton Rouge, another at New Orleans.  Four of his grandsons moved to the western prairies in the early 1800s.  His other grandsons remained on the river, in the Baton Rouge area and in St. James Parish.  His fourth son's line was especially vigorous.  Some of his descendants were living in southeastern Texas during the late antebellum period.  Most of the Labauves of South Louisiana and perhaps all of them in East Texas descend from Antoine, fils

Oldest son Jean, perhaps a twin, born in exile in c1759, followed his family into the prison compound at Halifax and to Louisiana.  He was counted with his family on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in January 1777, age 18, and then disappears from Louisiana records.  He probably did not marry.  

Antoine, fils's second son Marin, perhaps Jean's twin, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Agnès Hébert dit Manuel, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in February 1786.  Marin died a widower at New Orleans in February 1797.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Marin was age 35 when he died, but he was probably closer to 37.  All three of his sons married.  Two of them settled on the western prairies, and the other returned to St. James Parish.  A grandson also returned to the river. 

Oldest son Marin-Joseph, called Joseph, born at Cabahanocer in July 1787, married Anne Marine, called Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Dupuis and Élisabeth Benoit, in the 1800s.  They lived near St. Gabriel on the river before moving to the western prairies in the 1810s.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their son Joseph Bernardin, called Bernard, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in May 1809; and Jean Baptiste died at his parents' home on the Vermilion, age 1, in September 1815.  Marin Joseph remarried to Marie, daughter of William Perry of Carencro and his French-Canadian wife Marguerite Roger, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1822.  They settled on the lower Teche near New Iberia.  Their son Joseph Émile, called Émile and J. E., was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1828; Marc Joseph near New Iberia in October 1833; and Joseph in October 1841.  Their daughters married into the Etie, French, and Miguez families.  Marin Joseph may have died near New Iberia in April 1865.  The New Iberia priest who recorded the burial of "Mr. Labauve" said he died "at age 70 yrs.," but the priest did not mention a wife.  If this "Mr. Labauve" was Adolphe, he would have been age 78 at the time of his death.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following August.  Only two of his five sons married by 1870.  His oldest son returned to the river and settled near Baton Rouge.  The others probably remained on the prairies. 

Oldest son Bernard, by first wife Anne Marine Dupuis, married cousin Marie Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Bénoni Daigle and Anne Marie Dupuis and widow of Pierre LeTullier, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1837.  They remained on the river.  Their son Damas Cleopha, called Cleopha, was born near Baton Rouge in October 1838.  Their daughter married into the Baron family.  Their son also created his own family

Only son Cleopha married Julienne Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadians François Henry and Aureline Lejeune, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1859.  Cleopha died near Baton Rouge in September 1866.  His family line may have died with him. 

Marin Joseph's third son Joseph Émile, by second wife Marie Roger,  married Martha, daughter of William Cobbom, Colborm, or Carmon and Mary Aldridge and widow of ____ French, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in June 1867.  Their son Joseph Abner was born near New Iberia in October 1869. 

Marin Joseph's fourth son Marc Joseph, by second wife Marie Roger, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Marin Joseph's fifth and youngest son Joseph, by second wife Marie Roger, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Marin's second son Adolphe, born at Cabahannocer in July 1790, married cousin Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Louis Hébert and Rose Richard of Côte aux Puces, or the Flea Coast, near New Iberia, at the St. Martinville church in February 1812.  They settled in St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche.  Their daughter married into the Curtis family.  In 1855, Adolphe, in his mid-60s, testified in a lawsuit over who was the rightful owner of Île Dernière, or Last Island, a popular resort off the coast of Terrbonne Parish.  The resort, popular among Teche valley planters, was destroyed by a hurricane in August 1856 with a frightful loss of life.  Adolphe's older son returned to the river, but his younger son settled in the coastal marshes of what became Cameron Parish. 

Older son Théodule Clairville of St. Mary Parish married first cousin Marie Irma, daughter of Antoine Labauve and Anastasie Rome, his uncle and aunt, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1840.  One wonders if they had any children. 

Adolphe's younger son Théogène, born probably in St. Mary Parish in April 1823, married Lise Ardoin.  Their son Hermogène was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in June 1852; Léo near Creole, then in Calcasieu but now in Cameron Parish, in June 1853; Alex McDonald in January 1859; Désiré in July 1860' and Joseph Philogène near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in September 1861. 

Marin's third and youngest son Antoine, born at New Orleans in c1796, married Anastasie, daughter of Alexis Rome and Marie Charlotte Frederique, at the Convent church in January 1824.  Their son Adonis was born near Convent in June 1828; Damanche or Domas in June 1830; and St. Hilaire, called Hilaire, in January 1833.  Antoine died near Convent in March 1848, age 52.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted five slaves--two males and three females, all black except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 16 to 4--on Wdw. Ant. Labauve's farm in the parish's Eastern District next to Sébastien Rome; these were the slaves of Antoine's widow, Anastasie Rome.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted eight slaves--four males and four females, six blacks and two mulattoes, ages 22 to 2, living in three houses--on Wd. Ant. Labauve's farm in the parish's Second District on the Left Bank of the river.  Her and Antoine's daughters married into the Cantrelle and Labauve families.  Two of Antoine's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Adonis married Marie Zulma, called Zulma, daughter of Jean Baptiste Cantrelle and Eugènie Simoneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1857.  Their son Alfred was born in St. James Parish in February 1859.  Adonis died near Convent in July 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Adonis died at "age 38 years," but he was 41.  A daughter had been born the previous February. 

Antoine's second son Domas married Louisa, daughter of Prosper Plaisance and his Acadian wife Adèle Guidry, at the Convent church in December 1870. 

Antoine's third and youngest son Hilaire died near Convent in July 1856.  He was age 23 and probably did not marry. 

Antoine, fils's third son Pierre, born at St.-Jacques in c1767, married cousin Henriette Renée, called Renée, daughter of fellow Acadians Daniel Benoit and his first wife Henriette Legendre, at Baton Rouge in February 1793.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and Trahan families, and one of them settled on the western prairies.  One of Pierre's sons also settled on the western prairies.  

Older son Isidore-Pierre, called Pierre, born near Baton Rouge in August 1796, married Élise, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadianx Athanase Hébert and Félicité Breaux and widow of Placide Hébert, at the St. Martinville church in February 1820.  They settled at Le Grand Bois near New Iberia.  Pierre's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May 1824, years before he died.  Pierre died in St. Martin Parish in April 1848, age 51.  His post-mortem succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following July.  His daughter married into the Arceneaux family.  At least three of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Pierre Adolphe, called Adolphe, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1820, married Marie Pouponne, called Pouponne, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul David and Marcelline Vincent, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in November 1850.  Their son Pierre was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1852 but died at age 2 1/2 (the recording priest said 2 1/2 months) in October 1854, Joseph Thelimpe was born near New Iberia in April 1855, and Eugène in July 1859.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family. 

Isidore Pierre's second son Telesphore, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1822, died in St. Martin Parish at age 11 in October 1833.

Isidore Pierre's third son François Valcour, called Valcour, born in St. Martin Parish in December 1826, married Émilie, probably another daughter of Paul David and Marcelline Vincent, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in April 1857, nine years after a daughter was born to them in St. Martin Parish.  Their son François Oscar was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1860, and Demascart in December 1861. 

Isidore Pierre's fourth son Joseph Théolin, called Théolin, born in St. Martin Parish in July 1829, died in St. Martin Parish in September 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Théolin died "at age 22 yrs.," but he was 24.  He probably did not marry. 

Isidore Pierre's fifth son Jean Baptiste, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1834, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Isidore Pierre's sixth son François Ovide was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1837.  Was he the O. Labauve who held two slaves--both of them 22-year-old mulatto males--in the western district of St. Mary Parish in June 1860? 

Isidore Pierre's seventh and youngest son Joseph Livaudais, born in St. Martin Parish in January 1841, married Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Trahan and Elmire LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church in January 1861. 

Pierre's younger son Zenon, born near Baton Rouge in February 1801, married first cousin Eulalie Élisabeth, called Elise or Eliza, daughter of Isidore Labauve and , his uncle and aunt, at the Baton Rouge church in March 1828; they had to secure dispensation for second degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Adison, Edison, Olidon, or Odillon, was born near Baton Rouge in August 1832; Isidore Labeo near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1847; John Fernand near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in April 1853; and Joseph Alberti in July 1857.  Their daughters married into the Caneza, Haggerty, Lauve, Mille, and Scratchley families.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Olidon married Ann Pamelia, called Pamelia, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Thomas Mille and his Acadian wife Pauline Dupuy, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in April 1853.  Their son Thomas Wilfrid was born near Plaquemine in September 1857, and Paul in October 1859.

Antoine, fils's fourth son Joseph-Isidore, called Isidore, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in December 1771, married Jeanne-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Granger and Anne Thériot of St.-Malo, at Baton Rouge in January 1798.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Isidore died near Baton Rouge in February 1824, in his early 50s.  His daughters married into the Derichebourg, Hébert, and Labauve families.  Seven of his sons married.  One of them settled on the western prairies.  The others remained in West Baton Rouge Parish.  One of his younger sons and a grandson were among the relatively few Acadians who settled in Pointe Coupee Parish.  His oldest son married five times!

Oldest son Jean-Ambroise, called Jean-Baptiste, J. B., and Ambroise, born near Baton Rouge in September 1798, married Anne Virginie, called Virginie, daughter of fellow Acadian Magloire Dupuis and his Creole wife Henriette Serret, probably at Baton Rouge in the late 1810s.  Their son Victorin was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1820; Nuan near Baton Rouge in August 1824; and Baptiste Ulysse in September 1828.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Jean Baptiste remarried to Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Hébert and Marguerite Chiasson of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1835.  They had a son named Numa.  Jean Baptiste remarried again--his third marriage--to fellow Acadian Eurasie Dupuis of West Baton Rouge Parish at the Baton Rouge church in June 1838, and remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Marie Felasie, Ferelie, or Forelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Daigre and his Creole wife Agathe Betancourt of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1842.  Their son Jean Alcide was born near Brusly in January 1849.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 11 slaves--six males and five females, all black except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 43 to 2--on John B. Labauve's farm next to brother Dominique.  At age 59, Jean Baptiste remarried a fourth time--his fifth marriage--to first cousin Alida Marthe, 24-year-old daughter of Louis Terence Derichebourg and his Acadian wife Mathilde Marguerite Granger at the Brusly church in February 1858; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  She gave him another daughter in May 1861, when he would have been age 62.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 14 slaves--seven males and seven females, all black except for one mulatto, ages 48 to 2, living in 4 houses--on Jean Bte. Labauve's farm.  Two of his sons married by 1870, and one of them settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, the only Acadian Labauves to go there before the War of 1861-65.

Oldest son Victorin, by first wife Anne Virginie Dupuis, married Augustine, another daughter of Édouard Daigre and Agathe Betancourt of West Baton Rouge Parish and sister of his stepmother, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1846.  Augustine died near Brusly in October 1847, age 22, probably from the rigors of childbirth.  Victorin evidently remarried to Amelia or Émelia Bélagie, probably Pélagie, Ansoward or Enswart and settled in Lafourche Parish by the late 1850s.  Their son John William was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1858, and Robert Isaac Moïse in April 1860. 

Jean Baptise's fourth son Numa, by second wife Joséphine Hébert, married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Foret and Athemise Landry at the Brusly church in July 1857.  Their son Homer was born near Brusly in May 1858, Jean Olidon in May 1861, and Henri in October 1869. 

Isidore's second son Joseph-Dominique or Dominique-Joseph, born near Baton Rouge in August 1799, married Azélie, another daughter of Magloire Dupuis and Henriette Serret, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1821.  Their son Isidore Dorval or Dorville, called Dorval, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1821.  Dominique remarried to Dorsille, daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Chiasson and Henriette Dupuy, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1829.  Their son Adolphe was born near Baton Rouge in September 1829.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  Dominique remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, another daughter of Alexis Hébert and Marguerie Chiasson, at the Baton Rouge church in October 1835.  Their son Joseph Isidore le jeune was born near Baton Rouge in July 1836; Joseph in March 1838; Joseph Gilbert was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in April 1840; Joseph Thelesmar was born in near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1849; and Joseph Aristide in February 1853.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted nine slaves--four males and five females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 1--on Dominique Labauve's farm next to brother John B.  Dominique's daughter Ulyssia was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1855, so Dominique may have moved his family there by then.   During the late 1850s, when he was in his late 50s, Dominique and younger brother Victor, who had settled on lower Bayou Teche, moved to the prairies of southeastern Texas.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Jackson County, Texas, counted eight slaves--four males and four females, all black, ages 46 to 2, living in one house--on Dominique Labauve's farm next to brother Victor.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Dorval, by first wife Azélie Dupuis, while a resident of West Baton Rouge Parish, married Émelie, daughter of Creoles Zenon Bergeron and Madeleine Picard, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in August 1842.  Their son Joseph Aloysius was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1844 but died in December; Joseph Dominique Zenon, called Zenon, was born in September 1845 but died at age 5 1/2 in August 1851; Joseph Roselius was born in April 1847; and Joseph Louis Odilon in June 1849.  Dorval died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Dorval died at "age 32 years," but he was 30.  A daughter was born posthumously in early 1853.  His daughter married into the Bueche family. 

Joseph Domingue's second son Adolphe, by second wife Dorsille Chiasson, married Marie Séverine, called Séverine, daughter of fellow Acadian Séverin Lejeune and his Creole wife Séraphine Aillet, at the Brusly church in January 1848.  Their son Joseph Edgard was born near Brusly in November 1848, and Joseph Alcide in March 1851. 

Isidore's third son Pierre-Marie, born near Baton Rouge in March 1803, married Henriette Coralie, called Coralie, yet another daughter of Magloire Dupuis and Henriette Serret, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1831.  Their son Simon le jeune was born near Baton Rouge in December 1837, and Joseph Aulim near Brusly in January 1849.  Their daughters married into the Gassie, Hébert, Richard, Saurage, and Thibodeaux families.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted six slaves--four males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 14, living in two houses--on Pierre Labauve's farm; the probably was Pierre Marie. 

Isidore's fourth son Joseph Isidore, fils, born near Baton Rouge in November 1804, married Hélène, also called Melina, daughter of Jean Baptiste Juge and Aimée Porché, at the Pointe Coupee church in March 1833.  Their son Jules was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1844 but died at age 3 1/2 in August 1847; Louis Albert, called Albert, was born in July 1846 but died at age 8 in September 1854; and Jean Baptiste le jeune was born in October 1848.  They also had older sons named Léon and Numa.  Joseph, a resident of Chenal, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1850, age 46.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 18 slaves--11 males and seven females, six blacks and 12 mulattoes, ranging in age from 61 years to 8 months, living in five houses--on Wdw. Jos. Labauve's farm; these were the slaves of Joseph Isidore's widow Hélène Juge.  His daughter married into the David and Major families.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Léon married Julie, daughter of Creole Bruno Lejeune and Odille Picard, at the Pointe Coupee church in February 1857.  Their son Joseph Jules, called Jules, was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1863 but died age 2 in January 1866. 

Joseph Isidore, fils's second son Numa married Adèle Lelia, daughter of Creoles Lelio Lebeau and Adelphine Bergeron, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870. 

Isidore's fifth son Victor, born near Baton Rouge in July 1806, Victor married Marie Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Dugas and his Creole wife Susanne Bonin, at the St. Martinville church in July 1833.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Victor remarried to Joséphine Elina or Helina, daughter of Valcour Gonsoulin and his Acadian wife Élise Hébert, at the New Iberia church in October 1844.  They remained near New Iberia until the late 1850s, when they followed Victor's older brother Dominique to southeastern Texas.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Jackson County, Texas, counted 10 slaves--four males and six females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 1, living in two houses--on Victor Labauve's farm next to brother Dominique.  One of his sons married in Louisiana and remained there. 

Oldest son Charles Auguste or Gustave Charles, by first wife Marie Arthémise Dugas, born near New Iberia in November 1838, married Suzanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Sosthène Vincent and his Creole wife Hyacinthe Judice, at the St. Martinville church in July 1858.  Their son Sosthène was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1859 but died at age 2 1/2 in February 1862, and Joseph Numa le jeune was born in March 1862.  When his father and uncle migrated to southeastern Texas in the late 1850s, Gustave and Suzanne remained in St. Martin Parish. 

Victor's second son Romain Dupré, by first wife Marie Arthémise Dugas, born near New Iberia in February 1841, was granted emancipation by the St. Martin Parish court in November 1859, after he turned 18.  One wonders if this had anything to do with his father's migrating to southeastern Texas in the late 1850s.  Did Romain remain in South Louisiana? 

Victor's third son Victor Éloi, called Éloi, from first wife Marie Arthémise Dugas, born near New Iberia in April 1843, died the following August. 

Victor's fourth son Victor, fils, by second wife Joséphine Helina Gonsoulin, was born probably near New Iberia in December 1851.

Victor, père's fifth son Odilon, by second wife Joséphine Helina Gonsoulin, was born near New Iberia in January 1857. 

Victor, père's sixth son Joseph Numa, by second wife Joséphine Helina Gonsoulin, was born probably near New Iberia in August 1858. 

Victor, père's seventh and youngest son Charles William, by second wife Joséphine Helina Gonsoulin, was born near New Iberia in January 1859. 

Isidore's sixth son Guy, born near Baton Rouge, married Elisa, daughter of fellow Acadians J. B. LeBlanc and Rosalie Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1832.  Guy remarried to Emma, daughter of Antoine Serret and his Acadian wife Eulalie LeBlanc of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1843.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 12 slaves--six males and six females, 10 blacks and two mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 3, living in three houses--on Guy Labauve's farm.  One wonders if he fathered any sons by either of his two wives. 

Isidore's seventh son Louis Onésime, called Onésime, born near Baton Rouge in July 1814, married Doralise, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Landry and Emerante Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church in March 1837.  Their son Louis Timoléon was born near Baton Rouge in April 1838, Joseph Simon in March 1840, and Pierre Armant in May 1848.  Onésime died near Brusly in January 1849, age 34. 

Isidore's eighth and youngest son Simon, born near Baton Rouge in February 1821, probably died young. 

Antoine, fils's fifth and youngest son Paul, a twin, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in July 1776, probably died young.  

Antoine's daughter Adélaïde married first cousin Louis Legendre at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in December 1785 and again at New Orleans in January 1792.  Louis's mother was Marguerite Labauve, Antoine's older sister!  Louis and Adélaïde settled at New Orleans.  Adélaïde's daughter Marie, called Maneta, Labauve was born at New Orleans in June 1802 but died in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche, age 12, in October 1814, and son François Labauve was born in the city in July 1803.  Strangely, the priest who recorded the children's baptisms in September and November 1803 did not list Louis Legendre as the father and recorded the names only of the maternal grandparents.

Jean-Baptiste (c1743-1803) à Antoine, père à Louis-Noël Labauve

Jean-Baptiste, only son of Charles Labauve and Marie Hébert and Antoine, fils's nephew, was born probably at Minas in c1743.  He followed his family into exile and may have been one of the five childern of his uncle Antoine, fils counted on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, in August 1763.  He followed his uncle, aunt, and two first cousins to Louisiana and settled with them at Cabahannocer, but he did not remain there.  In the late 1760s, he moved to the Attakapas District, where he married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil and Agnès Thibodeaux, in c1769.  Françoise, a native of Peticoudiac in the trois-rivières area, had come to Louisiana with her widowed father and large extended family in February 1765.  With her, Jean-Baptiste created a western branch of the Labauve family.  He died at Attakapas in February 1803.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean-Baptiste died "at age 65 yrs.," but he probably was closer to 60.  His daughter married into the Benoit and Landry families.  One of his two sons also married on the prairies. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste, fils, called Jean, born at Attakapas in April 1771 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest later that month, probably died young.  

Jean-Baptiste, père's younger son François, baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in May 1776, married Marguerite dite Éloise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Françoise Hébert of New Iberia, at Attakapas in June 1795.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Landry families.  François remarried to Marie-Angèle, daughter of Jacques Fostin of Illinois and his Acadian wife Françoise Trahan and widow of Augustin Trahan, at Attakapas in June 1802.  François's succession was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in April 1835.  He would have been in his late 50s that year.  

Oldest son Placide, a twin, from first wife Éloise Hébert, born at Attakpas in February 1796, married Anne, called Annette and Manette, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Thibodeaux and Anne Trahan of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1817.  Their son Placide, fils was born "at Vermilion" in November 1818; David in September 1820; Émile Saule in January 1825; Toussaint was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 1 1/2 months, in October 1826; Celibate at age 10 months in August 1835; and Désiré was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in May 1841.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 12 slaves--six males and six females, all black except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 50 to 3--on Placide Labauve's farm; was this Placide, père or Placide, fils?  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 13 slaves--eight males and five females, four blacks and nine mulattoes, ages 55 years to 4 months, living in three houses--on Placide Labauve's farm; again, which Placide was this?  Placide, père's daughter married into the Venable family.  Three of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Placide, fils  married Marie Nathalie, called Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Xavier Drosin Broussard and Marie Denise Duhon, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1843, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in July 1847.  Their son Théogène was born near Grand Coteau in January 1849; David le jeune in September 1852; Jean near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in May 1855; and Ozémé near Grand Coteau in March 1858.  They also had an older son named Placide III.  They were living near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in the mid-1860s.  Two of Placide, fils's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Placide III married Amelia or Amelie, daughter of Dominique Gary and Célestine Leleux, at the Church Point church in February 1867.  Their son Joseph was born at Coulee Triffe, now Estherwood, Acadia Parish, in July 1867. 

Placide, fils's second son Théogène married cousin Uranie, daughter of fellow Acadians Béloni Broussard and Josèphine Landry, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1867.  They settled near Church Point. 

Placide, père's third son Émile married Nancy, daughter of James Griffin and Catherine Laner or Larier, at the Grand Coteau church in May 1850.  Their son Émile, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1855.

Placide, père's sixth and youngest son Désiré may have married fellow Acadian Mare Zelima Richard.  Their son Simon was born near Church Point in September 1866. 

François's second son Nicolas, by first wife Éloise Hébert, was born in Attakapas in July 1799 but died at age 2 in September 1801. 

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Four more Labauves--a small family, an unmarried, sister, and their female cousin and her family--came to Louisiana aboard at least two of the Seven Ships of 1785.  The first of them, the female cousin and her family, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late July 1785.  They followed their fellow passengers to Manchac below Baton Rouge.  The other Labauves from France--the male cousin, his second wife, a stepson, and his unmarried sister--crossed on .Le St.-Rémi, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans during the second week of September.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, but no new Labauve family line came of it.  Not until the late antebellum period did a Labauve from the Acadian Coast establish a new center of family settlement on the bayou:

Pierre (c1747-?) à Louis à Louis-Noël Labauve

Pierre, only son of Jean Labauve and Agnès Saulnier, born at Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas, in c1747, followed his family to Virginia, England, and Morlaix, France.  He married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Brun and Anne Caissie of Chignecto and Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in St.-Martin des Champs Parish, Morlaix, in September 1770.  Madeleine gave him a daughter at Morlaix in 1773.  That year, Pierre took his family to Poitou, but they did not remain there.  After two years of effort, they retreated with dozens of fellow exiles to the port city of Nantes in November 1775.  Their daughter died at nearby Chantenay in 1778, age 8.  Meanwhile, Madeleine gave Pierre three more children, a son and two more daughters, at Chantenay, but they, too, died young.  Madeleine died at Chantenay in December 1783, age 38.  Pierre remarried to Anne, also called Jeanne, daughter of François Bonfils and Marie Sevin of St.-Martin-de-Cheix, France, and widow of Acadian Jean Dugas, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in October 1784.  Pierre, Anne, and her Dugas son from her first marriage emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and went to upper Bayou Laforuche.  Anne gave Pierre no more children in France and in the Spanish colony, so this line of the family did not take root in the Bayou State. 

Lachaussée

In the fall of 1755, while the British were rounding up thousands of Acadians in peninsula Nova Scotia, they sent only a raiding party to the lower Rivière St.-Jean, which drove off the small Canadian garrison there.  The British pursued the Canadians farther upriver until they met stiff resistance.  As a result, the Acadian settlements along the middle St.-Jean remained unmolested ... for now.  Not until the early autumn of 1758, after the British had captured the French fortress at Louisbourg on Île Royale, did a force of redcoats under Colonel Robert Monckton strike the Rivière St.-Jean settlements.  By then, a French-born surgeon, Philippe de Saint-Julien de Lachaussée, his second wife, and infant daughter from his first wife, had moved on to Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where the surgeon took care of his fellow refugees in the overcrowded camp.  By early 1760, the family had moved north with other refugees to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where the Frenchman served as chief surgeon for the Acadian militia during the battle with a British naval force that summer.  The surgeon's son was baptized at Restigouche in March 1761.  Not long after the son's baptism, the surgeon and his family were either captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area and were held with hundreds of other Acadians in a prison compound in Nova Scotia.   

When the war with Britain finally ended, the Acadians being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, two were the surgeon, a widower again, and his 10-year-old daughter.  His son evidently had died by then. 

The surgeon and his daughter joined other Acadian refugees on the long voyage from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  They reached New Orleans in early 1765; the surgeon was, in fact, the leader of one of the contingents of refugees from Halifax.  He and his fellow exiles settled at the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  He remarried, again, this time to an Acadian widow, who gave him another son.  The son survived childhood, married a fellow Acadian at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in April 1792, and created a family of his own, but only one of his sons married.  Meanwhile, the old surgeon died in St. James Parish in August 1808, age 80. 

French-Canadian Lachaussés appeared on the river above New Orleans in the 1760s and on upper Bayou Lafourche on the eve of the Louisiana Purchase.  Church and civil records reveal no kinship between these Canadians and the surgeon from Acadia.  Moreover, despite one of the Canadians marrying twice at Cabahannocer and producing a son of his own, the son died before he could marry, so the surgeon's Canadian namesakes produced no family lines in South Louisiana. 

The old surgeon's grandson did not remain on the Acadian Coast but crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the old Attakapas District during the early antebellum period.  He married a fellow Acadian in St. Martin Parish in September 1821 and remarried to another Acadian in the 1830s.  They settled in what became Lafayette Parish, and he fathered at least five sons by his two wives.  Three of those sons created families of their own and settled in Lafayette and Vermilion parishes. 

Judging by the number of slaves they held during the late antebellum period, the Acadian Lachaussées of the western parishes, despite their aristocratic ancestry, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  A Lachaussée's widow owned four slaves in 1850.  A decade later, her older surviving son held only three bondsmen. 

Only one Acadian Lachaussée appears in Confederate service records during the War of 1861-65.  Simon Lachaussée was married and a father when he served in Company C of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in South Louisiana.  The 7th Louisiana Cavalry was especially effective in fighting Jayhawkers on the southwestern prairies.  Simonet survived the war and settled near Erath, Vermilion Parish.  

Although the name Lachaussée is not as common as other Acadian surnames, descendants of the Acadian Coast surgeon can still be found in Abbeville, Lafayette, Erath, Delcambre, Jennings, and other prairie communities, as well as in East Texas.  Local priests sometimes called the family St. Julien as well as La Fosse, the names of non-Acadian families who settled in the area.  Over time, the Acadian family's name evolved from the aristocratic de Saint-Julien de Lachaussée to simply Lachaussée

The family's name in Louisiana and East Texas also is spelled Dechaussé, La Chance, La Chanse, La Chasse, Lachause, Lachaussai, Lachaussaye, Lachausee, Lachauset, La Chausse, La Chiose, Lachoche, Lachose, Lafause, Lafausse, St. Julien.  ...03

Philippe de Saint-Julian de (c1727-1808) Lachaussée

Philippe de Saint-Julien de Lachaussée, a surgeon, born in Picardy, France, in c1727, came to greater Acadia in the 1750s and married Françoise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg, in c1754.  He settled with her on Rivière St.-Jean and became the area's surgeon.  The Rivière St.-Jean Acadians escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the summer and fall of 1755, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  In late 1758, after the fall of the French fortress of Louisbourg on Île Royale, British forces moved up Rivière St.-Jean and lay waste to the Acadians settlements there.  By then, the surgeon had lost his first wife and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marguerite Granger of Annapolis Royal, on the river in c1756, soon after Marguerite's family had escaped deportation to North Carolina and sought refuge on Rivière St.-Jean.  After the British struck, Philippe took his family to the refugee camp at Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Philippe served as surgeon at the overcrowded camp and also in the French outpost at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  In the early 1760s, the surgeon and his family either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area and were held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia.  By 1764, Philippe was a widower again.  He and a daughter by his first wife emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65.  Still a vigorous man in his late 30s, Philippe remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Rose, called Rose or Rosalie, daughter of Acadians Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard and widow of Pierre Gravois, at Cabahannocer in October 1766, the year after he reached Louisiana.  She gave him at least one more daughter, who married into the Préjean family and settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Rose also gave the surgeon another son.  The old surgeon died in St. James Parish in August 1808.  The priest who recorded his burial said that "St. Julien La Chaussé, widower of Rosalie Bourgeois," died at "age about 40 yrs."  He was 80!  His daughter married into the Gravois and Belaire families on the river, but she died on Bayou Lafourche.  The Acadian Lachaussées of Louisiana are descended from the surgeon's second son.  By the 1820s, the surgeon's descendants no longer lived on the river but had settled on the western prairies.  

Older son Pierre-Philippe, by second wife Marguerite Belliveau, baptized at Restigouche, age unrecorded, in March 1761, died probably at Halifax a few years later. 

Philippe's younger son Valentin-Philippe, called Philippe, by third wife Rose Bourgeois, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1772, married Pélagie, also called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Marie Richard and Rosalie Bourgeois, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in April 1792.  Valentin-Philippe died at St.-Jacques in August 1797, age 25.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc family and settled on the western prairies.  As a result of Valentin-Philippe's surviving son following his sister to the western prairies during the early antebellum period, the family's name disappears from Acadian Coast church records after 1810.  Valentin-Philippe's surviving son created an enduring family line on the western prairies. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste de Saint-Julien, born at Cabahannocer in August 1793, probably died young. 

Valentin-Philippe's second son Philippe de Saint-Julien le jeune, born probably at Cabahanncoer in the mid-1790s, followed his sister to St. Martin Parish, where he stood as a godfather at the St. Martinville church in August 1814.  Philippe le jeune married Hortence, daughter of fellow Acadians Benjamin LeBlanc and Scholastique Breaux, at the St. Martinville church in September 1821; the priest who recorded the marriage called the groom Philippe St. Julien, the name under which his family was known in some of the area church records (not to be confused with a French-Creole family of that name).  Philippe le jeune and Hortence's daughters married into the Bernard, Guidry, and Melançon families.  Philippe le jeune remarried to fellow Acadian Marie-Céleste, called Céleste, Girouard, probably in Lafayette Parish in the mid- or late 1830s.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted four slaves--three males and a female, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 20--on Widow P. Lachaussée's farm in the parish's western district; these probably were the slaves of Philippe le jeune's widow, Céleste Girouard.  Philippe le jeune had at least five sons by his two wives.  Three of them created families of their own and settled in Lafayette and Vermilion parishes, but only two of the lines survived. 

Oldest son Philippe de St. Julien, fils, by first wife Hortence LeBlanc, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1824, died at age 4 1/2 in April 1829. 

Philippe le jeune's second son Vileor, by first wife Hortence LeBlanc, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 1/2 months, in January 1832, died at age 2 1/2 years in August 1833. 

Philippe le jeune's third son Raphaël, by first wife Hortence LeBlanc, born in Lafayette Parish in September 1833, married cousin Héloise LeBlanc at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in June 1857.  They settled near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted three slaves--a 23-year-old mulatto female, a 3-year-old mulatto female, and a year-old black male--on Raphaël Lachaussée's farm next to Mrs. Euclide Bernard, who was Raphaël's sister Mavine.  Raphaël died in Lafayette Parish in November 1861, age 26  His family line probably died with him. 

Philippe le jeune's fourth son Saint Julien, called Julien, from second wife Céleste Girouard, born probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s, married cousin Cécile LeBlanc at the Youngsville church in April 1861 (the marriage was not registered civilly at the Vermilionville courthouse until April 1867).  Their son Eraste was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1862.  Saint Julien remarried to Euphémie Dillon or Dellon at the Abbeville church in October 1865.  They settled on the lower Vermilion.  Their son Philippe Alcide was born in August 1866, and Luc in February 1870. 

Julien's second son Luc married fellow Acadian Sylvanie Broussard in November 1889. 

Luc's son Henry, born in April 1897, married Olite Hébert in June 1917.  In the 1920s, Henry took his family to Port Arthur, Texas, where his descendants can be found today. 

Philippe le jeune's fifth and youngest son Simonet, by second wife Céleste Girouard, born in Lafayette Parish in July 1840, married fellow Acadian Marie Belzire Broussard at the Abbeville church in January 1861.  Their son Désiré was born near Abbeville in December 1861, and Adraste in July 1865 after Simonet served in Company C of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in South Louisiana, which fought local Jayhawkers during the War of 1861-65.  Simonet was still alive in the 1890s and was buried at Erath, Vermilion Parish.  

Valentin-Philippe's third and youngest son Charles-François, born posthumously at Cabahannocer in November 1797, probably died young. 

Lalande

Pierre Lalande, alias Blaise des Brousses dit Bonappetit, a soldier in the King's service, married Anne, daughter of Joseph Prétieux and Anne Gautrot, at Annapolis Royal in November 1710.  After the British took over the colony, Pierre went to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, aboard the French ship La Marie Josephe to look at land there.  Evidently he did not see anything he liked because he moved his family to the Minas Basin by 1719.  They lived at Grand-Pré and at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  Anne died at Grand-Pré, only 35 years old, in March 1726.  Pierre took his family to Petiticoudiac later in the decade, putting himself even farther away from the British authorities at Annapolis Royal.  He and Anne had eight children, three daughters and five sons.  A daughter married into the LeBlanc family at Grand-Pré.  Four of his sons married into the Lapierre and Saulnier families.

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Lalande, alias Blaise des Brousses dit Bonappetit, and Anne Prétieux could be found at Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto and on one of the Maritime islands.  Another Lalande, François, no kin to Pierre, was living at Louisbourg on Île Royale, perhaps serving in the citadel's garrison. 

Pierre dit Bonappetit's oldest son Joseph and two of his children were recorded at Halifax in August 1763, a typical fate for Acadians from Petitcoudiac who escaped the British roundup in 1755.  What is certain is that Joseph did not emigrate to Louisiana from Halifax.  The fate of his younger brothers Jean-Baptiste, Sylvestre, and Jacques also is anyone's guess.  What is certain is that Sylvestre's daughter Madeleine by wife Marguerite Saulnier did end up in Louisiana, though exactly when she got there, and with whom, is uncertain.  She probably sailed from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, with hundreds of other Acadians from the prison compounds of Nova Scotia in 1764-65.  Only seven years old at the time, she probably was watched over by her mother's Saulnier relatives. 

The story of Joseph et al.'s youngest brother Pierre dit Bonappetit, fils is more easily guessed at.  Pierre, fils and his family probably moved from Petitcoudiac to one of the French Maritime islands in the 1740s or early 1750s.  When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in 1755, Pierre dit Bonappetit and his family, living in territory still controlled by France, would have escaped deportation.  Their respite from British oppression would have been short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on the islands and deported them to France. 

Most of the island Acadians ended up at St.-Malo, but many were scattered to other French ports.  Pierre dit Bonappetit, fils and his family were deported to Le Havre in Normandy, which they reached in early February 1759.  Tragedy stalked the family there.  The year 1768 was especially hard on them.  In September, Pierre dit Bonappetit, fils, now a widower, died at Le Havre, age 45.  In October, his 25-year-old son Sylvain died, and in November, 19-year-old son Joseph le jeune followed his father and brother to the grave.   One of Pierre dit Bonappetit, fils's nephews may have accompanied him to France.  Joseph, fils, son of Pierre dit Bonappetit's older brother Joseph, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1746, somehow became separated from his parents and most likely followed his uncle to the French Maritimes, from which the British deported him to France in 1758.  Joseph, fils would have been age 13 when he reached Le Havre that year.  When he came of age, he became a sailor and married fellow Acadian Marie-Pélagie Doiron at Le Havre in c1772.  They had at least three children:  Émilie, also called Eulalie, born at Châtellerault in the Poitou region in January 1774; Joseph-Édouard, born at Nantes in January 1777; and Jacques-Jean, born at Nantes in c1779 but died at age 2 at Chantenay near Nantes in 1781.  As Émilie's birthplace reveals, Joseph and his family were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  After two years of effort, Marie-Pélagie Doiron retreated with her daughter Émilie and the majority of the Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Joseph, fils was not with her in the convoy to Nantes, so he probably had returned to the sea to provide for his family.  Joseph, fils died in the late 1770s or early 1780s, in his 30s.  Marie Lalande, perhaps a descendant of Pierre dit Bonappetit, married Jean-Baptiste-Toussaint, son of Acadians Joseph-Simon Granger and Marie-Josèphe Thériot of Minas and Belle-Île-en-Mer, at Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, in c1774.  She gave him two sons in the port. 

Meanwhile, François Lalande of Louisbourg made the crossing from Île Royale to St.-Malo aboard the British transport Duc Guillaume, which left the island in late summer of 1758 and limped into St.-Malo harbor the first of November 1758.  Two weeks later, François departed for La Rochelle. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Marie-Pélagie Doiron, still an unmarried widow, and two of her Lalande children--Émilie, age 11, and Joseph-Édouard, age 8--agreed to take it.  François Lalande, on the other hand, evidently remained in France.

Lalandes settled fairly late in Acadia, and most of them came "late" to Louisiana.  A Lalande orphan came to Louisiana in 1765 and settled in the Opelousas District.  She married twice and remained in the area.  Joseph-Édouard Lalande of Nantes, France, did not come to the colony until 1785, and he did not settle near his cousin on the western prairies.  He followed his widowed mother to the Acadian Coast, but he did not remain there.  He moved to the old Attakapas District in the 1810s and settled at Fausse Pointe on lower Bayou Teche.  Half of his 10 sons created families of their own and settled in St. Martin, Lafayette, Vermilion, Acadia, and St. Landry parishes.  All of the Acadian Lalandes of South Louisiana are descended from Joseph-Édouard and his sons. 

Lalande seems to be a fairly common surname in France.  French Lalandes came to colonial Louisiana as early as the 1720s.  Most, if not all, of them settled at New Orleans.  They could be found, also, at Natchitoches on the Red River.  In the 1770s, two French-Canadian brothers who tended to spell their surname Lalonde settled on the western prairies, concentrating in what became St. Landry Parish; the younger brother, Guillaume, created a vigorous family line there; many of his descendants settled near Arnaudville on upper Bayou Teche.  Smaller families of French-Creole and Foreign-French Lalandes settled in some of the river parishes above New Orleans and along Bayou Lafourche, but most Lalande/Lalondes, Acadian and non-Acadian, lived west of the Atchafalaya Basin, creating a complicated genealogical picture for the family there.  For example, by the 1830s, area priests began using the surname Lalonde for descendants of Acadian Joseph-Édouard Lalande

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, some Lalande/Lalondes lived comfortably on their farms and plantations along Bayou Lafourche and on the western prairies.  In 1850, the estate of Foreign Frenchman Joseph Lalande of Assumption Parish held 33 slaves.  French Canadian Cyprien Lalonde owned 21 slaves in St. Landry Parish.  Older brother Georges held nine slaves that year.  Most of the Lalande/Lalondes of South Louisiana, however, owned no slaves at all, at least none who appear on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860. ...

The family's name also is spelled Lalan, Laland, Lalanda, Lalane, Lalanne, L'allande, Lauland, Lelande, Loland.04

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The first of the family--a 7-year-old orphan in the care of Saulnier relations--came to the colony in 1765 from Halifax via French St.-Domingue and followed them to the western prairies, where she married twice to non-Acadians.

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Twenty years later, in 1785, two Acadian Lalandes, a sister and brother, came to the colony with their widowed mother.  They crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans during the third week of August.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge.  The sister married into the LeBlanc family on the river, and the brother married there, too.  But he and his wife did not remain there.  During the early antebellum period they moved to the old Attakapas District, where the only Acadian line of the family endured:

Joseph-Édouard (1777-1822) à Joseph à Pierre Lalande

Joseph-Édouard, son of Joseph Lalande, fils and Marie-Pélagie Doiron, born at Nantes, France, in January 1777, came to Louisiana as an eight-year-old orphan with his widowed mother and older sister.  He grew up first in the Baton Rouge area and then at Cabahannocer on the Acadian Coast farther down the river, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breaux and his first wife Marie-Madeleine Melançon, in February 1803.  Although most of their children were born at Cabahannocer, now St. James Parish, Joseph-Édouard and Marie-Madeleine did not remain on the river.  In the late 1810s, they crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled at Fausse Pointe on Bayou Teche, present-day Iberia Parish, where more sons were born to them.  Joseph Édouard died at his home at Fausse Pointe in November 1822, age 45.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in August 1823.  His daughters married into the Gaspard and Guilbert families.  Only half of his 10 sons created families of their own.  Most of his sons and grandsons settled in Lafayette Parish, west and northwest of Fausse Pointe, but some of them remained in St. Martin Parish, moved southwest into Vermilion Parish, or moved north into the Grand Coteau area of St. Landry Parish, where a number of French-Canadian Lalondes had settled (in fact, by the 1830s, area priests began applying the surname Lalonde to Joseph-Édouard's descendants although most of the Lalandes lived not in St. Landry but in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes).  The Acadian Lalandes of South Louisiana descend from Joseph Édouard and his sons. 

Oldest son Joseph Maximilien, called Maximilien and Maxilien, born at St. James in February 1804, followed his family to the western prairies and married Madeleine Arsènne, called Arsènne, daughter of fellow Acadians Théodore Joseph Broussard and Henriette Trahan, at the St. Martinville church in March 1823.  Joseph Maximilien died a widower in Lafayette Parish in November 1857.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 58 when he died, but he was 53.  His daughter married a Broussard cousin.  Four of his sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph Bruno, also called Joseph, fils, born in St. Martin Parish in November 1823, married Carmelite, 16-year-old daughter of Salvador Morvant and his Acadian wife Anastasie Granger, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1844.  

Maximilien's second son Paul Maximilien, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1827, may have died young. 

Maximilien's third son Paul Delineau, born in St. Martin Parish in c1830, married Palmyre, daughter of fellow Acadians André Landry and Marie Melançon, at the Vermilionville church in October 1852, and remarried to Mélanie or Mélaïde, daughter of Pheliciene Hulin, at the St. Martinville church in July 1854.  Their son Arsène was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1855; and Joseph Edgard near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in July 1859 but died at age 3 in St. Martin Parish in November 1862.  

Maximilien's fourth son Joseph Valsin, also called Valsin, born in St. Martin Parish in June 1831, may have married Marie Lapointe at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in June 1858.  Their son Joseph was born near Abbeville in September 1861 but may have died at age 1 in November 1862.  

Maximilien's fifth son Pierre Théolin, called Théolin, born in St. Martin Parish in c1833, was emancipated by the Lafayette Parish court in July 1851 after he turned 18.  He married Zoë, daughter of perhaps Nicolas Vallot and Marguerite Domingues, at the St. Martinville church in July 1854.  Their son Léonard was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1855, and Laodis near Youngsville in February 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, Pierre Théolin served in Company B of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  Pierre Théolin remarried to Céleste Saveur in Lafayette or Vermilion Parish in the late 1860s.  Their son Pierre was born soon afterwards.  Pierre Théolin died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in 1888, age 56.  

Maximilien's sixth and youngest son Théodore, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 2 months in February 1837, died at age 3 in September 1840. 

Joseph Édouard's second son Arsène, born at St. James in May 1805, died at age 6 in May 1811 while the family was still living in St. James Parish.

Joseph Édouard's third son Joseph Ursin, called Ursin, born at St. James in August 1806, followed his family to the western prairies and married Marie Catherine, called Catherine, daughter of Jean Schexnayder and Marguerite Baudoin, at the Vermilionville church in July 1829.  Ursin remarried to Adélaïde, called Délaïde and Mélaïde, 20-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Julien Louvière and Louise Granger, at the Vermilionville church in November 1836.  Their daughter married into the Schexnayder family.  His son also married.

Only son Melozain, also called Adam, by second wife Adélaïde Louvière, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 1 1/2 months, in December 1837, may have married Elina Leleux.  They were living near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in the late 1860s.  Adam died near Rayne, Acadia Parish, in October 1898, age 60. 

Joseph Édouard's fourth son Joseph Napoléon, called Napoléon, Napoléon R., Paul, Paul Napoléon, and Augustin Napoléon, born in St. James Parish in October 1808, followed his family to the western prairies and married Susanne, daughter of Jean Fabre and Charlotte Normand, at the Vermilionville church in July 1828.  Their daughter married into the Comeaux and Richard families.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted two slaves--both female, both black, ages 20 and 2--on Napoléon Lalande's farm in the parish's western eistrict.  Napoléon, at age 56, remarried to Azélie, another daughter of Salvador Morvant and Anastasie Granger, at the Youngsville church in November 1864.  

Oldest son Demostine, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1864.

Napoléon's second son Joseph Napoléon, fils, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1867.

Napoléon's third son Vileor or Vilcor, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1868,

Napoléon's fourth son Numa Lalon, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1870.

Napoléon's fifth son Aristide, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1872.

Napoléon's sixth son Henry or Harrison, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was near Abbeville in March 1879.

Napoléon's seventh son Joseph Overton, by second wife Azélie Morvant, was born near Rayne, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1882 when his father was 73 years old!    

Joseph Édouard's fifth son André Joseph, born in St. James Parish in October 1810, probably died young.  

Joseph Édouard's sixth son Joseph Sylvère, called Sylvère and Sylvain, born in St. James Parish in August 1814, followed his family to the western prairies and married Marguerite, another daughter of Jean Fabre and Charlotte Normand, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in July 1834.  Their daughter married into the Morvant family.  Two of Joseph Sylvère's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Dorsin or Dorsile, born in Lafayette Parish in April 1836, married Eléonore or Léonore, daughter of Jean/Léon Gary and Marie Dolor Viator, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1855, and sanctified the married at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1862.  Their son Léodice Joseph was born near Grand Coteau in September 1862; and Joseph Cleopha near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in April 1867.  They were living near Youngsville in 1870. 

Joseph Sylvère's second son Portalise or Portalys, born in Lafayette Parish in December 1837, died at age 1 in May 1839.

Joseph Sylvère's third son Joseph, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in November 1839, died at age 13 months in October 1840.

Joseph Sylvère's fourth son Jean Ida, born in Lafayette Parish in April 1841, if he suvived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Joseph Sylvère's fifth son Aladin, born in Lafayette Parish in November 1842, if he suvived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Joseph Sylvère's sixth son Paul, born probably in Lafayette Parish in the 1840s, married Natalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Dubois, fils and Alzire Broussard, at the Youngsville church in September 1867.  Their son Arthur was born near Youngsville in January 1872, and Albert in November 1873.  

Joseph Sylvère's seventh son Jules, born in Lafayette Parish in February 1853, died at age 13 (the recording priest said 18) in April 1866. 

Joseph Sylvère's eighth and youngest son Albert was born in Lafayette Parish April 1855. 

Joseph Édouard's seventh son, name unrecorded, born in either St. James or St. Martin Parish in c1817, died at age 2 in September 1819 at his parents' home at Fausse Pointe.  

Joseph Édouard's eighth son Jean Dositée, born in St. Martin Parish in May 1818, probably died young.  

Joseph Édouard's ninth son Valsin, born in St. Martin Parish in October 1822, married 17-year-old Aglae, yet another daughter of Salvador Morvant and Anastasie Granger, at the Vermilionville church in October 1842.  Aglae died in October 1843, age 18, probably giving birth to daughter Anastasie, born three days before Aglae died.  Valsin remarried to Julienne Dubois probably in Lafayette Parish in the 1840s.  Their daughter married into the Vidaillet family. 

Joseph Édouard's tenth and youngest son Jean Baptiste Alcendore, called Alcendore, born posthumously in St. Martin Parish in April 1823, died at "his mother's home at La Fausse Pointe," age 1 1/2, in June 1824. 

Lambert

Philippe Lambert, probably no kin to the other Lamberts of greater Acadia, was born probably in France in c1682.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Marie-Madeleine Cormier, in c1712 and settled at Chignecto.  They had five children, three daughters and two sons.  Two of their daughters married into the Garceau dit Richard and Doiron families.  Philippe's sons married into the Girouard, Arseneau, and Doiron families. 

In 1755, descendants of Philippe Lambert and Marie Boudrot could still be found at Chignecto.  Le Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered the family to the winds.  The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Philippe Lambert's widow and probably some of her children and their families were among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant-Governor Charles Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with the French at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

 In October 1755, the British deported Philippe Lambert's younger son Pierre, Pierre's second wife, and seven children to South Carolina aboard the ship Edward Cornwallis, which reached Charleston in late November.  In January 1756, Pierre, his wife, and two children appeared on a list of Acadians "incapable of Labor, Sick or Infirm."  Colonial officials counted Pierre at Prince Frederick Winyaw Parish, South Carolina, in 1756; once again he was a widower.  In c1761, he remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Boucher.  Two years later, in August 1763, colonial officials found Pierre, Marie, son Pierre, fils, and infant son Jean, still living in the colony.   With them were three Doiron orphans, children of Pierre's older sister Anne, who had died at Prince Frederick probably of malaria in October 1756.  Later in 1763 or in 1764, Pierre and his family may have followed other Acadian exiles from South Carolina to French St.-Domingue.  Although driven from North America, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  A new naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island would protect the approaches to what was left of their possessions in the Caribbean basin.  French officials saw the Acadian exiles as a ready source of cheap labor there.  To entice them to the tropical colony, they promised them land of their own there if they came to work on the naval base.  After a year or more of effort, Pierre and his family, still without land, looked for the first opportunity to leave the sugar colony.  This occurred in 1765 when Acadian refugees from Halifax came through Cap-Français, east of Môle, on their way to New Orleans.  

Philippe Lambert settled fairly late in Acadia, but his younger son was among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  Pierre Lambert and his third wife arrived directly from French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  She gave him more children there.  Four of his seven sons married, but only three of them created family lines that endured.  During the early antebellum period, two of Pierre's grandsons moved to Bayou Lafourche, but his other grandsons remained in what became St. James, Ascension, and Livingston parishes.  One of the Lafourche valley grandsons moved down bayou to Terrebonne Parish, but the other remained in Assumption Parish.  The larger center of this family's settlement remained on the Mississippi and along the Amite.  The Lamberts along the Amite were among the few Acadians who settled in Livingston Parish.  None of Pierre's descendants moved west of the Atchafalaya Basin during the antebellum period. 

Meanwhile, non-Acadian Lamberts came to the colony as early as the 1720s, decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived from French St.-Domingue.  Most of the French-Creole Lamberts lived at New Orleans, but one family settled on the Lower German Coast and another at Pointe-Coupée.  During the late colonial and early antebellum periods, non-Acadian Lamberts also settled in the predominantly-Acadian communities of St.-Jacques, St.-Gabriel, Assumption, Attakapas, and Opelousas.  During the antebellum period, two non-Acadian families, one created by a Dalmatian from the Adriatic coast, the other by a young Parisian, set down roots in St. Landry and St. Martin parishes.  In the late antebellum period and during the War of 1861-65, non-Acadian Lamberts, both French and Anglo American, moved to the Baton Rouge area and into the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, further complicating the family's genealogical picture along the river and the bayous.  Lamberts who lived in South Louisiana, especially on the western prairies, during the antebellum and post-war periods were Afro Creoles who may have been owned by Lamberts, or, more likely, were descendants of slaves or free blacks with the given name Lambert.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Lambar, Lambare, Lamber, L'Ambert, Lamberti, Lamberto, Lampert, Lembert.  It should not be confused with the Lambre family, none of whom were Acadians.05

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The only Acadian Lamberts to come to the colony--a small family with two children, only one of them a Lambert--arrived in 1765, but they did not come from Halifax via French St.-Domingue.  They, in fact, came to New Orleans directly from St.-Domingue, among the few Acadians who arrived there via that route.  They settled with the exiles from Halifax in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  The only family line of Acadian Lamberts, a robust one, came of it: 

Pierre (c1726-1790s) Lambert

Pierre, younger son of Philippe Lambert and Marie-Madeleine Boudrot, born at Menoudy, Chignecto, in c1726, married Marguerite Arseneau probably at Chignecto in c1750, and remarried in 1754 or 1755 probably at Chignecto to a woman whose name has been lost to history.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported him, his second wife, and his seven children to South Carolina, where he was counted with sons Pierre, fils and Jean at Prince Frederick's Parish, Winyaw, in 1756.  His second wife and his other children evidently had died by then.  In 1761, Pierre remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Boucher, in South Carolina.  Colonial officials counted him, wife Marie, and six children, only two of them Lamberts, still in the southern colony in August 1763.  They probably went to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, later that year or in 1764 and came to Louisiana in 1765 probably with Acadian refugees from Halifax who came through Cap-Français.  They settled at Cabahannocer, where Pierre and Marie had their marriage blessed in May 1766.  She gave him more children in Louisiana, including another son.  Pierre died probably at Cabahannocer before July 1794.  His daughters married into the Bonvillain and Labis or Labys families.  Four of his seven sons married, but only three of their lines endured.  One of his daughters lived, and died, at New Orleans.  Two of his grandsons moved to the Bayou Lafourche valley in the early 1800s.  The others remained in what became St. James, Ascension, and Livingston parishes.  

Oldest son Pierre, fils, by first wife Marguerite Arseneau, born probably at Chignecto in c1747, followed his family to South Carolina, French St.-Domingue, and Louisiana.  At age 40, he married Josèphe-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Bruno Célestin dit Bellemère and Anne Breau, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in October 1787.  Josèphe-Marie, also called Marie-Josèphe, had come to Louisiana from France as a teenaged orphan in 1785.  Pierre, fils died at Cabahannocer in August 1800.  The St.-Jacques priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 55 when he died, but he was closer to 53.  His widow Josèphe-Marie remarried at St. James to a French Canadian and moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Two sons and two daughters by Pierre, fils followed her there.  His daughters married into the Guidry, Moron, Petit, and Rivet families.  Two of his sons also created their own families. 

Their son Pierre III, born at Cabahanncoer in July 1788, followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche and married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Benoit and Marie Madeleine Gautreaux and widow of Charles Bergeron, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1815.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Pierre III remarried to Marie, daughter of Mathurin Daunis or Donis and his Acadian wife Anne Bourg of Lafourche, at the Plattenville church in January 1819.  They settled in Terrebonne Parish.  Their daughters married into the Daigle and Thibodeaux families.  Pierre III died in Terrebonne Parish in October 1835, age 47.  His succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in August 1836.  Both of his sons married and remained in Terrebonne Parish.  

Older son Pierre Polycarp, by first wife Victoire Benoit, born in Assumption Parish in January 1815, married Célanise, daughter of fellow Acadians Béloni Babin and Madeleine Dugas of Iberville Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1842.  Their daughter married a Boudreaux stepbrother.  Pierre Polycarp remarried to Eugènie or Amelise, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Isidore Gautreaux and his Creole wife Marie Rosalie Siville and widow of Aurelien Boudreaux, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1849, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in August 1854.  They settled on Bayou Petit Caillou.  Their son Joseph Arthur was born probably on Bayou Petit Caillou in November 1851, and Georges Jean in January 1858.   Pierre died in Terrebonne Parish in December 1870, age 55.  

Pierre III's younger son Leufroi Donat, by second wife Marie Daunis, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1833, married Zéolide Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Firmin Blanchard and his Creole wife Marie Hélène LeBoeuf of Terrebonne Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in August 1858, and, erroneously called Pierre by the recording priest, sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in June 1859.  Their son Adam Oleus was born in Terrebonne Parish in October 1864, Joseph Firmin near Montegut in December 1867, and Joseph Pierre Marie in March 1870.  

Pierre, fils's second son Éloi-Élias, born at Cabahannocer in August 1790, evidently died young. 

Pierre, fils's third and youngest son Pascal, born at Cabahannocer in April 1792, followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche and married Marie Césaire, called Césaire, daughter of Nicolas Bélanger and Marguerite Lejeune of Illinois, in a civil ceremony recorded in both Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes in July 1815, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church in July 1817.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes before moving to Bayou Boeuf.  Their son Joseph Drosin, called Drosin, was born in Assumption Parish in March 1822; Joseph Michel in January 1825 but died at age 10 months the following October; and Pascal, fils was born in Ascension Parish in March 1835 but died at age 17 months in August 1836.  Their daughter married into the Mars family.  Only one of Pascal's sons created a family of his own.  He settled in Assumption Parish.   

Oldest son Joseph Drosin married German Creole Marie Céleste Stout probably in the early 1840s and settled in Assumption Parish.  Their son André Marcellus was born near Paincourtville in February 1853, Lucien near Plattenville in September 1854, and Pierre Hippolyte near Paincourtville in August 1856.  Their daughter married into the Alleman family at Pierre Part north of Lake Verret. 

Pierre, père's second son Jean, by first wife Marguerite Arseneau or his father's second wife, died in South Carolina after 1756.

Pierre, père's third son Jean, the second with the name, by third wife Marie Doiron, born probably in South Carolina in c1762, was counted with his family there in August 1763 but, like his older namesake, probably died young.  

Pierre, père's fourth son Michel, by third wife Marie Doiron, born at Cabahannocer in c1769, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Vincent and Marguerite Cormier, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in May 1798.  Michel died at St. James in March 1804, age 35.  His daughter married into the Berteau family.  Two of his three sons also created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Michel-Édouard, called Édouard, born at Cabahannocer in July 1799, married cousin Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Guidry and Marguerite Vincent, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Édouard Lucien, called Lucien, was born near Convent in January 1828; Auguste Théogène in March 1834; Théodule in July 1838; Victorin in November 1840; a son, name unrecorded, died 6 hours after his birth in May 1843; and Édouard Thelesmar was born in September 1846.  Édouard may have died near Convent in April 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Édouard died at "age 55 years," but this Édouard would have been age 69.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Lucien married cousin Hélène Guidry probably at Convent in the late 1850s.  They settled near Convent.  

Édouard's fourth son Victorin died near Convent in April 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Victorin was age 30 when he died, but he was 26.  He probably did not marry.  

Michel's second son Eugène, born at Cabahannocer in January 1801, married Virginie, daughter of Creoles Joseph Michel and Marie Pertuit, at the Convent church in May 1830.  Their son Eusèbe was born near Convent in March 1831; Eugène Sosthène, called Sosthène, was baptized at the Convent church, age 6 months, in June 1835; Justilien or Justinien in May 1837 but died at age 16 months in September 1838; Zenon Félicien was born in July 1839; Auguste in August 1841; Charles Adolphe, called Adolphe, in August 1845; and Laurent Jean in August 1850.  Their daughters married into the Donaldson and Guidry families.  Three of Eugène's sons married by 1870. 

Oldests son Eusèbe married cousin Marie Eveline, called Eveline, daughter of German Creoles Onésime Oubre and Josèphine Bernard, at the Convent church in January 1858; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Eugène's second son Sosthène married Marie Félicie, called Félicie, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Célestin Bourgeois and his Creole wife Gertrude Coussat, at the Convent church in April 1859.  Their son Félix Valcour, called Valcour, was born near Convent in August 1865 but died at age 3 1/2 in March 1869; and Eugène Victor was born in January 1867.  

Eugène's sixth son Adolphe married first cousin Angelina, daughter of Étienne Badeaux and Elmire Michel, his maternal uncle and aunt, at the Convent church in April 1868; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Michel's third and youngest son Jean Joseph, born at St. James in November 1804, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1823, age 18.  He did not marry.  

Pierre, père's fifth son Joseph, by third wife Marie Doiron, born at Cabahannocer in c1773, married Théotiste, also called Osite, daughter of Nicolas Vicknair and Apollonie Helfer, probably at Cabahannocer in the early 1790s.  His descendants were among the few Acadians who settled across the Amite River in Livingston Parish.  They, in fact, helped put the "French" in French Settlement there.  Three of Joseph's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born at Cabahannocer in November 1794, died there at age 14 months in January 1796. 

Joseph, père's second son Pierre-Léon, born at Cabahannocer in February 1796, also may have died young. 

Joseph, père's third son Michel-Drosin, born at Cabahannocer in May 1801, married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Eusèbe Babin and Françoise Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1829.  Their son Joseph Timoléon, called Timoléon, was born in Ascension Parish in November 1829 but died at age 2 1/2 in August 1832.  Michel Drosin remarried to Marie Eulalie, called Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Gautreaux and Marie Marthe Richard, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1831.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in Ascension Parish in April 1832; Sosthène, also called Drosin, was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age 7 months, in December 1838; and Alexandre was born in January 1843.  Three of Michel Drosin's sons created their own families.  They settled along the Amite River in either Ascension or Livingston Parish near French Settlement. 

Second son Joseph le jeune, by second wife Eulalie Gautreaux, married fellow Acadian Virginie Adeline Guidry probably in Ascension Parish in the early 1850s.  They settled near French Settlement.  Their son Pierre was born in May 1853; Joseph, fils in February 1856; Jean le jeune in June 1858; and Louis in December 1860.  

Michel Drosin's third son Sosthène, by second wife Eulalie Gautreaux, married Marguerite Lutetia, called Lutetia and Tesia, daughter of Norbert Villeneuve and his Acadian wife Marcellite Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1855.  They settled near French Settlement.  Their son Drosin le jeune was born in October 1857, Jean le jeune in Ascension Parish in June 1860, and Félix Beauregard in February 1867. 

Michel Drosin's fourth and youngest son Alexandre, by second wife Eulalie Gautreaux, likely married French Creole Marie Irma, called Irma, Guitreau probably at French Settlement in the mid-1860s.  Their son Maurice was born near French Settlement in September 1866.  

Joseph, père's fourth Joseph, fils, the second with the name, born at Cabahannocer in February 1802, married Susanne, daughter of Jean Descareaux and Susanne Chenet, at the Convent church in July 1826.  Their son Joseph III was born near Convent in March 1827 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1828, and Pierre Degore was born in Ascension Parish in April 1831.  Joseph, fils remarried to Caisere, daughter of Antoine Haydel and Césaire Miette, at the French Settlement church, Livingston Parish, in June 1842.  One of Joseph, fils's sons created his own family.

Second son Pierre Dagore, by first wife Susanne Descareaux, married first cousin Marie Célestine, daughter of Célestin Poché and Coralie Descareaux, at the Convent church in June 1853; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Joseph, père's fifth and youngest son Jean Cyprien or Symphorien, born in St. James Parish in December 1808, seems to have married Marguerite Merisa or Mirza Gautreaux, Guitreaux, or Guidroz probably in Ascension Parish in the 1830s.  Their son Jean Symphorien, fils was born probably near French Settlement in January 1840; Hippolyte in April 1844; Joseph le jeune in July 1846; François Luc in October 1848; Pierre le jeune in April 1853; and Marc in November 1857.  They also had an older son named Paul.  Their daughter married into the Salassi family.  One of their sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Paul married cousin Marie Florestine, daughter of Leufroi Deslattes and Elmire Vicknair, at the French Settlement church in May 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Evariste was born near French Settlement in March 1867, and Lucien in January 1869.  

Pierre, père's sixth son Philippe or Félix, by third wife Marie Doiron, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in May 1774, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Charpentier and Jeanne Moutard of New Orleans, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in February 1801.  Félix died at Cabahanocer the following October.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Félix was age 25 when he died, but he was 27.  His line of the family probably died with him.  

Pierre, père's seventh and youngest son Paul, by third wife Marie Doiron, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1776, may have died young.

Landry

René Landry l'aîné, an early 1640s arrival, and his wife Perrine Bourg created the first, and what proved to be the smaller, branch of the Landry family in Acadia.  Perrine gave René l'aîné five children, two sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Doucet, Comeau, Granger, Richard dit Beaupré, and Dupuis families.  René l'aîné's sons married into the Robichaud dit Cadet and Thériot families.  The great majority of their descendants remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but a few also moved on to Pobomcoup and the French Maritimes.  A Landry cousin with the same given name as René l'aîné came to the colony in the late 1650s, nearly two decades after his older cousin reached Acadia.  René le jeune created a much larger branch of the family there.  He and his wife Marie Bernard also settled at Port-Royal, where Marie gave le jeune 15 children, eight sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Thériot, Racois dit de Rosier, Dupuis, Richard, LeBlanc, and Blanchard families.  All eight of René le jeune's sons married, into the Thibodeau, Babin, Melanson, Guilbeau, and Broussard families.  Typical of most early Acadian families, many of René le jeune's descendants left Port-Royal and settled in other communities, including Minas, Pigiguit, Chignecto, the trois-rivières, and in the French Maritimes.  They were especially numerous at Minas. 

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the spring and summer of 1750, Canadian militia, along with Mi'kmaq led by Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Landrys may have been among the refugees affected by this petit dérangement.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Landrys may have been among the Chignecto Acadians who were serving in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant-Governor Charles Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British seaboard colonies.  Landry families were shipped to South Carolina and Georgia.  Most of the Landrys at Chignecto, however, escaped the British roundup and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore or moved on to Canada. 

Most of the many Landrys at Minas and Pigiguit found themselves on transports bound for Massachusetts, Connecitcut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia.  The 1,500 Acadians transported to Virginia, the first contingent of which reached Hampton Roads during the second week of November 1755, suffered the indignity of being turned away by the colony's authorities.  For weeks, the exiles languished in the lower James River aboard disease-infested ships while the governor and his council pondered their fate.  Later that autumn, Lieutenant-Governor Robert Dinwiddie ordered the "French Neutrals" dispersed to the ports of Hampton, Norfolk, and Richmond.  The following spring, the colony's Burgesses debated the question and concluded that the papists must go.  Virginia authorities hired more vessels and sent the Acadians on to England, where they were packed into warehouses in several English ports and treated like common criminals.  Landrys were held at Falmouth, Southampton, and Liverpool.  Back in Nova Scotia, the few Minas Landrys who escaped the British roundup joined their cousins on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore or in Canada.  Most of the Landrys still at Annapolis Royal evidently escaped the roundup there.  After a hard winter on the Fundy shore, they crossed to Chepoudy and joined their fellow refugees on lower Rivière St.-Jean before moving on to Canada or the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

Living in territory controlled by France, the many Landrys on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale escaped the fate of their cousins in Nova Scotia from the summer of 1755 to the spring of 1756.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the British captured the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, they rounded up most of the habitants on the Maritime islands and deported them to France, Landrys among them.  The crossing devastated some of the Landry families.  A Landry wife and her children died aboard a British transport that landed at Rochefort; only her husband survived the crossing.  A Landry family from Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie on Île St.-Jean perished aboard the British transport Duke William that sank in a North Atlantic storm off the southwest coast of England in mid-December.  Most of the island Landrys crossed on one or more of the five British transports--the Yarmouth, Patience, Mathias, Restoration, and John Samuel--that left Chédabouctou Bay in late November with 1,033 Acadians aboard, bound for St.-Malo.  Despite the mid-December storm that sank two other vessels, the Five Ships remained in convoy and reached St.-Malo during the third week of January 1759.  Only 694 exiles were still aboard, 339 having died at sea.  During the following weeks, 156 of the Five-Ships survivors died in local hospitals from the rigors of the crossing--nearly 500 deaths aboard these vessels, some of them Landrys.

Island Landrys who survived the crossing did their best to create a life for themselves in the teeming suburbs of St.-Malo.  Not all of them remained there.  One Landry who had lost his wife and three children on the crossing to the Breton port received permission from French authorities to move on to La Rochelle in February 1759, a few weeks after he reached St.-Malo.  He then disappears from history.  But most of his Landry kinsmen remained at St.-Malo and either created new families or watched their families grow.  Island Landrys who had been deported to other French ports such as Boulogne-sur-Mer and Rochefort also converged on the St.-Malo area months or years after their arrival.  Other island Landrys who landed at Cherbourg and Boulogne-sur-Mer remained where they had landed, at least for a while.  Back in North America, after the fall of Louisbourg, a British force attacked the settlements at Cap-Sable and Pobomcoup in late September 1758, captured many Acadians there, including Landrys, shipped them to the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, and held them there for a year.  In late 1759, the British deported them to France via England, and they landed at Cherbourg in January 1760, and there they remained.  In the spring of 1763, after tortured negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England, including many Landrys, were repatriated to St.-Malo and other French ports.  Considering the number of Minas Landrys deported to Virginia in the autumn of 1755, it is no wonder that more members of the family went to France from England than from the Maritime islands in 1759.  Nearly all of the Acadians from England who landed at, or moved on, to St.-Malo did not follow other exiles from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  A widow and her Landry children were an exception.  In November 1765, they settled on the island at Bordrehouant in the Bangor district with other Acadians.  In the early 1770s, Landrys in France chose in even greater numbers to take part in another settlement venture, this one in the interior province of Poitou.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  New Landry families were created, others continued to grow, and some, sadly, continued to shrink during the family's sojourn in Poitou.   After two years of effort, most of the Acadians deserted the Poitou venture.  From October 1775 through March 1776, hundreds of them, including the Landrys, retreated in four convoys to the port city of Nantes.  There and at nearby Chantenay, the wayward Acadians lived as best they could on government handouts and what work they could find.  Again, Landry families were created, others continued to grow, more loved ones were buried in the soil of mother France.  During their two and a half decades in the mother country, Acadian Landrys proliferated, and some even prospered, there.  Yet, in the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, at least 54 Landrys agreed to take it.  Other members of the family, including the Landrys on Belle-Île-en-Mer, chose to remain.  

Meanwhile, in North America, conditions got only worse for the Acadians who had escaped the British roundups of 1755 and 1758 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and in Canada, where they gathered at Québec.  Life in the crowded Canadian capital came with a price.  For the first time in their lives, Acadians were exposed to the hazards of an urban environment.  A number of them died at Québec in September 1756.  Later that summer and in early autumn, Acadian refugees in the Québec area began to die in ever greater numbers.  Smallpox, a disease scarcely known on the Fundy shore, killed more than 300 Acadians, including René l'aîné Landrys from Annapolis Royal, in and around the Canadian citadel through the fall, winter, and early spring of 1757-58.  This did not endear the survivors to their Canadian hosts, who saw them more as burdens than as reliable compatriots in their struggle against the British.  After the fall of Québec in September 1759, the British gathered their forces to attack the remaining French strongholds in New France, one of which was the Acadian refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  The British attacked in June 1760.  After a spirited fight in which Acadian and Mi'kmaq militia played an important role, the French commander blew up his larger vessels and  retreated up the Restigouche, leaving the militia to prevent a British landing.  Unable to land his redcoats and lay waste to the area, the British commander ordered his ships to return to their base at Louisbourg with what booty and prisoners they could carry.  Among the prisoners were 300 Acadians, some of whom may have been Landrys.  In late October 1760, soon after the French surrendered the outpost to a second British force, French officials counted 1,003 Acadians still at Restigouche, including a family of Landrys:  Renné and his family of five.  During the following months, Acadians who had escaped capture at Restigouche either surrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region, who held them in prison compounds in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  One of these compounds was Fort Edward, overlooking the old Landry homesteads at Pigiguit.  Another was Fort Cumberland, formerly French Fort Beauséjour, at Chignecto, where, in August 1763.  Still another was at Chédabouctou on the Atlantic coast.  The largest and oldest prison compound in Nova Scotia was on Georges Island in the middle of Halifax harbor.  British officials counted Landrys in all of these compounds at war's end.

The war over, Landrys being held in the British seaboard colonies theoretically were free to go, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  Even then British authorities discouraged resettlement.  Landrys from both branches of the family were especially numerous in Massachusetts and Maryland.  Landrys also were being held in Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.  Most of the Acadians in New England, New York, and Pennsylvania, including many Landrys, chose to go to Canada, where kinsmen from Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, Minas, and the Maritime islands already had gone.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of the Landry cousins began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  Especially after 1766, Landrys could be found on the upper St. Lawrence at Bécancour, L'Acadie, La Chine, La-Prairie-de-la-Magdeleine, St.-Philippe-de-La-Prairie, L'Assomption, Lavaltrie, Maskinongé, Montréal, Nicolet, Pointe-du-Lac, St.-François-du-Lac, St.-Grégoire-du-Nicolet, St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, St.-Sulpice, and Yamachiche; on the lower St. Lawrence below Québec at Charlesbourg, Cap-St.-Ignace, St.-Joachim, L'Islet, and Kamouraska; in Gaspésie at Bonaventure and Carleton; and in the Îles-de-la-Madeleine.  In what became New Brunswick, Landrys settled at Caraquet, Grande-Anse, and Memramcook.  In Nova Scotia, they could be found at Pigiguit now Windsor, Pointe-de-l'Église or Church Point, Chezzetcook, D'Escousse on Île Madame, and L'Ardoise on Cape Breton Island.  And on Newfoundland.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed.  After the war, the Landry family being held at Chédabouctou settled on Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland that offered them an opportunity to elude British jurisdiction. 

Other Landrys languishing in the seaboard colonies at war's end emigrated, instead, to the French Antilles to avoid living in territory controlled by the British.  Even while the end-of-war treaty was still being negotiated, French officials encouraged Acadians in the British colonies to go to French St.-Dominique, today's Haiti, to work on a new naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America by the Seven Years' War, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  Another naval base on the northwest shore of the big sugar island would protect the approaches to their remaining possessions in the region and assist in the "war of revenge" to come.  Acadians who could be lured to the sugar island would prove a ready source of labor for constructing the base as well as for wealthy sugar planters.  To sweeten the deal, the French promised them land of their own in the colony.  The first of them reached Cap-Français in late 1763.  The experience proved an unhappy one for many of the exiles, including members of two Landry families who French officials sent to Mirebalais in the island's interior to work in the sugar fields.  When fellow Acadians from Halifax and Maryland, including Landrys, came through Cap-Français on their way to Spanish Louisiana from late 1764 through 1769, none of the Landrys still in St.-Domingue chose to join them.  They evidently had found a place for themselves in the colony's slave-based economy, or, most likely, most of them were dead. 

 A Landry still living in one of the seaboard colonies, perhaps after communicating with a kinsman, consulted with three other Acadian family heads on where they should resettle.  The four family heads and their wives all were closely kin to one another:  Olivier à Joseph Landry's wife was Cécile Poirier, whose brother Jean-Baptiste Poirier was married to Marie-Madeleine Richard, whose parents were Jean-Baptiste Richard and Marie-Catherine, called Catherine, Cormier, and Catherine was a first cousin of Jean-Baptiste Cormier, whose wife Madeleine Richard was a sister of Jean-Baptiste.  Moreover, Olivier Landry's paternal grandmother was Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot.  Marie's younger sister Jeanne had married French official Mathieu de Goutin at Port-Royal in the late 1680s.  The De Goutin's youngest son, Joseph de Ville, born at Port-Royal in 1705, like his older brother François-Marie became an army officer.  Joseph was still a bachelor when he was posted to New Orleans in the 1730s or 1740s.  He was, a far as the records show, the first native of French Acadia to settle in Louisiana.  Well into his middle age, he married a Creole girl in 1747 and, after his retirement, became a merchant at New Orleans and an officer in the colonial militia.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, he received a grant of land in the newly created Attakapas District on the Louisiana prairies.  It may have been about that time that he communicated with his cousin Olivier in the Acadian diaspora and sold him on the qualities of the Gulf Coast region.  Sometime in early 1763, perhaps after hearing from cousin Joseph, Olivier Landry, Jean-Baptiste Cormier, Jean-Baptiste Poirier, Jean-Baptiste Richard, their wives, and children left New York, where they may have been held since 1756, and headed back to the southern seaboard colonies, to which they had been deported from Chignecto in the fall of 1755.  In South Carolina late that August, colonial officials counted the four families at Charles Town and Port Royal.  Later that year, perhaps after securing more funds, the families moved on to Savannah, Georgia, from where, in late December 1763, they took the Savannah Packet to Mobile in eastern Lousiaina, which they likely thought was still a part of New France.  It was not.  They in fact arrived in the Gulf Coast city just as the caretaker governor of French Louisiana, Jean-Jacques-Blaise d'Abbadie, was transferring jurisdiction of eastern Louisiana to a British force from Cuba.  Lingering at Mobile in late January, the four families rehabilitated one of their marriages there before moving on to New Orleans, which they reached in February 1764--the first documented Acadian exiles to settle in Louisiana. 

Meanwhile, the hand full of Landrys being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, including Landrys, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, at least nine were Landrys. 

The dozens of Landrys in Maryland endured life among English colonists who did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  When word reached the Acadians there that they would be welcome in Spanish Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  Dozens of Landrys were part of the three contingents of exiles from Maryland that reached New Orleans in September 1766, July 1767, February 1768--130 Landrys in all, more than any other family from any one place that settled in Louisiana.

Landrys (two separate families, the progenitors cousins) were among the first families of Acadia.  No Acadian family came earlier to Louisiana, and no other Acadian family sent more individuals to the colony than the Landrys.  Between February 1764, when the first Acadian exiles reached New Orleans, through 1785, when hundreds more arrived from France, over 200 Landrys--130 of them from Maryland alone--called Louisiana their new home.  (Nearly all of them were descendants of René le jeune of Acadia; only four of them, immigrant siblings from France, can be traced back to the older cousin, Rene l'aîné.)  Most of these Acadian Landrys settled on the Mississippi River along what was called the Acadian Coast, but their presence there was not substantial at first.  Not until the migrations from Maryland in 1766, 1767, and 1768 did the family become a significant one on the river.  During the late colonial period, centers of family settlement arose also on the western prairies and along Bayou Lafourche, but most Landrys remained on the river, in St. James, Ascension, Iberville, and West Baton Rouge parishes.  Some even settled in Pointe Coupee Parish, where few Acadians had gone.  Most, not all, of the 1785 arrivals favored the Bayou Lafourche valley over the crowded river settlements.  Not until later in the colonial period, however, when Maryland exiles or their children moved from the river to Bayou Lafourche, did this third center of family settlement become substantial. 

Non-Acadian Landrys from Canada, France, and Switzerland appeared in St. Martin Parish in the early 1800s, but they were vastly outnumbered by their Acadian namesakes.  The family line from Switzerland, which arose in St. Martin Parish and spread western into nearby Lafayette, was especially vigorous.  Afro-Creole Landrys also lived in South Louisiana during the antebellum and immediate post-war periods. 

As they had occupied nearly every significant settlement in old Acadia, Landrys settled in every Acadian community of South Louisiana.   The family's settlement patterns in the late colonial and early antebellum periods resemble a series of waves spreading out from the family's substantial base on the Acadian Coast.  The first wave, no more than a ripple, moved out to the western prairies beginning in the early 1770s, followed by successive waves across the Atchafalaya Basin into the early antebellum period.  Most of the western Landrys settled in what became St. Martin, Lafayette, St. Mary, and Vermilion parishes, but at least one family set down roots on the Opelousas prairie south of the present city.  Meanwhile, beginning in the late 1780s, several waves of Landrys moved from the river to upper Bayou Lafourche, followed by ripples of movement deeper into the Lafourche and Terrebonne country during the early 1800s.  At least two Landrys settled on the Gulf at Chenière Camanada, near Grand Isle, at the southern edge of Jefferson Parish.  Others moved from the upper bayou to the shores of Lake Verret, where some of their descendants hunted alligators.  During the early antebellum period, in a reversal of the usual Acadian migration pattern, a few Landry families moved from upper Bayou Lafourche back to the river.  Also in a reversal of the usual migration pattern, at least one Landry moved from the prairies to the river during the late antebellum period.  Following a more typical pattern of movement, Landrys from the Lafourche valley moved to the lower Atchafalaya, to the western prairies, and especially to lower Bayou Teche during the late antebellum and immediate post-war periods.  Evidently this movement was the beginning of a virtual family exodus.  A recent study of Louisiana families with French and Spanish roots notes:  "Today [1986] ... Landry families in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes comprise but a small part of the clan in Louisiana."  Perhaps as part of that exodus, Landrys from the Lafourche valley were moving to the Vacherie area of St. James Parish during the immediate post-war period.  The Landrys nevertheless maintained a solid presence on the upper bayou in Assumption Parish. 

The family produced a number of wealthy indigo and sugar planters, a district commandant, and a lieutenant governor, most of them from families in river parishes.  Joseph dit Bellehomme Landry served as commandant of Ascension from 1799-1803 and was elected to the first state senate in 1812.  His son Trasimond served as the first lieutenant governor of Louisiana during the late 1840s. ...

According to a recent study of Louisiana families with French and Spanish roots, "Among the surnames of French origin in Louisiana that of Landry is second only to Hébert."  Interestingly, dozens more Landrys than Héberts emigrated to Louisiana, and Landry marriages outnumbered Hébert marriages by a substantial margin during the first century of Acadian presence in South Louisiana.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Lendry, Landri, Landris, and L'audry in Louisiana.  Members of a Landry family from Canada who settled in western Virginia spell their surname Londeree.06

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Landrys came to Louisiana as early as February 1764.  They were, in fact, among the first Acadian exiles--21 in all, four of them Landrys--to settle in Louisiana: 

Olivier (c1728-1770s) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Olivier, second son of Joseph Landry and first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Minas in c1728, married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Marie Cormier, at Chignecto in September 1748.  The British deported them to Georgia in the fall  of 1755, but they did not remain there.  They evidently were among the exiles in the southern colonies who made their way north along the Atlantic coast in the spring of 1756 and were held on Long Island, New York, until the end of the war.  In 1763, they headed back to the southern colonies perhaps to resettle in the French Antilles.  Colonial officials in South Carolina counted them at Port Royal in August 1763, but they returned to Georgia later that year.  Olivier, Cécile, and three of their children, two sons and a daughter, along with three other related families--the Cormiers, Poiriers, and Richards--were the first Acadian exiles to emigrate to Louisiana.  The party left Savannah, Georgia, for Mobile, Alabama, in December 1763, reached Mobile in January, and moved on to New Orleans, which they reached in February 1764.  That April, the French caretaker government settled them at Cabahannocer on the river above the German Coast.  Olivier died probably at Cabahannocer by April 1774, in his 40s, when his wife remarried there.  His daughter married into the Thibodeau famliy on the river.  His older son married into the Cormier family and also remained on the river, where he created a vigorous line of the family. 

Older son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1751, followed his family to Georgia, New York, South Carolina, back to Georgia, to Louisiana via Mobile, Alabama, in late 1763 and early 1764, and to Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Cormier, père and Madeleine Richard of Chignecto, in c1768.  Anne also had come to Louisiana from Georgia via Mobile in 1764.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabhanncoer in 1777.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in January 1811, age 60.  His daughters married into the Green, Poirier, Richard, and Theriot families.  Only two of his five sons seem to have created families of their own, and only a single line--that of a grandson--remained on the river, in St. James Parish.  Another grandson settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1770, married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Michel and Marie Léger, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in February 1797.  Their son Joseph III was born at Cabahannocer in September 1799; Pierre Léon in July 1805; and Jean Hildebert, Ildebert, or Philibert near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1810.  Joseph, fils died near Convent in April 1835.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died at "age 65 yrs.," so this probably was him.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux and Thibodeaux families.  Two of his three sons married, but only one of their lines seems to have survived.  It remained in St. James Parish, but it was a vigorous line. 

Oldest son Joseph III married Anastasie, also called Octavie, daughter of Jacques Poché and Véronique Vickner, at the Convent church in July 1825.  Their son Joseph IV was born near Convent in September 1828; Norbert Sylvère or Sylvain, also called Sylvère Norbert, in July 1830; Joseph Philippe, called Philippe, in January 1835; Joseph Justin in August 1842; and Joseph Clément in February 1847.  They also had a son named Joseph Théophile, called Théophile.  Joseph III died near Convent in February 1866.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died at "age 67 years." Joseph III would have been age 66, so this was him.  His daughters married into the Badeaux, Guidry, Part, and Poirier families.  Five of his sons also created their own families on the river.

Oldest son Joseph IV married Élise, called Lise, daughter of Michel LeBoeuf and his Acadian wife Scholastique Guidry, at the Convent church in March 1849.  Their son Alfred was born near Convent in May 1862, Joseph V in May 1860, and Victor in December 1864.  Their daughter married into the Bethancourt family. 

Joseph III's second son Norbert Sylvère married Marie Irma, called Irma, daughter of Evariste Oubre and Charlotte Dufrene, at the Convent church in April 1849.  Their son Joseph Sylvère le jeune was born near Convent in March 1850 but died the following November, Léon Norbert was born in April 1856, Alcée in January 1860, George Jefferson died at age 10 months in August 1862, and Joseph was born in February 1869. 

Joseph III's third son Philippe married first cousin Marie Augustine, called Augustine, daughter of Jacques Poché and Cléonise Picou of Jefferson City, at the Convent church in August 1855; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Philippe Aubrez or Aubry was born in St. James Parish in July 1856; and Joseph Jhonson, probably Johnson, in March 1864.  Philippe remarried to first cousin Marie Olide or Olype, another daughter of Jacques Poché and Cléonise Picou, in a civil ceremony probably in St. James Parish, and sanctified the marriage at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in May 1869; they had to secure a dispensation for first degree of affinity and second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Fernand Emmanuel was born in St. James Parish in November 1868. 

Joseph III's fourth son Joseph Théophile married Geneviève Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of Creoles Simon Rouiller, Rouillier, or Rouillet and Carmelite LeBlanc, at the Convent church in August 1855, on the same day and at the same place his brother Philippe married his first wife.  Théophile and Élodie's son Louis Théophile was born near Convent in October 1864, and Jean Antoine in March 1867. 

Joseph III"s sixth and youngest son Joseph Clément married Louisa, minor daughter of fellow Acadian Philemon Guidry and his Creole wife Louisa Matherne, at the St. James church in November 1867. 

Joseph, fils's third and youngest son Hildebert married cousin Marie Euphémie, called Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Élie Landry and Henriette Hébert of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1830.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Hildebert remarried to Clémence, daughter of Gerasin Desormeaux and his Acadian wife Madeleine Hébert, "at the home of Joseph Landry," perhaps his older brother, in St. James Parish in December 1835; the second marriage was recorded at both the St. James and Convent churches.  Did Hildebert father any sons by either of his wives? 

Joseph, père's second son Pierre, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in March 1772, died in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche in November 1815.  He was age 44, a resident of St. James Parish, and probably never married. 

Joseph, père's third son Benjamin, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in February 1774, married cousin Anne-Apolline, called Apolline and Poulone, daughter of fellow Acadians René Landry and his second wife Anne Landry of Ascension, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in April 1799.  Their son Benjamin, fils was born at St. James in January 1804; and Placide in March 1808 but died the following August.  Apolline died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in April 1808, "age about 35 yrs."  Her and Benjamin's daughters married into the Achée and Blanchard families.  Benjamin remarried to cousin Marie Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Landry and Agathe Landry and widow of Allain Babin and Amand Breaux, at the St. James church in November 1810.  Their son Joseph Sylvère, called Sylvère, was born in St. James Parish in December 1815.  Benjamin died in St. James Parish in March 1816.  Tthe priest who recorded his burial said that Benjamin was age 45 when he died, but he was in his early 40s.  Only one of his sons seems to have married, and he settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Third and youngest son Joseph Sylvère, by second wife Céleste Landry, married Rosalie or Rosaline, daughter of Jacob Rebre and Gertrude Piercuire of Germany, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1835.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Numa was born in Assumption Parish in June 1836; Landry Ernest in January 1838; and a son, name unrecorded, died in Assumption Parish the day of his birth in February 1841. Sylvère may have died in Assumption Parish in October 1848.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said Silvère, as he called him, died at "age 36 years."  Joseph Sylvère would have been age 32. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in October 1779, may have died young. 

Joseph, père's fifth and youngest son François, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in May 1781, may have died in St. James Parish in March 1816.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Francois was "age about 40 yrs." when he died and mentioned no wife, so he may not have married. 

Olivier's younger son Jean-Antoine, born probably in New York in November 1760 and baptized at New Orleans in February 1764, soon after his family came to Louisiana from Georgia via Mobile, was still alive in April 1766, when Spanish officials counted his family at Cabahannocer.  He then disappears from Louisiana church records, so he probably died young. 

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In February 1765, three Landrys--two young sisters with their mother and stepfather and a young husband with a pregnant wife--reached Louisiana with the Broussard party from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche, where the sisters remained, and one of them married.  After the young husband lost his wife and newborn son, he followed other Teche valley Acadians back to Cabahannocer on the river, where he remarried, but no new Landry family line came of it: 

 Mathurin (c1737-1823?) à ? à René le jeune Landry

Mathurin, second or third son of Jean Landry and Claire LeBlanc of Minas, born in the 1730s, may have been the Mathurin Landry who married Marie Dugas, date unrecorded.  They escaped the British roundup of 1755 and took refuge probably on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area, who held them in a prison compound in Nova Scotia until the end of the war.  They followed the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, and reached New Orleans in February 1765.  In April, they followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche.  Marie died in the epidemic that swept through the Teche valley that summer and fall, or she may have died from childbirth.  Their son was born in late July but died the following September, and Marie died three days after her son's birth.  Mathurin did not remain on the Teche but retreated with dozens of other Tech valley Acadians to Cabahannocer on the river and did not return to the western prairies.  Spanish officials counted him on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in April 1766; he was living with a widow and her sons, so he probably was an engagé.  He remarried to a woman whose name has been lost to history probably at Cabahannocer in the early 1770s and moved upriver to San Gabriel, where Spanish officials counted him and his wife on the "right bank ascending" in 1777.  By then, he was the father of two daughters, ages 10 and 6, and owned three slaves, 12 head of cattle, 14 hogs, and 20 chickens on his six arpents of frontage along the river.  One of his daughters married into the Foret famiy.  Mathurin may have died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1823, age 86.  His second wife does not seem to have given him any more sons.  If so, his family line, except for its blood, died with him. 

Only son Isidore, by first wife Marie Dugas, born at Attakapas in July 1765, died along the Teche the following September, a victim, perhaps, of the epidemic that killed dozens of his fellow Acadians that summer and fall. 

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Six more Landrys--a widower with two young sons, an orphan, and two wives--came to Louisiana in 1765 on later ships from Halifax via Cap-Français.  They did not follow the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche but settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Another line of the family came of it.

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Many more Landrys--67 of them, including four sets of brothers--reached New Orleans in September 1766--the largest single Acadian family group ever to reach the colony.  They settled at Cabahannocer, where their cousins from Georgia and Halifax already had gone.  After the arrival of these Maryland exiles, the number of Landrys dramatically increased along what was being called the Acadian Coast and later on the western prairies and upper Bayou Lafourche.  Many new Landry family lines came of it::

Joseph (c1710-1783) à René le jeune Landry

Joseph, fifth son of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1710, was a middle-aged bachelor when the British deported him to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted him at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763; he was still unmarried.  He emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 with members of his family and settled with them at Cabahannocer.  He died at nearby Ascension in September 1783, in his early 70s, still unmarried. 

Abraham dit Petit Abram (c1712-1786) à René le jeune Landry

Abraham dit Petit Abram, sixth son of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau and Joseph's brother, was born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1712.  Petit Abram married Élisabeth, another daughter of Charles LeBlanc and Marie Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in June 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1751, Élisabeth gave Petit Abram nine children, five sons and four daughters.  According to Stephen A. White, Petit Abram, who would have been in his early or mid-30s, remarried to Marguerite, another daughter of Jean-François Flan and Marie Dupuis, probably at Pigiguit in c1746; Marguerite was a sister of Petit Abram's brother Alexandre's wife Anne.  Arsenault says that between 1753 and 1756, Marguerite gave Petit Abram three more children, two daughters and a son--a dozen children, six sons and six daughters, in all.  The British deported Petit Abram and most of his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Second son Joseph eluded the British roundup at Pigiguit, took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, and married a woman whose name has been lost to history.  Meanwhile, colonial officials counted Petit Abram, Marguerite, and 10 of their unmarried children, four sons and six daughters, at Oxford on the Eastern Shore in July 1763.  At the time, Petit Abram's son Joseph, who had been captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the Gulf of St. Lawrence area, was being held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  In 1765, now a widower, Joseph took his two young sons from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Petit Abram, a widower again, and nine of his unmarried children, four sons and five daughters (not Nathalie, who would have been age 20 at the time), emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer near son Joseph.  Petit Abram's oldest son Mathurin, who married in Maryland, came to the colony from Port Tobacco in 1768.  After the Spanish released Mathurin, his family, and other exiles from the remote Acadian settlement across from Natchez, Mathurin resettled near his father and siblings at Cabahannocer.  Petit Abram, in his 60s, remarried again--his third marriage--to Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Rivet and Anne Leprince of Pigiguit and widow of Bonaventure Forest, at nearby Ascension in the 1770s.  She gave him no more children.  Petit Abram died at Ascension in August 1786, in his early or mid-70s.  Four of his daughters married into the Bourgeois, Babin, Savoie, Duhon, and Broussard families on the river and upper Bayou Lafourche.  His six sons also married and created vigorous lines on the river, the upper Lafourche, and out on the western prairies. 

Oldest son Mathurin, by first wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, born probably at Pigiguit in c1734, followed his family to Maryland, where he married fellow Acadian Marie Babin probably in the late 1750s or early 1760s.  Colonial officials counted him, his wife, and a daughter at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac River in July 1763.  They came to Louisiana in 1768 with the party led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit and were forced to settled at San Luìs de Natchez far upriver across from British-controlled.  Their daughter married into the Dupuy family there.  Mathurin remarried to cousin Anne Landry, widow of ____ Dugas, at New Orleans in c1768.  When the Spanish released the Acadians from Fort San Luìs in 1769, Mathurin and Anne moved downriver and settled near his father and siblings at Cabahannocer, where Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  They owned a single slave in 1777.  Their daughters married into the Braud, Bujole, Comes, Dannequin, Dugas, and Gibosset families.  He likely was the Maturin[sic] Landry who had a run-in with the Ascension priest, Father Pedro de Zamora, in 1789.  The priest threatened to shoot him after Mathurin complained about the good father confiscating a yolk of oxen and a cart from him.  The incident, among others, led to the priest's removal from Ascension.  Mathurin died near St. Gabriel in 1806.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Mathurin was age 73 when he died.  Only his younger son created a family of his own and settled in what became Ascension Parish. 

Older son Marcel, by first wife Marie Babin, born in Maryland in c1766, probably died young. 

Mathurin's younger son Joseph-Nicolas, by second wife Anne Landry, born at Ascension in September 1774, married Susanne Marie Josèphe, daughter of Thomas Houardon Calegan and his Acadan wife Marie-Madeleine Leprince, at Ascension in January 1804.  Susanne, born in Morlaix, France, had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, with her mother and maternal grandparents in 1785.  Their son Joseph Raymond Tranquille Mathurin, called Joseph Mathurin, was born at Ascension in July 1806; Joseph Ovide, called Ovide, in August 1808 but died at age 15 in August 1823; and Joseph Nicolas, fils, called Nicolas, was born in January 1821.  Joseph Nicolas, père died in Ascension Parish in November 1827, age 53.  His daughters married Gonzales brothers.  His youngest son settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but his oldest son remained in Ascension Parish. 

Oldest son Joseph Mathurin married cousin Gertrude Melitine, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Béloni Landry and his Creole wife Marie-Jeanne Chauvin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1828.  Their son Joseph Thomas was born in Ascension Parish in October 1828.  Joseph Mathurin, called Joseph Nicolas by the recording priest, died in Ascension Parish in October 1829, age 23.

Only son Joseph Thomas died in Ascension Parish in November 1848, age 20.  He probably did not marry.

Joseph Nicolas's third and youngest son Joseph Nicolas, fils married Marie Carmelite, daughter of Manuel Suarez and Marie Acosta, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1840.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Three of their four sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Nicolas III, born near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in January 1841, married Joséphine, daughter of Jean Prevost and his Acadian wife Scholastique dite Colastie Dupuis, at the Plattenville church in April 1861.  Their son Joseph Oleus was born near Plattenville in February 1862. 

Joseph Nicolas III"s second son Joseph Manuel Adrien, called Adrien, born near Plattenville in June 1842, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Hébert and Scholastique Giroir, at the Plattenville church in January 1862.  Their son Arthur Séverin was born near Plattenville in February 1863, and Evariste Léonard in October 1870. 

Joseph Nicolas III's third son Joseph René, called René, born near Paincourtville in August 1845, married Octavie, daughter of fellow Acadians Thomas Isidore Guillot and Constance Eulalie Giroir, at the Plattenville church in January 1866.  Their son Joseph Joachim was born near Plattenville in March 1869. 

Joseph Nicolas III's fourth and youngest son Joseph Symphorien Oscar was born near Paincourtville in August 1854. 

Petit Abram's second son Joseph, by first wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, born probably at Pigiguit in c1739, eluded British forces in 1755 and took refuge probably on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Meanwhile, the British deported the rest of his family to Maryland.  While in exile, Joseph married a woman whose name has been lost to history.  During the late 1750s or early 1760s, they were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the Gulf of St. Lawrence area held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  At least two sons were born to them probably in Nova Scotia in c1763 and 1764.  Joseph, now a widower, took his two sons to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français in 1764-65.  They settled at Cabahannocer, where Joseph reunited with his father, stepmother, and siblings when they reached the Spanish colony from Maryland in 1766 and 1768.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Granger and Euphrosine Gautrot, at Cabahannocer in August 1768.  She gave him more children, including sons.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension the following year and in 1777.  Joseph remarried--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of perhaps fellow Acadians Pierre Breaux and Marguerite Gautrot of Minas and widow of Olivier Babin and Pierre Forest, at Ascension in May 1782.  Only one of his many sons seems to have created a family of his own and settled in what became Ascension Parish. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by first wife _____, born probably in a prison compound in Nova Scotia in c1763, followed his widowed father to Louisiana in 1765 and may have died young. 

Joseph, père's second son Pierre, by first wife _____, born probably in a prison compound in Nova Scotia in c1764, followed his widowed father to Louisiana in 1765 and also may have died young. 

Joseph, père's third son Éloi, by second wife Anne Granger, died at Ascension, age unrecorded, in October 1772. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Grégoire-Raphaël, by second wife Anne Granger, died at Ascension five days after his birth in October 1773.

Joseph, père's fifth son Guille or Guillaume-Raphaël, called Raphaël, by second wife Anne Granger, born at Ascension in January 1775, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Breaux and Marie-Marthe LeBlanc, at Ascension in November 1792.  Their son Augustin- or Auguste-Valéry, called Valéry, was baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in September 1793; Polycarp was born in January 1802 but died at age 3 1/2 in September 1805; Henri was born in November 1808; and Terence Joseph or Jean posthumously in August 1815.  Raphaël died in Ascension Parish in April 1815.  The Donaldson priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names or Raphaël's age at the time of his death, but the priest did call Raphaël "spouse of ___ Braud," so there is no doubt that this was him.  Raphaël was age 40 when he died.  His daughters married into the Babin, Broussard, Dupuis, Landry, and Tregle families.  Two of his sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Augustin Valéry married cousin Constance Céleste or Célestine, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Eusèbe Landry and Constance Babin, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in June 1818.  Their son Valéry Didier was born in Ascension Parish in May 1819.  Céleste died at age 19 a week after son Valéry Didier was born.  Augustin Valéry remarried to cousin Rose or Marie Hortense, called Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré Landry and Justine Richard, at the Donaldson church in March 1822.  Their son Auguste Dorsini, called Dorsini and Dorsino, was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age 5 months, in January 1826; and Raphaël le jeune in April 1827 but died less than 2 weeks later.  Augustin Valéry died in Ascension Parish in August 1852.  The priest who recorded the burial said that Augustin Valéry died at "age 60 years."  One of his sons created his own family.

Second son Dorsini, by second wife Hortense Landry, married Marie Roselia or Rosella, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Breaux and his second wife Martine Thériot, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1843.  Their son Raphaël Dorsini was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age unrecorded, in October 1845 but died at age 8 in September 1853; Alexandre Sylvestre or Sylvestre Alexandre was born in January 1848; and André Jackson in August 1851.  Their daughter may have married into the Barland family.  Dorsini remarried to cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Ursin Babin and his Creole wife Odile Berteau and widow of Gervais Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1856; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of both consanguinity and affinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Robert Dorcino was born in August 1864, Vincent Sidney Alphred in September 1866, and twins Joseph Alphred and Louis Albert in January 1870.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Second son Alexandre Sylvestre, by first wife Marie Rosella Breaux, married Marie Malvina, called Malvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Derosin Bourgeois and Odalie Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1866.  Their son William Alexandre was born in Ascension Parish in June 1868. 

Guillaume Raphaël's fourth and youngest son Terence married cousin Marie Antoinette, called Antoinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Breaux and his first wife Marguerite Richard and widow of Nicolas Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in November 1849; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Théodule Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in December 1850; William Franquelin in November 1852; and Terence, fils posthumously in May 1856 but died at age 10 in July 1866.  Terence, père died in Ascension Parish in October 1855.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Terence Jean, as he called him, died at "age 40 years, 31 days." 

Joseph, père's sixth and youngest son François, by second wife Anne Granger, born at Ascension in October 1779, died at age 11 months in September 1780. 

Petit Abram's third son Étienne, by first wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, born probably at Pigiguit in c1742, followed his family to Maryland, was counted with them at Oxford in July 1763, and followed them to Cabahanncoer in 1766.  He married cousin Brigitte, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Trahan and his first wife Brigitte Landry, at nearby Ascension in May 1776.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension in 1777.  They lived for a time at New Orleans.  Étienne died by July 1787, when his wife remarried at Ascension.  His daughter married into the Leroux and Martin families and settled in St. Bernard and St. Tammany parishes.  His only surviving son settled on the western prairies. 

Older son Éloi, born at Ascension in August 1779, married cousin Julienne, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Trahan and Marie Hugon, probably at Ascension in the late 1790s or early 1800s.  They settled at Grande Pointe on upper Bayou Teche and on the lower Vermilion.  Éloi's first succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in May 1831.  The record says he was a widower and listed three of his daughters as his heirs.   Éloi died in November 1843.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Éloy, as he called him, died "at age 66 yrs.," but he was 64.  The priest also noted that Éloi was "buried at Perry's Bridge near Abbeville, La."  Éloi's postmortem succession record was filed at Vermilionville courthouse in January 1844.  The parish clerk who recorded the succession noted that Éloi was "Grandfather to Lusiphore and Telesphore Landry, the children of Antoine Landry and Clémence Guidry," so this was him.  His daughters married into the Benoit, Bourgeois, Campbell, Dubois, Guidry, and Maillard families.  Only one of his four sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Antoine, born probably at Grande Pointe in September 1803, married Virginie Clementine or Clémence, called Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian François Guidry and his Creole wife Céleste Dartes, at the Vermilionville church in January 1828.  Their son Lusiphor or Onésiphore was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in April 1830; and Telesphore at age 3 months in April 1832.  Antoine died in Lafayette Parish in November 1833, age 30.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse that December.  His two sons also created their own families.

Older son Onésiphore married cousin Felicienne, also called Félicia, daughter of Joseph Dejean and his Acadian wife Arcène Guidry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1851.  They settled on the lower Vermilion River.  Their son Joseph Antoine had been born in February 1851, and Onésiphore Albert in October 1853. 

Antoine's younger son Telesphore likely married fellow Acadian Louisa Hébert and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the early 1850s.  Their son Antoine Dermily was born near Abbeville in February 1857, and Onésiphore le jeune in January 1867.

Éloi's second son Éloi, fils, born at Grande Pointe in December 1810, died at his father's home on the lower Vermilion in August 1824, age 14. 

Éloi, père's third son Jean, born at Vermilion in June 1817, died in Lafayette Parish in August 1831, age 14.

Éloi, père's fourth and youngest son, name unrecorded, died at Vermilion in December 1818 eight days after his birth. 

Étienne's younger son Mathurin, born at Ascension in March 1784, died at New Orleans, age 6 1/2, in November 1790. 

Petit Abram's fourth son Simon, by first wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, born probably at Pigiguit in c1744, followed his family to Maryland, was counted with them at Oxford in July 1763, and followed them to Cabahanncoer, where he married cousin Anne-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter perhaps of fellow Acadians Germain Babin and Marguerite Landry, in October 1767.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same bank of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  They owned a single slave in 1777.  Simon may have died at Ascension in February 1782, in his late 30s.  His daughters married into the Babin, Gaudin, and Landry families.  Most of his many sons created families of their own and remained on the Acadian Coast. 

Oldest son Cletus or Elotte, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in August 1770, died at Ascension, age 2, in September 1772. 

Simon's second son Simon-Béloni, called Béloni, born probably at Ascension in c1771, married Marie-Jeanne, called Jeanette, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Chauvin and his Acadian wife Marguerite Breaux, at Ascension in September 1793.  Their son Eugène was born at Ascension in November 1793 but died at age 1 in January 1795, Robert died nine days after his birth in April 1806, and Jean Baptiste Longin was born in March 1815.  Simon Béloni died in St. James Parish in March 1829, age 58.  His daughters married into the Babin, Breaux, Landry, and Theriot families.  One of his sons also created his own family.

Third and youngest son Jean Baptiste Longin married Marie Aureline, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Théodore Babin and Henriette Babin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in July 1836.  They settled near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Martiale Morille was born in July 1841, Jules Olésime in May 1843, and Baptiste Gustave in March 1845.  Their daughter married into the Dugas family.  Jean Baptiste Longin remarried to cousin Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians François Crochet and Eulalie Landry of Assumption Parish, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1853.  Their son François Louis was born in Ascension Parish in November 1853, Jean Franklin in February 1855, Félix Augustin in November 1856, and Arsènes Théo in December 1860. 

Simon's third son Pierre-Alexis, born at Ascension in July 1774, married cousin Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvain LeBlanc and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at Ascension in January 1795.  Their son Sylvain was born at Ascension in August 1795; Élie-Narcisse in March 1799; and Simon le jeune, called Simonet, in June 1801.  Pierre-Alexis died at Ascension in October 1801, age 27.  All three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Sylvain married double cousin Claire Bathilde or Mathilde, called Bathilde or Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Céleste Landry, at the Donaldson church in May 1820; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Sylvain died in Ascension Parish in February 1826, age 30.  His daughter married into the Delaune family.  Did he father any sons? 

Pierre Alexis's second son Élie Narcisse married cousin Mélanie Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Guillaume Raphaël Landry and Marie Madeleine Breaux, at the Donaldson church in February 1822; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Guillaume Sylvanie was born in January 1823, Édouard Dorsigny in September 1825, Jules Élie in December 1827, and Laurent Rodolphe in August 1830.  Mélanie died near St. Gabriel in June 1831, age 27.  Élie Narcisse, at age 42, may have remarried to Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Julie Trahan and widow of Firmin Guidry, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1841.  One of his sons created a family of his own.

 Third son Jules Élie married Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Dupuy and Hortense Hébert, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1855.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son Paul Élie was born in December 1859, Germain Séverin in February 1862, and Terence Mathurin in November 1869. 

Pierre Alexis's third and youngest son Simonet married double cousin Bathilde Célesie, called Célesie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Donat Landry and Angèle Landry of Iberville Parish, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1828.  Their son Simon George Gédéon was born in Ascension Parish in July 1830, and Acadius Augustine in January 1841.  Simonet died in Ascension Parish in January 1867.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Simonet died at "age 65 years."  Célesie died in Ascension Parish also in January 1867, age 65, less than a week after Simonet died.  Their daughters married Landry and LeBlanc cousins.  None of their sons married by 1870. 

Simon's fourth son Joseph-Simon, born at Ascension in December 1775, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Osite LeBlanc, at Ascension in September 1797.  Their son Gilbert-Firmin was born at Ascension in September 1799; Joseph Valéry in December 1809; Pie Isidore, called Isidore, in May 1811; Raphaël Cyprien, called Cyprien, in December 1812; Bernua died, age unrecorded, in March 1815; Agappe Vunsul was born in March 1816; and Simon Thiburse, called Thiburse, posthumously in March 1820.  Joseph Simon died in Ascension Parish in December 1819, age 44.  His daughters married into the Braud, Gaudin, Gautreaux, LeBlanc, and Villeneuve families.  At least three of his seven sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Gilbert Firmin died in Ascension Parish in December 1837, age 38.  He may not have married. 

Joseph Simon's third son Isidore married Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Gautreaux and Marie Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1835.  Their son Thomas Isidore was born in Ascension Parish in December 1835; Edmond Martin in November 1837 but died at age 9 1/2 in August 1847; Joseph Oscar, called Oscar, was born in January 1847 but died at age 8 1/2 in October 1855; Prudent Avit was born in June 1849; and August Eugène, called Eugène, in November 1854 but died at age 10 1/2 in September 1865.  Isidore died in Ascension Parish in September 1855, age 44.  His daughter married into the Babin family.   

Joseph Simon's fourth son Cyprien married Marie Apolline, called Apolline, daughter of François Lucenty, Lucenti, or Lucentie and his Acadian wife Marie Anne Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1837.  Their son James Xavier was born in Ascension Parish in May 1847 but died at age 6 in August 1853, Aubin Alvery was born in March 1850, and Joseph Elphége in January 1852.  Their daughters married into the Allemand, Erris, and Yentzen families.

Joseph Simon's seventh and youngest son Thiburse married Élizabeth, daughter of Manuel Monson or Mansan and Eulalie Lagrange, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1855.  Their son Lucien Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in December 1856, Simon Grégoire in May 1860, and Paul Adrien in January 1864.

Simon's fifth son Olivier, born at Ascension in December 1777, married Angèle or Angélique, another daughter of Sylvain LeBlanc and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at Ascension in June 1797.  Their son Servant or Simon was born at Ascension in October 1803; and Paul Onésime, called Onésime and also Olésime, in September 1805.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Villard families.  Olivier remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Pierre Culaire and his Acadian wife Geneviève Marie Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1812.  Their son Jean was born in Ascension Parish in September 1813.  Olivier, at age 50, remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Osite LeBlanc and widow Alexandre Valéry Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1827.  Olivier died probably at his home on Bayou Corne, Ascension Parish, in February 1832.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Olivier was age 58 when he died, but he was 54.  All three of his sons created their own families

Oldest son Simon, by first wife Angèle LeBlanc, married cousin Anne Valerante or Valerente, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Céleste Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1826.  Their daughter married into the Daigre family.  Did Simon father any sons? 

Olivier's second son Onésime, by first wife Angèle LeBlanc, married cousin Madeleine Clothilde, perhaps also called Marie Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Théodore Babin and Madeleine Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Onésime Roselier was born in June 1831 but died at age 4 in August 1835, Simon Théodore was born in October 1834, and Olivier le jeune in March 1837 but died at age 15 months in June 1838.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Richard, and Trosclair families and perhaps to a Landry cousin as well.  Paul Onésime remarried to Rosalie, daughter of Ferdinand Capdeville and his Acadian wife Marie Élisabeth Melançon and widow of Norbert Neraux, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1844.  Their son Abraham Sylvère was born in Ascension Parish in March 1848, and Vincent de Paul in July 1849.  At least one of Onésime's sons married by 1870. 

Second son Simon Théodore, by first wife Madeleine Clothilde Babin, married Joséphine, daughter of Pierre Pellerin, also called Tellier, and Marie Rose Lartigue, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1853.  Their son Théodore Gervais was born in Ascension Parish in June 1854, and Siméon Olivier in January 1860. 

Olivier's third and youngest son Jean, by second wife Marie Culaire, married Marie Elina, called Elina, daughter of André Conrad and Eulalie Grabert, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1844.  Jean, called "a native of New River, Ascension parish," died near St. Gabriel in November 1846, age 33.  Did his family line die with him? 

Simon's sixth son Firmin, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in November 1779, married cousin Henriette, another daughter of Joseph Babin and Osite LeBlanc, at Ascension in October 1803.  Their son Andrew Firmin, also called Odin, was born at Ascension in September 1804 but died at age 15 in November 1819; and Marcellin was born in April 1808 but died the following September.  He and his wife may have had no more sons.  If so, this line of the family did not endure. 

Simon's seventh and youngest son Simon-Nicolas or Nicolas-Simon, born at Ascension in February 1782, married cousin Osite, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Marguerite Babin, at Ascension in April 1804.  Their son Barthélemy Séverin was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in November 1812; and Emérant in January 1817.  Their daughter married a Babin cousin.  Nicolas remarried to cousin Marie Élise or Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Melançon and Marie Christine Landry and widow of Jérôme Rivet, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1828.  Their son Louis Simon was born in Ascension Parish in August 1831; Joseph Ferdinand in February 1834; Vilfrid Geraud, called Geraud, in October 1837 but died at age 2 in October 1839; and Edmond Nicolas was born in November 1842.  Nicolas, while a "res. of New River at the Bluff," died in Iberville Parish in October 1849, age 67.  Three of his sons married by 1870.

Third son Louis Simon, by second wife Marie Élise Melançon, married double cousin Marie Sulvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Landry and Madeleine Joséphine Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in November 1855.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Alibert was born in May 1856, and Cleopha Siméon in January 1862. 

Nicolas's fourth son Joseph Ferdinand, by second wife Marie Élise Melançon, married Marie Armelise, called Armelise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Valéry Breaux and Marie Rose Hébert, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1855.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Joseph Albert was born in November 1856, Simon B. in February 1859, François Richard in April 1863, and twins Lucas Jean and Lucas Nicolas in June 1865. 

Nicolas's sixth and youngest son Edmond Nicolas, by second wife Marie Élise Melançon, married cousin Elisca, daughter of fellow Acadians Séverin Breaux and Serasine Landry, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in January 1866.  Their son Jean Séverin was born near Gonzales in December 1869. 

Petit Abram's fifth son Pierre-Abraham dit Pitre, by second wife Marguerite Flan, born probably at Pigiguit in c1752, followed his family to Maryland, was counted with them at Oxford in July 1763, and followed them to Cabahannocer in 1766.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Allain and Catherine Hébert, at San Gabriel in January 1773.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension in 1777.  Pierre Abraham dit Pitre died at Ascension in September 1805, age 53.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux, Landry, Mollere, and Rousseau families.  Two of his three sons married and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

Oldest son Alain, born at Ascension in October 1778, married Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Aucoin and Marie Marguerite Noël, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1808.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Libois was born in Assumption Parish in June 1809 but died at age 1 1/2 in December 1810, and Gervais Esprit was born in Ascension Parish in August 1827.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  Alain's younger son, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Pitre's second son Pierre-Augustin, born at Ascension in July 1780, may have died young. 

Pitre's third and youngest son Pierre-Grégoire, also called Landry and Grégoire, born at Ascension in November 1782, married Marie Joséphine, called Joséphine, daughter of Jacques Rousseau and Charlotte Oubre, at the Plattenville church in November 1811.  They remained on the upper bayou.  Their son Terence Prudent, called Prudent, born in Assumption Parish in April 1815; Romain Dufoi, Dufossard, or Defossat in February 1817; Emérante Gilbert in January 1819; Landry Godegrand, called Godegrand, in September 1822; Justin in August 1826; and Adolphe in December 1831 but died at age 1 in December 1832.  Grégoire died in Assumption Parish in November 1840.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Pierre Grégoire Landry died at "age ca. 50 years," but he was 58.  His daughters married into the Gross and Landry families.  Five of his six sons created their own families.  One of them settled on the western prairies, but the others remained on the Lafourche. 

Oldest son Prudent married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin LeBlanc and Arthémise Dugas, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1845.  Their son Catoire Prudent was born near Paincourtville in November 1846; Pierre Justin, called Justin le jeune, was baptized at the Paincourtville church, age 2 months, in May 1849; Charles Édouard was born in April 1852; and Grégoire le jeune in November 1856.  Noe of their sons married by 1870. 

Second son Justin le jeune died in Assumption Parish in August 1867.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial said that Justin died at "age 19 years," but he was 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Pierre Grégoire's second son Romain Dufoi, Dufossard, or Defossat, married Mare Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marie Melançon of Ascension Parish, at the Plattenville church in September 1837.  They settled near Paincourtville.  Their daughter married a Gautreaux cousin.  Did Duffosard father any sons who survived infancy? 

Pierre Grégoire's third son Emérante Gilbert moved to the western prairies and married Adélaïde, daughter of French Canadian Valéry Roy and his Creole wife Brigitte Nezat, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1847.  They remained on the prairies.  Their son Ambroise was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1850, Henry Emérante in July 1852, Pierre Anatole in July 1856, and Joseph Edgard in November 1861.  Their daughter married a Nezat cousin.  None of his sons married before 1870. 

Pierre Grégoire's fourth son Godegrand married first cousin Marie Julie Zulmée, called Zulmée, daughter of Adélard Rousseau and Azélie Porché, at the Paincourtville church in June 1850; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Charles was born near Paincourtville in November 1857, Augustin Alcide in April 1859, and Jean Beauregard in June 1862.  Godegrand, at age 46, remarried to Alexandrine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Alexandre Ozelet and Henriette Guillot, at the Paincourtville church in March 1869. 

Pierre Grégoire's fifth son Justin married Marie Zulmée or Zulma, daughter of Charles Triche and Marguerite Alexandre, at the Plattenville church in March 1857.  Their son Pierre Mirouvet was born near Plattenville in May 1858; Charles Maldorfi in March 1860; Joseph Thomas Delphin, called Thomas, near Paincourtville in December 1861 but died at age 1 in December 1862; Optime was born in April 1863; a son, name and age unrecorded, perhaps Optime, died near Plattenville in December 1863; Adam was born in March 1865; and Abel in August 1866. 

Petit Abram's sixth and youngest son Joseph dit Le Cadet, by second wife Marguerite Flan, was so named to distinguish him from his eldest half-brother Joseph.  Cadet was born probably at Pigiguit in c1752, followed his family to Maryland, was counted with them at Oxford in July 1763, and followed them to Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne LeBlanc and Élisabeth Boudrot, in February 1778.   Cadet died at nearby Ascension in January 1784, age 27.  Only his oldest son seems to have married, and he settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where the family line continued. 

Oldest son Joseph-Thadée, born at Ascension in March 1780, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dugas and Rose Babin, at Ascension in July 1799.  They settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Joseph-Marcellin or Marcellin-Joseph was born at Ascension in May 1800; Donat-Benjamin, called Benjamin, in February 1803; Pierre in October 1805; and Étienne Rosémond in September 1808.  Joseph Thadée died near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in October 1857.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph Thadée died "at age 76 yrs."  He was 77.  His daughter married into the Henry family.   His four sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Joseph-Marcellin or Marcellin-Joseph married Carmelite Rosalie or Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Savoie and Marie Bergeron, at the Plattenville church in September 1819.  Their son François was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1821; Lucien in August 1826; Henry Omer, called Omer and Homere, in July 1834; and Laurent Ferjus, called Ferjus, in August 1836.  Their daughters married into the Dupré, Guidry, Hébert, and Henry families.  Their sons also created their own families on the Lafourche. 

Oldest son François may have married Creole Marie Basilise LeBoeuf.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1841.

Joseph Marcellin's second son Lucien may have married German Creole Honorine Mathilde Hotard in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in August 1852. 

Joseph Marcellin's third son Omer married Elma, Elina, or Helina, daughter of Octave Bouvier and his Acadian wife Delphine Thériot, at the Raceland church in May 1856.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Edgard Amédée was born in February 1858; and Théophile Nickles, probably Nicolas, in April 1858. 

Joseph Marcellin's fourth and youngest son Ferjus "from Terrebonne Parish" married cousin Euzelie or Euselia, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Basile Henry and Madeleine Landry of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1862.  Ferjus died by May 1865, when his widow remarried at Chacahoula to another Landry.  One wonders if Ferjus's death was war-related and if his family line survivied. 

Joseph Thadée's second son Benjamin married cousin Marie Delphine, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Breaux and Adélaïde Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1823.  Their son Joseph Aurelien, called Aurelien, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1826.  Benjamin may have died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in October 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Benjamin died at "age ca. 77 years."  Donat Benjamin would have been age 66.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois, Boutary, Chiasson, and Waguespack families.  His son also created his own family.

Only son Aurelien married Marcelline, daughter of Pierre Destival or Detreval and his Acadian wife Clothilde Foret, at the Thibodaux church in February 1848.  Their son Pierre Joseph Onésime, called Onésime and Onésippe, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1849; and Pierre Oscar, called Oscar, posthumously near Raceland in November 1854.  Aurelien died near Raceland in August 1854.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Aurelien died "at age 28 yrs.," so this probably was him. "Letters of tutorship" for his sons Onésippe and Oscar were filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in May 1857. 

Joseph Thadée's third son Pierre married Mélicère, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bourgeois and Madeleine Thériot, at the Thibodauxville church in June 1832.  Their son Pierre, fils was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1834; Joseph Ernest, called Ernest, in March 1837; Michel Théophile, called Théophile, in October 1841; and Ozémé, perhaps also called Pierre, in October 1844.  A decree of tutorship for his three sons was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in March 1855.  Pierre would have been age 50 that year.   His daughter married into the Babin family.  One of his sons married by 1837. 

Second son Ernest married Félicie Marcelline, called Marcelline, daughter of Joseph Walker and Georgina Brou, at the Raceland church in August 1860.  Their son Joseph Ernest, fils, called Ernest, fils, was born near Raceland in July 1861.  Ernest, père died in October 1862, age 25.  His daughter Marie Alice was born posthumously the following January.  A succession inventory record, listing his two small children, was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in December 1865.  Was Ernest's death war-related? 

Joseph Thadée's fourth and youngest son Étienne Rosémond may have been the Rosémond Landry who married Marie Agnès Corvesier and settled in Lafourche Interior Parish by the early 1850s. 

Cadet's second son Simon le jeune, born at Ascension in April 1782, may have died young. 

Cadet's third and youngest son Jacques-Donat, born at Ascension in December 1783, also may have died young. 

René (c1716-1781) à René le jeune Landry

René, seventh and youngest son of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau and brother of Joseph and Petit Abram, was born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1716.  He married Marie, daughter of Jacques Thériot and his first wife Marie-Marguerite LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in February 1737 and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  Between 1740 and 1753, Marie gave René at least four children, three sons and a daugher.  The British deported most of the family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Their oldest son Pierre, who would have been age 15 in 1755, ended up Virginia, in England in 1756, and in France in 1763.  Meanwhile, in Maryland, Marie gave René two more sons in 1757 and 1760--six children in all.  Colonial officials counted René, now a widower, and four children, three sons and a daughter, at Oxford on the Eastern Shore in July 1763; his second son, who would have been age 15, may have been indentured to another household.  René and his five children, including his second son, emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer on the river.  René remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Landry and Marie-Isabelle Blanchard and widow of Jean-Baptiste Broussard, probably at Cabahannocer in c1769.  She gave him three more sons there--nine children in all by both wives.  Spanish authorities counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same bank at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  They owned three slaves in 1777.  René died at nearby Ascension in June 1781, age 64.  His daughter married into the Melançon and Babin families on the river.  All eight of his sons by both wives survived childhood, and six of them married on the river.  Two remained on the river, but one of the lines there did not survive.  Another created a vigorous line on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Three other sons resettled on the western prairies in the late colonial and early antebellum periods, and two of them created vigorous lines there.  A grandson from France, whom the others had never met, also settled on the river, where he became a shaker and a mover at San Gabriel, later a part of Iberville Parish.  

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Marie Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1740, evidently became separated from his family in the fall of 1755, and the British deported him to Virginia.  Virginia authorities sent him and other exiles on to England the following spring.  He may have been held with relatives at Southampton.  With the family of Jean-Jacques Thériot, his maternal uncle, and hundreds of other exiles in England, Pierre was repatriated to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763.  Pierre settled with his relatives at nearby St.-Servan, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Hébert and Élisabeth LeBlanc, in January 1769.  Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre a son at St.-Servan in 1770.  Pierre died at St.-Servan in December 1772, age 32.  One wonders if his widow remarried.  She did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785, but her Landry son, who would have been only in his mid-teens at the time, did choose to join his father's family in the Spanish colony. 

Only son Pierre-Joseph, born at St.-Servan in January 1770, was raised by his widowed mother and her family.  At age 15, perhaps with the family of his maternal great-uncle Jean-Jacques Thériot, who crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, Pierre-Joseph emigrated to Spanish Louisiana in 1785 and followed his relatives and the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian settlement of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  Like them, he did not remain there.  In the late 1780s or early 1790s, he followed them to San Gabriel on the river south of Baton Rouge, where he came of age.  Pierre-Joseph married cousin Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph-Charles Breaux and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at San Gabriel in June 1790.  Scholastique was a native of Louisiana.  Pierre-Joseph remarried to Marguerite Rosalie, daughter of Swiss surgeon Bernard Capedeville and his second wife Acadian Anne Clouâtre, at St. Gabriel in January 1804.  During the War of 1812, Pierre-Joseph served as captain of the 8th Company, Meriam's Regiment of Louisiana Militia.  After the war, his contemporaries referred to him as Captain.  He also was an artistic woodworker.  He died at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1843, age 73.  A plaque highlighting his life and accomplishments stands in the cemetery behind the old church at St. Gabriel.  His daughters married into the Boush or Bush, Breaux, Capdeville, and Rivière families.  Nine of his 11 sons by both wives also married on the river. 

Oldest son Joseph-Raphaël, called Raphaël, by first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in June 1791, married Joséphine, daughter of Manuel Couillard and Marie Louise Mesinger, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1818.  Their son Julian Raphaël was born near St. Gabriel in January 1819 and died there in February; Damase in December 1819; Jean Timoléon died there at age 14 months in December 1820; Raphaël Florentin was born in St. James Parish in July 1821 but died at age 3 months the following October; Gustave Raphaël in December 1823; and Joseph Raphaël, fils in c1828 but died at age 3 in September 1831.  Joseph Raphaël may have died near St. Gabriel in October 1828.  If so, he would have been age 37.  His daughter married into the Hébert family.  Only one of his sons seems to have created a family of his own. 

Fifth son Gustave Raphaël married Marie Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Dupuy and Hortense Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1849.  

Pierre-Joseph's second son Édouard-Léandre, by first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in December 1792, married Marie Eméranthe, called Eméranthe, daughter of Jean Baptiste Lambremont and Anne Hamilton, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1816.  Their son Eliezer was born near St. Gabriel in September 1816; Jean Baptiste Raphaël in January 1818; a son, name unrecorded, died a newborn in December 1823; Ulger was born in c1825 or 1826 but died there at age 15 or 16 in August 1841; and Valmond was born in August 1829.  Their daughters married into the Gautreaux, Landry, and Trosclair families.  Only one of his five sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Eliezer married Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dupuy and Serasine Orillion, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1849.  Their son Joseph Alonzo was born near St. Gabriel in September 1852. 

Pierre-Joseph's third son Florentin, by first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in February 1795, married Marie Céleste Alethe, daughter of fellow Acadians Armand Hébert and Marie Boudreaux and widow of Louis Mathieu Boissac, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1824.  Their son Florentin, fils was born near St. Gabriel in August 1825 but died there at age 12 in August 1837.  Did this family line survive? 

Pierre-Joseph's fourth son Lazare, also called Azarie, Azary, and Azory, from first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in August 1798, married Marie Céline or Célestine, another daughter of Jean Baptiste Lambremont and Anne Hamilton, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in January 1823.  Their son Pierre Augustin was born near St. Gabriel in April 1825; Joseph Newville or Neuville, called Neuviille, in October 1826; Hermogène in c1829; Jean Diogène, called Diogène, a twin, in March 1835; and Paul Théodore, Diogène's twin, died at age 11 months in February 1836.  They also had an older son named Gustave.  Lazare died near St. Gabriel in September 1835.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Cezary, as he called him, died at "age 38 years."  Lazare would have been age 37, so this probably was him.  His daughter married into the Allain family.  Three of his six sons married by 1870. 

Second son Neuville may have married Joséphine Marquette.  Their son Numa was born in Iberville Parish in June 1852 but died at age 1 in June 1853.  Joseph Neuville died in Iberville Parish in December 1854, age 28.  His line of the family probably died with him. 

Lazare's third son Gustave married Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Victorin Allain, père and Aimée Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1849.  Their son Joseph Azarie was born in Iberville Parish in February 1856, Joseph Charles in March 1866, and Gustave Ignace in February 1868. 

Lazare's fourth son Hermogène died near there in November 1847, age 18.  He probably did not marry.  He was buried in St. Raphaël Cemetery on the west bank of the river. 

Lazare's fifth son Diogène married Marie Alisia, Aloisa, Aloisia, or Aloysia, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Richard and Laurence Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1855.  Their son Simon Hermogène was born near St. Gabriel in June 1856, and twins Paul Neuville and Vincent Théodore in July 1864.  They were living near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in the late 1860s.

Pierre-Joseph's fifth son Pierre, by first wife Scholastique Breaux, born at Ascension in January 1802, died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in April 1826, age 25.  He probably did not marry. 

Pierre Joseph's sixth son Jean Esilippe or Eshinte, by second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born near St. Gabriel in November 1804, died near there in September 1823, age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Pierre Joseph's seventh son Lucien, by second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born in Iberville Parish in May 1808, married Marie Madeleine Delphine, also called Mary Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Élie LeBlanc and Victoire Chiasson, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1839.  They settled near Plaquemine on the west bank of the river in Iberville Parish.  Their son Joseph Lucien was born probably at Plaquemine in January 1840 but died there the following August; Théophile was born in February 1842; Élie Murat, called Murat, in May 1843; Armand in March 1848; Octave in August 1851; Romain Nemour in August 1856; and Prevost in September 1859.  Their daughter married into the Bernard family.  None of Lucien's many sons married by 1870.  At least two of them served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.

During the War of 1861-65, second son Théophile served in Company A of the 1st Louisiana Regiment Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Théophile, who enlisted in the company in August 1861, was captured near Somerset, Kentucky, in March 1863 and sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Kentucky and Maryland before he was exchanged in Virginia in late April.  The following July, he was wounded near Richmond, Kentucky, and left on the field.  He again spent time in Federal prison camps in Kentucky, Ohio, and Illinois until he was exchanged again, in March 1865, so he survived the war. 

During the War of 1861-65, Lucien's third son Murat served in Companies E and I of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  He enlisted in the regiment at Plaquemine in March 1862 and was present with his unit until July 1864, when a wound sent him to a hospital, no place recorded.  One wonders if he survived the war. 

Pierre Joseph's eighth son Eugène, by second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born in Iberville Parish in June 1810, married Marguerite Adrienne, called Adrienne, daughter fellow Acadians Jean Élie Hébert and Marguerite LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in August 1835.  They settled on the west side of the river along Bayou Maringouin, at the eastern edge of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Their son Eugène, fils was born in Iberville Parish in August 1836; Césaire in June 1838; Luc Valaze or Valazin in November 1841; and Joseph Aristide in December 1843 but died there at age 10 1/2 in June 1854.  At least two of his sons married by 1870. 

Second son Césaire married Marie Cordelia, daughter of Jacques Trosclair and Joséphine Seguinot, at the Plaquemine church in January 1869. 

Eugène's third son Luc married Ermance, daughter of Charles F. Lefeaux and Félice Hotard, at the Plaquemine church in February 1869. 

Pierre Joseph's ninth son Benjamin Achille, called Achille, from second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born in Iberville Parish in March 1812, married cousin Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Landry and his Creole wife Rosalie Hamilton, at the St. Gabriel church in August 1833.  Their son Théodore Erval died near St. Gabriel, age 1 month, in October 1834.  Benjamin Achille remarried to Ada Cécile Pauline or Pauline Cécile, also called Marie Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Breaux and Marie Joséphe Henry, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1836.  Their son Joseph Amédée, called Amédée, was born near St. Gabriel in October 1837; Volney Grégoire or Grégoire Volney in May 1842; and Pierre Mazaire in July 1847.  They also had an older son named Florian T.  Benjamin Achille died near St. Gabriel in October 1854, age 42.  Three of his five sons married by 1870, and at least three of them served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65. 

During the War of 1861-65, second son Florian T., by second wife Marie Pauline Breaux, probably was the F. T. Landry who served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Florian enlisted at Bayou Goula, Iberville Parish, in May 1861, served for a time as clerk in the Adjutant General's office, so he was educated, was captured with his unit at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863, and joined other members of his company in a parolee camp at Enterprise, Mississippi.  With other paroled men from the 3rd Louisiana Infantry, he served in Company H of the 22nd Consolidated Regiment Louisiana Infantry, which was organized at Enterprise in January 1764 from remnants of several Louisiana regiments and fought in the Mobile area.  Florian T. did not surrender with the regiment at Meridian, Mississippi, on 8 May 1865 but was paroled at Jackson, Mississippi, on May 19.  Back at home, he married Marie Marcelline, called Marcelline, daughter of Adonis Petit and Eulalie Emma Gaiennie, at the Plaquemine church in June 1866.  Their son Benjamin Alcée was born near Plaquemine in March 1867. 

Benjamin Achille's third son Amédée, by second wife Marie Pauline Breaux, born near St. Gabriel in October 1837, married Marie Louise Eléonide, daughter of Joseph Besson and his Acadian wife Célestine Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1867.  Their son Henry was born in Iberville Parish in December 1869. 

During the War of 1861-65, Benjamin Achille's fourth son, called Volney H. in Confederate records, from second wife Marie Pauline Breaux, served in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Volney enlisted at Camp Schlatre, Louisiana, in August 1861, age 19, but he did not serve out the war with his regiment.  In the summer of 1862, when his regiment was in eastern Tennessee, he was discharged from the service, probably for medical reasons, and went home.  He married Henrietta, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Eugènie LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in October 1865.  Their son Joseph Benjamin was born in Iberville Parish in June 1866. 

Benjamin Achille's fifth and youngest son Pierre Mazaire, by second wife Marie Pauline Breaux, may have been the P. M. Landry who, along with an uncle and first cousin, served in the Independent Rangers of Iberville Squadron Militia Cavalry, which never left the area, and who also served in the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in Louisiana.  He did not marry by 1870. 

Pierre Joseph's tenth son Louis Onésime, called Onésime, from second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born in Iberville Parish in August 1817, married, at age 32, Joséphine, daughter of Alexandre Hotard and Euphémie Loriot, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1850.  Their son J. Montéléon died in Iberville Parish, age 16 months, in September 1852; Jean Aramis was born in December 1852 but died at age 4 1/2 in August 1857; twins Alexandre Athos and Pierre Pathos were born in May 1855 but Alexandre Athos died at age 1 in August 1856; and André Ascanio was born in December 1856 but died the following July.   

Pierre Joseph's eleventh and youngest son Magloire, by second wife Marguerite Rosalie Capdeville, born in Iberville Parish in October 1820, married Marie Dulcinée, daughter of Pierre Michel Lambremont and his Acadian wife Marie Louise Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church in July 1843.  Their son Pierre Misael was born in Iberville Parish in March 1844; Joseph Alonzo in January 1849; and Gille in c1850 but died there at age 4 in October 1854.  Their daughter married a Breaux cousin.  Magloire remarried to Marie Elena, Eline, or Elina, daughter of fellow Acadian Dorville Breaux and his Creole wife Sophie Boush, at the Plaquemine church in August 1854.  They settled at Bayou Goula on the west bank of the river.  Their son Magloire Raphaël, called Raphaël, born probably near Bayou Goula in April 1855 died at age 3 1/2 in October 1858 and was buried in St. Raphaël Cemetery near Bayou Goula; and Joseph Aristide was born in June 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Magloire probably was the Magloin Landry who served in the Independent Rangers of Iberville Squadron Militia Cavalry, which never left the area.  He would have been in his 40s at the time of his service.

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Pierre Misael, by fiirst wife Marie Dulcinée Lambremont, may have been the Mizael Landry who, along with his father and a first cousin, served in the Independent Rangers of Iberville Squadron Militia Cavalry.  Pierre Misael did not marry by 1870.

René's second son Marin, by first wife Marie Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit in c1748, followed his family to Maryland and Cabahannocer, where he married cousin Pélagie Landry in c1770.  Marin died in St. James Parish in October 1812.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Marin was "age about 68 yrs." when he died, but he was closer to 64.  Their daughters married into the Gautreaux, Godin, Hébert, and Melançon families.  Two of his sons married and created families of their own in St. James Parish.  One of his grandsons moved to the western prairies, but the others remained on the old Acadian Coast. 

Oldest son Donat, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1779, married Marie-Marthe, called Marthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Lanoux and Catherine LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in May 1800.  Their son Éloi Framentin was born at St. James in September 1806 but died near Convent, St. James Parish, age 12 1/2, in April 1819; a son, name and age unrecorded, died in March 1807; Augustin dit Doradou or Douradour was born in c1810; Arsène near Convent in December 1819 but died at age 8 months in September 1820; Donat, fils was born in July 1823; and Pierre Vileor, called Vileor, in August 1825 but died at age 12 1/2 in March 1838.  Donat died near Convent in July 1835, age 56.  His daughters married into the Bourg, Gravois, Lanoux, LeBlanc, Peytavin, and Richard families.  Two of his sons also created their own families. 

Third son Augustin dit Doradou married Marie Phelonise, called Phelonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Marguerite Poirier, at the Convent church in September 1829.  Augustin died near Convent in June 1833, age 23.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois, Melançon, and Mire families.  Did he father any sons? 

Donat's fifth son Donat, fils married Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Richard and Madeleine Arceneaux, at the Convent church in January 1845.  Their son Donat III was born near Convent in December 1845; and Martin Benjamin, called Ben, in July 1847.  Donat, fils died near Convent in June 1850, age 26.  His daughter married into the Bourque family.  Both of his sons also created their own families. 

Older son Donat III married Sally Ann, also called Célene, Rochell or Rochelle at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1869.  Their son Pierre William was born in Ascension Parish in May 1870. 

Donat, fils's younger son Ben married first cousin Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Amédée Bourque and Célestine Landry, at the Convent church in April 1867; Estelle's mother was Ben's paternal aunt, so the couple had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Marin's second son Éloi, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1783, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Melançon and Marie LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques de Cabahanncoer in December 1801.  Their son Éloi, fils, also called Éloi Marin, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in January 1808; and Narcisse Marin in St. James Parish in January 1819 but died at age 13 in September 1832.  Éloi, père died in St. James Parish in February 1823, age 40.  His daughters married into the Babin, Boudreaux, LeBlanc, and Melançon families.  His surviving son married twice to cousins and moved to the western prairies in the 1830s. 

Older son Éloi, fils married cousin Madeleine Mathilde, called Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Theriot and Madeleine Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1829; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Éloi, fils remarried to cousin Marie Bathilde or Bertille, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Landry and Madeleine Brasseaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1835.  They remained in Lafayette Parish.  Their daughters married into the Guidry and Sonnier families.  Except for its blood, one wonders if this family line endured.    

Marin's third and youngest son Valentin-Marin, born at Cabahannocer in February 1790, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in November 1840.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Valentin died at "age 51 yrs.," so this probably was him.  Did he marry? 

René's third son Olivier, by first wife Marie Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit in c1743, followed his family to Maryland and to Cabahannocer.  He married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Hébert and Marie-Josèphe Melançon, at Ascension in February 1775.  They lived near the boundary between the Ascension and San-Gabriel districts before moving to the Attakapas District in the 1780s, where they settled at Côte Gelée in present-day Lafayette Parish.  In the 1810s, Olivier "claimed land on Bayou Tortue, West of St. Martinville."  Olivier's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in July 1823.  He would have been age 70 that year.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Landry, and Missonnier families.  Six of his eight sons also created their own families on the prairies.

Oldest son Alexandre, born at either San Gabriel or Ascension in the late 1770s, followed his family to the western prairies and married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Blaise Brasseaux and Anne Préjean, at Opelousas in February 1801.  Their son, name unrecorded, died probably at Côte Gelée soon after his birth in February 1802; Alexandre, fils was born in August 1806 but died at age 5 months the following January; Achille Alexandre, called Alexandre, fils, was born in July 1808; Henri in November 1810; and Jean Euclide, also called Jean Baptiste Duclise, in July 1818.  Alexandre, père's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in October 1819.  He would have been in his late 40s that year.  His daughters married into the Duhon, Landry, and Sonnier families.  Two of his sons also created their own families. 

Third son Achille Alexandre married cousin Elisa or Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Fabien Landry and Beatrice Granger, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1831.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Their son Alexandre III was born in April 1832; Euclide in September 1833; Martin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months, in May 1836 but died at age 6 1/2 in September 1842; Oculi was born in January 1838; Victor in March 1840; Norbert le jeune in April 1842; Jacques Dupré in November 1848; Nicolas in April 1851; and Hippolyte in February 1854.  Their daughter married into the Bonin family.  Three of Achille Alexandre's nine sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Alexandre III may have married fellow Acadian Eliza Granger and settled near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, by the mid-1850s.

Achille Alexandre's second son Euclide married cousin Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Comeaux and Marguerite Granger, at the Vermilionville church in May 1854.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Ulysse was born in March 1860, and Styva in August 1864. 

Achille Alexandre's fourth son Victor married cousin Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Marie Azélie Comeaux, at the Youngsville church in December 1860.  Their son Alexandre le jeune was born near Youngsville in October 1861.  A succession record for Victor Landry was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in January 1869.  If this was his succession, he would have been age 29 that year. 

Alexandre, père's fifth and youngest son Jean Baptiste Duclise married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Comeaux and Marie Eugènie LeBlanc, at the Vermilionville church in August 1836.  Their son Armasa was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1837; Lucas in July 1842; Jean Baptiste, fils in May 1845; and Charles in January 1850.  Jean Baptiste Duclise's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in May 1854.  The parish clerk who recorded the document noted that Azélie Comeaux was "now remarried to Éloi Comeaux," so Jean Baptiste Duclise died probably in his early or mid-30s.  His daughters married into the Comeaux and Langlinais families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Fourth son Charles married Alice, daughter of fellow Acadians Dupré Guidry and Azélia Bernard, at the Vermilionville church in April 1870. 

Olivier's second son Edmond-Michel, born at either San Gabriel or Ascension in the late 1770s, followed his family to the western prairies and married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Girouard and Marguerite Cormier of Côte Gelée, at Attakapas in December 1801.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Their son Edmond, fils was born in September 1811; Albert in November 1812; Urbin in January 1819; Norbert in November 1820; and Norval or Norwall in October 1823 but died at age 7 1/2 in August 1831.  Edmond's succession record (the recording clerk called him Armand) was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1828.  He would have been in his late 40s or early 50s that year.  His daughter married into the Comeaux family.  Only one of his sons seems to have created a family of his own.

Oldest son Edmond, fils died in Lafayette Parish in February 1834, age 22.  He probably did not marry. 

Edmond Michel's fourth son Norbert married cousin Marie Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond Landry and Carmelite Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church in May 1841.  Their son Rosémond was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1851, and Albert in February 1864.  They also had an older son named Edmond.  Their daughters married into the Bernard and Langlinais families.  One of Norbert's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Edmond married double cousin Louise or Louisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Duclise Comeaux and Élodie Landry, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1867.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Lucien was born in September 1867. 

Olivier's third son Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, fils, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in December 1779, married Catherine Julienne, called Julienne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breaux and Catherine Arceneaux of Cabahannocer and Beaubassin near Carencro, at Attakapas in May 1805.  Their son Joseph-Achille, called Achille, was born at Beaubassin in March 1806 but died at age 1 in January 1807; Nicolas was born at Côte Gelée in January 1808; François Venance, called Venance, in March 1813; Zenon Alphanor near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1821; Gérard in Lafayette Parish in February 1824; Olivier Fulbert, called Fulbert and also Philibert, in April 1827; and Victor Thiburse was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in June 1830.  Olivier, fils's succession record may have been filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September 1860.  If this was him, he would have been in his early 80s that year.  His daughter married into the Comeaux family.  Five of his seven sons created their own families. 

Second son Nicolas Landry's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1843.  This Nicholas would have been age 35 that year.  Did he marry? 

Pierre Olivier's third son François Venance married Mélanie, daughter of Pierre Paul Montet and his Acadian wife Adélaïde Duhon, at the Vermilionville church in January 1835.  François Venance remarried to Carmelite, daughter of Olivier Blanchet and Carmelite Boudreaux and widow of Don Louis Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in April 1850.  They settled on the lower Vermilion River.  Their son Olivier Alcide was born in May 1852; a son, name unrecorded, died at birth in May 1855; Ovile Eustache was born in September 1857; and François, fils in February 1859.  François Venance's succession record was filed at the Abbeville courthouse, Vermilion Parish, in 1859.  He would have been age 46 that year. 

Oldest son Olivier Alcide, by second wife Carmelite Blanchet, may have died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in December 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Olivier died "at age 14 yrs.," but Olivier Alcide would have been age 16 1/2. 

Pierre Olivier's fourth son Zenon married cousin Oliva or Olida, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Valmont Comeaux and Eugènie Landry, at the Vermilionville church in April 1841.  Their son Pierre Olivier, called Olivier, was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1842; Joseph Numa in March 1850; Alexandre in April 1853; and Augustin in May 1855.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Olivier married double cousin Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Azélie Comeaux, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1868. 

Pierre Olivier's fifth son Gérard married Mélanie, also called Hélène, 20-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Olidon Broussard and Victoire Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in December 1844.  Their son Gérard Hasard was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1859.  Gérard, at age 42, remarried to Donatille, daughter of fellow Acadians Paulin Broussard and Célestine Broussard, at the Youngsville church in January 1866.  Their son Paulin was born near Youngsville in April 1868. 

Pierre Olivier's sixth son Fulbert/Philibert married cousin Elisa, also called Zillia, Ezilda, Esilda, and Azilda, another daughter of Pierre Valmont Comeaux and Eugènie Landry, at the Vermilionville church in July 1850.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Adolphe was born in August 1852, Pierre Marcel in March 1855, Louis Turbert in March 1858, Arthur in May 1860 but died at age 7 1/2 (the recording priest said 5) in September 1868, and Nicolas was born in February 1867. 

Pierre Olivier's seventh and youngest son Victor Thiburse, at age 19, was granted his emancipation in Lafayette Parish in December 1849 and married fellow Acadian Orliska or Auriska Broussard soon after.  Their son Louis Sevigne was born near Abbeville in September 1853; and Honoré Victor in October 1857.  A succession record for Victor Landry was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1869.  If this was his, he would have been age 39 that year. 

Olivier, père's fourth son Jean-Henri, called Henri, born at Ascension in March 1781, married Marie-Louise, called Louise or Lise, daughter of François Begnaud and his Acadian wife Honorine Doiron of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1808.  Their son Émilien, a twin, was born at La Pointe on upper Bayou Teche in December 1812; Jean Terville, called Terville, in October 1814; Émile Christophe in September 1816; and Hippolyte in November 1818.  Henri died in Lafayette Parish in November 1832, age 51.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1833.  His daughters married into the Bernard, Guidry, and Landry families.  Three of his four sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Émilien married cousin Marie Uranie, called Uranie, daughter of fellow Acadians Célestin Prejean and Marie Marcellite Landry of Lafayette Parish, at the Vermilionville church in February 1834.  Their son Charles Numa was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1837 but died at age 10 months the following July, Alcide was born in December 1846, and Henry in July 1849.  Their daughters married into the Billeaud, Doucet, and Pellerin families. 

Henri's second son Terville married Marie Irma or Isaurre, daughter of Raphaël Segura and Marie Carmelite Romero, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1842.  Their son Émile Alphonse, called Alphonse, was born near New Iberia in February 1843; Albert in December 1850; and Lucien Homere, a twin, in February 1853.  Terville remarried to Marie or Marguerite Aurelia, called Aurelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Hubert Theriot, fils and his Creole wife Marie Rosalie Romero, at the New Iberia church in September 1855.  Their son Joseph Terville was born near New Iberia in April 1862.  Terville died near New Iberia in May 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Terville died "at age 55 yrs."  He was five months shy of that age.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Alphones, by first wife Marie Irma Segura, married cousin Clara, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Duclise Comeaux and Éloidie Landry, at the Youngsville church in November 1866.  They were living near New Iberia in 1870. 

A succession record for Henri's third son Émile Christophe was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1866.  The succession said that Émile Christophe was married to Lise Begueneau, but it likely meant he was a child of hers.  Christophe would have been age 50 that year.  Did he marry? 

Henri's fourth and youngest son Hippolyte married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of Nicolas Valleau, Valleaux, Valot, or Vallot and his Acadian wife Marie Cormier, at the Vermilionville church in September 1837.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Their son Erneste was born in November 1838; Ovide in December 1841 but died the following July; Jean Dupré, perhaps called Dupré, was born in February 1844; Joseph in September 1846; and Edmund in November 1854.  They also had a son named Estinville or Stainville.  Their daughters married into the Fabre and Landry families.  Two of Hippolyte's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Estinville/Stainville married Nercide, Nerèide, or Nesèide, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Duhon and Euphémie Prejean, at the Youngsville church in December 1865.

Hippolyte's fourth son Dupré may have married cousin Mathilde Landry in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1868. 

Olivier, père's fifth son Fabien, born at Ascension or Attakapas in the early 1780s, married Anne Beatrice, called Beatrice, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Granger and Susanne Cormier of Côte Gélée, at the St. Martinville church in December 1810.  Their son Clet or Clette was born at Côte Gelée in June 1815, twins Eugène and Théogène in September 1822, and Symphorien in November 1824.  Fabien died in Lafayette Parish in August 1843.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Fabien died "at age 62 yrs."  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following February.  Two of his four sons created families of their own and remained in Lafayette Parish. 

Oldest son Clet married cousin Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Landry and Adélaïde Giroir, at the Vermilionville church in May 1835.  Their son Jean Adéol, called Adéol, was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1839; Fabien in February 1844; Émile Clevence in November 1853; Joseph Alphée in February 1858; and Symphorien in August 1860.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Girouard families.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Adéol married Clara, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard LeBlanc and his Creole wife Séraphine Iréné Roy, at the Youngsville church in December 1868.  Their son Joseph Avery was born near Youngsville in December 1869. 

Fabien's twin son Théogène died in Lafayette Parish in November 1842, age 20.  He probably did not marry. 

Fabien's twin son Eugène died in Lafayette Parish in December 1842, age 20, only a couple of weeks after his twin Théogène died.  He, too, probably did not marry. 

Fabien's fourth and youngest son Symphorien married cousin Estelle Advina or Vina, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Anastasie Girouard, at the Vermilionville church in April 1845.  Their son Alcide Cyprien was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1847, Valérien in October 1850, and Charles in May 1852.  Their daughter married into the Bonin family. 

Oldest son Alcide Cyprien died in Lafayette Parish in December 1868, age 21.  He probably did not marry. 

Olivier, père's sixth son Raphaël, born probably at Attakapas in January 1786, married Adèle, another daughter of François Begnaud and Honorine Doiron, at the St. Martinville church in November 1816.  Their son Noël Charles, perhaps called Charles, was born in St. Martin Parish in December 1822.  Raphaël's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in June 1860.  He would have been age 74 that year.  His daughters married into the Bourdier, Gautreaux, and Guchereaux families.  His son also seems to have created his own family.

Only son Charles may have married fellow Acadian Sismène Broussard by the early 1850s and settled in St. Martin Parish.

Olivier, père's seventh son Michel-Simon, baptized at Attakapas, age 3 months, in September 1787, may have died young. 

Olivier, père's eighth and youngest son Louis, born at Attakapas in November 1788, died in Lafayette Parish in October 1828.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis died "at age about 30 years," but he was 40.  He probably did not marry. 

René's fourth son Joseph dit Dios, by first wife Marie Thériot, born probably in Maryland in c1757, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana in 1766 and settled with them at Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Melançon and his first wife Osite Dupuis, in October 1789.  They lived for a time at nearby Ascension before moving to the western prairies during the early 1790s.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Joseph dit Dios died in Lafayette Parish "at 5:00 p.m." in August 1827, "at age about 70 years."  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following month and another at the same courthouse in February 1830.  His daughters married into the Bernard and Boudreaux families.  Seven of his eight sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Célestin, born at Ascension on the river in c1790, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Granger and Susanne Cormier of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1810.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Their son, name unrecorded, died at birth in January 1817.  Célestin died in Lafayette Parish in December 1837, age 48.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January.  His daughters married into the Duhon, Guidry, Hébert, and Meaux families.  His line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

Dios's second son Éloi-Joseph or -Jean, also called Éloi-Gilles, baptized at Attakapas, age 4 months, in April 1795, married Madeleine Adélaïde or Cidalise, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Babin and Anne Duhon, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in July 1817, but they settled on the prairies.  Their son Norbert was born on the Vermilion in February 1820; Théodule was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 14 months, in June 1828; and Terence at age 2 1/2 months in January 1830.  Their daughter married into Bernard family.  Evidently none of their sons, if they were still living, married by 1870. 

Dios's third son, name unrecorded, died at Attakapas five days after his birth in January 1797.

Dios's fourth son Rosémond, born at Attakapas in June 1798, married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Comeaux and Rosalie Prejean of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church in June 1821.  Their son Clément, Clémine, or Clémile Rosémond, also called Rosémond Clémile, was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1824; Charles Numa, called Numa, in January 1826 but died at age 11 1/2 in August 1837; and Jean Baptiste Désiré, called Baptiste Désiré and Désiré, was born in December 1827.  Rosémond, père died in Lafayette Parish in August 1837, age 39.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1838.  His daughters married Landry cousins.  Two of his sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Rosémond Clémile married cousin Marie Irma, called Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Don Louis Bernard and Carmelite Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1849.  Their son Charles Numa le jeune was born in May 1853, and Arthur in February 1855.  Their daughter married into the Bonin family.  Rosémond Clémile remarried to Félicia, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Zéphirin Doucet and Adeline Breaux, at the Vermilionville church in February 1866. 

Rosémond's third and youngest son Jean Baptiste Désiré married first cousin Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Estinville Landry and Marie Marcellite Landry, his uncle and aunt, at the Vermilionville church in December 1851.  Their son Alcée was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1853, and Joseph Arthur in February 1865.  Jean Baptiste Désiré's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1868.  He would have been age 41 that year.  Emma remarried into the Billaud family in Lafayette Parish in April 1869. 

Dios's fifth son Maximilien, born at Attakapas in May 1800, married, at age 50, Marie, also called Anne, daughter of Creole Alexis Bertrand, père and his Acadian wife Marguerite Clémence Richard, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1850; they evidently had been living together for years.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1851.  They also had a much older son named Maximilien, fils.  Maximilien, père died by April 1858, when he was listed as deceased in a son's marriage record.  Maximilien, père's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August 1858.  He would have been age 58 that year.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Older son Maximilien, fils married cousin Azélia, also called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Landry and his Creole wife Geneviève Baudin, at the Vermilionville church in April 1858.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Octave was born in December 1859. 

Dios's sixth son Ursin, born at Côte Gelée in December 1804, married Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Constance Mire, at the Vermilionville church in May 1830.  Their son Émile Ursin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in April 1834; Alexandre at age 3 months in August 1836; Charles at age 4 months in July 1839 but may have died at age 11 1/2 in January 1851; and Sosthène dit Anastase was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1841.  Three of Ursin's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Émile Ursin married Marie Émilie, called Émilie or Amelia, daughter of Léon Montet and his Acadian wife Divine Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in February 1855.  Émile Ursin's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1868.  He would have been age 34 that year.  Did he father any children?   

Ursin's second son Alexandre married Marie Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Comeaux and his Creole wife Marguerite Emelina Bonin, at the Vermilionville church in April 1856.  Their son Éloi was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1858; Ursin le jeune in October 1860; and Gaston near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1865. 

Ursin's fourth and youngest son Sosthène married cousin Olymphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Zenon Landry and Oliva Comeaux, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in July 1865.  Their son Ulysse Bernard was born near Youngsville in August 1867, and Arthur in June 1869. 

Dios's seventh son Joseph Estenville, Estinville, Justinville, Stenville, or Stainville, born at Côte Gelée in February 1807, married cousin Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Henri Landry and his Creole wife Lise Begnaud, at the Vermilionville church in May 1827.  Their son Neuville was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1830; Joseph Clémile or Clerville in August 1831; Hema was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in August 1833; Jean Darman, Darmase, Darmas, or Dermas at age 4 months in April 1835; Julien was born in January 1840; and Désiré in June 1843.  Marcellite died in Lafayette Parish in March 1861, age 45.  Her succession record, calling her Marie, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1866.  Her and Estenville's daughter married into Billaud and Landry families, including to a first cousin.  Five of her and Estenville's sons also created their own families.  Two of them married sisters, and most, if not all, of them married cousins. 

Oldest son Neuville married first cousin Madeleine Emma, called Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond Landry and Marie Carmelite Comeaux, his uncle and aunt, at the Vermilionville church in February 1851.  Emma died in Lafayette Parish in March 1855, age 25.  Neuville remarried to cousin Adèle, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Robichaux and his Creole wife Azélie Begnaud, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in December 1857; strangely, the marriage record notes that Adèle was "born a Broussard."  Their son Thomas Henry was born near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in July 1861.

Estenville's second son Joseph Clémile married cousin Marie Erasie or Eurasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Hilaire Bernard and Marie Arthémise Landry, at the Vermilionville church in February 1855.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Valérien was born in December 1855, and Joseph Félix in March 1865. 

Estenville's fourth son Darmas married cousin Adélaïde Louise or Louisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Désiré Comeaux and Céleste Célanie Landry, at the Vermilionville church in February 1854.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son André Eraste was born in November 1859; Emérite, perhaps a son, in December 1863; and Désiré in July 1866. 

Estenville's fifth son Julien married Creole Anne Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, Montet at the Vermilionville church in January 1860.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Julien, fils was born in June 1864. 

Estenville's sixth and youngest son Désiré married cousin Marie Elisa or Eliza, another daughter of Hilaire Bernard and Marie Arthémise Landry, at the Youngsville church in November 1860; the marriage also was recorded at the Vermilionville church.  Their son Edgar was born near Youngsville in September 1861, Romain in August 1866 but died at age 1 in August 1867, Lucius Roch was born in August 1868, and Jean Clémile in December 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Désiré served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  As the birth of his sons indicate, he survived the war. 

Dios's eighth and youngest son Onésime, born at Côte Gelée in October 1810, married cousin Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Agricole Landry and Christine Labauve, at the Vermilionville church in April 1827.  Their son Clairville or Clerville was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1828; Jules in February 1832; Ursin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 11 months, in August 1834; Édouard at age 7 months in August 1836 but died at age 6 1/2 in September 1842; and Joseph was born in Lafayette Parish July 1845.  They were living near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in the late 1840s.  Onésime died in Lafayette Parish in August 1861.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Onésime died "at age 52 yrs.," but he was two months shy of 51.  His daughter married into the Mouton family.  Three of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Clairville likely married cousin Celima, Celiva, Seliva, Olivia, or Oliva Landry.  Their son Euphémon was born near Abbeville in April 1848; Maximilien le jeune in December 1855; Onésime le jeune near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1861; Jules near Church Point in June 1863; Eraste in May 1867; and Ophelias near Abbeville in February 1870.  A succession record for Clairville Landry was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in May 1866.  This Clairville would have been age 38 that year.  If this was him, the birth date of two of his sons hints that it probably was not a post-mortem succession.  His daughter married into the Sanchez family. 

Onésime's second son Ursin le jeune married cousin Suzanne Onesia, called Onesia, daughter of fellow Acadian Gédéon Landry and his Creole wife Anne Lormand, at the Vermilionville church in December 1854.  Their son Valérien was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in March 1858; Séverin near Abbeville in July 1862; Demos near New Iberia in March 1865; and Rodolphe in April 1870. 

Onésime's fifth and youngest son Joseph married Émilie or Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ferdinand Trahan and Aspasie Boudreaux, at the Youngsville church in July 1866.  They were living near Abbeville in 1870. 

René's fifth son Firmin, by first wife Marie Thériot, born probably in Maryland in c1760, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana in 1766 and settled with them at Cabahannocer.  He married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Vincent-Ephrem Babin and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Ascension in July 1789.  Their daughters married into the Broussard, Gautreaux, and Villeneuve families.  Firmin remarried to Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and his second wife Marie Trahan, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in August 1795.  Marie-Anne had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  One of his sons settled in St. James and another in Ascension Parish.

Oldest son Firmin, fils, by second wife Anne LeBlanc, born at Ascension in June 1798, evidently died young.

Firmin, père's second son, another Firmin, fils, by second wife Anne LeBlanc, born on the river in January 1801, married Tarsile, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Melançon and Marie Louise Lanoux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1820.  Their son Firmin III was born near Convent in July 1822 but died at age 3 in September 1825, and Louis Valière was born in October 1824 but died at age 6 1/2 in July 1831.  One wonders if the family line endured.

Firmin, père's third and youngest son Raphaël Auguste or Auguste Raphaël, also called Auguste Firmin, born on the river in March 1804, married cousin Adélaïde, Adeline, or Audelitte, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Raphaël Babin and Marguerite Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1825.  Their son Jean Raphaël was born in Ascension Parish in January 1832, and Pierre Lavigne in September 1833.  Raphaël Auguste died in Ascension Parish in October 1837, age 33.  His daughters married into the Bourque, Braud, and Parent families.  Neither of his sons married by 1870. 

René's sixth son Pierre, by second wife Anne Landry, born at Ascension in c1768, died at San Gabriel in March 1798, age 30.  He probably did not marry. 

René's seventh son Valentin, by second wife Anne Landry, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1771, married Célestine or Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourgeois and Marie Giroir, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in November 1792.  In the 1810s, they moved to Grande Pointe on upper Bayou Teche.  Their daughters married into the Begnaud, Bourgeois, Breaux, Sonnier, and Thibodeaux families.  Valentin, at age 52, remarried to Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dupuis and Marie Poirier and widow of Jean Charles Guilbeau, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1823.  Valentin, père died "in the morning ... at his home on Bayou Teche" in September 1823. The priest who recorded his burial said that Valentin was "age about 56 yrs." when he died, but he was closer to 52.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville Parish courthouse 10 days after his death.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own.

Oldest son Valentin, fils, by first wife Célestine Bourgeois, born at Cabahannocer in January 1786, died "at the home of Éstienne Bourgeois at la pointe," St. Martin Parish, in April 1824.  The priest who recorded Valentin, fils's burial said that he was "age about 30 years" when he died, but he was 38.  He probably did not marry. 

Valentin's second son Adélard, by first wife Célestine Bourgeois, born at Cabahannocer in January 1800, may have died young. 

Valentin's third son Léon or Léonard Valentin, by first wife Célestine Bourgeois, born at Cabahannocer in January 1803, married Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin dit Ephrem Robichaux and Marie Anne Surette, at the St. Martinville church in May 1828.  Their son Clairville was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 5 months, in August 1834.  Léon died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in March 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Léon died "at age 65 yrs."  His daughters married into the Frederic, Pourciau, Quebedeaux, and Savoy families.  If his son was still living, he did not marry by 1870. 

Valentin's fourth and youngest son, name and age unrecorded, from first wife Célestine Bourgeois, died in St. James Parish, an infant, in November 1811. 

René's eighth and youngest son Pierre-Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Anne Landry, born at Ascension in February 1773, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Breaux and Madeleine Clouâtre, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in January 1797.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.

François (c1711-1797) à René le jeune Landry

François, third and youngest son of Pierre Landry and Madeleine Broussard, born probably at Pigiguit in c1711, married Dorothée, daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite Melanson, at Grand-Pré in November 1731.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1750, Dorothée gave François three children, a daughter and two sons.  Other records give them another daughter.  The British deported the family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials may have counted François, now a widower, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  He emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 with three unmarried children, two sons and a daughter, and settled at Cabahannocer.  François did not remarry.  He died at nearby Ascension in February 1797, in his mid-80s.  His older daughter had married into the Trahan family at Minas and did not go to Louisiana.  His younger daughter married a Landry cousin probably at Cabahannocer.  His two sons married at Cabahannocer, and the younger one moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Both created vigorous family lines. 

Older son François, fils, born probably at Pigiguit in c1741, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his widowed father and younger siblings to Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Rose, called Rose or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Dugas and Marie-Charlotte Godin, in the early 1770s.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1777.  They owned a slave there in 1779.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Landry, LeBlanc, Savoie, and Simoneaux families.  François, fils's son settled in Ascension Parish, married twice, and had several sons of his own.  One of François's grandsons moved down into the Bayou Lafourche valley, but the others remained on the river.

Only son Édouard, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1773, married cousin Henriette or Marie Élise, called Élise or Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Marguerite Allain, at Ascension in June 1796.  In June 1798, Édouard and his wife purchased from his widowed mother in Ascension three arpents of land near Pierre LaBatte, on which they built "a house of posts in ground, 30' x 15', bousillier between the posts, covered with pickets."  Their son Laurent was born at Ascension in August 1802; Félix Jean Baptiste, called Jean Baptiste, in November 1804; Joseph Richard, also called Joseph François, in April 1807; Jean in December 1809; and Libois Drosin or Drosin Libois, in November 1815.  Élise died in Ascension Parish in November 1822, age 37.  Her and Édouard's daughters married into the Babin and Dugas families.  Édouard, at age 51, remarried to Antoinette, daughter of Louis Barbay and Charlotte Falgout, at the Donalsonville church, Ascension Parish, in March 1824.  Édouard died in Ascension Parish in December 1825, age 52.  Four of his five sons created their own families, and one of them settled on the upper Lafourche. 

Oldest son Laurent, by first wife Elise Landry, died in Ascension Parish in November 1862.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Laurent died at "age 60 years," so this probably was him.  Did he marry?  

Édouard's second son Félix Jean Baptiste, by first wife Elise Landry, married Marie Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Breaux and Adélaïde Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1826, and remarried to cousin Anasie, Angèle, or Aspasie Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvère Breaux and Rosalie Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1830.  They settled in Ascension Parish.  Their son Frumence or Joseph Félix was born in October 1830 but died at age 8 in November 1838; Joseph Édouard or Édouard Joseph was born in September 1833; Jean Désiré, called Désiré, in December 1835; Louis Furcy in January 1838; Louis Philippe in August 1842; Joseph Octave, called Octave, in January 1846 but may have died at age 9 1/2 in September 1855; Félix Janvier was born in September 1848 but died at age 7 in September 1855; and François Hector was born in February 1851 but died at age 1 1/2 in June 1852.  Their daughter married into the Genazzini family.  Félix Jean Baptiste died in Ascension Parish in October 1855.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean B., as he called him, died at "age 51 years."  Félix Jean Baptiste would have been a few weeks shy of age 51.  Two of his eight sons married by 1870. 

Second son Joseph Édouard, by second wife Aspasie Breaux, married Joséphine, daughter of Jean Buquoi and Joséphine Buquoi, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1855.  Their son Joseph Édouard, fils was born in Ascension Parish in February 1860. 

Félix Jean Baptiste's third son Désiré, by second wife Aspasie Breaux, married Emma, daughter of Alfred Hatkinson and Clémentine Buquoi, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1867.  Their son Louis Jean was born in Ascension Parish in August 1870. 

Édouard's third son Joseph Richard/François, by first wife Elise Landry, married cousin Marie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Henri Landry and Scholastique Bergeron, at the Plattenville church in January 1836.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Charles Drosin, called Drosin, was born in Assumption Parish in November 1838; Joseph Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, near Paincourtville in December 1845; François Domingue, called Dominque, in March 1848 but died at age 14 in July 1862; Telesphore in December 1849; Henri Léon in January 1856 but died at age 3 1/2 in June 1859; and Casimir Désiré was born in January 1861.  Their daughters married into the Guidry, Savoy, and Theriot families.  Two of Joseph François's six sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Charles Drosin married cousin Eveline or Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Lucien Landry and his Creole wife Aurore Marois, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Louis Édouard was born near Paincourtville in June 1860. 

Joseph François's second son Joseph Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, married cousin and fellow Acadian M. Ethelvina Babin of Assumption Parish at the Donaldsonville church in April 1869; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Édouard's fourth son Jean, by first wife Elise Landry, married cousin Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Dugas and Isabelle Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1836; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Barbay, and Roth families.  Did Jean father any sons? 

Édourad's fifth and youngest son Drosin Libois, by first wife Elise Landry, married Marie Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry LeBlanc and his Creole wife Euphrosine Denou and widow of ___ Rivet, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1841.  Their son Sébastien Valéry, called Valéry, was born in Ascension Parish in January 1844; Joseph Edward in June 1846; Jacques Gustave in July 1848, twin sons Alexandre and Calixte in October or December 1858; and Ulgere Denis in October 1861.  One of Drosin's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Valéry married Alouysia or Alysia, daughter of fellow Acadian Trasimond Dupuy and his Creole wife Arthémise Hosler, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in March 1867.  Their son Clément Maurice was born near Gonzales in September 1869. 

François, père's younger son Joseph, born in Maryland in c1758, followed his widowered father and two older siblings to Cabahannocer, where he married cousin Osite, daughter of fellow Acdians Pierre dit Pierrot à Jaques Landry and his first wife Geneviève Broussard and widow of Pierre Bujole, in February 1778.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche by the late 1780s and lived near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Joseph may have died in Assumption Parish in February 1815.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial called him Josef, "age 59 yrs., married to Osita Landry," but gave no parents' names.  Osite may have died in Assumption Parish in October 1843.  The Plattenville priest who recorded her burial, and who did not give her parents' names, said that she died at "age 79 years," a widow.  Her and Joseph's daughters married into the Blanchard, Daigle, Dugas, Dupuis, Guidry, Landry, and Marois families.  Four of Joseph's seven sons also created families of their own.

Oldest son Édouard le jeune, born at Ascension in August 1780, died at Lafourche, age 12 1/2, in January 1793. 

Joseph's second son Joseph, fils, born at Lafourche in March 1789, evidently died young.

Joseph, père's third son, another Joseph, fils, born at Lafourche in November 1791, married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Hébert and Isabelle Mazerolle, at the Plattenville church in May 1814.  Joseph, fils died in Assumption Parish in August 1815.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Josef, as he called him, died at "age 25 yrs."   Joseph, fils was age 23. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Auguste-Gérard, -Géran, or -Gerant, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in October 1798, married cousin Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Luc Alexandre Landry and Françoise Hélène Le Borgne de Bélisle, at the Plattenville church in April 1822.  Their son Joseph Augustin was born in Assumption Parish in March 1827; Joseph le jeune in January 1831; another Joseph le jeune died at birth in October 1834; Pierre Guillaume was born in June 1838; Joseph Géran, perhaps called Gérant, in March 1843; and Alfred, perhaps their son, died five days after his birth in June 1846.  Auguste Gérard may have died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in September 1853.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Auguste died at "age 55 years," so this probably was him.  His daughters married into the Alonso and Savoy families.  Two of his sons may have married by 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Augustin may have died near Paincourtville in September 1853.  The priest who recorded the burial called the deceased's father Auguste, did not give the mother's name, and said that Gustave, as he called the deceased, died at "age 27 years"; Joseph Augustin would have been been age 26.  Or he may have been the Joseph, son of Auguste Landry and Delphine Landry, who married Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Theriot and his Creole wife Elisa Comes and a great-granddaughter of Olivier Terriot, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1858.  Their son Joseph Samuel was born in Ascension Parish in September 1861, and Joseph Sabin near Paincourtville in October 1869. 

Auguste Géran's fifth son Joseph Géran called Gérant by the recording priest, may have married fellow Acadian Noemie Bujole at the Donaldsonville church in January 1870. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Basile-Valéry, called Valéry, born at Assumption in January 1801, died there at age 2 years, 7 months in August 1803.

Joseph, père's sixth son Hubert-Marin, born at Assumption in November 1802, married cousin Azélie, daughter of Maurice Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Geneviève Landry, at the Plattenville church in February 1827, and remarried to Victoire or Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier LeBlanc and Marie Madeleine Breaux, at the Paincourtville church in June 1841.  Their son Joseph Olivier, called Olivier, was born near Paincourtville in April 1845.  Hubert Marin, called Hubert Martin by the recording priest, who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, died in Assumption Parish in January 1846, age 43.  His daughter married into the Babin family.  His son evidently did not marry.

Only son Olivier, by second wife Victoire LeBlanc, died in Assumption Parish in June 1865, age 20.  He probably did not marry.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  Except perhaps for its blood, his family line died with him. 

Joseph, père's seventh and youngest son Ursin Jean, also called Ursin Léon Louis, born at Ascension in January 1807, married Adeline, also called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Lubin LeBlanc and Mélanie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church in September 1834.  Their son Joseph Pierre was born in Assumption Parish in October 1835 but died at age 5 months the following March; Joseph Laurent, called Laurent, was born in April 1837; Joseph Lusignan, called Lusignan, in July 1839; Joseph in November 1841; Joseph Gesner in January 1844; and Joseph Murville in July 1852.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Laurent married Anatalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Rivet and his Creole wife Carmelite Bermeyo and widow of Marcellus Landry, at the Paincourtville church in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Wilfrid was born near Paincourtville in May 1870. 

Usin Jean's third son Lusignan married cousin Léocade, daughter of Ferdinand Romagossa and his Acadian wife Euphrosine Landry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Pierre dit Pierrot à Chaques (c1721-1778) à Germain à René le jeune Landry

Pierre dit Pierrot à Chaques, oldest son of Abraham dit Chaques Landry and Marie-Isabelle Blanchard, born probably at Pigiguit in c1721, married Geneviève Broussard in c1745, place unrecorded.  She gave him two children, a son and a daughter, in c1752 and c1753.  The British deported them to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Between 1756 and 1762, Geneviève gave Pierrot four more children in Maryland, a daughter and three sons, including a set of twins--six children in all.   Colonial officials counted Pierrot, Geneviève, three sons and a daughter, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Geneviève died in Maryland after the counting.  Pierrot and his six children emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer.  In his late 40s, Pierrot remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Gautrot and Anne LeBlanc of Minas and widow of Pierre Granger, at Cabahannocer in the late 1760s.  She gave him no more children.  They moved upriver to Ascension, where, at age 57, Pierrot remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau and widow of Désiré LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in February 1778.  She gave him no more children.  Pierrot died at Ascension in July 1791, age 70.  His older daughter married ito the Bujole and Landry families on the river before resettling on upper Bayou Lafourche.  All four of his sons, all by first wife Geneviève, married on the river, but only one of the lines was a robust one. 

Oldest son Jean, by first wife Geneviève Broussard, born probably at Pigiguit in c1752, followed his family to Maryland and his widowered father and siblings to Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same side of the river at Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  He married cousin Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Blanchard and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at nearby San Gabriel in October 1788; Marie-Josèphe was a sister of Jean's brother Jean-Baptiste's second wife.  Jean and Marie-Josèphe's daughters married into the Bercegeay, Dannequin, Edwin, Gaudin, Hatkinson, Lavergne, LeBlanc, and Richard families.  Both of Jean's sons failed to create families of their own, so this line of the family, except for its blood, probably did not endure. 

Older son Toussaint, born near San Gabriel in November 1789, died in Ascension Parish in October 1825, age 35.  He probably did not marry. 

Jean's younger son Valéry, born at Ascension in July 1806, died in Ascension Parish in October 1822, age 16. 

Pierrot's second son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Geneviève Broussard, born probably in Maryland in c1756, followed his widowered father and siblings to Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabanocé in 1769 and on the same side of the river at Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  He married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Charles LeBlanc and Judith Landry, at San Gabriel in November 1786.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to cousin Anne-Marguerite, another daughter of Joseph Blanchard and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at San Gabriel in August 1788; Anne-Marguerite was a sister of Jean-Baptiste's brother Jean's wife.  Jean-Baptiste's line of the family evidently did not endure. 

Only son Jean Narcisse, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Blanchard, born in Ascension Parish in May 1808, may have died young. 

Pierrot's third son Firmin, by first wife Geneviève Broussard, born probably in Maryland in c1759, followed his widowered father and siblings to Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabanocé in 1769 and on the same side of the river at Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  He married Frances Sally, called Sally, daughter of Anselm Scantien and Sally Grin of New England, at Ascension in August 1782.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

Pierrot's fourth and youngest son Paul, also called Olivier, by first wife Geneviève Broussard, born probably in Maryland in c1762, followed his widowered father and siblings to Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabanocé in 1769 and on the same side of the river at Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  He married Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre-Paul Hébert and Marguerite LeBlanc, at San Gabriel in June 1787.  They settled at Ascension.  Paul, at age 63, may have remarried to fellow Acadian Ludivine LeBlanc, widow of Donat Landry of Iberville Parish, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1825.  Paul may have died in Ascension Parish in November 1829.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Paul died at "age ca. 60 yrs.," but this Paul would have been closer to age 67.  His daughters married into the Amiraty, Bourdier, Landry and LeBlanc families.  Three of his five sons, also by his first wife, created their own families, but only one of the lines seems to have endured. 

Oldest son Simon-Julien, called Julien, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born at Ascension in February 1794, married Rosalie Justine, called Justine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Breaux and Brigitte Foret, at the Donaldson church in May 1816.  Their son Pierre Théodule was born in Ascension Parish in June 1819, Félix Valcourt in July 1827 but died at age 13 in July 1840, and Simon Homere was born in April 1832.  Julien died in Ascension Parish in September 1845.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Julien died at "age 52 years," but he was 51.  His daughters married into the Bingay family, and perhaps into the Allen family as well.  None of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Pierre Théodule died in Ascension Parish in October 1839, age 20.  He probably did not marry. 

Paul's second son Pierre-Paul, called Paul and also Hippolyte-Paul, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born at Ascension in November 1795, married Denise Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Theriot, who called himself a Térriot, and Marie Aucoin of Nantes, France, at the Donaldson church in January 1823.  Denise's father had been a leader in the Acadian exodus from France in 1785, but Denise, like Paul, was a native of Ascension.  Her and Paul's son Pierre was born in Ascension Parish in January 1828; Joseph Osémé, called Osémé, in November 1829; and Jean died 5 days after his birth in September 1832.  Paul died by June 1863, when he was listed as deceased in a son's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Hatkinson family, and perhaps into the Cire family as well.  Both of his surviving sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre married cousin Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Theriot and Lise Richard, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1863; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Louis Alcée, called Alcée, was born in Ascension Parish in August 1864 but died at age 10 months in June 1865; Jean Fernand, called Fernand, was born in June 1866 but died at age 4 in June 1870; Claude Prosper was born in June 1868; and Joseph Léon in February 1870. 

Pierre Paul's second son Joseph Osémé married Célestine, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Martial Cabern, Cabert, Capbern, or Caberne and his Acadian wife Célestine Gaudet, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1857.  Their son Frédéric was born in Ascension Parish in April 1861; Osémé Kirby in June 1863 but died at age 1 in June 1864; Hippolyte Osémé, called Osémé, was born in March 1866 but died at age 4 1/2 in November 1870; and Joseph George was born in November 1870. 

Paul's third son Élie Léger or Lazare, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born at Ascension in January 1804, died at age 7 years, 8 months, in September 1811. 

Paul's fourth son Onésime, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born at Ascension in January 1806, married Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Urbain Breaux and Marcellite Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1833.  Did Onésime father any sons? 

Paul's fifth and youngest son Jean Baptiste, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born in Ascension Parish in June 1808, may have died young. 

Vincent (c1727-1798) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Vincent, oldest son of Joseph Landry and first wife Marguerite Forest and older brother of Olivier of Cabahannocer, was born probably at Minas in c1727.  Still a bachelor in his late 20s, Vincent was deported with his family to Maryland in 1755.  In his late 30s, he married Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre-Joseph Godin dit Châtillon dit Préville and his first wife Marie-Josèphe Bourg of Minas, in Maryland in October 1765; Vincent's father's second wife was Susanne's mother, so Vincent married his step-sister.  They went to Louisiana with an infant son evidently with the first contingent of exiles from Maryland in 1766.  They had more children in Louisiana.  Spanish officials counted them in New Orleans in July 1767, so they may have taken their time following their fellow exiles, including a younger brother, to Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, where Spanish officials counted Vincent and his family on the right, or west, bank of the river in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  Vincent was "singer of the church" at Ascension.  Two of his daughters, born in December 1768 and July 1770, were baptized at New Orleans in May 1769 and February 1771, so the family spent more time in the city.  They were living on upper Bayou Lafourche by the mid-1790s.  Vincent died a widower at Assumption in March 1798.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Vincent was age 74 when he died, but he probably was a few years younger.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Bourque, Mazerolle, Melançon, and Ozelet families.  Two of his three sons also married and settled on the Lafourche. 

Oldest son Charles-Calixte, called Calixte, born in Maryland in c1766, died at Assumption in October 1798, age 32.  He may not have married. 

Vincent's second son Grégoire, born probably at Ascension in c1772, married Françoise-Luce, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Luce-Perpétué Bourg, at Assumption in February 1797.  Françoise had come to Louisiana in 1785 with her widowed mother aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships.  Grégoire died in Assumption Parish in January 1849.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Grégoire died at "age 78 years," so this was him.  His daughters married into the Bolot, Cancienne, and Hébert families.  Half of his six sons created families of their own and settled on the upper bayou. 

Oldest son Charles-Hubert, called Hubert, born at Assumption in November 1797, married Euphrosine or Euphrasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Aucoin and Marguerite Aucoin, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1827.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes.  Their son Simon André was born in September 1830; Jean Baptiste Marcellin in June 1839; Hubert, fils died a day after his birth in June 1842; and Joseph Hubert was born posthumously in March 1848.  Hubert, père died in Assumption Parish in February 1848, age 50.  His three surviving sons created their own families, and two of them married sisters. 

Oldest son Simon André married Zéolide or Zéolite, daughter of fellow Acadians Florentin Blanchard and Émelie Arceneaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1853.  Their son Damase or Damas was born near Plattenville in November 1853 but died at age 13 1/2 in August 1867, Augustave Eliss was born near Labadieville in January 1855, Cyprien in September 1862 but died at age 5 in November 1867, Louis Joseph was born near Plattenville in December 1865, and Alcée Éloi in December 1869. 

Hubert's second son Jean Baptiste Marcellin married Zulma, daughter of fellow Acadian Hubert Arceneaux and his Creole wife Irma Rodrigue, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1859.  Their son Xavier Telesma was born near Labadieville in September 1867. 

Hubert's fourth and youngest son Joseph Hubert married Celima, another daughter of Hubert Arceneaux and Irma Rodrigue, at the Labadieville church in April 1868. 

Grégoire's second son Joseph-Damas, born at Assumption in December 1800, died in Assumption Parish in March 1845.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial, and who called him Joseph Damaze, said that he died at "age 40 years."  He was 44.  Did he marry? 

Grégoire's third son Vincent le jeune, born at Assumption in December 1802, married, in his late 30s, Élisabeth, called Élise, daughter fellow Acadians Alexandre Arceneaux and Marie Aimée Blanchard, at the Plattenville church in January 1838.  Their son, name and age unrecorded, died in Assumption Parish in January 1839; Augustave died at age 13 days in September 1846; Désiré Alfred, called Alfred, was born in January 1850 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1851; and Oscar François was born in January 1862.  They also had an older son named Lusignan V.  Their daughters married into the Delaune and Landry families.  One of Vincent le jeune's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Lusignan V. married cousin Alice, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Pamela Landry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1868.  Their James was born near Paincourtville in December 1868 but died the following August. 

Grégoire's fourth son Emery Jean or Jean Emery, born at Assumption in October 1806, died at age 6 in October 1812,

Grégoire's fifth son Jean Baptiste Reynard, also called Jean St. Bernard and Jean Baptiste Bernard, born in Assumption Parish in March 1812, married, at age 38, Basilise, another daughter Florentin Blanchard and Émelie Arceneaux, at the Plattenville church in April 1849.  Their son Joseph Serta Amédée was born near Plattenville in March 1853.  Their daughter married into the Boudreaux family. 

Grégoire's sixth and youngest son Grégoire, fils, born in Assumption Parish in April 1818, died in Assumption Parish in February 1836, age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Vincent's third and youngest son Joseph-Vincent, born at Ascension in September 1778, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Bourg and Marie Bujole, at Assumption in May 1804.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux family.  At age 48, Joseph Vincent remarried to Renée Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac Hébert and Marie Daigle and widow of Isaac Doiron, at the Plattenville church in January 1827.  Renée had come to Louisiana as an infant aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  Three of Joseph Vincent's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Victor, by first wife Madeleine Bourg, born in Assumption Parish in July 1808, may have died in Lafourche Parish in June 1857.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Victor died "at age 51 yrs."  This Victor would have been a month shy of 49.  Did he marry? 

Joseph Vincent's second son Ursin Romain, by first wife Madeleine Bourg, born in Assumption Parish in July 1810, married Rosalie, daughter of Hyacinthe Rousseau and his Acadian wife Rosalie Delaune, at the Thibodaux church in February 1842.  Their son Dejauri or Dejori was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1843 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1844; Joseph Léomer was born in June 1844; and Ursin Arseneaux posthumously in June 1846, nine months after his father died.  Ursin, père died in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1845.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Urcin, as he called him, died "at age 38 yrs."   He was 35. 

Joseph Vincent's third son Joseph Basile, called Basile, from first wife Madeleine Bourg, born in Assumption Parish in June 1820, married Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Naquin and his Creole wife Constance Lirette, at the Thibodaux church in August 1841.  Their son Joseph Scailaire was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1843; Noël Léopal, called Paul, in December 1845; Aurestile Auguste in July 1851; Joseph Willier in May 1853; Marcellin Marcellus, called Marcellus, in April 1857; Émée Théophile, called Théophile, in March 1860; and Volsi in March 1863.  Basile died in Lafourche Parish in August 1868, age 48.  A "petition for tutor," listing his children, was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in September 1870.  One of Basile's sons married by 1870.

Second son Paul married Ursule, daughter of Michel Sevin and his Acadian wife Théotiste Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in February 1868. 

Joseph Vincent's fourth son Léon Valéry, by first wife Madeleine Bourg, born in Assumption Parish in November 1822, may have died young. 

Joseph Vincent's fifth and youngest son Zenon Zéphirin, also called Jean, from second wife Renée Eulalie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in October 1827, married first cousin Zéolide, daughter of Pierre Cedotal and his Acadian wife Marie Hébert, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1849; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Octave was born near Paincourtville in June 1850 but died at age 1 1/2 in October 1851, and Martial was born in July 1854.  Their daughter married into the Oufnac family. 

Joseph dit Belhomme (c1752-1814) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Joseph dit Belhomme, third and youngest son of Joseph Landry and second wife Marie-Josèphe Bourg, half-brother of Olivier and Vincent, and grandson of Alexandre Bourg dit Bellehumeur, the Council delegate, notary, and judge of Grand-Pré, was born at Minas in c1752.  He followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his widowed mother and three sisters to Cabahannocer, where he settled with them near his older half-brothers.  Belhomme married cousin Élisabeth, also called Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré LeBlanc and Marie-Madeleine Landry, at Ascension on the river in April 1775, and remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bujole and Anne LeBlanc and sister of his older sister Anne-Gertrude's husband, at Ascension in November 1779.  Belhomme became a successful planter at Ascension.  His plantation, where he grew sugar and corn, was called New Hope.  He also owned a retail sugar business at Ascension.  He served as a lieutenant of militia, was ad interim commandant of the Acadians at Ascension between 1799 and 1803, was promoted to major and commander of the Ascension militia in 1804, and served as justice of the peace in Ascension.  He was elected to the territorial legislative council in September 1805 and to the first Louisiana State Senate in July 1812.  Belhomme died at Ascension in October 1814, age 62.  According to one source, he was paid high tribute by the Church; a mausoleum was dedicated to him and his family at the Church of the Ascension in Donaldson, today's Donaldsonville.  His daughters, all by second wife Anne, married into the Constant, Duffel, Hopkins, LeBlanc, Pedesclaux, Poursine, and Vives families.  All six of his sons by both wives created families of their own.  His sons became major sugar planters in Ascension and St. James parishes, and, during the 1840s, his youngest son served as the State of Louisiana's first lieutenant governor.  Several of Belhomme's grandsons married first cousins.  One grandson lived in Missouri.  Another grandson commanded the famous Donaldsonville Artillery, which fought under General R. E. Lee during the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Louis, by first wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, born at Ascension in May 1776, described by the recording priest as a "soldier of the militia," married Marguerite-Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of Jean Vives of Spain and his Acadian wife Marguerite Bujole, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in January 1803; Carmelite's mother was Louis's stepmother's sister.  Their daughters married into the Corvaisier, Dugas, Gaudet, Gourrier, Landry, Morrison, and Templet families.  Louis, at age 47, remarried to Clémence Lessard, widow of Butler Gilbert, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1824.  Louis died in Ascension Parish in June 1831.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was age 60 when he died, but he was 55.  The priest also said that Louis's mother was Anne Bujol, but his date of birth suggests that his mother was his father's first wife, Élisabeth LeBlanc.  Only one of Louis's five sons may have carried on the family line.   

Oldest son Onésime Théodule, by first wife Carmelite Vives, born in Ascension Parish in May 1809, evidently died young. 

Louis's second son Achille Édouard, by first wife Carmelite Vives, born in Ascension Parish in April 1812, died at age 7 in April 1819. 

Louis's third son Joseph Théodule, by first wife Carmelite Vives, born in Ascension Parish in c1814, while a "res. of Perry County, Missouri," married first cousin Marie Manette, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Landry and his Creole wife Félicité Désirée Renaud, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1846; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Joseph Théodule died in Ascension Parish in August 1849, age 35.  Did he father any sons?

Louis's fourth son Louis Lessard, by second wife Clémence Lessard, born in Ascension Parish in December 1824, married cousin Delia, daughter of first cousin Achille Landry and Gertrude Blanchard, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1852; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Louis Lessard died in Ascension Parish in February 1853.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, did not give Louis Lessard's age at the time of his death, only his name; Louis Lessard would have been age 28.  Did he father any sons? 

Louis's fifth and youngest son Joseph Homere, also called Homere, by second wife Clémence Lessard, born in Ascension Parish in September 1827, not baptized until March 1834.  He may have married Emilia or Amelia Chestnut, Chesnot, or Cesnet and settled near the boundary between Ascension and St. James parishes.  Their son Julien Omere was born in December 1854, and Alexandre in September 1860 but died at age 9 1/2 in April 1870.   

Belhomme's second son Achille-Toussaint, called Toussaint, from second wife Anne Bujole, born at Ascension in November 1784, married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Breaux and Madeleine Clouâtre, at St. James in August 1806.  Achille Toussaint died in Ascension Parish in November 1823, age 39.  His daughters married into the Beaman, Martin, and Turnillon families.  All five of his sons created their own families.  His widow remarried to his younger brother Jean Trasimond. 

Oldest son Joseph, born in Ascension Parish in July 1807, married first cousin Marie Edelvina or Ethelvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Landry and Henriette Blanchard, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Pierre was born in Ascension Parish in January 1831; Lazare St. Jacques, also called Lazare Louis Jacques and L. St. James, in December 1833; Louis Aubrey near Convent, St. James Parish, in June 1836; and Pierre Armand, called Armand, in October 1837 but died at age 6 in October 1843.  Marie Ethelvina died in Ascension Parish in November 1844.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 36 yrs., 11 months," a widow.  One wonders when Joseph died.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Lazare St. Jacques married cousin M. Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of Jean Baptiste Noël Jourdan and Mélanie Pourcine, at the Convent church  in January 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Alfred was born near Convent in March 1861, Joseph St. Jacques in July 1862, Joseph Pierre Louis in March 1866, and Joseph Denis Albert in October 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, Lazare St. Jacques, called L. St. James in Confederate records, served as a private in two Louisiana artillery units that fought in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama.  He enlisted in the Watson Battery at Corinth, Mississippi, in June 1862, several weeks after the unit had seen action at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in April.  He was age 28 at the time of his enlistment and the father of two sons, the youngest of whom had been born less than two months before he enlisted.  Lazare St. Jacques followed his unit back to Louisiana and was captured and paroled with them at Port Hudson, Louisiana, in July 1863.  He and his fellow gunners waited for exchange in a parolee camp at Enterprise, Mississippi.  While waiting for exchange, Lazare must have found time to visit his family in St. James Parish in the fall of 1863; daughter Marie Agnès was born near Convent in June 1864.  In late 1863, Confederate authorities de-commissioned the Watson Battery, and most of the men served in a Mississippi battery.  Lazare St. Jacques, however, enlisted in another Louisiana unit, Holmes's Battery, which was organized at Clinton, Louisiana, in March 1864.  The battery saw action at Woodville, Mississippi, in October 1864.  Captain Holmes and many of his gunners were captured in the fight.  Nonetheless, a superior officer described Holmes's unit as "the most efficient arm of the [artillery] service" in the region.  Lazare St. Jacques evidently was among the unit's gunners who escaped capture, and he likely served for a time in Bradford's Mississippi Battery.  In early 1865, the remnants of Holmes's Louisiana Battery, including Lazare St. Jacques, were assigned to the fortifications at Mobile, Alabama, where they manned the guns in Battery Missouri.  In March 1865, Lazare St. Jacques was assigned temporarily to department headquarters at Mobile.  He and his fellow Confederates evacuated the city in April 1865 and surrendered with other Confederate forces under Lieutenant General Richard Taylor at Meridian, Mississippi, in May 1865.  As the birth of his third son attests, Lazare St. Jacques returned to his family and resumed his life in St. James Parish. 

Achille Toussaint's second son Joseph Achille, called Achille, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in February 1809, married cousin Marie Gertrude, called Gertrude, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Blanchard and Marguerite Dupuy, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1831.  They settled near the boundary between Iberville and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Trouard was born in February 1838 but died at age 2 1/2 in July 1840.  Their daughters married into the Degelos, Landry, and Lessarde families.  Achille remarried to cousin Anne Marie Aureline, Aurelie, or Azeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Éloi Blanchard and Louise LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1843.  They also settled near the boundary between Iberville and Ascension parishes.  Their son Jean Ovide, called Ovide, was born in December 1843 but died at age 11 1/2 in July 1855; and Elphége Éloi Toussaint was born in February 1845 but died at age 10 1/2 in October 1855.  Achille died in Ascension Parish in April 1870.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Achille died at "age 62 years."  He was 61.  Except for its blood, his line of the family died with him.  

Achille Toussaint's third son Francois Amédée, called Amédée, born in Iberville Parish in November 1809, married first cousin Marie Anne Emma, called Emma, another daughter of his uncle and aunt Narcisse Landry and Henriette Blanchard, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1834; they, too, had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Octave was born in Ascension Parish in June 1835, and Amédée Louis in August 1841.  François Amédée, while "domiciled in New Orleans," remarried to Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Evariste Mire and Anne Clémence Gaudet of St. James Parish, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1848.  Their son Evariste Amédée was born in St. James Parish in March 1850. 

Achille Toussaint's fourth son Pierre Théodule, called Théodule, born in Iberville Parish in December 1814, married Marie Alvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Gaudet and Melicerte Richard, in a civil ceremony in Mississippi in September 1841, and sanctified the marriage at the Donaldsonville church the following day.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and St. James parishes.  Their son Théodule Eugène was born in March 1843; Nicholas Siméon in January 1847 but died the following August; and Joseph Armand, called Armand, was born in May 1852 but died at age 6 1/2 in October 1858.  Pierre Théodule remarried to Marie Louise, daughter of Napoléon Dupont and Irma Dupuis, perhaps a fellow Acadian, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1866. 

Achille Toussaint's fifth and youngest son Joseph Gustave, born in Iberville Parish in December 1818, married cousin Rosalie Elisca, another daughter of Evariste Mire and Anne Clémence Gaudet, at the St. James church in April 1844; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Augustin Gustave, also called Gustave Achille, was born in Ascension Parish in October 1846 but died at age 6 in November 1852. 

Belhomme's third son Philippe-Ursin, called Ursin, from second wife Anne Bujole, born probably at Ascension in May 1785 and baptized at New Orleans in December 1789, married Marie Clémence, called Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire LeBlanc and Marie Babin, at the Donaldson church in May 1810.  Ursin died in Ascension Parish in June 1831.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Ursin was age 44 when he died, but he was 46.  His daughters married into the Boucherou and Butterly families.  Two of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph Jules, called Jules, born in Ascension Parish in February 1811, married Marie Éloise, called Éloise, daughter of  Jean Louis Picou and Gertrude Lavigne, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1830, and remarried to cousin Marie Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Blanchard and Marie Judith LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1837.  Their daughter married a LeBlanc cousin.  At age 37, J. Jules, as the recording priest called him, remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond LeBlanc and Clotilde Bujole and widow of Edmond Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1848.  Joseph Jules died in Ascension Parish in January 1870.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jules died at "age 59 years."  Joseph Jules would have been a month shy of that age. 

Philippe-Ursin's second son Ursin, fils, born in Ascension Parish in October 1817, died at age 1 1/2 in July 1819.

Philippe-Ursin's third son Joseph Philippe Adolph, born in Ascension Parish in August 1819, may have died young. 

Philippe-Ursin's fourth and youngest son Philippe Ursin, fils, called Ursin, born in Ascension Parish in January 1823, may have married Emma Marguerite or Marguerite Emma St. Martin at the Donaldsonville church in March 1853.  Their son Joseph Atanas was born in Ascension Parish in December 1853; Paul Cleopha in September 1855; Jean Edgar in November 1857 but died at age 8 in February 1866; Pierre L. was born in March 1864; and Joseph Théodule Ursin, called Théodule, in March 1866 but died at age 2 1/2 in October 1868. 

Belhomme's fourth son Joseph-Narcisse, called Narcisse, from second wife Anne Bujole, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in October 1786, married cousin Marie Henriette, called Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Blanchard and Madeleine Bujole, at Ascension in February 1807.  Their daughters married into the Braud, Landry, and Vives families.  Narcisse, in his early 40s, remarried to cousin Marie Gérarde or Gérade, daughter of Joseph Comes and his Acadian wife Marie Landry and widow of Auguste Jacques Dubor, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1829.  Their daughter married into the Comstock family.  Joseph Narcisse died in Ascension Parish in March 1870.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph Narcisse died at "age 83 years."  Only one of his six sons survived childhood and created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Narcisse Joseph, born in Ascension Parish in February 1816, died there at age 3 years, 2 months, in March 1819.

Narcisse's second son Joseph Aristide or Aristide Joseph, by first wife Henriette Blanchard, born in Ascension Parish in July 1817, married first cousin Anne Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Landry and his first wife Carmelite Vives, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1838; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Louis Aristide was born in Ascension Parish in July 1840.  Anne Estelle died in Ascension Parish in September 1843, age 24.  Joseph Aristide remarried to another first cousin, Marie Anne Nesida, Nisida, or Nizida, perhaps also called Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Trasimond Landry and Modeste Breaux, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1847; they, too, had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity.  Their son Joseph Trasimond was born in Ascension Parish in March 1848, Joseph Samuel in February 1855, Joseph Laurant in June 1857 but died at age 15 days, and Édouard Fernand was born in December 1858.  One of his sons married by 1870.

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Louis Aristide, called "Tip," from first wife Anne Estelle Landry, served as a corporal and sergeant in the Donaldsonville Artillery with some of his Landry cousins.  "Tip" married cousin Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadians Léon LeBlanc and Euphemie Breaux, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Louis, fils was born in Ascension Parish in April 1867; Joseph Raymond in January 1869; and Henry Robert in July 1870. 

Narcisse's third son Joseph Narcisse, fils, called Narcisse, fils, by first wife Henriette Blanchard, born in Ascension Parish in July 1821 died there at age 1 in September 1822. 

Narcisse's fourth son Joseph Hercules, by first wife Henriette Blanchard, born in Ascension Parish in October 1826, died there at age 4 1/2 months the following March. 

Narcisse's fifth son Vincent de Paul, by second wife Marie Gérade Comes, baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age unrecorded, in November 1831, died in Ascension Parish at age "several months" the following January,

Narcisse's sixth and youngest son Hercule Pierre or Pierre Hercule, by second wife Marie Gérade Comes, born in Ascension Parish in June 1833, died there at age 9 months in April 1834.

Belhomme's fifth son Isidore-Valéry, called Valéry, from second wife Anne Bujole, born at Ascension in April 1790, married Félicité Désirée, called Désirée, daughter of Jean Renaud or Reynaud and Marie Charlotte Eléonore Songy of New Orleans, at the Donaldson church in August 1815.  Valéry became a "sugar maker."  His and Désirée's son Philippe L., also called Phillip, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1821; Jean Reynaud Jacques Prosper, called R. Prosper and Prosper, in March 1826; Louis Valéry in September 1827; Casimir Octave in August 1829 but died at age 1 in August 1830; and Joseph Reynaud was born in July 1834 but died at age 2 1/2 in January 1837.  Valéry died in Ascension Parish in September 1863, age 73.  His daughters married into the Duffel, Eaton, Landry, Peck, and Reynaud families.  Two of his sons also created their own families on the river.  One of them became a lawyer and served as an officer in General R. E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.

Oldest son Philippe married first cousin Marguerite or Marie Narcissa Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of Pierre Pedesclaux and his Acadian wife Marie Arthémise Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1847; Estelle's mother was Philippe's paternal aunt, so the couple had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Philippe Edgar, called Edgar, was born in Ascension Parish in October 1848 but died at age 3 in September 1851; a son, name unrecorded, died the day of his birth in August 1849; Joseph Charles was born in April 1851; Joseph Egard in August 1854; Phillip, fils in April 1857; Georges in June 1858; twins sons Félix and Jean in February 1861 but Jean died a day after his birth and Félix at age 18 days; and Charles was born in August 1862. 

Valéry's second son R. Prosper, at age 20, graduated from Georgetown College, Washington, D.C., in 1846.  After traveling two years through Europe he studied law at the State University, today's Tulane University, in New Orleans.  Following his graduation in 1854, he returned to Donaldsonville to practice law.  He married first cousin Adèle, another daughter of Pierre Pedesclaux and Marie Arthémise Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1855; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Charles W. was born in Ascension Parish in June 1862, nine months after his father joined the Confederate army.  During the War of 1861-65, Prosper served in the Donaldsonville Artillery, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  At age 35, he enlisted in the battery as a private and was soon elected second lieutenant.  In July 1864, he was promoted to captain and battery commander.  On 9 April 1865, he surrendered with his unit, and Lee's army, at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, and returned to his family and his law practice in Ascension Parish. 

Valéry's third son Louis Valéry died in Ascension Parish in December 1850.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Louis Vallery, as he called him, died at "age 23 years," so this was him.  He probably did not marry. 

Belhomme's sixth and youngest son Jean-Trasimond, called Trasimond, from second wife Anne Bujole, was born at Ascension in December 1795.  In his late teens, he served as a second lieutenant in the Seventh Regiment Louisiana Militia during the War of 1812.  He was appointed paymaster of Sixth Regiment Ascension Parish Militia in May 1814 and commanded a militia company in December 1814, when he was only 19.  In March 1815, after the Battle of New Orleans, he joined St. Martin's Company Militia at Camp Hopkins on Bayou Lafourche.  In January 1817, two and a half years after his father's death, he helped form a family partnership to manage his father's plantation, New Hope, a share of which he acquired in March 1821.  Not yet age 30, he was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives in July 1824 and served until his resignation in 1831.  He married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Breaux and Madeleine Clouâtre and widow of older brother Achille, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1825.  Trasimond served as a delegate to the Democratic national conventions of 1828 and 1836.  In 1833, he was appointed to solicit subscriptions to the Citizen's Bank of New Orleans.  He was elected to the Louisiana state senate in 1832 and became the state's lieutenant governor in 1846, by which time he had become a Whig.  He was, in fact, the first lieutenant governor in Louisiana state history.  During the War of 1861-65, while in his late 60s, he served as a colonel in the Louisiana state militia and as head of the Ascension Parish Police Jury's appropriations committee for the war.  Trasimond died in Ascension Parish in October 1873, age 78.  He was buried in the Ascension church cemetery, Donaldsonville.  His daughters married into the Landry and Pedesclaux families.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own.

Older son Jean Trasimond, fils, called John and J. T., born in Ascension Parish in March 1831, married Amelie, Émelia, or Emilia Elizabeth, called Elizabeth, daughter of Adolphe Seghers or Segers and Élisabeth Duffel of Ascension Parish, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1855.  Their son Robert Boyd Lee was born in Ascension Parish in September 1863, and George Beaman near Baton Rouge in March 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, John served as corporal and sergeant in the Donaldsonville Artillery with first cousin Prosper Landry

Jean Trasimond, père's younger son Samuel Joseph, born in Ascension Parish in October 1832, died there in November 1854.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Samuel died at "age 22 years."  One wonders if he married. 

Firmin (c1728-1801) à Germain à René le jeune Landry

Firmin, son of Alexandre Landry and Marie-Marguerite Blanchard, born at Pigiguit in c1728, married Élisabeth-Françoise Thibodeau at Pigiguit in c1752.  Three years later, the British deported them to Maryland.  Colonial officials counted the couple, two daughters, and two sons at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Firmin came to Louisiana probably in 1766, a widower with four children and, with the majority of his fellow passengers, settled at Cabahannocer on the river, but he did not remain there.  He remarried to Théotiste dite Sally, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Thibodeau and Brigitte Breau and widow of Bonaventure Godin, at either Cabahannocer or Attakapas in c1769.  Théotiste, a widow with a small daughter, had come to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and had remained with her in-laws on the Acadian Coast.  Firmin's was the first Landry family to remain west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  He and Théotiste settled on upper Bayou Vermilion and also owned land at Fausse Pointe on lower Bayou Teche.  Théotiste gave Firmin many more children on the prairies, including sons.  Firmin "died suddenly" at Attakapas in February 1801.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Firmin was "60 and 16 years," that is, age 76, when he died.  His daughters by both wives married into the Boudreaux, Broussard, Lapointe, Louvière, Perault, Quebedeaux, and Ransonet families.  Four of his five sons also created families of their own.  His was not only the first, but also one of the largest Landry family lines established on the prairies. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Élisabeth Thibodeaux, born probably at Pigiguit in c1752, followed his family to Maryland, to Cabahannocer, and to the western prairies.  He married Marie-Anne, called Marine, daughter of perhaps fellow Acadians Paul Melançon and Marie Thériot, at Opelousas or Attakapas in the late 1770s.  Marine was a native of Maryland.  They settled at Côte Gelée and on Bayou Vermilion.  Joseph, père died probably at Côte Gelée in June 1797.  The Attakapas priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 47 when he died.  His daughters married into the Babin, Bourg, Duhon, Durio, Prejean, Thibodeaux, and Trahan families, and at least one of them settled on the river.  Five of his six sons also created their own families, all of them on the prairies. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in May 1779, may have died young. 

Joseph, père's second son Louis dit Agricole, baptized at Opelousas, age 13 months, in April 1780, married Christine or Emeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Labauve and Françoise Broussard, at Attakapas in February 1801.  They settled at Grande Pointe on upper Bayou Teche and then on the Vermilion.  Their son Camille was born on the Vermilion in December 1807; Agricole, fils in December 1811 but died at age 1 in December 1812; Hilaire was born in September 1813; Désiré in July 1815; and Émile in November 1818.  Agricole "died suddenly and by accident at the home of Éloy Dugas at La fausse pointe" in November 1819, age 39.  His succession records were filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1821 and the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1829.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Dugas, and Landry families.  Three of his five sons also created families of their own.

Third son Hilaire married Marie Emetile, daughter of Robert Bell and his Acadian wife Julie Broussard and widow of Aurelien Broussard, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in February 1840.  Did the family line survive? 

Agricole's fourth son Désiré married Marie Mélicère, called Mélicère, daughter of Louis Benjamin Lafenetre and Clémence Duval, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1836.  Their son Anatole was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in October 1837; Ursin was born in November 1840; and a son, name unrecorded, died at age 3 months in September 1857.  Their daughter married into the Menard family.  Désiré surviving sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Anatole likely married Azéma Dubois, perhaps a fellow Acadian, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in October 1858.  Their son Delma was born near Abbeville in August 1859. 

Désiré's second son Ursin married Élisabeth, daughter of Eugène Meaux and his Acadian wife Carmelite Trahan, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1869.  They settled on the lower Vermilion.  Sylvanie, perhaps a son, was born in August 1869. 

Agricole's fifth and youngest son Émile married Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis André Richard and Julie Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in September 1839.  Their son André, called Andéol and Andréol, was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1842; and Jules Agricole near Abbeville in December 1854.  They also had a son named Désiré.  Émile may have died in August 1855.  The Abbeville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Émile died "at age 35 yrs. at Bayou Tigre."  This Émile would have been age 36, so this probably was him.  Bayou Tigre is at the edge of the coastal marsh south of present-day Delcambre, Vermilion Parish.  Émile's daughters married into the Mayer and Quebedeaux families.  Two of his sons also created their own families.

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Andéol, called Andriol in Confederate records, may have served in Company A of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, that fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  While his unit was at Vicksburg,, perhaps while he was on leave, Andéol married Azéma, daughter of Louis Taylor, formerly Teller, and his Acadian wife Carmelite Leger, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1863.  Andéol remarried to Alida, daughter of Jean Miller and his Acadian wife Françoise Boudreaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in June.   

Émile's second son Désiré married Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Mouton and his Creole wife Azélie Teller, at the Grand Coteau church in November 1870. 

Joseph, père's third son Cyrille, born at Attakapas in February 1787, married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Isabelle Appoline Trahan of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1815.  Their son Philemon, also called Edmond, was born on the Vermilion in April 1818.  Their daughters married into the Bourg and Simon families.  Cyrille remarried to Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles dit Charlitte Trahan and his Creole wife Marie Landreaux of Anse à Michaux, at the St. Martinville church in June 1821.  Their son Joseph was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1826; Émile in July 1829; Jean or Joseph Seville, called Seville, in November 1831; Cyrille, fils was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 1, in April 1835; Camille at age 19 months in August 1837; and Clémile at age 7 months in March 1839.  Their daughters married into the Clark, LeBlanc, and Simon families.  Cyrille, père died in Lafayette Parish in August 1839.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Cyrille was age 50 when he died, but he was 52.  Five of his seven sons by both wives married by 1870.

Oldest son Philemon/Edmond, by first wife Scholastique Boudreaux, married cousin Marie Célanise, Sidalise, or Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Vincent and Lise Landry, at the Vermilionville church in June 1839.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1841 but died at age 2 in September 1843; Cyrille le jeune was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in April 1845; and Camille near Abbeville in May 1848.  Their daughters married into the Dubois and St. Germain families.  One of Philemon/Edmond's sons married by 1870.

Third and youngest son Camille married double cousin Delphine, perhaps also called Christine, daughter of fellow Acadians Valsin Vincent and Joséphine Landry, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in May 1869. 

Cyrille's second son Joseph, by second wife Adélaïde Trahan, married Eugénie, daughter of Édouard Picard and Céleste Doré, at the St. Martinville church in June 1848.  Their son Joseph, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1850.  They were living near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by 1860. 

Cyrille's third son Émile, by second wife Adélaïde Trahan, married Azéma, daughter of Augustin Simon and his Acadian wife Arcène Leger, at the Vermilionville church in December 1850.  Their son Camille le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1854, Guilbert in February 1857, and Augustin Treville in the late 1850s. 

Cyrille's fourth son Seville, by second wife Adélaïde Trahan, married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Baptiste Guidry and Marguerite Dugas, at the Vermilionville church in May 1851, and remarried to Adélaïde Cécile, daughter of Ange Degeyter and Hélène Dutel, at the St. Martinville church in June 1856.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Joseph Angelbert was born in April 1857; Cyrille le jeune in December 1858; Jean Seville, fils died "at age 18 mths." in June 1864; Ernest was born in March 1864; Gustave in May 1865; and Jean Evariste near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in October 1867.  In July 1862, at age 30, Seville enlisted in Confederate service at Camp Pratt near New Iberia probably as a conscript in the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which had been raised in St. Martin Parish.  The Yellow Jackets fought in South Louisiana, especially in the Teche Campaign of spring 1863.  In November 1863, at Simmesport on the upper Atchafalaya, the battalion was consolidated with another largely-Cajun unit, and Seville was assigned to Company G of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which also fought in the Pelican State.  In early 1864, he was reported sick at a general hospital "on Ouachita River" in northeastern Louisiana.  A son was born to him back at Breaux Bridge while Seville was in the hospital.  Sadly, one of his other sons died a few months later, while Seville was serving with his unit in central Louisiana.  As the birth of one of his younger sons attests, Seville survived the war and returned to his family.  He was buried at St. Bernard Catholic Cemetery, beside the church in Breaux Bridge.

Cyrille's fifth son Cyrille, fils, by second wife Adélaïde Trahan, likely married Marie Aglae, called Aglae, daughter of Frédéric Gary or Gario and Céleste Caroline Romero, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1856, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in June 1858.  Their son Cyrille III was born near Grand Coteau in June 1857; Hilaire near New Iberia in January 1861; and Adam near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in July 1869. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Joseph-Denis, called Denis, born at Attakapas in December 1788, married Élisabeth, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians François Labauve and Eloise Hébert of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church in June 1809.  Their Joseph, fils was born on the Vermilion in April 1815 but died at age 3 1/2 in January 1819; a son, name unrecorded, died at his parents' home nine days after his birth in October 1817; Camille was born in May 1819; Léo was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 months, 2 days, in November 1828; and Delma or Adelma was baptized at age 4 in May 1840.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard and Thibodeaux families, one of them on the river in Iberville Parish.  Three of Denis's sons created their own families.  His youngest son also settled in Iberville Parish.

Third son Camille married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dugas and Théodose Gautreaux, at the Vermilionville church in January 1838.  Their son Paulin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in October 1839 but died at age 2 in August 1841; Onésime was born in January 1842; Adrien near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July 1844; Joseph near Abbeville in December 1855; and Charles in June 1858. 

Denis's fourth son Léo evidently married fellow Acadian Elmire Brasseaux and settled near Abbeville by the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph Denis was born near Abbeville in February 1862. 

Denis's fifth and youngest son Adelma married Victoria, daughter of fellow Acadian Paulin Dupuy and his Creole wife Marie Victorine Marrionneaux, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in July 1861. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Pantaléon, born at Attakapas in c1790, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Trahan and Françoise Vincent of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church in January 1810.  Their son Jean Joachim, called Joachim, was born on the lower Vermilion in October 1810.  Their daughter married into the Gerard and Kirkham families and perhaps into the Trahan family as well.  Pantaléon remarried to Susanne Rayon or Rion of St. Landry Parish in the 1820s.  Their son Joseph was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 4, in May 1833; and Jacob was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in December 1836.  Only one of Pantaléon's sons seems to have married by 1870. 

Oldest son Jean Joachim, by first wife Marguerite Trahan, married Marguerite Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of Charles Cohem, Cohen, Come, Comme, Comb, Combe, or Combs and Marguerite Laviolette, at the St. Martinville church in June 1836.  Their son Numa was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1841, Luca in March 1843, Lucien in February 1846, and Omer in July 1848.  Jean Joachim died in St. Martin Parish in January 1850, age 39.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Numa married Angelina, daughter of Bernard Faustin Romero and Zelina Pommier, at the St. Martinville church in November 1868. 

Joseph, père's sixth and youngest son Maximien or Maximilien, called Maxille dit Simien or Similien, baptized at Attakapas, age 5 months, in November 1795, married Marie Domicile or Domitille, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Anselme Thibodeaux and his second wife Anne Marie Trahan of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church in January 1816.  Their son Maximilien, fils, also called Similien, was born on the Vermilion in November 1816; and Joseph le jeune in January 1818.  Maximilien, père died in Lafayette Parish in December 1839, age 44.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August 1840.  His daughters married Trahan cousins.  Only one of his sons married.

Oldest son Maximilien, fils married cousin Marie Marcellite F., called Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Trahan and his Creole wife Marie Marcellite Sellers, at the Vermilionville church in January 1837; one of Maximilien, fils's sisters married Marie Marcellite's brother.  Maximilien, fils and Marie Marcellite's son Rosiclaire was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1840; Isaac in November1844; Théodore near Abbeville in March 1849; and Joseph Théolin, called Théolin, in August 1850.  They also had a son named Théogène, unless he was Théodore.  Maximilien, fils's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1868.  He would have been age 52 that year.  His daughter married into the Miguez family.  His four sons also married.

Oldest son Rosiclaire married cousin Marie Uranie, called Uranie, Landry at the Abbeville church in February 1858.  Their son Joseph Duplex was born near Abbeville in August 1860.  During the War of 1861-65, Rosiclaire, age 22, perhaps as a conscript, enlisted as a private in Company F of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry at Baton Rouge on New Year's Day 1863.  He was captured at Port Hudson in July 1863, paroled by the Federals, and returned to his unit.  After the war, son Jean Baptiste Polignac was born near Abbeville in October 1866.  Rosiclaire was buried in Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Cemetery, Erath. 

Maximilien, fils's second son Isaac married cousin Elina, daughter of Théodule Delcambre and his Acadian wife Oresile Landry, at the New Iberia church in January 1867.  Isaac died by October 1870, when his wife remarried to an Hébert at New Iberia. 

Maximilien, fils's third son Joseph Théolin married cousin Félicia, another daughter of Théodule Delcambre and Oresile Landry, at the New Iberia church in February 1868.  Their son Lucien was born near New Iberia in October 1868. 

Maximilien, fils's fourth and youngest son Théogène married Félicia, daughter of Charles Miguez and Elmire Joséphine Viator, at the New Iberia church in July 1868.  Their son Justilien was born near Abbeville in August 1869. 

Firmin's second son Saturin or Saturnin, by first wife Élisabeth Thibodeaux, born either at Pigiguit or on Maryland in c1755, followed his family to Maryland, to Cabahannocer, and to the western prairies.  He stood as godfather to his half-brother Hubert in April 1773 and was counted with his parents at Attakapas in May 1777, age 22, so he survived childhood, but he probably did not marry. 

Firmin's third son Hubert, by second wife Sally Thibodeaux, born at Attakapas in April 1773, married Anne-Euphrosine, called Euphrosine and Euphosie, daughter of Jean Legros and Marie Anne Lecuron of False River, Pointe Coupée, and Opelousas, at Attakapas in February 1800.  Hubert died "at his home at la fausse pointe" in July 1824.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hubert died at age "about 53 years."  He was 51.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in March 1830.  His daughters married into the Derouen, LeBlanc, and Leleux families.  Six of his nine sons married, four of them to LeBlancs, three of whom were sisters, and two to Héberts who were sisters.  All of Hubert's married sons settled on the lower Teche, most of them near New Iberia but one as far down as St. Mary Parish.  A granddaughter and at least two grandsons settled in St. Landry Parish. 

Oldest son Hubert-Euphroi dit Godefroi, also called Leufroi, born at Attakapas in July 1802, married Marie Eloise, also called Louise Modeste and Modeste Éloise, daughter of fellow Acadians Agricole LeBlanc and Euphrosine Hébert, at the St. Martinville church in January 1827.  Their son Godefroi, fils was baptized at the St. Martinville church, age 5 months, in April 1828; Alfred was born in October 1834; Alix near New Iberia in March 1840; and Ozémé in Lafayette Parish in June 1850.  Godefroi, père's succession record may have been filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1860. He would have been age 58 that year.  His daughters married into the Ardoin, Gary, LeBlanc, and Lopez families in St. Landry Parish.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Godefroi, fils married cousin Marguerite Eugénie or Virginie, also called Éloise, daughter of fellow Acadian François Landry and his Creole wife Marguerite Leleu, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1849.  Their son Hubert was born near Grand Coteau in June 1852, and Léopold in February 1858.  Godefroi, fils's succession record may have been filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1860.  He would have been age 32 that year.  His daughters married into the Broussard and Gary families, one at New Iberia. 

Leufroi's second son Alfred likely married Marie Azéma, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand Richard of St. Martin Parish, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1855.  They settled on the lower Vermilion.  Alfred's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in June 1866.  He would have been age 32 that year.  Marie remarried at Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in November 1866, so Alfred's succession was post-mortem.  Did his family line survive? 

Hubert's second son Bélisaire married Logie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadiand Théophile LeBlanc and Clarisse Hébert, at the St. Martinville church in March 1829.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Paul Bélisaire was born in April 1831 but died at age 9 months in February 1832; Hubert le jeune was born in October 1833; Agricole in March 1836; Bélisaire, fils in March 1838; Jacques in May 1842; Alexandre in December 1844; Alexis in November 1846; and Charles Ernest in April 1849.  Their daughter married into the Leleux family.  They also had a son named Luc or Lucquet.  Four of his sons married by 1870. 

Second son Hubert le jeune married Marie Zelma, called Zelma, daughter of Joseph Daniel and his Acadian wife Marie Sonnier, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1857.  Their son Laclaire was born near New Iberia in October 1859, Luc le jeune in September 1864, Eusèbe in October 1866, and Paul O. near Lydia in December 1868. 

Bélisaire's third son Agricole married Isabelle or Élizabeth, another daughter Joseph Daniel and Marie Sonnier, at the New Iberia church in October 1859.  Their son Césaire was born near New Iberia in December 1864, Camille in July 1867, and Alexandre near Lydia in July 1870. 

Bélisaire's fourth son Luc married Marie Lezima or Lezina, daughter of Arvillien Gary or Garry and his Acadian wife Azélie Thériot, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in October 1865, and sanctified the marriage at the New Iberia church in November.  They settled near Patoutville, now Lydia.  Their son Jacques was born there in October 1868. 

Bélisaire's seventh son Alexis married Idea, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Rivet and his Creole wife Carmelite Bermeyo of Assumption Parish, at the Lydia church, Iberia Parish, in April 1870. 

Hubert's third son, name unrecorded, died at his parents' home at Île-aux-Cannes near Fausse Pointe seven days after his birth in September 1806.

Hubert's fourth son Eusèbe, born at Petite Anse, southwest of Fausse Pointe, in January 1810, also may have died young. 

Hubert's fifth son Émilien, born at Fausse Pointe in January 1812, married Rosalie Dalisene, Dalizene, Delisene, Alizaine, or Fanelie, another daughter of Théophile LeBlanc and Clarisse Hébert, at the St. Martinville church in March 1832.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Émilien, fils, also called Émile, was born in January 1834; Achille in January 1838; Alix le jeune in February 1851; and Léonce in July 1854.  Their daughters married into the Broussard, Daniel, Dugas, and Louvière families.  Two of Émilien's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Émilien, fils married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Louvière and Delphine Broussard, at the New Iberia church in May 1854.  Émilien, fils died in Lafayette Parish in September 1857.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial said that Émile, as he called him, died "at age 25 yrs.," but Émilien, fils was 23.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse two days after his death.  Was Émilien a victim of the yellow fever epidemic that struck South Louisiana during the summer and fall of 1857?  Did his family line die with him? 

Émilien, père's second son Achille married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Frédéric Louvière and his Creole wife Doralise Borel, at the New Iberia church in August 1866; Achille's sister Rosalie remarried to Célestine's brother Adrien.  Achille and Célestine's son Achille, fils was born near Patoutville, now Lydia, in February 1869; and Rodolphe in June 1870. 

Hubert's sixth son Édouard Valsin, born at Fausse Pointe in July 1816, married Julie Pamelise, yet another daughter of Théophile LeBlanc and Clarisse Hébert, at the St. Martinville church in July 1837.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Siméon Ovid or Ovide, was born in March 1844; Paulin in June 1848; Hébert in November 1850; Gustave in September 1854; Oscare in June 1856; Jacques in October 1858; and Richard Toffle in April 1861. 

Oldest son Siméon Ovide was working as a clerk perhaps in New Iberia during the summer of 1861 when, at age 17, he enlisted in Company C of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.  According to Confederate records, Siméon had a fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes, and stood 6 feet, 7 inches tall! The gangly youth was captured four times in Virginia during his service as one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers--at Fredericksburg in May 1863, Rappahannock Station the following November, Strasburg in September 1864, and High Bridge in April 1865.  Needless to say, he spent much time in Federal prisoner-of-war camps--at Old Capitol Prison, D.C.; Fort Delaware, Delaware; and Point Lookout, Maryland.  In June 1865, exactly four years after his enlistment, he was released from the prison compound at Newport News, Virginia, after taking the oath of allegiance to the U.S. government.  Siméon returned to South Louisiana, married Creole Olorine Ardoin, and settled on the Calcasieu prairies.  Their son Simeon, fils was born "in Lacassine," Calcasieu Parish, today's Jefferson Davis Parish, in June 1874.  Siméon, père died probably at Lacassine in c1904, age 59 or 60. 

Hubert's seventh son Victor Treville, born at Fausse Pointe in November 1820, married Marie Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Lacroix Hébert and his Creole wife Geneviève Bonvillain, at the New Iberia church in June 1844.  They settled near Charenton, St. Mary Parish, before moving to Lafayette Parish by the late 1850s.  Their daughter married into the Henry family. 

Hubert's ninth and youngest son Jean Beauville, called Beauville and Bouville, born probably at Fausse Pointe in September 1823, married Clementine, another daughter of Jean Lacroix Hébert and Geneviève Bonvillain, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in April 1846, and sanctified the marriage at the New Iberia church the following June.  Their son Jean Ovide, called Ovide, was born near New Iberia in March 1851; Ulysse in April 1853; and Eugène in November 1858.  Their daughters married into the Hains and Malitte families. 

Firmin's fourth son Valentin, by second wife Sally Thibodeaux, baptized at Opelousas, age 9 months, in May 1779, married Marie-Françoise, called Marine and Marinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Françoise Hébert, at Attakapas in April 1801.  Their daughters married into the Amy, Leleux, and Pellerin families.  Valentin, at age 46, remarried to Joséphine, daughter of François Prevost and  and widow of Gilbert Amy, at the St. Martinville church in June 1824.  Valentin died near New Iberia in December 1842.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Valentin died "at age 67 yrs."  He was 64.  His succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in February 1845, so he may have lived near the boundary between St. Martin and St. Mary parishes.  Three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Valentin, fils, by first wife Marie Hébert, born at Attakapas in December 1801, died at age 4 months the following April.

Valentin's second son Joseph Adolphe, by first wife Marie Hébert, born at Fausse Pointe in December 1804, married Arthémise, daughter of Creole Louis LeBlanc and his Acadian wife Aspasie LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church in November 1832.  They settled in St. Mary Parish.  Their son Joseph O., perhaps Oliffe, was born in February 1834.  Joseph Adolphe's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse in May 1836.  He would have been age 32 that year.  His son married. 

Only son Joseph O. married Marie Estelle, called Estelle, Estellia, and Estelie, daughter of Gabriel Viator and Adélaïde Miguez, at the New Iberia church in January 1854.  Their son Arsène died near New Iberia "at age 13 mths." in February 1856, Luke Deluke was born in September 1858, Darmas Armand in June 1861, Désiré in September 1864, and Pierre Fenelon in April 1867. 

Valentin's third son François Xavier, by first wife Marie Hébert, born at Fausse Pointe in December 1812, married Marguerite Levine, daughter of Louis Leleu and Iréné D'Autruiel, at the St. Martinville church in July 1833.  They lived on lower Bayou Teche before moving to the St. Landry prairies.  Their son Drosin was born near New Iberia in June 1842; Aristide near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in May 1846; François Devasin in October 1861; and Philosin in April 1864.  François's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1866.  He would have been age 54 that year.  His daughters married into the Landry and LeBlanc families.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Second son Aristide married Azéma, daughter of François Legros or Gros and his Acadian wife Carmelite LeBlanc, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in November.  Their son Gabriel was born near Church Point in February 1869. 

Valentin's fourth and youngest son Valentin, fils, the second with the name, by first wife Marie Hébert, born at Fausse Pointe in December 1814, married Merite Marie Armeline, Amelie, or Armelise, daughter of fellow Acadian Dorothée Dupuy and widow of Petit Maubon Latiolais, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1855, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church in August 1856, but Valentin, fils and Marie Amelie had been married, or at were living together, for years.  Their son Firmin was born near New Iberia in December 1846; Jean Baptiste near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in January 1849; and Valentin III in June 1851.  

Firmin's fifth and youngest son Alexandre-Anselme, by second wife Sally Thibodeaux, born at Attakapas in February 1782, married Susanne, daughter of Benjamin Hargrave and Rebecca Gwaltney of Virginia and Vermilion, in St. Martin Parish in December 1807.  Alexandre died "at 5:00 a.m. ... at his home" in Lafayette Parish in June 1826, age 44.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July.  He and his wife probably had no sons, at least none who appear in area church records, so Alexandre Anselme's family line probably died with him. 

Pierre dit La Vielliarde (c1732-1815) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Pierre dit La Vielliarde, elder son of Pierre Landry and Anne-Marie Doucet, born probably at Pigiguit in c1732, married Anne-Élisabeth or -Isabelle Dupuis probably at Pigiguit.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted them at Oxford, on Maryland's Eastern Short, in July 1763.  When Pierre dit La Vielliarde brought four of his children to Louisiana with the first contingent of exiles from Maryland and settled at Cabahannocer, he was a widower.  His daughter by his first wife married into the Comeaux family.  He remarried to cousin Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Landry and Marguerite Bourg, at Cabahannocer in November 1767.  She gave him more children, including sons.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  Daughter Marie-Françoise, born in October 1768, was baptized at New Orleans in April 1769, so they spent some time in the city.  Pierre dit La Vielliarde owned three slaves at Ascension in 1777 and 11 in 1778, an impressive number for an Acadian at that time and place.  He, Marie-Josèphe, and their children were living on upper Bayou Lafourche by the late 1780s.  Pierre dit La Vielliarde held 15 slaves on the upper bayou in 1791, and owned 16 slaves there seven years later.  His daughters by his second wife married into the Breaux, Dupré, LeBlanc, and Zeringue families.  Pierre dit La Vielliarde died in Assumption Parish in June 1815.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that "Pedro of Acadia," as he called him, died at "age 86 yrs."  Five of his eight sons married, but not all of the lines survived.  His older sons remained on the river, but his younger sons and a grandson by his second son settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  (This grandson, Baptiste dit Petit-René, is the great-great grandfather of Troy Landry of Pierre Part, Assumption Parish, an alligator hunter who stars in History Channel's popular series, "Swamp People.")  Pierre dit La Vielliarde's second wife and widow, Marie-Josèphe, died in Assumption Parish in February 1836.  The Plattenville priest who recorded her burial said that she was age 83 when she died, but she was closer to 92. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Anne-Élisabeth Dupuis, born in Maryland in c1756, may have married cousin Osite, daughter of fellow Acadians François-Sébastien Landry and his first wife Marguerite LeBlanc.  Their son Joseph-Alexandre was born at Ascension in January 1789.  Did the family line survive? 

Vielliarde's second son Pierre-Alexis, by first wife Anne-Élisabeth Dupuis, born in Maryland in c1762, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Hébert and Marie-Marguerite LeBlanc, at San Gabriel on the river above Cabahannocer in November 1786.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Crochet, and Freoux families.  Only three of Pierre-Alexis's five sons created their own families.  One settled on upper Bayou Lafourche perhaps near his paternal grandfather.  The other two remained on the river, but their lines did not endure. 

Oldest son Jean-Louis le jeune, born at San Gabriel in August 1787, married cousin Anne Marine or Marianne, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Hébert and Marguerite Gautreaux and sister of brother Armand's wife, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1812.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Séraphin was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in June 1817, and Jean Louis Raphaël in March 1832 Their daughters married into the Enger, Seguin, Thibodeaux, and Trahan families.  One wonders if either of Jean Louis le jeune's sons married. 

Pierre-Alexis's second Jean-Baptiste le jeune, called Baptiste dit Iréné, Baptiste dit Petit René, and Jean-Baptiste dit Tirné, born at San Gabriel in November 1788, married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean André Grégoire Templet and Marie Rose Doiron, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1811.  They lived on the Acadian Coast before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Valérien or Valéry was born near Baton Rouge in December 1813; Treville or Troiville in Iberville Parish in February 1816; Auguste Gervais in Assumption Parish in June 1821 but died there at age 17 months in November 1822; and a son, name unrecorded, died the day of his birth in March 1823.  Their daughters married into the Achée, Falcon, and Simoneaux families.  Baptiste dit Petit René remarried to cousin Euphrosine, called Frosine, daughter of Jean Malbrough and his Acadian wife Rosalie Comeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1824. (Baptiste dit Petit Renée and Euphroisine are alligator hunter Troy Landry's paternal great-great grandparents.)  Euphrosine's paternal grandfather, Nicolas Marcoff, a German, and his family, including Euphrosine's father Jean, had come to Louisiana from Port Tobacco, Maryland, in 1769 aboard the ill-fated ship Britannia.  Euphrosine's mother's parents had come to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768.  Euphrosine's maternal grandmother, Anne-Isabelle Landry, was a sister of Baptiste dit Petit Renée's grandfather, Pierre dit La Vielliarde.  Baptiste dit Petit Renée and Euphroisine's son Paul Valsaeur or Valsin, called Valsin and also Vincent, was born in Assumption Parish in June 1825; Clément in February 1833; Joseph Auguste in May 1841; and Octave Onésime in 1844.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Blanchard, Giroir, and Simoneaux families.  Baptiste dit Petit René may have died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in May 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean Baptiste, as he called him, died at "age 83 years"; Baptiste dit Petit René would have been age 80.  Six of his eight sons by both wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Valéry, by first wife Scholastique Templet, married first cousin Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Blanchard and Colette Landry, his uncle and aunt, at the Plattenville church in February 1836.  Their son Landry was born posthumously in Assumption Parish in January 1838.  Valéry died in Assumption Parish in November 1837, age 24. 

Only son Landry married Estelle, daughter of Pierre Houfnag, Oufnaud, or Oufnac and his Acadian wife Azélie Theriot, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1862.  Their child, name unrecorded, died near Paincourtville two days after its birth in October 1862.  Landry remarried to cousin Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Gédéon Hébert and Aglase Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1867.  Their son Ulysse Cletus was born near Paincourtville in April 1870. 

Baptiste dit Petit René's second son Tréville, by first wife Scholastique Templet, Treville, married first cousin Clarisse, another daughter of Louis Blanchard and Colette Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1842; they, too, had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Camille Jean Baptiste was born near Paincourtville in February 1849; Joseph Schuyler in August 1852; and Louis Cletus near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in April 1868.  Their daughter married into the Daigle family at Pierre Part. 

Baptiste dit Petit René's fifth son Valsin, by second wife Euphrosine Malbrough, married Rosa or Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin LeBlanc and Sidalise Breaux, at the Paincourtville church in September 1845.  Their son Joseph Émile was born near Paincourtville in February 1849, and Félix Zéphirin in May 1854.  Their daughters married onto the Simoneaux family.  Valsin remarried to Euranie or Uranie, also called Oralie and Manie, daughter of fellow Acadians Zéphirin Dupuis and Augustine Aucoin, at the Paincourtville church in June 1857.  Their son Camille Franklin was born near Paincourtville in March 1858; Laurent in July 1859; Aurelien in September 1861; a son, name and age unrecorded, died in December 1869; and Léopold Odressy was born in October 1870. 

Baptiste dit Petit René's sixth son Clément, by second wife Euphrosine Malbrough, married Marie, daughter of Domingue Perera or Perere and Rosalie Rivero, at the Paincourtville church in May 1867.  Their son George Clément was born near Paincourtville in April 1868. 

Baptiste dit Petit René's seventh son Joseph Auguste, by second wife Euphrosine Malbrough, married Marie, another daughter of Pierre Houfnag and Azélie Theriot, at the Paincourtville church in February 1862.  Their son Joseph Émile was born near Paincourtville in December 1862, and Joseph Arish Anatole in December 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Auguste, called J. A. in the Confederate records, may have served in Company H of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  Joseph Auguste, at age 45, remarried to Leora Angella, called Angela Léocade, 20-year-old daughter of Corsican Immigrant Jean Baptiste Melini or Meligni and his Acadian wife Célestine Hébert, at Napoleonville, Assumption Parish, in June 1886.  They settled near Pierre Part.  One of their sons, Edmond Joseph, was born at Pierre Part in December 1899.  Joseph Auguste--the paternal great-grandfather of alligator hunter Troy Landry--died at Pierre Part in July 1919, age 78.  

Baptiste dit Petit René's eighth and youngest son Octave, by second wife Euphrosine Malbrough, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Trasimond Daigle and his Creole wife Roufine Rivero, at the Paincourtville church in January 1867.  Their son Joseph Étienne was born near Paincourtville in December 1870. 

Pierre-Alexis's third son Amand- or Arnaud-Apollinaire, born at Ascension in July 1792, married cousin Marie Marthe, called Marthe, another daughter of Charles Hébert and Marguerite Gautreaux and sister of brother Jean-Louis's wife, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in April 1817.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, Dupuis, and Ferbos families.  Did Armand father any sons? 

Pierre-Alexis's fourth son Jean-Augustin, born at Assumption in January 1794, may have died young. 

Pierre-Alexis's fifth and youngest son Ursin, born at Assumption in May 1796, died there at age 16 months in October 1797. 

Vielliarde's third son Fabien, by first wife Anne-Élisabeth Dupuis, born in Maryland in c1764, was living with his father, stepmother, and seven half-siblings on upper Bayou Lafourche in January 1788.  One wonders if he married. 

Vielliarde's fourth son Armand, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born probably at Ascension in c1770, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Blanchard and Marie-Madeleine Livois, at Assumption in January 1795, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Le Borgne de Bélisle and Marie-Josèphe Dupuis, at Assumption in April 1799.  Armand died in Assumption Parish in July 1846.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Armand died at "age 76 years."  His daughters, all by his second wife, married into the Landry and LeBlanc families.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own. 

Older son Valéry-Pierre-Nicodemus, by second wife Marguerite Le Borgne de Bélisle, born at Assumption in June 1800, died there at age 2 1/2 in December 1802. 

Armand's younger son Eugène-Gervais, by second wife Marguerite Le Borgne de Bélisle, born in Assumption in February 1802, married double cousin Françoise Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Marguerite Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1821.  Their son Aristide was born in Assumption Parish in August 1828, and Drosin in April 1833.  Françoise Carmelite died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in January 1864, age 59.  Eugène died near Paincourtville two months later, in March 1864.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Eugène died at "age 62 years," so this probably was him.  His daughters married into the Babin, Breaux, Gilbert, and LeBlanc families and perhaps into the Nicolas or Nicholas family as well.  Both of his sons also created their own families.

Older son Aristide married cousin Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Blanchard and Céleste Landry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1850; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Téofile was born near Paincourtville in February 1851, Joseph Elphége in December 1852, Joseph Adrian in July 1854, Joseph Artus October 1856, and Victor Lucien in April 1858. 

Eugène Gervais's younger son Drosin married Uranie or Ulanie, daughter of Anselme Mollere and his Acadian wife Azema LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in July 1854. Their son Joseph Désiré was born near Paincourtville in December 1856, Pierre Robert in February 1861, Jean Wilson in November 1866, and Joseph Siméon in April 1869. 

Vielliarde's fifth son Jean-Louis, called Louis, from second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born at Ascension in October 1772, died at Assumption in October 1803.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was "about 27 years" old when he died.  He was 31.  He evidently did not marry. 

Vielliarde's sixth son Paul-Eusèbe, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born at Ascension in August 1774, died at Assumption in April 1794, age 19.  He probably did not marry. 

Vielliarde's seventh son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, from second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born at Ascension in February 1780, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Trahan and Marie Blanchard, at Ascension in May 1806.  Jean Baptiste probably died near Paincourtville in November 1861.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean Bapt., as he called him, died at "age 83 years."  Baptiste would have been a few months shy of 82.  His daughters married into the Feray, Gautreaux, and Verret families.  Five of his seven sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Landry Arseman, born at Ascension in March 1807, may have died young. 

Baptiste's second son Henri Alcide, called Alcide, born in Assumption Parish in November 1810, married cousin Colette Luce Landry probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1820s or early 1830s.  Their son Joseph Jean Baptiste, called Jean Baptiste, was born in Assumption Parish in September 1831; André near Paincourtville in November 1843 but died at age 9 in December 1852; and Séverin was born in June 1845 but died at age 1 in July 1846.  Colette died near Paincourtville in August 1864, age 53.  Their daughters married into the Dugas, Dupré, and LeBlanc families.  Their surviving son also created a family of his own.

Oldest son Jean Baptiste married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin LeBlanc and Azélie Duhon, at the Paincourtville church in October 1851.  Their son Joseph Victor was born near Paincourtville in December 1864. 

Baptiste's third son André Dorsin or Dorsino, called Dorsino, born in Assumption Parish in October 1812, married cousin Marie Elezile, called Elezile, daughter of fellow Acadian Grégoire Landry and his Creole wife Josèphine Rousseau, at the Plattenville church in October 1841.  Elezile died near Plattenville in July 1843, age 27.  Did she and Dorsino have any children?  Did Dorsino remarry?

Baptiste's fourth son Emérant Jean, born in Assumption Parish in January 1815, married first cousin Phelonise Barbe, daughter of Armand Landry and his second wife Marguerite Le Borgne de Bélisle, his uncle and aunt, at the Plattenville church in February 1835.  Their son Pierre Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in March 1836 but died at age 1 1/2 in June 1837, another Pierre Joseph was born in June 1838, and Joseph Léonce died eight days after his birth in April 1845.  Their surviving son created a family of his own.

Second son Pierre Joseph, the second with the name, married cousin Rosema, daughter of fellow Acadians François Crochet and Eulalie Landry, at the Paincourtville church in April 1858.

Baptiste's fifth son Hermogène Séverin, called Séverin, born in Assumption Parish in February 1817, married Zulmée Catherine, daughter of Manuel Fernandez and Julie Rousseau, at the Plattenville church in February 1842.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Assumption Parish a day after his birth in January 1843. 

Baptiste's sixth son Landry Anatole, called Anatole, born in Assumption Parish in July 1822, married cousin Adillia, Adelia, or Adelise, daughter of fellow Acadians Vincent Landry le jeune and Élisabeth dite Élise Arceneaux, at the Paincourtville church in June 1862.  Their son Pierre Elibee was born near Paincourtville in June 1865, and Désiré in December 1867 but died at "age a few days" in January 1868. 

Baptiste's seventh and youngest son Basile Pierre or Pierre Basile, born in Assumption Parish in June 1830, died there at age 3 in June 1833. 

Vielliarde's eighth and youngest son Henri, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born at Ascension in October 1781, married Marie Scholastique or Scholastique Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bergeron and Marie Foret, at St. James on the river in May 1805.  Henri died "in the 'catastrophy[sic] at Last Island,'" a popular resort on the Gulf of Mexico, in August 1856, age 75.  His daughters married into the Landry, Robichaux, and Simoneaux families.  Five of his six sons also created their own families.  A son and a grandson settled on lower Bayou Teche. 

Oldest son Michel Henri, baptized at Assumption, age 4 months, in June 1806, married Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Gravois and Rosalie LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1831.  Their son Michel Vileor was born in Assumption Parish in December 1831; Joseph Basile in January 1835; Maurice Henri, called Henri, in September 1836; Jules Marc in April 1838; Siméon Lusignon, called Lusignon, in February 1840; Joseph Désiré near Paincourtville in March 1846; Nicholas Joseph in December 1847; and Michel Murville, called Murville le jeune, in July 1849.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Hébert, MacCarty, and Simoneaux families.  Four of Michel Henri's sons married by 1870.  One married on lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65 but returned to the upper Lafourche. 

Third son Henri died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in December 1854.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Henry, as he called him, died at "age 19 years."  Maurice Henri would have been age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Michel Henri's fourth son Jules Marc married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Rivet and his Creole wife Carmelite Bermeyo, at the Paincourtville church in April 1864.  Their son Joseph Aldes was born near Paincourtville in April 1866. 

Michel Henri's fifth son Lusignon married Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Thomas Clovis Dugas and Claire Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in July 1858.  Their son Joseph died near Paincourtville 12 days after his birth in January 1861; and Joseph Laurent Adam, a twin, was born in January 1862 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1864.  Lusignon remarried to Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Comeaux and Azélie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in November 1865.  Their son Joseph Henri was born near Plattenville in September 1866, Joseph Rodolphe in December 1867, and Joseph Anatole near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in May 1870. 

Michel Henri's sixth son Joseph Désiré married Irma, daughter of Jean Baptiste Benit, Benite, or Bernique and his Acadian wife Amelia Boudreaux, at the Pattersonville church, St. Mary Parish, in February 1867, but settled on the upper Lafourche.  Their son Eno Alexandre was born near Paincourtville in February 1868.

Michel Henri's eighty and youngest son Murville le jeune married Cécile or Cécilia, daughter of Aglae Allen, at the Paincourtville church in January 1870.  One wonders who Cécile's father may have been. 

Henri's second son Drosin Mathurin, born in Assumption Parish August 1810, married Émilie, another daughter of Joseph Gravois and Rosalie LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Rousseau, at the Plattenville church in August 1835.  Drosin died in Assumption Parish in November 1836, age 26.  Did his family line die with him? 

Henri's third son Jean Baptiste Mourville, Murville, Meurville, or Merville, born in Assumption Parish in October 1812, married Marie Fidelie or Fidelise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Dugas and Marguerite Duhon, at the Plattenville church in September 1833.  Their son Joseph James, called James, was born near Paincourtville in February 1845; Désiré Bernard in July 1847 but died two days after his birth; Jean Joseph Aniou or Eno, called Eno, was born in October 1849; Joseph Pierre Bienvenu in October 1851; and Joseph Paul in December 1853.  Their daughters married into the Charlet, Laverre, and LeBlanc families.  Murville remarried to Munircca or Manurva Jane, called Jane and Jeanne, daughter of Henry Newchurch and Eliza McCasky, at the Paincourtville church in November 1856.  Their son Henry was born near Paincourtville in October 1857;  Joseph Sylvain, also called Joseph Dasilva, in July 1860 but died at age 10 months in May 1861; Thiburse, age unrecorded, died in April 1861; and Henry Lee was born in December 1866.  Two of Murville's sons married before 1870. 

Oldest son James, by first wife Fidelie Dugas, married cousin Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Blanchard and Colette Landry, at the Paincourtville church in February 1868, the day before his brother Eno married in the same church. 

Murville's second son Eno, by first wife Fidelie Dugas, married Carmelite, daughter of Narcisse Sanchez and Rosalie Martinez, at the Paincourtville church in February 1868, the day after his brother James was married in the same church. 

Henri's fourth son Angèl died in Assumption Parish four days after his birth in January 1815.

Henri's fifth son Joseph Telesphore, called Telesphore, born in Assumption Paris in February 1822, married Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadians Julien LeBlanc and Scholastique LeBlanc, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in May 1844, and sanctified the marriage at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July.  They remained in St. Mary Parish, though they may have lived briefly on upper Bayou Lafourche during the early 1850s.  Their son Telesphore, fils was born near Charenton, St. Mary Parish, in January 1845; and Joseph Desilva near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in May 1854.  Telesphore may have remarried to fellow Acadian Marie Célestine Comeaux at the Pattersonville church, St. Mary Parish, in August 1858. 

Henri's sixth and youngest son Pierre Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, born in Assumption Parish in July 1827, married Laurenza, daughter of Joseph Capdeville and his Acadian wife Henriette Blanchard, at the Paincourtville church in October 1847.  Their son Joseph Superville was born near Paincourtville in February 1852.  Bienvenu died near Paincourtville in August 1852, age 25.  His daughters married Blanchard cousins.   

Étienne (c1734-1789) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Étienne, younger son of Pierre Landry and Anne-Marie Doucet and brother of Pierre dit La Vielliarde, born probably at Pigiguit in c1734, married fellow Acadian Dorothée Babin in Nova Scotia or Maryland in the 1750s.  Étienne remarried to cousin Marie-Josèphe Landry probably in Maryland in the late 1750s or early 1760s.  Colonial officials counted them with a daughter at Baltimore in July 1763.  They followed his older brother to Louisiana.  Spanish officials counted Étienne and Marie-Josèphe on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  Étienne died at Ascension in October 1789.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Étienne was age 57 when he died.  Marie-Josèphe did not remarry.  She died in Assumption Parish in November 1810, age 77.  Étienne's daughter by first wife Dorothée married into the Hébert family.  Two of his three sons also married into that family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1767, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste dit Petit Jean Hébert and Marie-Madeleine Dupuis, at nearby San Gabriel in November 1789.  In 1797, Jean Baptiste owned five slaves on his farm at Assumption, an impressive number for that time and place.  The following year, he held only two slaves.  He died in Assumption Parish in July 1838.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 73 when he died, but he probably was closer to 71.  His daughters married into the Crochet, Dupuis, and Simoneaux families.  Only half of his six sons married.  One settled in Ascension Parish.  The others remained in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Alexandre le jeune, born at Ascension in September 1791, married Judith or Juliette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Melançon and Madeleine LeBlanc of Ascension, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1822.  They settled in Ascension Parish.  Their son Jérôme was born in Ascension Parish in September 1823; Vincent de Paul in July 1829; Joseph Gustave in October 1831 but died there at age 5 in October 1836; Florian Alexandre was born in November 1833 but died there at age 11 months in October 1834; Joseph Mortimer, called Mortimer, in July 1835; Jean Homere, perhaps called Homere or Omer, in November 1837; Hercule Alexandre or Alexandre Hercules in August 1841; and Right St. Landry in May 1847.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Gautreaux, and Hébert families.  Three of Alexandre le jeune's eight sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jérôme likely married fellow Acadian Julia Anne Brasset and settled in Ascension Parish by the late 1840s.  Their son Albert Jérôme was born in Ascension Parish in December 1858, Alexis Robraud in November 1860, Alexandre in January 1863, and Alcée Prudent near Gonzales in May 1868.  Their daughter married into the Salassi family. 

Alexandre le jeune's fifth son Mortimer married fellow Acadian Lodoisque or Lodoiska Breaux at the Donalsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1862.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son Janvier Mortimer was born in January 1863 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1864, Pierre Antoine was born in early 1865, and Philippe Alphonse in January 1867. 

Alexandre le jeune's sixth son Jean Homere may have been the Omer Landry who died in Ascension Parish in August 1865.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Omer died at "age 30 years."  Jean Homere would have been age 27. 

Alexandre le jeune's seventh son Alexandre Hercule married Alouisa, Alouisia, or Alysia, daughter of Michel Amédée Blouin and his Acadian wife Élisabeth Gaudin, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in February 1864.  Their son Léon Sidney was born near Gonzales in April 1865, and Michel Amédée in June 1867. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Siméon or Simon, born at Ascension in February 1794, married cousin Rosalie Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Giroir and Isabelle Landry, at the Plattenville church in August 1821.  Their son Hilarion or Ilarion Avasse was born in Assumption Parish in October 1822, Sylvain Luc or Luc Sylvanie in October 1825, Vincent Théodule in January 1830, Siméon Clairville in January 1835, Ursin Cyrille in September 1836, and Zéphirin Arsène in May 1838.  Siméon/Simon may have died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in March 1855.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Simon died at "age 67 years."  Siméon/Simon would have been age 61.  His daughters married into the Landry, LeBlanc, and Simoneaux families, one of them to a first cousin.  Three of his six sons married by 1870.  Two of the youngest sons and at least one grandson moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Hilarion likely married Célestine Coupel, Copel, Copelle, Coupele, or Coupelle.  Their son Eusilien Honoré was born near Paincourtville in April 1845; Joseph Clerville in November 1860; and Joseph Lusion, perhaps Lucien, was baptized at the Pierre Part church, age unrecorded, in July 1863.  Their daughter married into the Vane family.  One of Hilarion's married before 1870 and settled on lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Eusilien married cousin Dometille, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Crochet and Bathilde Landry, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in May 1864; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marriage.  Their son Joseph Clairville le jeune was born near Pierre Part in April 1865, and Joseph Ulysse near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche in February 1869. 

Siméon's second son Sylvain Luc married Arvilla, Arrivila, or Olvida, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis André Talbot and Rosalie Dugas, at the Plattenville church in January 1856.  Their son Maurice Lusignan was born near Paincourtville in September 1859, Robert Théophile in March 1862, and François Estefin near Plattenville in January 1864.  They were living near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche in the late 1860s. 

Siméon's fifth son Ursin Cyrille likely died near Paincourtville in August 1852.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who gave the father's but not the mother's name, said that Augustin Cirillo, as he called him, died at "age 11 months," but Ursin Cyrille would have been age 16.  Someone who reviewed the burial record wrote "Ursin" in the margin, so this probably was him. 

Siméon's sixth and youngest son Zéphirin Arsène, called Sifrin by the recording priest, married Ophelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Babin and Estelle Hébert of Lafourche Parish, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in January 1868. 

Jean-Baptiste's third son Calixte-Donat, born at Assumption in August 1797, died there at age 14 months in October 1798.

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Paulin, born at Assumption in June 1800, died in Assumption Parish in May 1833.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paulin was age 30 when he died, but he was 32.  He probably did not marry. 

Jean-Baptiste's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Assumption in December 1801, died there in January 1802 10 days after his birth. 

 Jean-Baptiste, père's sixth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, the second with the name, called Baptiste, born at Assumption in March 1803, married cousin Rosalie or Rosaline, daughter of Simon Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Rosalie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in February 1825.  They settled near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Jean Baptiste Grégoire was born in September 1832; Valéry or Valère Théophile in March 1835; Jean Baptiste Eusilien in July 1837; and Zéphirin was baptized at the Plattenville church, age unrecorded, in December 1839.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Blanchard, Crochet, Domingues, Landry, and Simoneaux families.  One of Baptiste's sons married by 1870.

Second son Valère Théophile married first cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Siméon Landry and Rosalie Isabelle Giroir, his uncle and aunt, at the Paincourtville church in January 1860; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Sarasin Simon was born near Paincourtville in March 1867. 

Étienne's second son Ignace, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born probably at Cabahannocer in June 1769, died at Ascension, age 5 1/2, in October 1774. 

Étienne's third and youngest son Joseph-Alexandre, called Alexandre and Alexis, from second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, born at Ascension in December 1775, married Céleste or Colette, daughter of fellow Acadians François Hébert and Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc of San Gabriel, at Assumption in February 1796.  Their daughter married into the Landry and Trahan families.  Five of Alexandre's seven sons created their own families, and two of them married sisters.  One of them "returned" to the river.  The others remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Joseph-Alexandre, fils, born at Assumption in February 1797, married cousin Anne Eméranthe, called Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Hébert and Marguerite Chiasson of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1825.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Achille was born in Assumption Parish in November 1825 but died there at age 7 months the following June, Joseph Vileor near Baton Rouge in July 1827, and Édouard in January 1830.  Joseph Alexandre, fils's daughters married Hébert cousins, one of them on Bayou Teche.  Neither of his surviving sons married by 1870. 

Alexandre's second son Hippolyte, born at Assumption in August 1798, married cousin Françoise Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Giroir and Isabelle Landry, at the Plattenville church in April 1820.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Assumption Parish the day of his birth in October 1821; Hippolyte Joseph Simon, called Joseph, was born in December 1824 but died at age 12 in December 1836; and Joseph Sylvanie, called Sylvanie, was born in August 1826 but died at age 1 in July 1827.  Hippolyte died near Paincourtville in January 1853, age 54.  His daughter married into the Robichaux family. The family line, except for its blood, evidently did not endure.   

Alexandre's third son Grégoire-Mathurin, born at Assumption in November 1800, married cousin Delphine Denise, another daughter of Jean Baptiste Giroir and Isabelle Landry, at the Plattenville church in February 1821.  Their son Didier Grégoire was born in Assumption Parish in May 1822 but died at age 7 years, 4 months, in September 1829; and a son, name unrecorded, died a day after his birth in October 1828.  Did this family line survive? 

Alexandre's fourth son Simon Alexandre, born at Assumption in February 1805, married Anne Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Aucoin and Marie Marguerite Noël, at the Plattenville church in May 1824.  Their son Landry Joseph, called Joseph and also Elegi, was born in Assumption Parish in July 1825.  Simon died in Assumption Parish in April 1832, age 27.  His daughters married into the Dugas and Hébert families.  His son also created his own family.

Only son Joseph married cousin Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pierre Landry, fils and Henriette Blanchard, at the Paincourtville church in April 1847; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Marcellin was born near Paincourtville in September 1850, Louis Xavier in August 1860, Aimée Camille in May 1867, and Maurice Barthélemy in August 1869.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin. 

Alexandre's fifth son Victor Béloni, born in Assumption Parish in November 1808, married cousin Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Barrilleaux and Élisabeth Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1830.  Victor Béloni may have died in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1849.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Victor died "at age 40 yrs.," so this probably was him.  Did he father any sons? 

Alexandre's sixth son Valérien, born in Assumptio Parish in November 1814, died there at age 2 1/2 in July 1817. 

Alexandre's seventh and youngest son Dominique Valérien, called Valérien, born in Assumption Parish in August 1818, died the following March. 

Charles (c1738-1804?) à ? à René le jeune Landry?

Charles Landry, born probably at Pigiguit in c1738, was deported with his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted him and his younger siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  He led his siblings to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer, where he married cousin Marie Landry in the late 1760s.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770.  Charles remarried to couisin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Germain Babin and Marguerite Landry, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in December 1775.  Spanish officials counted them on the east bank of the river at Ascension in 1777.  They owned a slave by then.  Charles, fils may have died at Ascension in April 1804.  He would have been age 66 that year.  His daughters married into the Babin, Braud, Landry, and Lecompte families.  His only son remained in Ascension Parish and had many sons of his own, but not all of them married, and not all of their lines survived.  This line of the Landry family, in fact, may have died out in the third generation. 

Only son Léger, by first wife Marie Landry, born probably at Ascension in c1783, married cousin Anne Louise, Élise, Elisa, or Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Osite LeBlanc, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in October 1807.  They settled near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Léger died "at his home in Iberville parish" in November 1837, age 54.  His daughter married into the Melançon family.  Only three of his eight sons married, but only one of the lines may have endured. 

Oldest son Léger Valsin or Valsin Léger, born in November 1808, married Aspasie, daughter of Honoré Grégoire and Louise Vensan, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1839, and remarried to cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Eusèbe Alexandre Babin and Madeleine Sylvina LeBlanc and widow of Paul Onésime Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1842; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Valsin Léger, as the recording priest called him, died in Ascension Parish in October 1848.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial did not give Valsin Léger's age at the time of his death, but he was a month shy of 40.  Did he father any sons by either of his wives? 

Léger's second son Philibert Trasimond, born in April 1810, evidently died young. 

Léger's third son Jean Rosémond, born in January 1812, died in Ascension Parish in May 1838, age 25.  He probably did not marry. 

Léger's fourth son Duval, born in October 1813, may have died young. 

Léger's fifth son Marcellin, born in March 1817, married Victoire Celina, Celima, or Selma, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Daigre and Adélaïde Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in December 1845.  Their daughter married into the Martinez family.  Marcellin, at age 47, remarried to Angélique, also called Angelie, daughter of Jacques Rosémond Berret or Perret and his Acadian wife Marcellite LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1864.  They settled near Plaquemine on the west side of the river.  Their son Joseph Lee was born in May 1865; a son, name and age unrecorded (perhaps Joseph Lee), may have died in July 1867; and Rosémond Léger was born in October 1867.  One wonders if the family line endured. 

Léger's sixth son Narcisse Pharon, also called Narcissus Pharas, born in October 1818, married Marguerite Coralie, called Coralie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and Marie Scholastique Gautreaux, at the Donalsonville church in February 1848.  They were living near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, on the west side of the river in the early 1850s.  Narcisse may have died in Iberville Parish in September 1855.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Narcisse died at "age 32 years." Narcisse Pharon would have been age 36.  Did he father any sons? 

Léger's seventh son Colin Suriaque, born in March 1820, evidently died young. 

Léger's eighth and youngest son Gervais Stanislas, born in March 1828, also may have died young. 

Jacques (c1743-1783) à ? à René le jeune Landry?

Jacques Landry, born probably at Pigiguit in c1743, brother of Charles, was deported to Maryland with his family in 1755.  Colonial officials counted him and his siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Jacques married fellow Acadian Françoise Blanchard probably in Maryland in the mid-1760s.  They followed his family to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer, where Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770 and 1777.  They owned two slaves in 1777.  Jacques died at Ascension in December 1783, age 40.  His daughters married into the Bergeron, Duhon, and Mollere families.  Only half of his six sons seem to have created families of their own, but only two of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Victor, born probably at Ascension in c1768, died there at age 3 or 4 in August 1772. 

Jacques's second son Donat died at Ascension, age 20 months, in September 1772. 

Jacques's third son Jacques, fils, born at Ascension in January 1779, died in Ascension Parish in July 1829, age 50.  He does not seem to have married.   

Jacques, père's fourth son Jacques- or Joseph-Désiré, called Désiré, born at Ascension in January 1782, married Rosalie Justine or Justine Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Marie Richard and Rose Bourgeois, at Cabahannocer in July 1803.  Désiré died in Ascension Parish in April 1823.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Désiré was age 43 when he died, but he was 41.  His daughters married into the Bouquet, Hamilton, and Landry families.  Did he father any sons?   

Jacques, père's fifth son Donat, the second with the name, a twin, born at Ascension in November 1783 a month before his father died, married cousin Anne, also called Marie Élise or Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Melançon and Marguerite Landry, at Ascension in May 1805.  They settled near the boundary of what became Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Donat died in Ascension Parish in May 1836, age 52.  His daughter married into the Dugas family.  Only one of his four sons seems to have created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Donat, fils died two days after his birth in Ascension Parish in January 1807.

Donat, père's second son Paul Onésime, born in Ascension Parish December 1807, evidently died young. 

Donat, père's third son Ursin, born in Ascension Parish in September 1808, also may have died young. 

Donat, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph Valentin, called Valentin and T. Valentin, born in Ascension Parish in July 1813, married cousin Christine Élisabeth, called Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Hyacinthe Landry and Marguerite Eugènie Babin, at the Donalsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1839.  Their son Bernard Harmon, also called Hermand Bernard, was born in Ascension Parish in May 1843; Joseph Augustin in March 1845; Eustache Vileor in March 1847; and Vincent died at age 6 months in September 1852.  Élisabeth died in Ascension Parish in October 1854, age 32.  Her and Valentin's daughter married into the Gautreaux family.  At age 42, Joseph Valentin, called T. Valentin by the recording priest, remarried to cousin Marguerite Elina, called Elina, another daughter of Auguste Hyacinthe Landry and Marguerite Eugènie Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1855.  They settled near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their son Laurent Valentin was born in September 1858, Landry Elphége in March 1859, Barthélemy Alphrede in August 1862, and Alexandre Joseph in March 1869.  Two of Valentin's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Hermand Bernard, by fist wife Élisabeth Landry, married Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Boudreaux and Eulalie Hébert, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in April 1870. 

Valentin's third son Eustache Vileor, by first wife Élisabeth Landry, called Vileor E. by the recording priest, married Louise, probably Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Victorin Melançon and Marie Sylvanie Boudreaux, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1870. 

Jacques, père's sixth and youngest son Victor-Martin, Donat's twin, married cousin Anne Jeanne, called Jeanette, another daughter of Joseph Melançon and Marguerite Landry, at the Donaldson church in February 1808.  Victor died in Ascension Parish in March 1838, age 54.  Their daughters married into the Babin, LeBlanc, and Regauffre families.  One of his sons also created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Gédéon, born in Ascension Parish in December 1808, married cousin Marie Zulma, called Zulma, Melançon probably in the late 1820s.  Their son Martin was born in Ascension Parish in November 1830 but died at age 5 months in May 1831; Joseph Joachim, called Joachim, was born in February 1832; Joseph Dernon or Dornon in July 1833 but died at age 13 months in August 1834; Gédéon Victor was born in November 1836 but died at age 16 months in March 1838; Joseph Valsin was born in July 1844 but died the following November; and Joseph Privat Destival was born in August 1845 but died at age 2 in October 1847.  Gédéon died in Ascension Parish in May 1849.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Gédéon died at "age 41 years."   Gédéon fathered many sons, but nearly all of them died young.  One wonders why.  One of his six sons lived long enough to marry and settle in Ascension Parish.  The son also died young, but not before fathering a son of his own. 

Second son Joseph Joachim married cousin Marguerite Clara, called Clara, daughter of fellow Acadians Olésime Landry and Marie Madeleine Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1850; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Jackson was born in Ascension Parish in June 1852.  Joachim died in Ascension Parish in July 1852.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joachim died at "age 21 years."  He was 20. 

Victor Martin's second son Joseph Ursin, born in Ascension Parish in January 1820, may have died young. 

François (?-1783?) à ? à René le jeune Landry?

François Landry, born probably at Pigiguit, Charles and Jacques's brother, was deported with his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted him and his siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  François followed his siblings to Cabahannocer, where he married fellow Acadian Marie-Rose LeBlanc in May 1768.  François may have died there in 1783.  The priest who recorded the burial of François Landry, "First Sergeant of Militia," did not give his parents' names, mention a wife, or give his age at the time of his death, so one wonders if this was him. 

Joseph (c1752-?) à ? à René le jeune Landry?

Joseph Landry, born probably at Pigiguit in c1752, Charles, Jacques, and François's brother, was deported to Maryland with his family in 1755.  Colonial officials counted him and his siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Joseph followed his older brother Jacques to Cabahannocer, where Spanish officials counted him with his brother's family on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770.  He may have been the Joseph Landry who married first to fellow Acadian Madeleine LeBlanc and then to fellow Acadian Madeleine Babin, widow of Charles Babin, at Ascension in November 1781. One wonders if his family line survived in the Bayou State. 

Only son Pierre, perhaps by second wife Madeleine Babin, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in December 1785, may have died young. 

Amand-Pierre (c1746-1793) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Amand-Pierre, younger son of Charles Landry and Marie LeBlanc, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1746, followed his family to Maryland and two of his sisters to Cabahannocer, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Melanson and Rosalie Blanchard, in c1768.  Spanish officials counted Amand-Pierre and Marguerite on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabanocé in 1769 and on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770.  Later that decade, probably following his sister Pélagie, who married a son of Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil, Amand-Pierre and Marguerite moved to the Attakapas District and settled at Côte Gélée.  In his early 40s, Amand-Pierre remarried to cousin Élisabeth, also called Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Landry and his second wife Isabelle Dugas and widow of Joseph Dugas, in August 1789.  Élisabeth was born in France and had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, one of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  A tutor was appointed for Amand-Pierre's children in May 1793.  He died at Attakapas in November 1793, in his late 40s.  His daughters by both wives married into the Broussard, Granger, and Melançon families.  Three of his four sons also created their own families on the prairies. 

Oldest son Joseph-Vital, called Vital, from first wife Marguerite Melançon, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in December 1770, married Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Mire and Madeleine Cormier of Côte Gelée, at Attakapas in December 1797; Pélagie also had been born on the river.  Vital died at his home at Côte Gelée in January 1805, age 34.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in September 1808.  His daughters married into the Bodin, Leleux, and Louviere families.  He and his wife had no sons, at least none who appear in local church records, so his line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

Vital's only son, name unrecorded, died probably at Côte Gelée, age 15 days, in June 1802. 

Amand-Pierre's second son Pierre, by first wife Marguerite Melançon, baptized at Opelousas, age 7 months, in April 1780, evidently died young. 

Amand-Pierre's third son Jean-Marcel, by first wife Marguerite Melançon, born at Attakapas in September 1781, married Amable Ursule, also called Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Doiron and Marie Blanche Bernard of Nantes and La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in January 1808.  Ursule had come to Louisiana in 1785 aboard the third of the Seven Ships from France.  Jean Marcel died in Lafayette Parish in July 1835, age 53.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1839.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  She remarried to a Durio widower from Grand Coteau. 

Amand-Pierre's fourth and youngest son Pierre, the second of the name, by first wife Marguerite Melançon, born at Attakapas in April 1784, married cousin Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Landry and Marie Madeleine Hébert of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church in June 1813.  Their daughters married into the Broussard, Comeaux, Granger, LeBlanc, Richard, and Sonnier families.  Two of his four sons also created their own families on the prairies. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Comeaux and Marguerite Granger, at the Vermilionville church in December 1841 (the printed marriage record states that "This entry was scratched," but for what reason it does not say; nonetheless, the couple married).  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Aristide Alexis was born in February 1847, and François in October 1855.  Pierre's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1866.  His daughters married into the Guidry, Hulot, and Landry families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

 Oldest son Aristide Alexis married Émelia Fabre, widow of Edgar Sonnier, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1870. 

Pierre, père's second son Basile, born at Côte Gelée in April 1816, may have died young. 

Pierre, père's third son Eugène, born at Côte Gelée in May 1819, also may have died young. 

Pierre, père's fourth and youngest son Amand Trasimond, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 months, in December 1829, married cousin Marie Amelia, Azélie, or Azélia, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Landry and his Creole wife Marie Azélie Vallot, at the Vermilionville church in January 1858.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son François Zulmé was born in December 1858; and Joseph Trasimond, perhaps their son, in St. Landry Parish in October 1863.   

Basile (c1750-1811) à Claude, fils à Claude à René le jeune Landry

Basile, third and youngest son of Vincent Landry and Marguerite Boudrot, born at Minas in c1750, was deported with his family to Pennsylvania in 1755.  After his parents died in the Quaker colony, he joined a Thériot half-sister and her Melanson husband at Snow Hill, Maryland, after July 1763.  Still in his teens, in 1766 he followed them to Cabahannocer, where officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1769.  The following year, he was counted with his half-sister, now a widow, on the same side of the river at nearby Ascension in 1770.  Basile married Marie-Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Catherine Blanchard, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in November 1776.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at nearby Ascension in 1777.  In the late 1770s or early 1780s, they moved to the Attakapas District and settled at Côte Gelée and along the Vermilion.  Their daughter Madeleine was a deaf-mute who died at age 38 in September 1822; she never married.  At age 36, Basile remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Mire and Madeleine Cormier of Côte Gelée, at Attakapas in October 1786.  Daughter Eléonore, called Léonore, gave birth to son Jean in June 1804, three years before she married into the Breaux family; she later married a Matherne.  Basile and Marie-Anne's other daughters married into the Broussard, Frederick, Hébert, Taylor, Trahan, and Vincent families on the prairies.  Basile died "at the home of Jean Baptiste Broussard at Côte Gelée" in November 1811.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Basile was age 56 when he died, but he was closer to 61.  One wonders why he did not die at his own home.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in December 1811.  Four of his eight sons by both wives also created their own families on the prairies, and most of the lines endured.  

Oldest son Raphaël, by first wife Marie-Anastasie Richard, born either at Ascension or Attakapas in c1779, died at Attakapas, age 4, in January 1783. 

Basile's second son Jean-Pierre, called Pierre, from first wife Marie-Anastasie Richard, born at Attakapas in February 1782, married cousin Rose Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Isabelle Landry, at Attakapas in June 1802.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Jean Pierre died in Lafayette Parish in December 1822.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 45 when he died, but he was 40.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1827.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Broussard, and Dubois families.  Three of his five sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, fils, born in Attakapas in April 1801 or 1802, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Isidore Broussard and Marie Broussard, probably in Lafayette Parish in the early 1820s.  Their son Martel was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1829; Pierre Théodore near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1840; Sosthène in November 1843; Jean in August 1846; and Placide in October 1849.  They also had an older son named Jean or Pierre Théolin, called Théolin and Cheoley.  A succession record, calling him Pierre and mentioning two of his sons, was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in October 1866.  Jean Pierre, fils would have been in his mid-60s that year.  One wonders whose succession this may have been.  Jean Pierre, fils's daughters married into the Delcambre, Suire, Viator, and Vincent families.  Four of his six sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Martel married Marie Rosela or Rosalie, perhaps also called Ozea, daughter of Raphaël Viator and Adélaïde Miguez, at the New Iberia church in February 1850; Martel's sister Marie Celima married Marie's brother Ozémé.  Martel and Marie Rosela's son Martel, fils was born near New Iberia in June 1860; and Gabriel in July 1868.  Their daughter married into the Rajeur family. 

Jean Pierre, fils's second son Théolin married Marie Ozea, called Ozea, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Timothée Delcambre and his French Canadian wife Arthémise Oblanc, at the New Iberia church in January 1861.  Their son Drozin was born near New Iberia in September 1861, Ludovique in October 1864, and Homere in January 1870. 

Jean Pierre, fils's fourth son Sosthène married Marie, another daughter of Raphaël Viator and Adélaïde Miguez, at the New Iberia church in January 1862.  With younger brother Jean, he was mentioned in a succession record filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in October 1866. 

Jean Pierre, fils's fifth son Jean was mentioned with older brother Sosthène in a succession record filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in October 1866. 

Jean Pierre, fils's sixth and youngest son Placide married cousin Amelie or Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Éloi Broussard and   Rose Hébert and widow of Joseph Boudreaux, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in January 1869.  Their son Sosthène was born near New Iberia in May 1870. 

Jean Pierre, père's second son Joseph, born in Attakapas in October 1805, died in Lafayette Parish in December 1823, age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Jean Pierre, père's third son Gédéon, born in St. Martin Parish in January 1808, married Anne or Aimée Georgette Suzette, daughter of Jean Baptiste Lormand, LeNormand, or Normand and Susanne Caillet, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in July 1826.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Séverin was born in February 1831; a son, name unrecorded, probably Derbes, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in September 1833; Argille at age 3 months in September 1835; and Jean Onésiphore, called Onésiphore, at age 2 months in May 1840.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Delcambre, Hébert, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Three of Gédéon's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Séverin married cousin Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Don Louis Boudreaux and Zeline Landry, at the Vermilionville church in December 1853.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Severin, fils was born in August 1865.  Séverin, père's succession record, naming his wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1867. 

Gédéon's second son Derbes married cousin Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Landry and Adélaïde Girouard of Côte Gelée, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1856.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Paul Moléus, called Moléus, was born in March 1859; and Joseph Hebrard in June 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Derbes served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  In December 1885, in his early 50s, he remarried a second time--his third marriage--to fellow Acadian Ernestine Richard at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish.  The marriage also was recorded in Lafayette Parish, so they likely had moved to the Carencro area. 

Gédéon's fourth and youngest son Onésiphore married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Landry and his Creole wife Marie Azélie Vallot, at the Youngsville church in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Alphée was born near Youngsville in October 1867. 

Jean Pierre, père's fourth son Lucien, born in St. Martin Parish in August 1811, died at age 9 months in June 1812.  

Jean Pierre, père's fifth and youngst son Venance, born in St. Martin Parish in January 1816, married Cléonide, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Susanne Granger, at the Vermilionville church in February 1837.  Did the family line survive?

Basile's third son, unnamed, from first wife Marie-Anastasie Richard, died at Attakapas in January 1784 only eight days after his birth. 

Basile's fourth son Joseph-Pierre, also called Joseph-Basile, from second wife Marie-Anne Mire, born at Attakapas in March 1789, married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Louis Bodin or Baudin and his Acadian wife Françoise Doiron, at the St. Martinville church in October 1814.  Joseph's succession record, calling him Joseph Bazile and naming his wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1849.  Joseph would have been age 60 that year.  His daughters married into the Bourg and Landry families. 

Only son Denis Dolze, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1839 when his father was age 50, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Basile's fifth son Athanase, by second wife Marie-Anne Mire, born at Attakapas in December 1790, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Girouard and Adélaïde Broussard of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church in April 1815.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Athanase's succession record, naming his wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1867.  He would have been age 77 that year.  His daughters married into the Landry, Prejean, and Taylor families.  Four of his seven sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Sylvestre Furcy, born in Lafayette Parish in January 1823, married Creole Nathalie Mallet in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1854.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Sylvestre, fils was born in May 1857. 

Athanase's second son Jean Furcy, called Furcy, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in March 1827, died at age 6 in March 1833.

Athanase's third son, name unrecorded, died "in the morning at age un quart d'heure (quarter of an hour)" in Lafayette Parish in September 1828.  

Athanase's fourth son Simon Furcy, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in July 1830, married cousin Remise, also called Remigia, Bernice, and Nemise, daughter of fellow Acadians Maximilien Girouard and Carmelite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1852.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Simon Alcea was born in August 1855, Joseph Erasme in December 1857, Jules in February 1860, Marcel Duplessis in September 1862, and Elias in March 1868. 

Athanase's fifth son Émile Arcide or Alcide, called Alcide, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months in November 1832, married cousin Emma, another daughter of Maximilien Girouard and Carmelite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1855.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Alphonse was born in January 1864, and Joseph Gabeles in November 1869. 

Athanase's sixth son Basile Duplessis, called Duplessis, born in Lafayette Parish in April 1834, married cousin Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Florentin Bourg and Delphine Landry, at the Youngsville church in December 1865.

Athanase's seventh and youngest son Athanase, fils, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 1/2 months, in January 1837, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Basile's sixth son André-Basile, by second wife Marie-Anne Mire, baptized at Attakapas, age 4 months, in April 1795, married Marie Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Melançon and Madeleine Prejean of Lafayette Parish, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1823.  Their daughters married into the Lalande or Lalonde and Prejean families, and perhaps into the Lormand family as well.  At age 40, André remarried to Marie Céline or Célanie, daughter of Jean Caillier and Marie Picou, at the Vermilionville church in September 1835.  Their daughters married into the Babineaux and Leger families.  André Basile's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1864.  He would have been age 69 that year.  Three of his four sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Paul, by second wife Marie Céline Caillier, born in Lafayette Parish in June 1838, married cousin Eugénie, daughter of Edmond Hulot and his Acadian wife Françoise Elidoris Landry, at the Vermilionville church in October 1856.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Lucien was born in January 1859, Hermance in November 1867, and Albert in July 1869. 

André Basile's second son Gustave, by second wife Marie Céline Caillier, born in Lafayette Parish in April 1839, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

André Basile's third son Basile Philogène, called Philogène, from second wife Marie Céline Caillier, born in Lafayette Parish in January 1842, married cousin Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Camille Broussard and Marie Landry, at the Youngsville church in November 1860.  Their son Adam was born near Youngsville in September 1865. 

André Basile's fourth and youngest son Jules, also called Jean, from second wife Marie Céline Caillier, born in Lafayette Parish in c1844, married Marguerite Delzire or Dolzire, daughter of Antoine Fernandez Miguez and Marguerite Derouen, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1864.  Their son Jean Adelar was born near New Iberia in April 1867.  

Basile's seventh son Placide, by second wife Marie-Anne Mire, a twin, born at Attakapas in September 1800, may have died young, unless he was the Placide Landry who died in St. Martin Parish in September 1843.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Placide died "at age 40 yrs."  This Placide would have been age 43 at the time, so there is a good chance it was him.  Did he marry? 

Basile's eighth and youngest son Rosémond, by second wife Marie-Anne Mire, died at his parents' home at Côte Gelée, age 1, in November 1809. 

.

A second contingent of Landrys from Maryland--at least 41 of them--reached New Orleans in July 1767.  They were the largest Acadian family group to come to Louisiana that year.  Like the 1766 arrivals, these Landrys were largely from the Minas Basin and had been deported to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  They would have preferred to join their many relatives and fellow exiles at Cabahannocer, but Spanish Governor Ulloa insisted that they settle in a new Acadian community, San Gabriel d'Iberville, on the river above Cabahannocer.  The Acadians soon discovered that communication between San Gabriel and Cabahannocer would be easy via the river, so this second contingent of Maryland arrivals acquiesced into going to the new Spanish post, adding substantially to the number of Landrys on the Acadian Coast. 

Jean-Baptiste (c1710-1770s) à René le jeune Landry

Jean-Baptiste, sixth and youngest son of Germain Landry and Marie Melanson, born probably at Minas in c1710, married Anne, daughter of Jean Babin and Marguerite Boudrot, perhaps at Minas in c1731 and settled at Pigiguit.  The British deported the family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  In July 1763, colonial officials counted Jean-Baptiste, now a widower, with five of his children, two sons and three daughters, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore.  He emigrated to Louisiana with five unmarried children, a son and four daughters, and a married son and his wife, and settled with them at San Gabriel.  He died there by February 1777, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Clouâtre, Landry, Richard, and Breaux families on the river.  His older son remained at San Gabriel, but his younger son, after his second marriage, moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Older son Hyacinthe, born probably at Pigiguit in c1743, followed his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted him with his widowed father and siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Hyacinthe married cousin Marguerite, daughter of René Landry and his first wife Marie-Marguerite Thériot, in Maryland in the mid-1760s.  They came to Louisiana in 1767 with no children and settled at San Gabriel, where Spanish officials counted them on the "right bank ascending" in 1777.  They owned a single slave by then.  Hyacinthe died near San Gabriel in December 1792, age 49.  Marguerite may have died in nearby Ascension Parish in May 1816, in her early 70s.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Broussard, Henry, LeBlanc, and Melançon families.  Only one of Hyacinthe's sons created a family of his own, in Ascension Parish. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born at San Gabriel in c1767, married cousin Madeleine-Marie or Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Landry and Anne-Marguerite Babin, at Ascension in May 1790.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

Hyacinthe's younger son Auguste- or Augustin-Hyacinthe, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in October 1779, married, in his late 30s, Marguerite Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Babin and Anne Duhon, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in April 1818.  Their son Adélard was born in Ascension Parish in January 1819; Alfred in December 1824; Eugène Léon or Léon Eugène, also called Léon U., in July 1830; Lazare Gustave, called L. Gustave and Gustave, in September 1832; and Sylvère Augustin or Augustin Sylvère, also called A. Silvère and Silvert, in June 1840.  Auguste Hyacinthe died in Ascension Parish in November 1844.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Auguste Jacinte, as he called him, died at "age 70 years," but he was in his mid- to late 60s.  His daughters married the same Landry cousin.  Four of his five sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Adélard married Marie Ursule, called Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Gaudin and Rosalie Dugas, at the bride's home in Ascension Parish in February 1840; the marriage was recorded by a Donaldsonville priest.  Their son Martin Telesphore, called Telesphore, was in Ascension Parish in November 1840 but died at age 2 in October 1842; Octave Roman, also called R. Octave, was born in August 1843; Robert Atlas in April 1854; Julien Ernest in June 1857; and Jean Baptiste Achille in August 1860.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Bujole, and Dicharry families.  One of Adélard's sons married by 1870.

During the War of 1861-65, second son Octave Roman, called R. Octave in Confederate records, served in the Donaldsonville Artillery, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Octave enlisted in the battery in March 1862, age 18, and surrendered with his unit, and Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, in April 1865.  Octave returned home and married Georgina, daughter of Adélard Dicharry and his Acadian wife Carmelite Poirier, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1866; Octave's sister Marie Ersilia married Georgina's brother Sosthène. 

Auguste Hyacinthe's second son Alfred died in Ascension Parish in October 1855, age 30.  One wonders if he married.   

Auguste Hyacinthe's third son Léon Eugène married double cousin Marie Adveline or Aveline, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Landry and Berthilde Célesie Babin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1853.  Their son Samuel was born in Ascension Parish in September 1855, Pascal Rodolphe in May 1862, and Eusèbe Léonce in August 1867.

Auguste Hyacinthe's fourth son L. Gustave married cousin Lutetia, daughter of fellow Acadians Colin Babin and Gertrude Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1854; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Zenon Pranostradi was born in Ascension Parish in July 1856; Joseph Lazare, called Lazare, in March 1862 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1863; René Flegie was born in November 1864; Claude Fergus near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in June 1867; and Amédée Enamel in March 1869. 

Auguste Hyacinth's fifth and youngest son Augustin Sylvère married cousin Marie Lise Carmel, another daughter of Colin Babin and Gertrude Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Augustin Sylvère, called Sylvere A. in Confederate records, served in the Donaldsonville Artillery with his nephew Octave Roman.  Sylvère enlisted in the battery in March 1862, age 22, and remained with his unit until the spring of 1864, when he was detailed as a forage driver with the battalion to which his battery was attached.  He returned to the battery the following July and was present on all rolls through February 1865.  He did not surrender with the battery at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, in April 1865 but was captured either at Petersburg or on the retreat to Appomattox Courthouse late that winter or early spring.  The Federals released him as an end-of-war parolee in May 1865, and he returned to Ascension Parish.  His wife Marie Lise Carmel died either during the war or soon after it.  Called Sylvère A. by the recording priest, Augustin Sylvère remarried to cousin Ade Elmire, called Elmire, Bujole at the Donaldsonville church in December 1865; Sylvère and Elmire had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity and second degree of affinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Auguste was born in Ascension Parish in March 1867, and Vincent Nathanael in July 1868. 

Jean-Baptiste's younger son Jean-Athanase, born probably at Pigiguit in c1751, followed his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonials officials counted them at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Jean-Athanase accompanied his widowed father and siblings to San Gabriel, where he may have married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure LeBlanc and Marie Thériot, in the late 1760s or early 1770s.  Anne also had come from Maryland to San Gabriel in 1767.   Spanish officials counted Jean-Athanase on the "left bank ascending" at St.-Gabriel in 1777; by then, he was a widower and the father of three children--two daughters, ages 8 and 6, and a 2-year-old son--but the census taker did not record the children's names.  Jean-Athanase remarried to Marie-Anne-Barbe, called Anne, daughter of Frenchman Gabriel Moreau and his Acadian wife Marie Trahan of Morlaix, France, at nearby Ascension in January 1787.  Anne and her family had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  Spanish officials counted Jean-Athanase and his new family on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension in 1788 and 1791.  The census takers found no children with him in either census, so his older children had either died, moved out, or married by then.  Anne gave him more children, including sons.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where Spanish officials counted them in the late 1790s, but they seem to have returned to the river in the early 1800s.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, LeBlanc, and Rivers families.  Only one of his two sons married.  He, too, settled on the upper Lafourche before returning to the river. 

Older son Jean-Nicolas, called Nicolas, from first wife Anne LeBlanc, born at Ascension in September 1775, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Osite Landry, at Ascension in April 1802.  Their son Constant Clément was born at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in September 1807; and Jean Maxile Aurelien near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in October 1812. 

Jean-Athanase's younger son Joseph, by second wife Anne Moreau, born at San Gabriel in December 1799, may have died young. 

Augustin (1719-1781) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Augustin, oldest son of Pierre Landry and Marguerite Forest, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in May 1719, married Anne, daughter of Étienne Rivet and Anne Leprince, at Ste.-Famille in 1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Augustin a son in 1743, but other records say otherwise.  According to Stephen A. White, Augustin remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Babin and Marguerite Bourg, at Pigiguit in c1752; Arsenault says c1747.  According to Arsenault, between 1748 and 1756, Marie-Madeleine gave Augustin four more children, two more sons and two daughters, but other records say that, between 1748 and 1756, she gave him three sons and two daughters.  The British deported the family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted Augustin, Marie, and five children, three sons and two daughters, at Upper Marlborough in July 1763.  Augustin, Marie, and their six children, three sons and three daughters, the youngest daughter born after the 1763 counting, emigrated to Louisiana in 1767 and followed their fellow exiles to San Gabriel.  Augustin and Marie had no more children there.  Augustin died at San Gabriel in May 1781, age 62.  Two of his daughters married into the LeBlanc family on the river.  His three sons also married on the river, and two of them created vigorous lines there. 

Oldest son Joseph-Marie, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Babin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1748, followed his family to Maryland in 1755, was counted with them at Upper Marlborough in July 1763, and followed them to San Gabriel in 1767.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Pivauteau of San Gabriel, at nearby Ascension in December 1783.  They settled near San Gabriel.  Their daughters married into the Brown, Guilbeau, Lapointe, Templet, and Trahan families, and some settled on the western prairies.  Daughter Marie gave birth to son Grégoire near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1814; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.  Only one of Joseph-Marie's sons seems to have married, and the family line may not have survived.

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born near San Gabriel in February 1794, may have died in Ascension Parish in February 1817.  If so, he would have been age 23.  One wonders if he married. 

Joseph-Marie's second son Édouard, born near San Gabriel in August 1797, may have married cousin Marie Émilie Landry at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in the 1820s. If so, their son Euchere was born near St. Gabriel in July 1826.  One wonders if the line endured. 

Joseph-Marie's third and youngest son Anaclet, a twin, born near San Gabriel in October 1801, may have died young. 

Augustin's second son Joseph-Ignace, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Babin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1753, followed his family to Maryland in 1755, was counted with them at Upper Marlborough in July 1763, and followed them to San Gabriel in 1767.  He married cousin Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Breaux and Marguerite Landry and sister of his brother Mathurin's wife, at nearby Ascension in February 1776.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Joseph-Ignace remarried to Olive-Élisabeth, or -Isabelle, called Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Breaux and Isabelle LeBlanc, at San Gabriel in October 1787.  Olive-Élisabeth had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  Seven of Joseph Ignace's nine sons by both wives married.  His older married sons settled on the river in Iberville Parish, his younger sons in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Oldest son Louis, by first wife Scholastique Breaux, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in May 1777, may have died young. 

Joseph-Ignace's second son Joseph-Manuel or Manuel-Joseph, called Manuel or Emmanuel, from first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in August 1781, married Clarisse Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of Pierre Bruneteau and his Acadian wife Anne Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1808.  Their son Manuel Dorville was born near St. Gabriel in September 1809, and Jean in c1812 but died at age 11 in March 1823.  Emmanuel died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1854, a widower (his wife had died in August 1853, age 59, perhaps a victim of the yellow fever epidemic that struck South Louisiana during the summer and fall of that year).  The priest who recorded Emmanuel's burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that he died at "age 70 yrs."  Joseph Manuel would have been age 73.  Did this family line, except for its blood, die with him? 

Joseph-Ignace's third son Joseph-Auguste, called Auguste, from first wife Scholastique Breaux, born near San Gabriel in January 1783, may have died young, unless he was the Auguste Landry mentioned as an administer of Élie Landry's estate in J. Trasimond Landry's record book/journal, dated 16 August 1848 (Élie would have been Auguste's younger half brother and J. Trasimond his nephew).  If this was him, Auguste would have been age 65 at the time.  One wonders if he married. 

Joseph-Ignace's fourth son Élie, by second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in February 1790, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Hébert and Anne Gautreaux, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1813.  They settled probably on the west bank of Iberville Parish before moving upriver to West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Maximilien was born in Iberville Parish in July 1816; Jean Dresimond, probably Trasimond, in July 1818; Adolphe in September 1820; Octave probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1825; Drosin in February 1828; and Joseph Jules in January 1831.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Hébert, Landry, and Trosclair families.  Élie may have remarried to Azélie, perhaps also called Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Julie Trahan and widow of Firmin Guidry, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1841; if so, Élie would have been age 51 at the time of the wedding.  Élie died near Brusly in July 1848, age 58.  Only two of his sons married.

Oldest son Maximilien, by first wife Henriette Hébert, may have married Hermance Saizan and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the early 1840s. 

Élie's second son Jean Trasimond, by first wife Henriette Hébert, may have married cousin Marie Amelie, Ameline, Amelina, or Amelise Landry at Baton Rouge by the early 1840s.  They settled near Brusly.  Their son Joseph Ursin was born in May 1853; Jean Albert, perhaps called Albert, in May 1855 but may have died at age 10 1/2 in February 1866; and Ignace Élie was born in February 1857.  Their daughter married into the Duilhet family. 

Joseph-Ignace's fifth son Raphaël, by second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in October 1792, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Malo Guidry and Marguerite Dupuis, at the Baton Rouge church in August 1825.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Célestin was born in May 1826 but died at age 3 1/2 in October 1829; Jules was born in May 1835; Joseph A., perhaps Joseph Alexandre, in June 1839 but may have died at age 12 in August 1851; and Terence Olivier was born in October 1842.  Raphaël died near Brusly in April 1855.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Raphaël died at "age 61 years."  He was 62.  His daughters married into the Borvinkelmann and Tircuit families. 

Joseph-Ignace's sixth son Narcisse, by second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in October 1794, probably died young. 

Joseph-Ignace's seventh son Narcisse, the second with the name, by second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in January 1796, was a resident of Baton Rouge when he married Marguerite or Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Hébert and his Creole wife Marie Marthe Hernandez, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1819.  They settled probably in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Pierre Bélisaire, called Bélisaire, was born in June 1824; Joseph Amédée, called Amédée, in December 1828; Trasimond in August 1839; and Simon Alcide near Brusly in August 1845.  Their daughters married into the Bourg, Bujole, Hébert, Molaison, and Rivet families.  His sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre Bélisaire married cousin Lise Élizabeth, also called Marguerite Lise, daughter of Joseph Augustin Leveque and his Acadian wife Coralie Landry, at the Brusly church in May 1851; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Robert Bélisaire was born near Brusly in December 1855. 

Narcisse's second son Trasimond married cousin Marie Amelie, called Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bujole and Anne Adèle Landry, at the Brusly church in November 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.   They settled near Brusly. 

Narcisse's third son Simon Alcide married cousin Marie Céleste, another daughter of Joseph Augustin Leveque and Coralie Landry, at the Brusly church in November 1868; they, too, had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Joseph-Ignace's eighth son Valérien, by second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in March 1798, married Marie or Julie Eméranthe, Emérite, or Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Julie Trahan, at the Baton Rouge church in October 1825.  They settled probably in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Valérien was born in August 1826; Pierre Ulysse in August 1833; Jacques Adolphe in May 1835; Sosthène was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 4 months, in June 1840; and Derosin Adamis, called Adamis, was baptized at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, age unrecorded, in March 1842 but died at age 14 in October 1855.  Valérien may have died near Brusly in February 1855.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Valère, as he called him, died at "age 58 years."  Valérien would have been a few weeks shy of 57.  His daughters married into the Tullier family.  Only one of his sons seems to have married. 

Oldest son Joseph Valérien married Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin Daigre and his Creole wife Marguerite Betancourt, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1848.  Their son Adolphe Odilon was born near Baton Rouge in June 1860. 

Joseph-Igance's ninth and youngest son Élie Onésime, called Onésime, from second wife Élisabeth Breaux, born near San Gabriel in February 1800, married Jeanne Joséphine, Varbine, Zerbine, or Zetbinne, daughter of fellow Acadians Magloire Dupuis and his Creole wife Henriette Seret of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1825.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Léon was born in August 1826 but died at age 3 in September 1829, Edmond was born in February 1828 but died at age 7 1/2 in June 1836, and Jules Oscar was born in September 1833.  Onésime died in West Baton Rouge Parish in April 1837.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Onésime "of Iberville" was age 40 when he died, but he was 37.  His daughters married into the Aillet and Patureaux families. 

Augustin's third and youngest son Mathurin, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Babin, born either at Pigiguit or in Maryland in c1755, was counted with his family at Upper Marlborough in July 1763 and followed them to San Gabriel in 1767.   He married cousin Perpétué, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Breaux and Marguerite Landry and sister of his brother Joseph-Ignace's wife, at nearby Ascension in May 1779.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc family and perhaps into the Foret family as well.  In September 1779, Mathurin, a private in the Lafourche company of militia, fought under Spanish Governor Gálvez at Manchac and Baton Rouge.  He and fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste dit Petit Jean Hébert of the San Gabriel militia were the only men wounded in Gálvez's campaign; both survived their wounds.  Mathurin remarried to cousin Marie-Apolline, called Apolline, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Hébert and Marie Claire Landry, at San Gabriel in February 1800.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish and near Plaquemine in what became Iberville Parish.  Their daughter married into the Bernard du Montier family.  Mathurin died probably near Plaquemine in January 1808, age 53.  Five of his six sons by both wives created their own families.

Oldest son Joseph-Xavier, called Xavier, from first wife Perpétué Breaux, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in April 1780, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Paul Foret and Marguerite Orillion, at St. Gabriel in February 1805.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Landry Xavier or Xavier Landry, was born in February 1806; Pierre Treville, called Treville, in August 1807; Galein was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, age 1, in October 1823; and Joseph Octave, perhaps called Octave, was born in November 1825.  Xavier died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in January 1831, age 50.  His daughters married into the Ferbose and Hébert families.  Three of his four sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Landry Xavier married Marie Iréné, Hiréné, or Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Trahan and Marie Madeleine dite Mannon LeBlanc of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in December 1827.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Romain Deozor, called Deozor, was born in October 1828; François was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 5 months, in October 1840; Ernest, probably a twin, was born in c1845; and Numa in November 1847 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1849.  Landry Xavier died in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1855.  The Brusly priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Landry died at "age 50 years."  Landry Xavier would have been 4 months shy of that age.  His daughters married into the Leray and Lejeune families.  His three surviving sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Deozor married Elisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Dominique Labauve and Dorsille Chiasson, at the Brusly church in June 1851. 

Landry Xavier's second son François married Lutecia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Labauve and Marie Felasie Daigre, at the Brusly church in March 1867. 

Landry Xavier's third son Ernest married cousin Maria, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Amédée Bujole and Adèle Landry, at the Brusly church in December 1869. 

Xavier's second son Pierre Treville married cousin Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Moïse Foret and Bibianne Allain and widow of Jean Pierre Laguionie, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1830.  Did Pierre Treville father any sons? 

Xavier's fourth and youngest son Joseph Octave married cousin Marie Emma or Aimé, daughter of Jean Alexandry or Alexandria and his Acadian wife Emeranthe Foret, at the Brusly church in April 1848.  Their son Joseph Numa was born near Brusly, perhaps posthumously, in August 1852.  Joseph Octave may have died near Brusly in August 1852.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Octave Landry died at "age 29 yrs."  Joseph Octave would have been age 26.  If this was him, he died two days before his son was born. 

Mathurin's second son Pierre-Dosité, by first wife Perpétué Breaux, born near San Gabriel in December 1781, may have died young. 

Mathurin's third son Joseph, by first wife Perpétué Breaux, born near San Gabriel in January 1790, married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Daigre and Rose Molaison, at the Baton Rouge church in either March 1810 or January 1811.  They settled probably in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Narcisse, called Narcisse, was born in December 1815; and Ulysse in December 1826.  Their daughter married into the Vaughn family.  One of Joseph's sons also created their own families.

Older son Joseph Narcisse married first cousin Estelle, daughter of Agricole Bernard de Montier and his Acadian wife Améranthe Landry of West Baton Rouge Parish, his uncle and aunt, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1844.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Lucien was born August 1847, Justin in September 1849, Homer Joseph in September 1858, and Arthur Bernard in August 1861. 

Joseph's younger son Ulysse may have died "at Matamoros, Mexico," in July 1846, age 19, a victim, perhaps, of illness or wounds suffered in the war with Mexico.  Amazingly, his body was returned to his family, and he was buried near Brusly in April 1847.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Ulysse's parents' names, but this probably was him.  Ulysse evidently did not marry. 

Mathurin's fourth son Ursin, by first wife Perpétué Breaux, born near San Gabriel in May 1791, married Marie Eméranthe, called Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Marine Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1813.  They settled probably in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Ursin Amédée, called Amédée, was born in March 1827; Joseph Alfred in September 1832; and Jean Baptiste Oscar, called Oscar, in December 1834.  Ursin died by May 1850, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Bernard du Montier, Dupuy, Labauve, and Martinez families.  His sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Amédée married double cousin Marie Désirée, called Désirée, daughter of fellow Acadians Élie Landry and Henriette Hébert, at the Brusly church in September 1850; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Antoine Olivier was born near Brusly in August 1853. 

Ursin's second son Joseph Alfred married cousin Marie Aloysia or Aloysa, daughter of Joseph Auguste Leveque and his Acadian wife Clarisse Doralise Landry, at the Brusly church in October 1856.  Their son Joseph Alfred, fils was born near Brusly in July 1859; and Élie Joseph in March 1868. 

Ursin's third and youngest son Jean Baptiste Oscar married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joachim Daigre and Fortille Dupuy, at the Brusly church in October 1856, on the same day and at the same place his older brother Joseph Alfred married.  Jean Baptiste Oscar and Louise's son Jean Baptiste Henri was born near Brusly in January 1859, and Patrick Oscar in February 1861. 

Mathurin's fifth son Landry, by second wife Apolline Hébert, born probably near Plaquemine in April 1803, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin Daigre and his Creole wife Marguerite Betancourt, at the Baton Rouge church in August 1828.  They settled on the west side of the river near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish.  Their son Ulysses Mathurin was born in July 1829, and Jules in August 1832.  Their daughters married into the Barthélemy and Fabre families.  Landry may have remarried to Marie Delphine, called Delphine, Villier, Villiers, Devillier, or Devilliers, also called Greau, in a civil ceremony in either Iberville or West Baton Rouge Parish by the mid-1840s.  Their son Louis was born near Plaquemine in December 1851.  Their daughter married into the Chutz family at Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish.  Landry may have died in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1855.  The Brusly priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Landry died at "age 50 years."  This Landry would have been age 52 1/2.  A 16-year-old daughter died near Lakeland in May 1864.  One wonders when the family moved to Pointe Coupee. 

Mathurin's sixth and youngest son Jean Dorville, called J. Dorville and Dorville, from second wife Apolline Hébert, born probably near Plaquemine in December 1804, married Marie Aureline, called Aureline, another daughter of Louis Daigre and Marguerite Betancourt, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1827.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Célestin was born in February 1828, Adolphe Dorville or Dorville Adolphe in September 1833, Jean Damas in February 1840, and Louis Mathurin in February 1849 but died the following June.  They also had a son named Adonis, unless he was Jean Damas.  Dorville likely died near Brusly in August 1864.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give the age of the deceased, whom he called Dorvil.  Jean Dorville would have been age 59.  His daughters married into the Babin and Landry families.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Adolphe Dorville married cousin Marie Octavine, daughter of fellow Acadians Hilaire Bergeron and Marie Amelina Landry, at the Brusly church in May 1855, and remarried to Eliza, daughter of Joseph Berret and his Acadian wife Eugènie LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1866.

Jean Dorville's third son Adonis married Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Eusilien Broussard and Emerite Thibodeaux, at the Brusly church in April 1861.  They were living near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, where few other Acadians settled, in the late 1860s. 

Jean (c1732-?) à Germain à René le jeune Landry

Jean, third son of Abraham dit Chaques Landry and Marie-Isabelle Blanchard, and younger brother of Pierre dit Pierrot à Chaques of Cabahannocer, was born probably at Pigiguit in c1732 (Bona Arsenault says c1723).  Jean married Ursule, daughter of Pierre Landry and Marie Babin, at Pigiguit or in Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted them with a daughter, a brother-in-law, and two orphans at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  They emigrated to Spanish Louisiana in 1767 and settled at San Gabriel.  Their daughter married into the Melançon family.  Jean may have fathered no sons, so only the blood of this family line endured in the Bayou State. 

Pierre, fils (c1737-1780) à Germain à René le jeune Landry

Pierre, fils, older son of Pierre Landry and Claire Babin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1737, followed his family to Maryland or Pennsylvania in the fall of 1755.  If he went to Pennsylvania, he did not remain there.  In July 1763, colonial officials in Maryland counted him, still a bachelor, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore with five siblings.  He followed them to San Gabriel and died there in April 1780, age 43, still unmarried. 

Athanase (c1742-?) à Germain à René le jeune Landry

Athanase, younger son of Pierre Landry and Claire Babin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1742, followed his family to Maryland or Pennsylvania in the fall of 1755.  If he went to Pennsylvania, he did not remain there.  In July 1763, colonial officials in Maryland counted him, still a bachelor, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore with five siblings.  Athanase married fellow Acadian Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, Hébert in Maryland in the mid-1760s.  In 1767, they followed his three sisters and an older brother to Louisiana and settled with them at San Gabriel, where all of their children were born.  Spanish officials counted them on the "left bank ascending" at San Gabriel in 1777.  Their daughters married into the Melançon and Robichaux families.  Two of Athanase's four sons also married, into the Melanson, Landry, and LeBlanc families, and remained on the river. 

Oldest son Denis, born near San Gabriel in March 1774, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Melançon and Anne Babin, probably at San Gabriel in the 1790s.  They settled along Bayou Plaquemine on the west side of the river.  Denis died probably at his home on Bayou Plaquemine in January 1835, age 60.  His daughters married into the Bruneau, Devillier, and Truxillo families.  Except for its blood, did this family line endure? 

Oldest son François, a twin, born probably near Placquemine in June 1802, may have died young. 

Denis's second son Magloire, François's twin, also may have died young.  

Denis's third son Élie, born probably near Plaquemine in September 1807, also may not have survived childhood.

Denis's fourth and youngest son Ursin, born probably near Plaquemine in July 1815, died at age 7 (the St. Gabriel priest said 9) in July 1822. 

Athanase's second son Joseph-Donat, called Donat, born probably near San Gabriel in the mid-1770s, married cousin Angèle, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Landry and his second wife Marie Babin, at Ascension in January 1796.  Angèle died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in July 1815, age 37.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Harrison, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Donat remarried to cousin Marie Luce, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre LeBlanc and Anne Landry and widow of Joseph LeBlanc, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in August 1816.  Donat may have fathered no sons by either of his wives. 

Athanase's third son Joseph, born near San Gabriel in September 1777, died at age 7 in July 1784. 

Athanase's fourth and youngest son Jérôme-Louis, born near San Gabriel in July 1781, also may have died young. 

Anselme (c1738-?) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Anselme, second son of Alexandre Landry and Anne Flan, born probably at L'Assomption in c1738, followed his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755 and was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Baltimore in July 1763.  He evidently followed them to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel.  At age 31, he married cousin Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Landry and Anne Babin of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, at San Gabriel in April 1769.  He remarried to cousin Osite Landry probably at San Gabriel in the early 1770s.  Anselme died at nearby Ascension in February 1804, in his mid- or late 60s.  Spanish officials counted them on the "right bank ascending" at St-Gabriel in 1777.  Anselme's daughters evidently married into the Babin, Binfrede, Breaux, and Landry families.  Two of his three sons, both from his second wife, also created their own families on the river, but neither of the lines, except for its blood, seems to have survived in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son Anselme-Bénoni, called Bénoni, from first wife Marie-Madeleine Landry, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in June 1770, died at Ascension in February 1789, age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Anselme's second son Joseph-Eusèbe, called Eusèbe, from second wife Osite Landry, born near San Gabriel in March 1774, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Babin and Madeleine Babin, at Ascension in February 1795.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin.  Did Eusèbe father any sons? 

Anselme's third and youngest son Pierre-Anselme, by second wife Osite Landry, born probably near San Gabriel in the mid-1770s, married Renée, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Gaudin and Marie Babin, at Ascension in April 1802.  Pierre Anselme died in Iberville Parish in August 1850.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Pierre Anselme died at "age 77 years."  His daughters married into the Hébert and Lavergne families.  

Only son Pierre Drosin, called Drosin, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1812.  Drosin, a "single person," died in Iberville Parish in September 1858.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded the burial said that Drauzin, as he called him, died at "age 45 years."  He was 46.  His line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

François-Sébastien (c1741-1808) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

François-Sébastien, third son of Alexandre Landry and Anne Flan, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1741, followed his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph LeBlanc, in the Cheaspeake colony in the early 1760s.  Colonial officials counted him, wife Marguerite, and a Marie LeBlanc, perhaps her sister, at Baltimore in July 1763.  François, Marguerite, and two daughters, ages 3 and newborn, emigrated to Louisiana in 1767 and settled at San Gabriel near his widowed mother and siblings.  Bona Arsenault gives François-Sébastien a son in c1772.  Other  records give them two more sons in February 1773 and May 1775.   Spanish officials counted François-Sébastien and his family on the "right bank ascending" at San Gabriel in 1777.  They owned three slaves by then.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin and Giroir families, and perhaps into the Landry famlily as well.  In the late 1780s, François-Sébastien, now a widower, took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  He owned five slaves by then, a remarkable number for an Acadian living in that area at that time.  At age 52, he remarried to Marie-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Girouard and Marie-Anne Thériot of St.-Malo, France, at nearby Ascension in August 1793.  They held five slaves on the upper bayou in 1798.  François, described as "res. Assumption," died at Ascension in December 1808.  The Donaldson priest who recorded his burial said that François was age 70 when he died, but he was closer to 64.  Only one of his three sons married, at Ascension, and remained on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Lucas-Alexandre, called Luc and Alexandre, from first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel or Ascension in c1772, married Françoise-Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Le Borgne de Bélisle and Marie-Josèphe Dupuis, at Ascension in February 1793.  Lucas Alexandre may have died in Assumption Parish in December 1845.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Allen Luc, as he called him, died at "age 67 years," but Lucas Alexandre would have been in his early 70s.  His daughters married into the Hébert and Landry families.  Three of his six sons also created their own families on the upper bayou. 

Oldest son Apollinaire Luc, called Polinaire, married cousin Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Landry and Colette Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1818.  Their son Sidoine Sylvanie, called Sylvanie, was born in Assumption Parish in August 1822; Louis or Luc Joseph in January 1832 but died at age 3 months the following April; Joseph Désiré was born in February 1840 but died at age 1 1/2 in November 1841; and Joseph Cleopha, called Cleopha, was born in June 1842.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Breaux, Dugas, Guidry, and Rodriguez families.  His surviving sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Sylvanie married Élisabeth, called Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marie Melançon, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1844.  Their son Joseph Nicolas was born near Paincourtville in September 1845, and Valentin Numa near Plattenville in November 1846. 

Polinaire's fourth and youngest son Cleopha married Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Drosin Hébert and his Creole wife Élisabeth Mollere, at the Paincourtville church in January 1869.  Their son Louis Xavier was born near Paincourtville in September 1869. 

Lucas Alexandre's second son Joseph-Liduvino, born at Ascension in July 1798, may have been the Joseph, son of Alexander Landry, who died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in November 1820.  The priest who recorded the burial said that Joseph died at "age 20 yrs." Joseph Liduvino would have been age 22.  He probably did not marry. 

Lucas Alexandre's third son Auguste Alexandre Norbert, also called Auguste Luc and Luc, born at Assumption in June 1804, married cousin Iréné Clémence, another daughter of Alexandre Landry and Colette Hébert, at the Plattenville church in November 1824.  Their son Gervais Landry was born in Assumption Parish in June 1826 but died at age 7 in May 1833; Luc Alexandre, called Alexandre, was born in June 1828; David Jules in February 1836 but died the following month; and Auguste Luc was born in February 1837.  Their daughters married into the Barbier, Daigle, Landry, Savoy, and Simoneaux families.  None of Auguste's sons married by 1870.

Second son Luc Alexandre died near Paincourtville in September 1853, age 25.  Did he marry? 

Lucas Alexandre's fourth son François Véronique, born at Ascension in May 1806, may have died young. 

Lucas Alexandre's fifth son Cyrille, born in Assumption Parish in March 1810, married Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Gravois and Rosalie LeBlanc, at the Plattenville church in June 1832.  They settled near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Luc was born in July 1833; Cyrille Gille in August 1838; Zenon Telesphore, called Telesphore, in August 1845; Jean François Elphége in April 1847; and Michel Richard, called Richard, in April 1852 but died at age 1 in July 1853.  They also had a son named Joseph.  Their daughter married into the Daigle family.  At least three of Cyrille's five sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Luc married Élisabeth, daughter of Perique Vega or Vegas and Elizabeth Ruiz, at the Paincourtville church in January 1860.  They lived near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Bertil Elphége was born in November 1860, Barthélemy Luc in August 1866, Pierre Paul in June 1868, and Jean Félicien in June 1870. 

Cyrille's second son Telesphore married Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Henry Landry Daigle and Emerante Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in January 1867.  Their son Joseph Henry, called Henry, was born near Paincourtville in January 1868 but died the following June; and Juste Cyrille was born in September 1869. 

Cyrille's third son Joseph married cousin Adrienne, daughter of fellow Acadians Adrien Eusilien LeBlanc and Eliza Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1870.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born near Paincourtville in November 1870. 

Lucas Alexandre's sixth and youngest son Angèl, born in Assumption Parish, died there at age 2 months in March 1813. 

François-Sébastien's second son Ignace, by first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in February 1773, may have died young.

François-Sébasien's third and youngest son Laurent-Baptiste, by first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in May 1775, also may have died young. 

Paul-Marie (c1744-1794?) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Paul-Marie, fourth son of Alexandre Landry and Anne Flan, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1744, followed his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755 and was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Baltimore in July 1763.  He followed them to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel.  Paul-Marie married to Brigitte, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Marie LeBlanc of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, at nearby Ascension in February 1772.  Spanish officials counted them on the "left bank ascending" at San Gabriel in 1777.  They owned 12 head of cattle, 10 hogs, and 18 fowl on their six arpents of frontage on the river.  He may have been the Paul Landry who died at San Gabriel in November 1794.  If so, he would have been age 50 when he died.  His daughters married into the Babin, Breaux, and Gallagher families.  Only two of his eight sons married.  They remained on the river. 

Oldest son Jean, born near San Gabriel in October 1772, moved to the Attakapas District, where he died in December 1803.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was age 28 when he died, but he was 31.  He probably did not marry.

Paul-Marie's second son Grégoire, born at Ascension in December 1775, died near San Gabriel in August 1799, age 23.  He probably did not marry. 

Paul-Marie's third son Hippolyte, born probably near San Gabriel in c1777, married Marie Scholastique, called Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Hébert and Marguerite Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1807.  Hippolyte died near St. Gabriel in January 1815, age 38.  One of his three sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Jean, a twin, born near St. Gabriel in 1808, probably died young.  

Hipplyte's second Joseph Hippolyte, Jean's twin, died near St. Gabriel, age 6, in August 1814. 

Hippolyte's third and youngest son Joseph Thomasin, called Thomasin, born near St. Gabriel in August 1812, married Iréné, Adeline, Lucie, or Lucille Virginie, called Virginie, daughter of Joseph Martin Capdeville and his Acadian wife Modeste Henry, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1834.  They lived near the boundary between Iberville and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Thomasin, fils was born in June 1835; Hippolyte Martin in February 1837; Jean Baptiste Théophile in January 1839; Joseph Martinien Neve or Neré, called Neré, in February 1844; François Alcée, called Alcée, in September 1850 but died at age 14 1/2 in August 1865; and Pierre was born in January 1856 but died at age 1 1/2 in June 1857.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Hippolyte Martin married Léonise, daughter of French Canadian Melisé LeBlanc and Marie Dealferes of Assumption Parish, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1868.  Their son Hippolyte Albert or Albert Hippolyte died in Ascension Parish, age 4 days, in June 1869. 

Thomasin's fourth son Neré married Aimée, daughter of André Vegue and Élisabeth Allemand, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1867.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born in Ascension Parish in October 1868. 

Paul-Marie's fourth son Paul-Antoine, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in 1780, may have died young. 

Paul-Marie's fifth son Joseph, born near San Gabriel in February 1786, married Rosalie, daughter of Ignace Hamilton and Anne Boush, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1813.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin.  Joseph remarried to fellow Acadian Élise LeBlanc, widow of Louis Deshonnet.  Joseph died near St. Gabriel in January 1840.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died at "age 54 years."  His son also created a family of his own.  

Only son Louis Dorval or Erville, by first wife Rosalie Hamilton, born probably near St. Gabriel in the early 1810s, married Jeanne Elina, daughter of Armand Robert and Louise Vignaux, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1836, and remarried to Modeste Adeline, another daughter of Joseph Martin Capdeville and Modeste Henry, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1838.  

Paul-Marie's sixth son Blaise, born at Ascension or San Gabriel in c1791, died near San Gabriel, age 8, in March 1800.

Paul-Marie's seventh son Jean-Baptiste, born near San Gabriel in January 1792, may have died young. 

Paul-Marie's eighth and youngest son Augustin, born near San Gabriel in July 1794, also may have died young. 

Firmin (c1748-1792) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Firmin, fifth son of Alexandre Landry and Anne Flan, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1748, followed his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755 and was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Baltimore in July 1763.  He followed them to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel.  He married fellow Acadian Marie LeBlanc probably at San Gabriel in the late 1760s or early 1770s, and remarried to Louise-Ludivine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Babin and Madeleine Richard, at nearby Ascension in February 1774.  Spanish officials counted them on the "right bank ascending" at St.-Gabriel in 1777.  They owned a single slave by then.  They evidently lived near the boundary of the San Gabriel and Ascension districts, and perhaps farther down at Cabahannocer.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  At age 44, Firmin remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Hélène, daughter of Joseph Hamilton and Anastasie Comes and widow of ____, at San Gabriel in February 1792.  Their daughters married into the Allain, Brasseaux, Hébert, and Vives families.  Firmin died at San Gabriel in September 1792, in his early 40s.  Five of his six sons from his second and third wives, the youngest born posthumously, also created  their own families. 

Oldest son Hippolyte, by second wife Louise-Ludivine Babin, born probably near San Gabriel in c1770, married double cousin Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Anne Landry, at San Gabriel in October 1795; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of relationship in order to marry.  Hippolyte died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in October 1820, age 50.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Dupuis, and Viel families.  Only one of his five sons seems to have created a family of his own, but the line did not endure. 

Oldest son Achille, born near San Gabriel in December 1801, married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1824, and remarried to cousin Béatrice, daughter of fellow Acadians Abrahams Hébert and Ludivine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1828.  Achille may have died near St. Gabriel in March 1830.  If so, he would have been age 28.  His line of the family evidently died with him. 

Hippolyte's second Jean Hippolyte Labiere, born near San Gabriel in August 1804, probably died young. 

Hippolyte's third Fostin, a twin, was born near St. Gabriel in April 1806.  Called Faustin by the recording priest, Fostin died near St. Gabriel in October 1831, age 25.  He probably did not marry. 

Hippolyte's fourth son Sosthène, Fostin's twin, evidently died young. 

Hippolyte's fifth and youngest son Hippolyte Thomas, called Thomas, born near St. Gabriel in March 1818, died at the home of his brother-in-law, Eugène Breaux near St. Gabriel in November 1835, age 17 1/2.    

Firmin's second son Firmin-Paul, by second wife Louise-Ludivine Babin, born at Ascension in January 1775, may have died at New Orleans in January 1803.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Fermin, as he called him, was "native of Maryland in the United States of America" and died at "cir. 32 yr."  Firmin-Paul would have been age 28 that year.  He probably did not marry. 

Firmin's third son Pierre-Ferdinand, called Ferdinand, from second wife Louise-Ludivine Babin, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in March 1777, married cousin Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Landry and Françoise Hébert, at Ascension in November 1805.  Their daughters married into the Gaudet and Roberson families.  Only one of Ferdinand's six sons seems to have married. 

Oldest son Pierre Paul, born in Ascension Parish in December 1808, died there at age 2 years, 9 months, in September 1811.

Ferdinand's second son Ferdinand Colin, born in Ascension Parish in October 1812, died there at age 5 in September 1817.

Ferdinand's third son Valmon, born near Baton Rouge in December 1814, also seems to have died young. 

Ferdinand's fourth son Trasimond Sefranis or Dufrois, baptized at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, age unrecorded, in April 1817, died in Ascension Parish in March 1856.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Trasimond Dufrois, as he called him, died at "age 39 1/2 years."  One wonders if Trasimond married. 

Ferdinand's fifth son Jean Auguste Rosémond, born in Ascension Parish in May 1821, married double cousin Anne Marie Antoinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Emeranthe Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1845; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Jean Auguste Rosémond may have died in Ascension Parish in October 1852.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Rosémond died at "age 32 years."  He would have been 31.  His family line may have died with him. 

Ferdinand's sixth and youngest son Philippe Ferdinand, born in Ascension Parish in August 1828, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Firmin's fourth son Pierre-Augustin or -Auguste, called Auguste, from second wife Louise-Ludivine Babin, born near San Gabriel in November 1780, married cousin Marie-Rose or -Clémence, also called Clémence-Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Cécile Dupuis, at the St.-Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1808.  Their daughters married into the Allain and Simoneaux families.  Auguste remarried to Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste LeBlanc and Madeleine Marthe Foret, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1823.  Auguste died "at [the] home of his brother Firmin Davat Landry" in Iberville Parish in July 1850.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded his burial said that Auguste died at "age 72 years."  He was 69.  Neither of his sons seems to have created families of their own. 

Oldest son Auguste Valmond or Valmont, called Valmont, from first wife Clémence Richard, born near St. Gabriel in July 1813, died in Iberville Parish in March 1856.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Valmont died at "age 42 years."  Did Valmont create a family of his own?  If not, except for its blood, this family line died with him.   

Pierre-Augustin's second son Augustin, by second wife Adeline LeBlanc, born near St. Gabriel in January 1824, died there the following September. 

Firmin's fifth son Simon, by second wife Louise-Ludivine Babin, born near San Gabriel in October 1782, married Madeleine, Marie, or Manon, also called Marie Françoise Anstanore, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Hébert and Marie Boudreaux, at St. Gabriel in February 1805.  Simon, père, described by the recording priest as "formerly a captain of the militia," died near St. Gabriel in November 1838, age 56.  His daughters married into the Hébert and Jeffries families.  Both of his sons married, and one of them settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Only one of the lines seems to have endured. 

Older son Simon, fils, born near St. Gabriel in May 1807, married Telcide, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Arceneaux and Marie Eloise LeBlanc of St. James Parish, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1833.  Simon, fils died near St. Gabriel in May 1834, age 27.  Did his family line die with him? 

Simon, père's younger son Hermogène, born near St. Gabriel in March 1818, married Marie Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Placide LeBlanc and his Creole wife Laetitia Dodd, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1837.  Hermogène died near Brusly in November 1847.  The priest who recorded his burial, and did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Armogène, as he called him, died at "age 30 yrs."  He was 29.   

Only son Joseph Alcée, born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1846, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Firman's sixth and youngest son Firmin-Dava, -Davat, -Davot, or -Damase, by third wife Marie-Hélène or -Ellen Hamilton, born posthumously near San Gabriel in November 1792, married Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Comeaux and Marguerite Blanchard, at St. Gabriel in February 1817.  Firmin Dava, at age 31, remarried to Marie Mélisaire, called Mélisaire, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Breaux and Marie Daigre and widow of Gilbert Comeaux, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1823.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Hunt, and LeBlanc families.  Firmin Dava, at age 51, remarried again--this third marriage--to cousin Marie Joséphine, called Joséphine, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Landry and his Creole wife Emeranthe Lambremont, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1843.  Joséphine died in Iberville Parish in January 1848, age 25.  Firmin Dava, several weeks shy of his 60th birthday, remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Marie Euphrosine, Euphrasie, or Euphrasia, daughter of George Troxler and Anne Manard and widow of Charles LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1852.  Most of Firmin Dava's five sons by all four of his wives died young, but at least one of them managed to create a family of his own, which endured. 

Oldest son Firmin Dava, fils, by first wife Clémence Comeaux, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, age unrecorded, in March 1818, died near St. Gabriel in October 1839, age 22.  He probably did not marry. 

Firmin Dava, père's second son Adolphe, by first wife Clémence Comeaux, born at Shreveport, Louisiana, in October 1819, married cousin Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians David Landry and Cléonise Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1840.  Their son Joseph Adolphe was born near St. Gabriel in July 1841 but died at age 1 1/2 in November 1842; David was born in March 1843; Olivier, a twin, in September 1846 but died at age 1 in October 1847; Ignace was born in January 1850; Théodore in February 1852; and Adolphe, fils in January 1856.  Adolphe, père died near St. Gabriel in April 1856, age 35.  Célestine remarried to a Guitteaux at St. Gabriel in April 1862.  One of their sons married by 1870.

During the War of 1861-65, Adolphe's second son probably was the David Landry who served in the Independent Rangers of Iberille Squadron Militia Cavalry, which remained in the area, and in Company I of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  David married Ophelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Vives Hébert and Domitille Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1868. 

Firmin Dava, père's third son Joseph Austin, called Austin, by second wife Mélisaire Breaux, born near St. Gabriel in July 1829, died near St. Gabriel in late March 1854, age 24.  However, "because of inclement weather the services were performed" the first week of April.  Austin probably did not marry.   

Firmin Dava, père's fourth son Édouard Numa, by third wife Josèphine Landry, born near St. Gabriel in February 1845, died there at age 7 in May 1852. 

Firmin Dava, père's fifth and youngest son Firmin David, by fourth wife Marie Euphrosine Troxler, was born in Iberville Parish in April 1859 when his father was 66 years old. 

Jean (c1753-?) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Jean, sixth and youngest son of Alexandre Landry and Anne Flan, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1753, followed his family to Maryland in the fall of 1755 and was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Baltimore in July 1763.  Still in his early teens, he followed them to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel.  He evidently did not marry. 

Joseph (c1743-?) à Pierre à René le jeune Landry

Joseph, older son of Pierre Landry, fils and Marie Babin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1743, followed his family to Maryland and his married sister Ursule, her Landry husband, and their family to Spanish Louisiana in 1767.  Joseph married fellow Acadian Marguerite LeBlanc probably at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans in the late 1760s or early 1770s.  She gave him a son.  Joseph remarried to fellow Acadian Madeleine Babin, date and place unrecorded.  His daughter by second wife Madeleine married into the Breaux family on the river.  His son by his first wife also married and created a vigorous family line on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Only son Joseph-Donat, called Donat, from first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born near San Gabriel in March 1773, married Geneviève, daughter of Louis Estivan, Stephen, Stieven, Stiven, or Stivenne and his Acadian wife Marie Babin of Manchac, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1805; The Spanish priest who recorded the marriage called him "Donato of St. James," so he must have lived for a time at Cabahannocer.  Donat died in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1820, age 47.  A petition for a family meeting in his name was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse a few weeks before his death.  His daughters married into the Babin and Bourgeois families.  All three of his sons created their own families on the Lafourche.

Oldest son Alexandre, born in Assumption Parish in September 1813, married Evelina, also called Melina, Elina, and Lina, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bertrand and Henriette Rassicot, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1832.  Their son Edmond Amédée, called Amédée, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1835; Augustin in February 1838 but died at age 6 1/2 in August 1844; Alexandre Joseph Auguste, called Joseph, was born in March 1841; Louis in August 1844; Joseph Paulin died at age 2 in August 1852; and Bernard Marcel was born in March 1854.  They also had a younger son named Arsène.  Their daughters married into the Borne and Duroche or Durocher families, one of them at Vacherie, St. James Parish.  Four of his seven sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Amédée married Azémilia, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Bourgeois and his Creole wife Armelise Fremin, at the Thibodaux church in April 1863. 

Alexandre's third son Joseph married Marie Alphonsine, called Alphonsine, daughter of Alphonse Borne and Florence Mars, at the Thibodaux church in October 1860; Joseph's sister Louisa married Alphonsine's brother Joseph.  Joseph and Alphonsine's son Joseph Joachim was born in Lafourche Parish in November 1861; Louis le jeune in February 1866; and Arthur near Vacherie, St. James Parish, in July 1868. 

Alexandre's fourth son Arsène married Marie, daughter of Louis Peltier and his Acadian wife Azélie Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church in January 1865.  Their son Louis Oelcar, perhaps Oscar, was born in Lafourche Parish in April 1867. 

Alexandre's fifth son Louis married Osite, daughter of François Rodrigue and Joséphine Folse of Lafourche Parish, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1870, and sanctified the marriage at the Vacherie church, St. James Parish, in February.

Donat's second son Edmond, born in Assumption Parish in November 1816, married Clarisse Mélicère, called Mélicère, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Savoie and Marie Bergeron, at the Thibodauxville church in September 1837.  Their daughters married into the Augeron or Orgeron and Cantrelle families, and perhaps into the Thompson family as well. 

Donat's third and youngest son Séverin, born in Assumption Parish in June 1819, married Julienne, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Gilbert Melançon and his Creole wife Céleste Emerante Champagne, at the Thibodaux church in June 1839. 

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A third contingent of Landrys from Maryland--22, perhaps 23, more members of the family-- reached New Orleans from Port Tobacco in February 1768 with the large extended family led by Alexis and Honoré Breau of Pigiguit.  Governor Ulloa forced them to settle at Fort San Luìs de Natchez, north of Baton Rouge, far from their kinsmen on the Acadian Coast.  A French-Creole-led revolt overthrew Ulloa later that year; the Breaus and their kinsmen no doubt applauded the ouster of the unpopular governor.  Ulloa's successor, Governor-General Alejandro O'Reilly, at the head of a substantial military force from Cuba, established formal Spanish rule in the colony in the summer of 1769.  O'Reilly ordered the consolidation of Spanish defenses on the river and allowed the Acadians at Fort San Luìs de Natchez to settle where they wanted.  Most of the Landrys at Natchez moved downriver to the Acadian Coast, and some chose to resettle near their cousins on the western prairies.  More Landry families lines came of it, but few of them endured: 

Basile (1727-1788) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Basile, a twin, second son of Pierre Landry and Marguerite Forest and younger brother of Augustin of San Gabriel, was born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in May 1727.  Basile married Brigitte, daughter of Pierre Boudrot and Madeleine Hébert, in c1753 probably at Pigiguit.  The British deported them to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted Basile, Brigitte, a young daughter, and a Babin orphan at Upper Marlborough in July 1763.  Basile, Brigitte, and two daughters emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768.  After their release from Fort San Luìs de Natchez, they moved downriver to the Acadian Coast, but they did not remain there.  In the 1770s, they moved from the river to the Attakapas District on the western prairies, where, in his late 50s, Basile remarried to Anne-Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Vincent and Anne-Marie Doiron and widow of Michel Trahan, in May 1786.  She gave him no more children.  Basile died at Attakapas in March 1788, age 60.  His older daughter married into the Roger family on the river and also settled on the western prairies, so the blood of this family line endured. 

Joseph (1730-c1771) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Joseph, third and youngest son of Pierre Landry and Marguerite Forest and younger brother of Augustin and Basile, was born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in April 1730.  Joseph married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, another daughter of Pierre Boudrot and Madeleine Hébert, in c1751 probably at Pigiguit.  The British deported the couple to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted Joseph, Madeleine, two young sons, and a Babin orphan at Upper Marlborough in July 1763.  Joseph, Madeleine, and their three children, two sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768.  Like brother Basile and his family, they moved downriver to the Acadian Coast after their release from Natchez.  Joseph died probably on the river before 1771, in his late 30s or early 40s, when his wife remarried to a Clouâtre.  Joseph's daughter evidently married into the Hébert family on the river.  His two sons also married.  The older one resettled on the western prairies, and the younger one remained on the river. 

Older son Joseph, fils, also called Jean, born at Pigiguit or in Maryland in c1755, was counted with his parents at Upper Marlborough, Maryland, in July 1763.  He followed them to Louisiana and Fort San Luìs de Natchez, and probably lived with his widowed mother at San Gabriel on the Acadian Coast.  In the late 1770s or 1780s, Joseph, fils moved to the Attakapas District and married Marie-Louise, called Louise and Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Bourg and Anne Boudrot of Île St.-Jean and widow of Pierre Savoie, at Opelousas in July 1789.  He was the only Landry at the time who settled on the Opelousas prairie.  Joseph's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in February 1809.  He would have been age 54 that year.  His daughter married into the Richard family.  All three of his sons married.  Two remained in St. Landry Parish, and the other settled in St. Martin Parish.  Not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Léandre, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in July 1790, married Lise or Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Blaise Brasseaux and Marie Anne Prejean, at the Opelousas church in June 1811.  Their son Arsène was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1812; Léandre, fils in April 1814; Aloyse was "born at sea" in August 1815 and baptized at Opelousas the following November; Joseph was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1822; Arville in January 1824; Joseph Philemon in December 1828; and Éloi Aladin in October 1830.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Bourque, Brasseaux, and Prewett families.  None of Léandre's sons married by 1870.  One wonders if any of them survived childhood. 

Joseph, fils's second son Julien, born at Opelousas in February 1792, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Richard and Marie Dugas, at the Opelousas church in May 1813.  They settled in the Bellevue area of St. Landry Parish.  Their son Julien, fils was born in August 1817; Éloi le jeune in December 1819; and Alphonse in October 1826.  Julien, père died in St. Landry Parish in November 1829, age 37.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial noted that Julien "received the sacraments of the church."  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1838.  His daughter married a Richard cousin.  All three of his sons created their own families on the prairies and the Teche valley. 

Oldest son Julien, fils likely married Félicité D'arby.  Their son Albert was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1847.  Julien, fils may have remarried to Marie Dronet.  Their son Onésime was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in the early 1850s; Jean Baptiste in December 1855; Joseph Clémile in March 1857; Nicolas in October 1866; and Éloi in January 1870. 

Julien, père's second son Éloi le jeune may have married cousin Marie Bertisse, Bertille, or Herbetile Landry and settled on the upper Vermilion.  Their son Alexandre was born in November 1849, and Désiré in July 1854.  Their daughters married into the Guidry and LeBlanc families at Breaux Bridge.  One of Éloi le jeune's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Alexandre married Euphrasie or Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Valsin LeBlanc and Eugènie Bourgeois, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1869.  Their son Jules was born near Breaux Bridge in February 1870. 

Julien, père's third and youngest son Alphonse married Amelie or Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Melançon and Mathilde Doucet, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1846.  They settled near Breaux Bridge and then lived near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, perhaps at a place called Grande Louis, in the early 1850s.  Their son Louis Omer was born in September 1856 but died at age 11 in September 1867, and Jean Baptiste died at age 2 in March 1861.  Their daughter married into the Masson family.  Alphonse, at age 37, remarried to Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Sosthène Guidry and , at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1864. 

Joseph, fils' third and youngest son Éloi, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in February 1797, married Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Guidry and Victoire Semere of Grande Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in October 1815.  Éloi died in St. Martin Parish in November 1842.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Éloi died "at age 45 or 46 yrs.," so this was him.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

Joseph, père's younger son Simon, born in Maryland in c1763, was counted with his family at Upper Marlborough that July 1763 and followed them to Louisiana and Fort San Luìs de Natchez.  Simon may have married fellow Acadian Françoise Trahan at Ascension in May 1787.  One wonders if his line of the family endured. 

Augustin (c1743-1791) à René à Jean à René le jeune Landry

Augustin, second son of Joseph Landry and Marie-Josèphe Richard, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1743, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his siblings to Louisiana in 1768.  From Fort San Luìs de Natchez, they moved downriver to San Gabriel, where Augustin married fellow Acadian Anne-Marie, called Marie, Forest probably in the early 1770s.  At age 43, Augustin remarried to cousin Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Claire Babin and widow of Étienne Rivet, at San Gabriel in August 1786.  Augustin died at San Gabriel in March 1791, age 48.  His daughters married into the Hébert and Melançon families.  His son died young, so the family line, except for its blood, did not endure. 

Only son Simon, by first wife Marie Forest, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in June 1777, evidently died young. 

Alexandre (c1750-1822) à René à Jean à René le jeune Landry

Alexandre, third son of Joseph Landry and Marie-Josèphe Richard and younger brother of Augustin, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1750, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his siblings to Louisiana in 1768.  From Fort San Luìs de Natchez, they moved downriver to San Gabriel, where, at age 31, Alexandre married cousin Marie-Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Amable Hébert and Marie Richard, in February 1786.  Alexandre died at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in November 1822, in his early 70s.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Lanclos, and Rivet families.  His three sons also created their own families on the river, but not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son François-Joseph, called Joseph, born near San Gabriel in January 1787, married cousin Henriette Marine or Marie Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Melançon and Christine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1815.  Their daughter married into the Babin and Descoteaux families.  François Joseph's son also created his own family. 

Only son Joseph Anselme, called Anselme, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in April 1816, married cousin Madeleine Joséphine, called Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Landry and Constance Babin, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1837.  Their son Joseph Adrien, called Adrien, was born in Ascension Parish in March 1840; Siméon Félix in March 1846; and Augustin Telesphore in August 1851.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Anselme, at age 40, remarried to cousin Clothilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Céleste Landry and widow of François Denoux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in July 1856.   One of Anselme's sons married by 1870.

 Oldest son Adrien, by first wife Josèphine Landry, may have married cousin Ophelia Babin.  Their son Joseph Étienne was born near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in December 1865; and Vincent Apollinaire in July 1867.  Adrien remarried to cousin Alice, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Cheresia Breaux, at the Gonzales church in November 1870; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  

Alexandre's second son Louis-David, called David, born near San Gabriel in July 1790, married cousin Marie Cléonise Célestine, called Cléonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Breaux and Rosalie Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1818.  David died near St. Gabriel in November 1822.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that David died at "age 28."  He was 32.  Their daughters married into the Cox, Guitteaux, Landry, and Rivet families, so the blood of this family line survived. 

Alexandre's third and youngest son Mathurin, born near San Gabriel in July 1794, married Marie Adèle or Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Breaux and Marie Geneviève Daigle, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1821.  Mathurin remarried to Marie Élise, Elmire, Eloire, Elvere, Elvina, Elvira, Elvire, or Éloise, daughter of Olivier Hernandez and his Acadian wife Marine Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1828.  Their daughters married into the Orcutt and Orillion families.  At least two of Mathurin's sons married by 1870 and settled near Plaquemine on the west side of the river in Iberville Parish. 

Oldest son Jean Baptiste Léon, by first wife Marie Breaux, born near St. Gabriel in January 1822, died at age 10 months the following November. 

Mathurin's second son Victorin, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in March 1830, married Marguerite or Marie Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Xavier Rivet and Marie Robichaux, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1856. 

Mathurin's third son Alexandre Duprélong, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in January 1831, if he survived childood, did not marry by 1870. 

Mathurin's fourth son Joseph Drausinm, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in February 1836, died at age 1 1/2 in September 1837.

Mathurin's fifth son Paul Olivier, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in January 1838, if he survived childood, did not marry by 1870. 

Mathurin's sixth son Joseph, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in March 1840, married Celina Rivet, perhaps cousin Marie Celina, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Arvillien Rivet and Marie Roseline Landry.  Their son Edmond was born near Plaquemine in November 1869. 

Mathurin's seventh and youngest son Christophe, by second wife Marie Hernandez, born near St. Gabriel in July 1842, if he survived childood, did not marry by 1870. 

Pierre (c1752-1780s) à René à Jean à René le jeune Landry

Pierre, fourth and youngest son of Joseph Landry and Marie-Josèphe Richard and younger brother of Augustin and Alexandre, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1752, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his siblings to Louisiana in 1768.  From Fort San Luìs de Natchez they moved downriver to San Gabriel.  Pierre married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure Forest and Claire Rivet of San Gabriel, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer downriver from San Gabriel in February 1777.  They settled at San Gabriel, where Pierre died by November 1781, probably in his late 20s, when his wife remarried to an Hébert at San Gabriel.  Evidently she and Pierre had no children. 

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A generation after the first Landry family reached the colony, dozens more came to Louisiana from France in 1785.  These were Landrys from Minas whom the British had exiled to Virginia in the fall of 1755, had deported to England the following year, and repatriated to France in the spring of 1763; and also Landrys from Pigiguit, Cobeguit, and Île St.-Jean whom the British had deported to France in late 1758.  After enduring life in the mother country for a quarter of a century, they took up the Spanish government's offer to start a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Fifty-four of them came to the Spanish colony aboard five of the Seven Ships.  Most of them chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche, but some of them settled in river communities near their cousins already there.  Many new Landry family lines came of it.

The first of them--a large family with seven children, a middle-aged couple, and a wife, 10 Landrys in all--crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac on the river above San Gabriel: 

Charles, fils (c1729-1814) à Abraham à René le jeune Landry

Charles, fils, older son of Charles Landry and Marie LeBlanc and older brother of Amand-Pierre of Cabahannoce and Attakapas, was born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1729.  Charles, fils followed an uncle to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  A French official counted him with his uncle Jean Landry and his uncle's family at Grande-Anse on the south coast of the island in August 1752.  The British deported Charles, fils to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  He crossed with the family of Jean Burgeaud, a kinsman, and settled at nearby St.-Servan, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Boudrot and Marie-Josèphe Doiron and widow of Joseph Hébert, in November 1759.  Between 1760 and 1771, Marguerite gave Charles, fils seven children, six sons and a daughter, three of whom, all sons, died young.  Charles, fils took his family to Poitou in 1773.  Marguerite gave him another son--their eighth child--at Châtellerault in January 1775.  The following November, after two years of effort, Charles, fils and his family retreated to with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes and settled at nearby Chantenay.  Marguerite gave Charles, fils two more sons--their ninth and tenth children--at Chantenay in 1777 and 1779.  In 1785, Charles, fils, Marguerite, and their seven surviving children, six sons and a daughter, emigrated to Spanish Louisiana.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac.  Charles, fils and Marguerite had no more children in Louisiana.  He died in Iberville Parish in March 1814, in his mid-80s.  Marguerite died there in December 1826, in her early 90s.  Their daughter married into the Guidry and Breaux families on the river.  Five of Charles, fils's sons also married, on the river and upper Bayou Lafourche.  Not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Charles-Pierre-Alain, born at St.-Servan, France, in September 1760, died there at age 2 in August 1762. 

Charles, fils's second son Firmin-Pancrace, born at St.-Servan in May 1762, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana and married Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Babin and his first wife Bibianne Breaux, at San Gabriel in October 1790.  Marie-Anne was a native of Louisiana.  Firmin died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in October 1813, age 51.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

Charles, fils's third son Jean-Pierre, born at St.-Servan in January 1764, died there the following July. 

Charles, fils's fourth son Jean-Sébastien dit Bastien, born at St.-Servan in August 1767, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana and married cousin Victoire- or Marie-Constance, called Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre-Abraham dit Pitre Landry and Marguerite Allain, at Ascension in January 1798.  Constance was a native of Louisiana who parents had come to the colony from Maryland in the late 1760s.  Bastien and Constance lived near the boundary of what became Ascension and Assumption parishes before moving down bayou.  Bastien died in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1830.  The Thibodauxville priest who recorded his burial said that Sébastien was age 60 when he died.  He was 63.  His succession inventory was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse in September.  His daughters married into the Bernard, Henderson, and Richard families.  Half of his six sons died in their mid-20s and do not seem to have married.  His middle son and a younger son carried on the family line in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Sébastien-Rosémond, called Rosémond, born at Ascension in October 1798, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1824, age 25.  He probably did not marry.   

Bastien's second son Pierre-Thiburse, born at Ascension in August 1802, died in Ascension Parish at age 11 in November 1813. 

Bastien's third son Magloire-Benoît, born at Ascension in July 1804, married Marie Justine, called Justine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Babin and Anne Céleste Dugas, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1825.  Their son Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in December 1826; Léon in February 1828; Théodore Joseph in February 1832; Pierre Casimir, called Casimir, was born in April 1836 but died at age 6 months the following October; Joseph Camille, called Camille, was born in November 1840; Joseph Théophile, called Théophile, near Paincourtville in February 1846; and Eusèbe Anatole in August 1850.  They also had an older son named Adélard.  Magloire Benoît died near Paincourtville in December 1858.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Magloire died at "age 54-55 years."  He was 54.  His daughter married into the Babin and Dugas families.  Six of his eight sons married by 1870.  One of them moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Joseph married Marie Irma, called Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Hermogène LeBlanc and Marie Melançon, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1849.  Their son Joseph Nicolas, perhaps called Nicolas, was born near Paincourtville in November 1853 but may have died at age 9 months (the recording priest said 22) in August 1854; Joseph Vouilli was born in December 1857; and Joseph Paul in March 1870.  Their daughter married into the Rivet family. 

Magloire Benoît's second son Léon married cousin Ozile or Osile, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Daigle and Marguerite Babin, at the Paincourtville church in February 1857.  Their son Édouard Sabin was born near Paincourtville in December 1858, and Joseph Fernand in July 1866. 

Magloire Benoît's third son Théodore Joseph married Anaïse, also called Adélaïde, daughter of Jérôme Mollere and his Acadian wife Eselie LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in October 1856.  Their son Joseph Grismore was born near Paincourtville in August 1858, and Jules Laurent in July 1862. 

Magloire Benoît's fourth son Adélard married Scholastique, called Colastie, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Breaux and Arthémise Blanchard, at the Paincourtville church in January 1857.  Their son Joseph Faronelle or Porere was born near Paincourtville in January 1858 but died at age 7 in April 1865; Joseph Aristide, called Aristide, was born in October 1861 but died at age 1 1/2 in April 1863; and Cyprien was born in October 1866.  Adélard remarried to Armelise, another daughter of Hermogène LeBlanc and Marie Melançon, at the Paincourtville church in February 1869.  Their son Paul Maidie was born near Paincourtville in May 1870. 

Magloire Benoît's sixth son Camille married Alexandrine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Comeaux and Azélie Hébert, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in April 1861.  Their son Joseph Adam Lusignon , called Lusignon, was born near Paincourtville in October 1863 but died at age 10 months in August 1864; and Joseph Théophile was born near Plattenville in November 1869. 

Magloire Benoît's seventh son Théophile married cousin Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis LeBlanc and Marie Landry, at the Lydia church, Iberia Parish, in November 1869.  Their son Bert was born near Lydia in July 1870. 

Bastien's fourth son Césaire, born probably at Ascension in c1806, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1833, age 27.  He probably did not marry. 

Bastien's fifth son Ursin Damas, born in Ascension Parish in December 1812, married, at age 36, Adèle, daughter of George Adolphe or Adolpho and his Acadian wife Victoire Boudreaux and widow of Mathurin Hébert, at the Paincourtville church in June 1849.  Their son Gustave Oscar was born near Plattenville in November 1852; and Joseph Clet near Paincourtville in April 1857 but died near Paincourtville, age 12 1/2, in January 1870. 

Bastien's sixth and youngest son Henri-Clairville, called Clairville, born in Assumption Parish in July 1817, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1844, age 26.  Like two of his older brothers who died in their 20s, he probably did not marry. 

Charles, fils's fifth son Charles III, born at St.-Servan in June 1769, died there at age 1 1/2 in November 1770. 

Charles, fils's sixth son Louis-Abel, born at St.-Servan in April 1771, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in November 1822, age 51.  The priest who recorded his burial said nothing about a wife for Louis, so he probably never married. 

Charles, fils's seventh son Jean-Jacques, baptized at Châtellerault, France, in January 1775, followed his family to Nantes and Louisiana and married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Dugas and Sophie Forest, at Ascension in January 1804.  They settled on the upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary of what became Ascension and Assumption parishes before moving down bayou during the early antebellum period.  ean Jacques died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1828, age 53.  His succession inventory was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse in January 1829.  His daughter married into the Babin family.  Only his younger sons created families of their own, one in Ascension, the other in Lafourche.  

Oldest son Dominique died at Ascension three days after his birth in August 1806. 

Jean Jacques's second son Adélard, born in Ascension Parish in January 1813, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1827, age 14. 

Jean Jacques's third son Joseph Octave, born in Assumption Parish in June 1815, married cousin Marie Joséphine, called Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Orillion and Marie Reine Forest, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1834.  They remained in Ascension Parish.  Their son Joseph Octave, fils was born in Ascension Parish in c1834 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1837; Joseph Augustin was born in March 1835; and Jean Adélard or Allard in December 1836 but died at age 15 months in March 1838.  Their daughter married a Dugas cousin.  Joseph Octave remarried to Marie Thérèsine or Thérèse, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breaux and Marie Henriette Dupuis, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1850.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin at Gonzales.  His surviving son did not marry by 1870. 

Jean Jacques's fourth and youngest son Huber Eustache, called Eustache, born in Ascension Parish in September 1817, married Pélagie, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Théodore Boudreaux and Marie Blanche LeBlanc, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1838.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes, probably near Chacahoula.  Their son Joseph Eustache was born in January 1841; Émile Philippe, called Philippe, in December 1842; Amédée Léonard in February 1845; Aurestile in August 1847; Joseph Nicolas in December 1852; and Joseph Paulin in September 1857.  Their daughters married into the Esteve and Martin families.  Two of Eustache's sons married by 1870 and settled on lower Bayou Teche. 

Oldest son Joseph Eustache married cousin Euselia, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Basile Henry and Madeleine Landry of Terrebonne Parish and widow of Ferjus Landry, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in May 1865, and sanctified the marriage at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, the following month.  Their son Joseph Profile was born near Chacahoula in September 1867.   They were living near Lydia, Iberia Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, in 1869. 

Eustache's second son Philippe married cousin Octavie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Mathilde Landry of Terrebonne Parish, at the Lydia church in June 1870. 

Charles, fils's eighth son Charles III, the second with the name, baptized at St.-Martin de Chantenay in March 1777, followed his family to Louisiana.  Charles III, also called Charles François and Charles Valentin, moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married cousin Henriette Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Charles Theriot and Madeleine Landry, at Assumption in April 1805.  Their daughters married into the Augeron and Cantrelle families.  Only Charles III's youngest son seems to have created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Charles Célestin, born in Assumption Parish in February 1807, may have died young. 

Charles III's second son Fostin Alexandre, born in Ascension Parish in February 1809, also may have died young. 

Charles III's third son Eteloin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1815, also may have died young. 

Charles III's fourth and youngest son Jacques Tourville, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1824, married Clothilde, also called Clotine and Claudine, daughter of fellow Acadian Florentin Boudreaux and his Creole wife Marianne Durocher of Terrebonne Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in February 1842, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church in June 1845.  They lived on the Gulf at Chenière Caminada, Jefferson Parish, near Grand Isle, and in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Jean Baptiste Sosthène, called Sosthène, was born in July 1844; Joseph Célestin at Bayou Black, Terrebonne Parish, in November 1848; Éloi Osémé in December 1850; Octave Florestine in April 1855; Aubin Jacques in February 1858; and François Omer near Montegut, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1867.  They also had an older son named Amédée, unless he was Éloi Osémé.  Two of Jacques Tourville's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Sosthène married cousin Amelia, also called Émilie and Melia, daughter of fellow Acadians Evariste Aucoin and Emily Boudreaux, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1867.  Their son Evariste was born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1869. 

Jacques Tourville's second son Amédée married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Boudreaux and his Creole wife Eulalie Malbrough, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in December 1870.

Charles, fils's ninth and youngest son François-Marie, baptized at St.-Martin de Chantenay in November 1779, followed his family to Louisiana.  He married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Babin and Madeleine Babin and widow of Eusèbe Landry, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in February 1803.  Constance was a native of Louisiana.  They settled up bayou in what became Ascension Parish.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Landry, Melançon, and Roth families.  François Marie, at age 52, remarried to Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Marguerite Brasset, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in July 1831.  They remained on the river.  François Marie died in Iberville Parish in September 1850, age 71.  He seems to have had no sons who survived childhood, so this line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him.

A son, by first wife Constance Babin, name unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish a day after his birth in February 1809. 

Anselme (c1741-1810) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Anselme, eighth and youngest son of Jean dit Jane Landry and Madeleine Melanson, born probably at Minas in October 1741, became separated from his family in the fall of 1755, and the British deported him to Virginia.  In the spring of 1756, Virginia authorities sent him and the hundreds of other exiles in the colony to England, and he was repatriated with other exiles to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in the spring of 1763.  Later in the year, he received permission to move to St.-Malo and settled at nearby Pleudihen, where he married Agathe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Barrieau and Véronique Girouard of Pigiguit and widow of Isidore Daigre, in February 1765.  Between 1766 and 1771, Agathe gave Anselme three children, two daughters and a son.  The son died at La Villeger near Pleudihen in August 1773, age 4 1/2.  Anselme took his family to Poitou later that year.  They did not remain.  In December 1775, Anselme, Agather, and their two daughers retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes and settled at nearby Chantenay, where Anselme worked as a seaman.  Their younger daughter died at Chantenay in July 1780, age 9.  Older daughter Marie-Olive married a Boudrot at Chantenay in May 1783.  Two years later, Anselme, Agathe, and their married daughter and her family emigrated to Spanish Louisiana.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge, but they did not remain there.  In the late 1780s or early 1790s, they resettled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anselme died in Interior, now Lafourche, Parish in October 1810, in his late 60s.  His family line died with him. 

Only son Joseph-Charles, born at La Gravelle, Pleudihen, France, in February 1769, died there in August 1773, age 4 1/2.

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Twenty-one more Landrys--four families, one of them led by a widow, several wives, and two unmarried sisters--crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August 1785.  Most of them followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, but one family chose to settle on the western prairies.  More Landry family lines came of it, but not all of them endured:

Jean-Baptiste (c1724-1787) à Antoine à René le jeune Landry

Jean-Baptiste, sixth son of Antoine Landry, fils and Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born at Minas in March 1724, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of René Aucoin and Madeleine Bourg, at Grand-Pré in July 1748.  They settled at Rivière-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, Élisabeth gave Jean-Baptiste a child of unrecorded name and gender in 1748.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean after August 1752.  Arsenault says Jean-Baptiste had a daughter Anne in c1753 and a son Jean-Baptiste, fils in c1755 and attributes the children to Jean-Baptiste's second wife, who he says Jean-Baptiste married in c1752.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, followed here, says daughter Marie was born in c1751 and son Joseph, not Jean-Baptiste, fils, in c1754, and attributes them to first wife Élisabeth, who must have died on Île St.-Jean soon after Joseph's birth.  According to Stephen A. White, Jean-Baptiste remarried to Isabelle, also called Élisabeth, daughter of Claude Dugas and Anne Hébert, in c1759, which would have been in France.  However, Robichaux and transport passenger records show that when Jean-Baptiste reached St.-Malo in January 1759 he was accompanied by second wife Isabelle and two children, Joseph and Marie, so he and his second wife likely had married on the eve of Île-St.-Jean's dérangement.  They settled in the suburb of Plouër, where, between 1760 and 1771, Isabelle gave Jean-Baptiste five more children, three daughers and two sons--seven children in all.  Oldest daughter Marie by the first Élisabeth married a Dupuis widower at Plouër in 1771.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to Poitou in 1773.  Daughter Marie and her family also went to Poitou.  Isabelle gave Jean-Baptiste another daughter in Poitou in November 1775--their eighth child.  In March 1776, Jean-Baptiste, Isabelle, and their children retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Their ninth child, a daughter, was born in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in October 1780, but she died at age 3 in October 1783.  Meanwhile, two of their older children died in St.-Similien Parish in 1777 and 1778.  In 1785, Jean-Baptiste, Isabelle, three daughters, and a son, emigrated to Louisiana from France.  His oldest son, who would have been age 31 in 1785, if he was still living, did not accompany his father and stepmother to the Spanish colony.  Nor did oldest daughter Marie, who had died in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in January 1781, age 30.  Her widower Joseph Dupuis and their daughter did go to Louisiana.  From New Orleans, Jean-Baptiste took his family not to upper Bayou Lafourche with the majority of their fellow passengers, but to Attakapas on the western prairies.  Second wife Isabelle gave him no more children there.  Jean-Baptiste died at Attakapas in October 1787, age 63.  His three daughers married into the Dugas, Landry, Broussard, Granger, and Girouard families on the prairies.  His son also married at Attakapas and died two months after his father.  The son and his wife had one son who likely died young, so the family line, except for its blood, did not endure in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Élisabeth Aucoin, born probably on Île St.-Jean in c1754, followed his family to France, settled with them at Plouër, may have followed them to Poitou, but he did not not follow them to Nantes.  If he was still alive in 1785, he chose not to accompany his family to Spanish Louisiana. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, by second wife Élisabeth Dugas, born at Plouër, France, in January 1762, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, Louisiana, and Attakapas, where he married fellow Acadian Marie Breaux in the late 1780s.  Their daughter may have married into the Roman family and settled on the river.  Baptiste died at Attakapas in December 1787, age 25.  His family line may not have survived. 

Only son Augustin, born posthumously at Attakapas in February 1788, evidently died young. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's third and youngest son Pierre-Isaac, born at Plouër in May 1771, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes.  He died in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in February 1778, age 6 1/2. 

Prosper (c1726-1797) à Claude à René le jeune Landry

Prosper, second son of Jean-Baptiste dit Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Comeau, born at Minas in c1726, was still a bachelor when he moved to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  He married Anne-Josette, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Boudrot and Louise Saulnier of Pigiguit, at Port-La-Joye on the island in September 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted them with their 9-week-old daughter, his brother Joseph, and her brother Mathurin at Grande-Anse on the southeast coast of the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, this daughter was Prosper and Anne-Josette's only child.  Anne-Josette died on the island, and Prosper remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Bourg and Françoise Aucoin of Cobeguit, at Port-La-Joye in July 1754.  According to Arsenault, Marie-Madeleine gave Prosper a son in 1757.  The British deported them to Rochefort, France, in late 1758.  Marie-Madeleine died either on the crossing or in Rochefort before October 1759, when Prosper, now a widower, arrived at St.-Malo from Rochefort and settled in the suburb of St.-Suliac.  His children by both wivees also evidently had died by then.  At age 35, Prosper remarried again--his third marriage--to Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pitre and Marguerite Thériot and widow of Jean-Baptiste Henry, at nearby Pleurtuit in October 1761.  Between 1762 and 1769 at Pleurtuit, Élisabeth gave Prosper five more children, two sons and three daughters--seven children in all by three wives.  One of his daughters by Élisabeth died in infancy.  Prosper took his family to Poitou in 1773, and they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in March 1776.  Their youngest daughter died there in July 1777, age 8.  In 1785, Prosper, Élisabeth, and their two sons emigrated to Louisiana.  Oldest daughters Marguerite by first wife Anne-Josette and Marie-Madeleine by third wife Élisabeth, who would have been ages 33 and 21 in 1785, if they were still alive, did not follow their family to the Spanish colony.  From New Orleans, Prosper and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Prosper died in October 1797, in his early 70s, two days before third wife Élisabeth died.  Their two sons married on the upper Lafourche. 

Older son Jean-Pierre, by third wife Élisabeth Pitre, born at St.-Antoine near Pleurtuit, France, in July 1762, became a carpenter in France.  He followed his family to Louisiana and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Dominique Guérin and Anne LeBlanc, in February 1786.  Isabelle also had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, so they may have known one another in France.  Their daughter married into the Barrilleaux and Thibodeaux families.  Jean-Pierre remarried to Anne-Marie, called Annette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Daigle and Marie Boudreaux and widow, perhaps, of Simon LeBlanc, at Lafourche in January 1790.  Their daughters married into the Barrilleaux, Dovier, Guillot, Mendoza, and Simoneaux families.  Jean Pierre, père died in Assumption Parish in August 1810, age 48.  His son had many sons of his own and settled on the upper bayou.  One of Jean Pierre's daughters, however, settled on lower Bayou Teche. 

Only son Jean-Pierre, fils, called Jean, by second wife Annette Daigle, born at Lafourche in November 1790, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Blanchard and Marguerite Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1812.  Their son Jean, fils was born in Assumption Parish in April 1813; Henri Firmin in July 1815 but died at age 2 months the following September; Marcellin Florentin was born in July 1816; Ferdinand Théodule in November 1818; Pierre Victor in July 1821; and Rosémond Dormeville or Dorville in July 1825.  They also had an older son named Landry, also called L. W. and Eleme. Jean died by January 1840, when he was listed as deceased in a son's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Harvey and Landry families.  Five of his seven sons married and settled in Assumption Parish. 

Third son Marcellin Florentin married Clementine, daughter of André Dupré and Petronille Langlinais, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1840.  They had a son named J. B., probably Jean Baptiste, Maurice, called Maurice.  Marcellin died near Paincourtville in September 1847.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Marcellin died at "age 30 yrs."  This Marcellin would have been age 31, so this probably was him.  His son also created a family of his own.

Only son Maurice married Veneda or Velleda, daughter of fellow Acadians Onésiphore Aucoin and Marine Guillot, at the Plattenville church in February 1867.  Their son Gustave Morille was born near Paincourtville in March 1870. 

Jean's fourth son Landry married Azéline or Azéma, daughter of Lubin Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Marie Daigle, at the Plattenville church in November 1841.  Their son Sarasin Cyprien was born near Paincourtville in May 1847, Nicol in August 1852, and Cléobert in October 1854. 

Jean's fifth son Ferdinand Théodule likely married cousin Eglantine, perhaps also called Euphrosine, Landry.  Their son Omer was born near Paincourtville in September 1845, Joseph in January 1847, Lucien Ultimere in July 1849, and Octave Ulysse in September 1856.  One of Ferdinand's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Omer married Amanda, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Comeaux and Aureline LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in February 1868. 

Jean's sixth son Pierre Victor married cousin Eléonore, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Landry and Colette Hébert and widow of Narcisse Trahan, at the Paincourtville church in January 1846.  Their son Pierre Désiré or Desire Pierre was born near Paincourtville in April 1847, and Jean in June 1849 but died at age 9 months in April 1850.  Pierre Victor's surviving son also created his own family. 

Older son Désiré Pierre married Cordilia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Dugas and Clémence Hébert, at the Paincourtville church in April 1868.  Their son Pierre Leufroi was born near Paincourtville in October 1870. 

Jean's seventh and youngest son Dormeville married cousin Alsina or Alexine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Landry and his Creole wife Roseline Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in May 1847.  Their son Gervetus or Gervey was born near Paincourtville in November 1849 but died at age 1 1/2 in July 1851, and Augustin Jean Baptiste was born in February 1853. 

Prosper's younger son Simon-Joseph, by third wife Élisabeth Pitre, born at Crehan near Pleurtuit, France, in November 1765, also became a carpenter in France.  He followed his family to Louisiana and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Luce, daughter of fellow Acadians Marin Bourg and Marie-Osite Daigle, at Assumption in July 1795.  Marie-Luce had come to Louisiana from France aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  Simon-Joseph, père died in Assumption Parish in December 1815, a widower, age 50.  His son also created his own family on the bayou. 

Only son Simon-Joseph, fils, called Simonet, born at Assumption in May 1798, likely married fellow Acadian Élisabeth or Élise Aucoin in Assumption Parish in the 1820s.  Their son Octave was born in Assumption Parish in December 1824, and Simon Ulysse in January 1830.  Their daughter married into the Badeaux family.  Simonet died in Assumption Parish in June 1833, age 35.  Neither of his sons married by 1870. 

Pierre, fils (c1736-1798) à René, fils à René le jeune Landry

Pierre, fils, oldest son of Pierre Landry and Anne Thériot, born at Minas in c1736, followed his family to Virginia, Falmouth, and St.-Servan, France, where he worked as a carpenter.  He married fellow Acadian Marthe LeBlanc probably at St.-Servan in the early 1760s.  Between 1762 and 1773, Marthe gave Pierre, fils five children, four sons and a daughter.  In 1773, Pierre, fils took his family to Poitou.  In March 1776, after two years of effort, they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes and settled in St.-Jacques Parish, where Marthe gave Pierre, fils another daughter in July 1776--their sixth child.  Their youngest son died there the following September.  In 1785, Pierre, fils, Marthe, and four of their children, two sons and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  Their oldest son Joseph, who would have been age 23 in 1785, if he was still alive, chose not to accompany his family to the Spanish colony.  From New Orleans, Pierre, fils and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Pierre, fils died there in September 1798, age 63.  His daughters married into the Hébert and Penro families on the upper bayou.  His two sons also married there. 

Oldest son Joseph, born probably in England in c1762, followed his family to St.-Servan, France, but perhaps not to Poitou or Nantes.  If he was still alive in 1785, he chose not to accompany his family to Spanish Louisiana. 

Pierre, fils's second son Joseph-Giroire, born at St.-Servan in January 1766, became an engraver in France.  He followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Paule or -Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Prosper-Honoré Giroir and Marie Dugas, in December 1788.  Marie-Paule also had come to Louisiana from France aboard La Bergère, so they may have known one another in the mother country.  Their daughters married into the Charlet and Landry families.  Joseph remarried to Marie, daughter of Bernard Capdeville and his Acadian wife Anne Clouâtre, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1811.  Their daughters married into the Capdeville, Dufrene, and Duhon families.  Joseph Giroire likely died in Assumption Parish in June 1849.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph, "born in Nantes, France," died at "age 86 years."  This Joseph would have been age 83.  (Only three Joseph Landrys emigrated to Louisiana from France, all of them born at St.-Servan--this one; Pierre-Joseph, called Joseph, born in January 1770 and died in Iberville Parish in March 1843; and Joseph-Marie, born in April 1778, who died in St. Martin Parish in October 1852.)  Six of this Joseph's seven sons by both wives created their own families on Bayou Lafourche.

Oldest son Joseph-Henri, called Henri, by first wife Marie-Paule Giroir, born at Lafourche in March 1791, married Jeanne Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Simon Boudreaux and his French wife Marie Julienne Brossier, at the Plattenville church in November 1813.  Their son Gatino Joseph Ovid, called Joseph, was born in Assumption Parish in November 1813; a son, name unrecorded, died 8 days after his birth in May 1823; Henri Léovinski, Lovinski, or Lovency, called Lovency, was born in October 1826; and Octave Emare in July 1832.  Their daughters married into the Bourg and Foret families.  At age 44, Henri remarried to cousin Coralie Mélanie Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Bourg and Félicité Landry, at the Plattenville church in September 1835.  Three of Henri's four sons married.  The youngest son moved to the lower Atchafalaya after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Adélaïde Boudreaux, married Marguerite Élise, called Élise and perhaps also Basalisse, daughter of Joseph Élie Friou and his Acadian wife Marguerite Bourg, at the Plattenville church in December 1835.  Their son Désiré Joseph was born near Plattenville in March 1841.  They may also have had an older son named Lucien.  Their daughters married into the Gautreaux and Simoneaux families. 

Older son Lucien married Azéma, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Aucoin and Eléonore Barrilleaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1869. 

Henri's third son Lovency, by first wife Adélaïde Boudreaux, married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Fabien Bourg and Clarisse Daigle, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1848.  Their son Joseph was born near Plattenville in December 1849, Joseph Adrien in February 1852, and Joseph Henry in March 1855. 

Henri's fourth and youngest son Octave Emare, by first wife Adélaïde Boudreaux, may have married fellow Acadian Angelina Giroir.  Their son Désiré Gustave was born near Plattenville in November 1851, and Louis Oscar in September 1853.  They were living near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, on the lower Atchafalaya. in 1866.  Octave remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Delaune and Mélissaire Theriot, at the Brashear City church in December 1868. 

Joseph-Giriore's second son Auguste or Augustin, by first wife Marie-Paule Giroir, born at Assumption in August 1792, married Marie Louise, Luce, or Lucie, another daughter of Joseph Simon Boudreaux and Marie Julienne Brossier and widow of Hippolyte Brets, at the Plattenville in January 1816.  Their son Julien Auguste or Augustin, called Augustin, fils, was born in Assumption Parish in May 1821; Eugène Ansilien in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1824; Joseph Victor in November 1827; and Alexandre Zenon Charles in Assumption Parish April 1832.  Their daughters married into the Besse and Templet families and settled on lower Bayou Teche.  Wife Lucie's succession record, dated 9 October 1849, was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, so Auguste and Lucie must have lived there, too.  At age 62, Auguste remarried in a civil ceremony to Mélanie, daughter of Élie Friou and his Acadian wife Marguerite Bourg, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church in April 1855.  Evidently he returned to upper Bayou Lafourche after the death of his first wife.  Two of his four sons created their own families and moved to the lower Atchafalaya River and to lower Bayou Teche either just before or during the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Augustin, fils, by first wife Marie Luce Boudreaux, married cousin Gertrude Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Dupuis and Rosalie Landry, at the Plattenville church in May 1840.  Their son Eugène Augustin was born near Plattenville in February 1841, Siméon in February 1843, Charles in April 1845, and Caliste in September 1850.  Augustin, fils's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in June 1859.  He would have been age 48 that year.  One wonders when the family moved to lower Bayou Teche.  One of Augustin, fils's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Eugène Augustin married Marie Apolline Laforest at the Brashear City, St. Mary Parish, in April 1868. 

Auguste's third son Joseph Victor, by first wife Marie Luce Boudreaux, married Roseline or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Aucoin and Françoise Louise Daigle, at the Paincourtville church in July 1847.  Their son Augustin le jeune was born near Plattenville in May 1851, and Joseph Arthur near Brashear City in April 1863.  Their daughter married into the Rodriguez family at New Iberia. 

Joseph-Giroire's third son Fabien-Maximilien, called Maxile, from first wife Marie-Paule Giroir, born at Assumption in February 1795, married double cousin Marie Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Marguerite Landry, at the Plattenville church in February 1817.  Their son Lucien was born in Assumption Parish in December 1817; Auguste in c1819 but died at age 15 months in November 1820; Auguste Ennode was born in August 1820; Grégoire, also called Emar, in September 1825; and Constant or Constantin in April 1830 but died at age 5 in May 1835.  Their daughters married into the Charlet and Hébert families.  Two of Maxile's sons also created families of their own.

Oldest son Lucien married cousin Marie Aurora or Aurore, daughter of Ursin Marroy, Maroy, Maroi, Maroir, Marois, Marroi, or Marrois and his Acadian wife Louise Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1840.  Their son Joseph Telesphore Anatole was born near Plattenville in March 1843 but died at age 1 in March 1844; Joseph Aristide, called Aristide, was born near Paincourtville in January 1849; Joseph Enau in May 1851; Joseph Bienvenu in December 1856; and Joseph Camille in December 1861.  Their daughters married Guidry and Landry cousins.  One of Lucien's sons married by 1870.

Second son Aristide married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré Crochet and Bathilde Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1870. 

Maxile's fourth son Grégoire married cousin Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Lazare Hébert and Céleste Landry, at the Paincourtville church in September 1851.  Their son Joseph Nicols, called Nicols, was born near Paincourtville in August 1852 but died at age 3 in October 1855; Joseph Désiré was born in December 1860; and Joseph Maxil Lazare in May 1863 but died at age 2 in September 1865.  Grégoire died in Assumption Parish in November 1863.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Grégoire died at "age 37 years."  This Grégoire would have been age 38, so this probably was him. 

Joseph-Giroire's fourth son Ursin-Valéry, called Valéry, from first wife Marie-Paule Giroir, born at Assumption in November 1796, married cousin Marie Eulalie, called Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marie Rose Landry of Ascension, at the Plattenville church in February 1819.  Their son Théodule was born in Assumption Parish in November 1820, Jules in April 1821[sic] but died at age 7 in August 1828, and Rosémond Osémé was born in December 1827.  They also had a son named Eugène.  Valéry died in Assumption Parish in April 1831, age 34.  His two surviving sons married, and one of them moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Eugène married cousin Constance, also called Hortense Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Richard and Constance LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in September 1845.  Their son Nicholas Abraham was born near Plattenville in June 1846 but died at age 1 in June 1847.  Eugène remarried to Marie Armelise or Aselima, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Daigle and Rose Templet, at the Paincourtville church in June 1848.  They settled on Grand Bayou north of Lake Verret before moving to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65.  Their son Joseph Théogène Adrien was born in February 1852; Joseph Philogène, called Philogène, in September 1854 but died at age 5 in November 1859; Désiré Augustin was born in April 1860; and Rodolphe Joseph was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1868.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc family in Assumption Parish. 

Valéry's fourth and youngest son Rosémond Osémé married Marcellite or Marcelline, daughter of Marcellin Solar and Dolar Rodrigue, at the Paincourtville church in December 1858.  Their son Jean was born near Plattenville in August 1860. 

Joseph-Giroire's fifth son Grégoire, by first wife Marie-Paule Giroir, born at Assumption in August 1799, married cousin Phelonise Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marie Rose Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1826, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Aucoin and Marie Rose Bourg and widow of Magloire Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1837.  Grégoire died in Assumption Parish in November 1839, age 40.  He may have had no sons by either of his wives.  If so, his family line died with him. 

Joseph Giroire's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie Capdeville, born in Assumption Parish in June 1818, may have died young. 

Joseph-Giroire's seventh and youngest son Ives, Yves, Ives Jean Baptiste or Jean Baptiste Ives, called Jose, from second wife Marie Capdeville, born probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1820s, married Delphine Denise, daughter of Jean Charles Barbier and his Acadian wife Jeanne Rosalie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church in August 1844.  Their son Camille Grégoire was born in Assumption Parish in November 1845 but died at age 9 in September 1855, Elphége Sosthène was born in August 1850 but died at age 5 in September 1855, Marcellin Achille was born in June 1852, Alexandre Aristide in August 1854 but died at age 1 in September 1855, and Jean Baptiste Arthur was born near Attakapas Canal east of Lake Verret in June 1858 but died the following October.  Meanwhile, Delphine died at age 37 in July 1858, probably from complications of giving birth to son Jean Baptiste Arthur.  Ives likely remarried to fellow Acadian Sidalise Bourg.  They settled at Attakapas Canal until after the War of 1861-65.  Their son Joseph Vincent was born near Attakapas Canal in January 1860, and Pierre Étienne in August 1862.  They were living near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche in the late 1860s. 

Pierre, fils's third son Jean-Raphaël, born at St.-Servan in April 1768, became a printer in France.  He followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married cousin Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Richard and Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, in August 1789.  Marie also had come to Louisiana from France aboard La Bergère, so they may have known one another in the mother country.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Martin, and Richard families.  At age 70, Jean Raphaël remarried to Marie Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Thibodeaux and Marie Madeleine Theriot, at the Plattenville church in February 1839.  Jean Raphaël died in Assumption Parish in February 1840, age 71.  Three of his five sons also created their own families on the Lafourche.

Oldest son Jean-Raphaël, fils, by first wife Marguerite Richard, born at Lafourche in August 1790, died at Assumption, age 7, in November 1797.

Jean-Raphaël, père's second son François-Magloire, called Magloire, from second wife Marguerite Richard, born at Assumption in April 1797, married Françoise or Fanny Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Aucoin and Madeleine Rose Bourg of Baton Rouge, at the Plattenville church in January 1817.  Their son Marcellin Faustin was born in Assumption Parish in March 1822 but died at age 3 in April 1825, and Théophile Raphaël was born in December 1829.  Magloire died in Assumption Parish in October 1834, age 37.  His daughter married into the Barthe and Boguet families.  His surviving son did not marry before 1870. 

Jean-Raphaël, père's third son Louis-Paterne, by second wife Marguerite Richard, born at Assumption in April 1799, married Marie Rose, called Rose, another daughter of Jean Baptiste Aucoin and Madeleine Rose Bourg, at the Plattenville church in December 1818.  Their daughter married into the Constance family.  Did Louis father any sons? 

Jean-Raphaël, père's fourth son Henri-Léon, called Léon, from first wife Marguerite Richard, born at Assumption in April 1801, married Marguerite Susanne, called Susanne, daughter of Joseph Cheramie, fils and his Acadian wife Gertrude Olivie Michel, at the Plattenville church in January 1821.  Their son Léon Raphaël, called Raphaël, was born in Assumption Parish in July 1823; and Magloire Saint Jeste in March 1827.  One of their sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Raphaël, while a resident of Chenière Camanada on the Gulf of Mexico, married Clémence, daughter of François Rigaud or Rigaux and Adélaïde Encalade of nearby Grand Isle, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1846, six months after a daughter was born to them.  Their son Alcide Raphaël was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1851. 

Jean Raphaël, père's fifth and youngest son Auguste Bernard, by first wife Marguerite Richard, born at Assumption in October 1805, may have died young. 

Pierre, fils's fourth and youngest son Louis-Pierre, born at St.-Servan or in Poitou in October 1773, followed his family to Nantes.  He died in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in September 1776, age 2 1/2. 

.

Five more Landrys--an elderly husband and his wife, who may not have survived the crossing, and four young siblings--crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in September 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passenges to upper Bayou Lafourche.  A vigorous Landry family line came of it: 

Simon (c1735-1785?) à Claude à René le jeune Landry

Simon, seventh and youngest son of Jean-Baptiste dit Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Comeau and younger brother of Prosper of La Bergère, was born at Minas in May 1735.  Simon was still a young bachelor when he accompanied his parents to Virginia in the fall of 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  He married fellow Acadian Marguerite Gautrot, widow of ____ Leroy and Joseph Granger, in England in c1761; she was nine years his senior.  She gave Simon a son there.  Simon and his family, including three stepsons, followed his widowed mother to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763 and settled near her at St.-Servan.  Simon and his family did not follow his older brothers and other Acadian exiles to Poitou in 1773 but remained at St.-Malo.  By September 1784, however, they had joined his family at Nantes.  The following year, Simon and Marguerite emigrated to Spanish Louisiana.  Their only child, son Jean, who would have been age 23 in 1785, if he was still alive, chose to remain in the mother country.  Simon and Marguerite, ages 59 and 50, respectively, may not have survived the crossing to New Orleans aboard Le St.-Rémi

Only son Jean, also called Jean-Baptiste, born in England in April 1762, followed his family to St.-Malo, France, but not to Nantes or Louisiana.  If he was still alive in 1785, he did not follow his parents to Spanish Louisiana. 

Aimable-Étienne (1765-1832) à René à Pierre à René l'aîné Landry

Aimable-Étienne, third son of Joseph Landry and his second wife Jeanne-Marie-Madeleine Varangue, was born at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in December 1765.  (He, his younger brother, and two sisters were perhaps the only descendants of René Landry l'aîné of Acadia to go to Louisiana.)  Aimable-Étienne followed his family to Poitou, his widowed mother to Nantes, and accompanied his three siblings to the Spanish colony and upper Bayou Lafourche.  Aimable married Ursule-Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians François Pitre and Ursule Breau, at Ascension on the river in February 1788.  Ursule had come to Louisiana from France aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships.  They settled on the upper bayou.  Aimable died in Assumption Parish in July 1832, age 67.  His daughters married into the Barrilleaux, Colon, Forest, and Hunot families.  Three of his five sons married on the bayou.  

Oldest son Étienne-Joseph, born at Assumption in September 1792, married cousin Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Marie Giroir, perhaps in a civil ceremony, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1813.  Étienne died near Plattenville in November 1853.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Étienne died at "age 64 years."  Étienne Joseph would have been age 61.  Rosalie died near Plattenville in November 1853, less than a week after her husband passed.  The priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 68 years."  Were Étienne and Rosalie victims of the yellow epidemic that struck South Louisiana during the summer and fall of 1853?  Only one of their sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Raphaël, born in Assumption Parish in September 1814, died at age 1 in September 1815.

Étienne Joseph's second son Édouard Trasimond, born in Assumption Parish in June 1818, also may have died young. 

Étienne Joseph's third son Cyprien, born in Assumption Parish, died 10 days after his birth there in September 1824.   

Étienne Joseph's fourth and youngest son Onésime Cleopha, called Cleopha, born in Assumption Parish in December 1825, may have married fellow Acadian Azélie Boudreaux.  Their son Henry Éloy was born near Plattenville in August 1852 but died at age 7 in July 1859.  Cleopha died in Assumption Parish in October 1853.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial said that Cleopha died at "age 25 years, 9 months."  He was 27.  Was he a victim of the yellow epidemic that struck South Louisiana during the summer and fall of 1853?  Did his family line survive?   

Aimable-Étienne's second son Paul-Olivier or Olivier-Paul, born at Assumption in September 1795, died at age 8 in September 1803. 

Aimable-Étienne's third son Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in March 1799, married Ludivine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Foret and Marie Madeleine Blanchard, at the Plattenville church in May 1820, and remarried to Euphrosine, Euphrasie, or Joséphine, called Frosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Blaise Boudreaux and Perrine Barrilleaux, at the Plattenville church in October 1827.  Their daughter married into the Thibodeaux family at New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche.  Only one of Jean Baptiste's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jean Baptiste, fils, by second wife Frosine Boudreaux, died in Assumption Parish nine days after his birth in September 1828.  

Jean Baptiste, père's second son Hermogène, by second wife Frosine Boudreaux, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1829, died at age 14 in September 1843.

Jean Baptiste, père's third son Jean Baptiste, fils, the second with the name, by second wife Frosine Boudreaux, born in Assumption Parish in October 1833, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Jean Baptiste, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph Léon, called Léon, from second wife Frosine Boudreaux, born in Assumption Parish in April 1837, married Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Aucoin and Clarisse Hébert, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1858.  Their son Grégoire Telemaque Joseph was born near Labadieville in June 1859, and Omer Audressy in June 1861.  

Aimable-Étienne's fourth son François-Lucien, born at Assumption in October 1800, may have died young. 

Aimable-Étienne's fifth and youngest son Élie, born at Assumption in December 1802, married Anne Rosalie, called Rosalie, another daughter of Blaise Boudreaux and Perrine Barrilleaux, at the Plattenville church in November 1825.  They lived near the boundary between Assumption and Lafourche Interior parishes.  Their daughters married into the Bertrand, Breaux, Lasseigne, Naquin, and Samson families.  Two of Élie's sons married and moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Hermogène, born in on the upper Lafourche in April 1828, married Clara Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Olivier Gautreaux and his Creole wife Rosalie Peltier, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1850 or 1851.  They settled near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes before moving to lower Bayou Teche.  Their son Ernest Demetrius was born in November 1851; Joseph Villier in April 1856; Charles Arthur in October 1858; and Pierre Oscar near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche in November 1869. 

Élie's second son Eugène Basile, called Basile, born on the upper Lafourche in December 1829, married Marie, daughter of Barthélemy Jolibois and his Acadian wife Mathilde Bourg, at the Thibodaux church in January 1853.  They settled near the boundary between Lafourche and Assumption parishes.  Their son Adolphe Avi was born in June 1860.  They, too, were living near New Iberia in the late 1860s but may have returned to the upper Lafourche by 1870. 

Élie's third and youngest son Jean Baptiste Villiers, born on the upper Lafourche in February 1832, died there at age 4 1/2 in November 1836. 

Abraham-Isaac (1772-1816) à René à Pierre à René l'aîné Landry

Abraham-Isaac, fifth and youngest Joseph Landry and second wife Jeanne-Marie-Madeleine Varangue and younger brother of Aimable-Étienne, was born at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in February 1772.  He followed his family to Poitou, his widowed mother to Nantes, and accompanied three of his siblings to Louisiana in 1785.  He settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Anne-Olive, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Aucoin and Marie-Geneviève Theriot, at Assumption in November 1795.  Anne-Olive had come to Louisiana from France aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  Abraham died in Assumption Parish in October 1816, age 44.  His only son, perhaps his only child, died young, so the family line did not survive. 

Angèl died at Assumption a week after his birth in October 1796. 

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Six more Landrys--an elderly widow with two orphaned grandchildren and a nephew, and two wives--crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passenges to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Another Landry family line came of it: 

François (1716-1797) à René le jeune Landry

François, younger son of Charles dit Charlot Landry and Catherine-Josèphe Broussard, born, according to Stephen A. White, at Annapolis Royal in May 1716, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Babin and Marguerite Boudrot, in c1735 and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1757, Marie gave François eight children, five sons and three daughters.  François took his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted François, Marie, and six of their children, five sons and a daughter, at Rivière-du-Nord in the island's interior.  The British deported them to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  François worked as a carpenter there.  At age 47, he remarried to Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson and widow of Barthélemy Martin, in Très-Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, in June 1763.  A French record of 1772 noted that François was asthmatique.  In 1773, he took his family to Poitou.  In December 1775, he and his family retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  At age 60, he remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pitre and Marguerite Thériot and widow of Joseph Blanchard, at Chantenay near Nantes in February 1777.  In 1785, a widower again, François emigrated to Louisiana with a Landry granddaughter, a Landry grandson, and another young Landry who was called his nephew.  The widow of one of François's sons, having just remarried to a Frenchman, did not, with her new husband and her five Landry children, accompany him to the Spanish colony.  From New Orleans, François and his young kinsmen followed the majority of their fellow passenters to upper Bayou Lafourche.  François did not remarry.  He died at nearby Ascension on the river in February 1797, age 80.  His granddaughter married into the Lejeune family on the upper Lafourche.  His grandson did not marry.  His nephew, however, married a Landry cousin on the upper bayou and created a vigorous family line. 

Jean-Charles (1767-1844) à Jean-Baptiste dit Baptiste? à Claude? à René le jeune Landry

Jean-Charles, putative "natural" son Eustache Landry and Marie, perhaps Marie-Madeleine, Landry, was born at Plouër, France, in May 1767.  If he was the natural son of this couple, he would have been the paternal nephew of Prosper Landry of La Bergère and Simon Landry of Le St.-Rémi and the maternal nephew of François Landry of L'Amitié.  When he was old enough, Jean-Charles worked as a sailor in France.  He may have followed relatives to Poitou and Nantes.  In 1785, at age 18, he accompanied his maternal uncle François and two cousins to Spanish Louisiana and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he was counted with them at Valenzuéla in January 1788.  In January 1793, at age 26, he married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians François Landry, fils and Marie-Rose Dugas and widow of Joseph Savoie, at nearby Ascension.  Marguerite was a native of Louisiana whose parents had come to the colony from Halifax in February 1765 and from Maryland in 1766.  She and Jean-Charles settled on the upper bayou.  He died in Assumption Parish in September 1844.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean died at "age 77 years," so this was him.  Marguerite died in Assumption Parish in January 1858, "age 87 years, 3 months."  The Paincourtville priest who recorded the burial called her "widow of Jean Landry," so she did not remarry.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Hébert, and Landry families.  Jean-Charles's two sons also married on the upper bayou and created vigorous lines there. 

Older son Édouard-Benjamin, called Benjamin, born at Assumption in December 1793, married cousin Françoise Denise, called Denise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Duhon and Adélaïde Landry, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in February 1816.  They settled on the upper Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Savoy, and Vincent  families.  Three of Benjamin's seven sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph, born in Assumption Parish in May 1818, died there at age 16 months in October 1819.

Benjamin's second son Marcellin, born in Assumption Parish in October 1820, died there at age 5 1/2 in September 1826.

Benjamin's third son Hippolyte Adon, born in Assumption Parish December 1824, likely married fellow Acadian Augustine, also called Marie Justine and Justine, Guidry in the early 1840s.  Their son Hippolyte Gédéon was born near Paincourtville in November 1844 but may have died at age 1 1/2 in October 1846; Jean Baptiste Théophile was born in June 1846 but died at age 1 in June 1847; Joseph Ernest, called Ernest, was born in December 1849; and Joseph Willfill in December 1852.  Hippolyte Adon died near Paincourtville in September 1854.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Hippolyte died at "age 30 years."  Hippolyte Adon would have been only 2 months shy of that age.  His daughter married a Babin cousin.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Third son Ernest married Hélène or Helena, daughter of fellow Acadian Eusilien Theriot and his Creole wife Mélasie Kern, at the Paincourtville church in February 1868.  Their son Joseph Alfred was born near Paincourtville in August 1870. 

Benjamin's fourth son Joseph Sosthène, called Sosthène, born in Assumption Parish in November 1830, married first cousin Adeline Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Henri Breaux and Joséphine Duhon, his uncle and aunt, at the Paincourtville church in May 1853; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph, fils, perhaps also called Meridier, was born near Paincourtville in November 1855 but may have died at age 3 1/2 in August 1859.  Joseph Sosthène may have been the Joseph Landry who died near Paincourtville in July 1856.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died at "age ca. 26 years," so this probably was him. 

Benjamin's fifth son Martin, born in Assumption Parish in April 1835, married double cousin Elesile, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Landry and Iréné Landry, at the Paincourtviille church in February 1858.  Martin may have died near Paincourtville in October 1862.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Martin died at "age 33-34 years."  This Martin would have age 27.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Benjamin's sixth son Désiré, born in Assumption Parish in March 1837, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Benjamin's seventh and youngest son Joseph Lima, born in Assumption Parish in June 1839, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870.  

Jean-Charles's younger son Marcellin-Séverin, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in January 1800, married cousin Delise, Felide, Feline, Phelie, Pheline, or Selide Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Armand Landry and his Creole wife Marguerite Borne, at the Plattenville church in September 1821.  Their daughter married into the Breaux and Gautreaux families.  Marcellin remarried to cousin Adélaïde Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Dupuis and Constance Landry and widow of Jean Baptiste Thomas Moïse, at the Plattenville church in July 1838.  Their daughters married Dugas cousins.  For of Marcellin's 11 sons by both wives married by 1870. 

Oldest son Firmin, by first wife Pheline Landry, born in Assumption Parish in October 1824, likely married fellow Acadian Ethelvina, called Telvina, Hébert and settled near Paincourtville by the mid-1840s.  Their son Firmin Augustin was born near Paincourtville in December 1851; Joseph Ophild in December 1853; and Joseph Oleus, called Oleus, near Pierre Par north of Lake Verret in February 1862 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1864.  Their daughters married into the Ozelet and Savoy families.  Firmin remarried to Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadian Léandre Hébert and his Creole wife Emeline Campos, at the Paincourtville church in October 1863.  Their son Augustin Alcée was born near Pierre Part in January 1865. 

Marcellin's second son, name unrecorded, from first wife Pheline Landry, died in Assumption Parish a day after his birth in September 1826. 

Marcellin's third son Marcellus Porphiro, by first wife Pheline Landry, born in Assumption Parish in February 1828, married Elmire or Elmina, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin LeBlanc and Arthémise Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in February 1850.  Their son Jean, perhaps also called Joseph, was born near Paincourtville in August 1857 but may have died at age 8 in November 1865.  Marcellus remarried to Anatalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Rivet and his Creole wife Carmela Bermeyo, at the Paincourtville church in July 1861.  Their son Augustin Liviston, perhaps Livingston, was born near Paincourtville in August 1862.  Marcellus died near Paincourtville in February 1865.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Marcellus died at "age 37 years," so this probably was him.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  

Marcellin's fourth son son Augustin Séverin, called Séverin and Séverin M., from second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, born in Assumption Parish in August 1839, married cousin Adveline, daughter of Sarasin Marroy or Marrois and his Acadian wife Élise LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in May 1858; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Germain was born near Paincourtville in May 1859, Joseph Treville in December 1860, Joseph Julien in January 1865, and Joseph Vileor in January 1867 but died the following November. 

Marcellin's fifth son Maurice Lucien, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, born near Paincourtville in September 1844, if he survived childhood, did not marry by 1870. 

Marcellin's sixth son Joseph Marcel, called Marcel, from second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, born in Assumption Parish in July 1845, married Ellen, daughter of William Burke and Kate Burke, at the Paincourtville church in February 1868.  Their son Marcellin Richard was born near Paincourtville in November 1868 but died the following August. 

Marcellin's seventh son Martial Aristide, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, born in Assumption Parish in July 1847, died there at age 3 1/2 in May 1851.

Marcellin's eighth son Joseph Théogène, a twin, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, was born in Assumption Parish in April 1852. 

Marcellin's ninth son Joseph Théophile, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, was Joseph Théogène's twin. 

Marcellin's tenth son Pierre Martial, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, was born in Assumption Parish in June 1854. 

Marcellin's eleventh and youngest son Ernest Ubalde, by second wife Adélaïde Dupuis, was born in Assumption Parish in May 1856. 

Jean-Jacques-Frédéric (1770-?) à François à René le jeune Landry

Jean-Jacques-Fréderic, older son of Germain Landry and Cécile Chesnay dit La Garenne, born at Cherbourg, France, in July 1770, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Chantenay, and his paternal grandfather to Spanish Louisiana.  He settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche and was still a bachelor there in 1798.  He evidently did not marry.

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Eleven, perhaps 12, more Landrys--a large family led by a widower, a wife, a widow and her family, and a young bachelor--crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans directly from St.-Malo in early December 1785.  The widow and her family chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche.  The family, the bachelor, and the wife followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Spanish settlement on Bayou des Écores in the Feliciana District north of Baton Rouge before moving downriver a few years later.  More Landry family lines came of it: 

René (1730-?) à René, fils à René le jeune Landry

René, third son of Antoine Landry and Marie Melanson, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in August 1730, was still a bachelor when he followed his parents to Virgina in 1755 and to Southampton, England, in 1756.  He married Marguerite, 20-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Babin of Minas, probably at Southampton in c1761.  She gave him a daughter the following year.  In May 1763, he, his family, and younger brother Antoine, fils were repatriated to St.-Malo, France.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan, where, between 1764 and 1781, Madeleine gave René eight more children, four daughters and four sons, all but one of whom survived childhood--nine children in all for the couple.  As the birth dates of their younger children reveal, René did not take his family to Poitou in 1773, nor did he join his fellow exiles at Nantes later in the decade.  Marguerite died probably at St.-Servan in the early 1780s.  In 1785, René and his eight children, five daughters and three sons, and a Babin brother-in-law, emigrated to Spanish Louisiana directly from St.-Malo and chose to go to Bayou des Écores.  René did not remarry, nor did he and his family remain at Bayou des Écores.  Four of his daughters married into the Raffray, Daigre, Doucet, and Guidry families at New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and on the western prarieis.  Two of his three surviving sons also married, on the river and on the western prairies. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste-Raphaël, born at St.-Servan in February 1767, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores.  Jean-Baptiste-Raphaël may have been the Jean-Baptise Landry who died downriver at San Gabriel in July 1790.  If so, he would died at age 23. 

René's second son Pierre-Marie, born at St.-Servan in April 1771, died there at age 1 in July 1772. 

René's third son Pierre, born at St.-Servan in November 1775, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and Baton Rouge, where he married Victoire-Eulalie, called Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Daigre and Marie LeBlanc, in February 1802.  Eulalie had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships.  Their daughter married into the Henry and Trahan families.  

Only son Pierre Julien, called Julien, born near Baton Rouge in October 1804, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Martinez and Marguerite Lopez, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1827.  They settled near the boundary between East Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes, probably north of Bayou Manchac.  Their son Philippe was born in May 1828; Hermogène in August 1829; Théodore in March 1831; and Alcidonis Fare, also called Alcide Onésiphore, in December 1832.  Their daughter married into the Rivas family.  Their of Julien's sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Philippe "of East Baton Rouge Parish" married Marie Emma Adélaïde, called Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard LeBlanc and Adélaïde LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Joseph Arnaud was born near St. Gabriel in November 1854 but died the following February; Joseph Julien was born in June 1858; twins Jean Enos and Omer were born in November 1860; and Philippe, fils was born in August 1862. 

Julien's third son Théodore may have married cousin Marie Lozama or Lozanna Martinez and settled in Iberville Parish by the late 1850s.  They were living near Plaquemine on the west side of the river in the late 1860s. 

Julien's fourth and youngest son Alcidonis/Alcide, at age 34, married Clara, daughter of J. H. Rils or Rills and Laure Delery, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1867.  Their son Julian Hamilton was born near Baton Rouge in November 1868.  

René's fourth and youngest son Joseph-Marie, born at St.-Servan in January 1781, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores.  Probably after he came of age, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where he married Modeste-Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of Pierre-Marin Lenormand and Jeanne-Charlotte dit Boutin of New Orleans, at Attakapas in July 1801; the priest who recorded his marriage said that Joseph had lived at Attakapas "for many years."  In the 1810s, they lived "around the Church" at St. Martinville.  Joseph-Marie died in St. Martin Parish in October 1852.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died "at age 75 yrs."  He was 74.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November.  His daughter married into the Gauthier family.  His three sons married sisters who also were their cousins. 

Oldest son Charles, born on Bayou Teche in September 1805, married cousin Adélaïde Léontine or Léontine Adélaïde, daughter of Joseph Marin Lenormand and Élisabeth dite Ponponne Caselar, at the St. Martinville church in January 1827.  Their son Charles, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in May 1828 but died at age 2 1/2 in January 1831; Joseph Dorcili was born in February 1831; and Pierre in December 1841. One of Charles's sons married by 1870.

Second son Joseph Dorcili, at age 38, married Marie Clelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Philemon Broussard and his Creole wife Elisa Ardoin, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in December 1869. 

Joseph Marie's second son Jean Darcourt, called Darcourt, born on Bayou Teche in October 1808, married cousin Marie Louise Euchariste, called Euchariste, another daughter of Joseph Marin Lenormand and Élisabeth Caselar, at the St. Martinville church in May 1829.  Their son Alexandre Darcourt was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1834; Césaire in December 1836; Pierre Numa, called Numa, in November 1841; Amédée in January 1847; and Alexandre Ismond in June 1852.  Their daughter married into the Berry family.  Two of Darcourt's sons married by 1870.

Second son Césaire married double cousin Adélaïde Clothilde, called Clothilde, daughter of Pierre Lenormand and Eléonora Adelina Lenormand, at the St. Martinville church in July 1861.  Their son Joseph Henri was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1862. 

Darcourt's third son Numa married double cousin Léocade, another daughter of Pierre Lenormand and Eléonora Adelina Lenormand, at the St. Martinville church in November 1865.  Their son Willy was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1867. 

Joseph Marie's third and youngest son Alexandre Victorin, called Victorin, born on Bayou Teche in June 1811, married cousin Adèle, yet another daughter of Joseph Marin Lenormand and Élisabeth Caselar, at the St. Martinville church in July 1835.  Their son Ernest was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1836. 

Lanoux

Pierre Lanoue, "young scion of a noble Huguenot family in France," came to Acadia in c1667 as a cooper after converting to Catholicism.  He was only 19 years old.  At age 34, he married Jeanne, 17-year-old daughter of François Gautrot, père and Edmée Lejeune, at Port-Royal in c1682.  They had only one child, a son, Pierre, fils, who married into the Granger family, but he had many sons of his own.  Pierre, père died at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal sometime between 1707 and 1714, in his late 50s or early 60s.  Jeanne died at Annapolis Royal in October 1749, in her mid-80s.  One of their three granddaughters married into the Melanson family, and their six grandsons into the Belliveau, Thibodeau, Landry, and Richard families, four of them to Belliveau sister. 

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Lanoue the cooper could still be found at Annapolis Royal and at Grand-Pré and Chignecto.  Le Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered this family to the winds. 

The Acadians of Chignecto were the first to be rounded up by the British during the fall of 1755, but many of them escaped.  Pierre, fils's younger sons Honoré and Michel and their families eluded the British and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They then moved on to the French stronghold at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Honoré and Michel died either on the shore or at Restigouche before 24 October 1760, when their widows and families were counted there soon after its surrender.  The British sent the exiles at Restigouche to prison compounds in Nova Scotia, where they languished for the rest of the war.  British officials counted Marie-Judith Belliveau, the widow Lanoue, and five of her children on Georges Island, Halifax, in August 1763.

The British pounced on the Acadians at Minas and Annapolis Royal later that autumn.  Most of the Lanoues there did not escape the round ups.  The British deported Pierre, fils's older sons Joseph and Pierre III at Annapolis Royal and Charles at Minas and their families to Connecticut.  A grandson, Joseph, fils, and his family ended up in Massachusetts.  At least one Lanoue eluded the British roundup at Annapolis and escaped to Canada.  Pierre, fils's daughter Marie-Josèphe, wife of Jean Melanson, died at Québec in January 1758, age 40, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians in and around Québec City that fall and winter. 

The war over, Lanoues being held in the British seaboard colonies theoretically were free to go, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  Even then British authorities discouraged resettlement.  In August 1763, Massachusetts colonial authorities counted Joseph Lanous [fils], wife Nanette, their two sons and a daughter still in the colony.  That same year, Connecticut authorites counted a number of Lanoue families still in that colony.  Most of the Acadians in New England, including the Lanoues, chose to go to Canada, where kinsmen from Annapolis Royal already had gone.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Pierre Lanoue the cooper began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  Especially after 1766, Lanoues could be found on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Montréal at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie and L'Acadie across from Montréal; St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan amd L'Assomption between Montréal and Trois-Rivières; and in Nova Scotia at Grosses-Coques on Baie St.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Lanoues captured at Annapolis Royal ended up in one of the southernmost colonies, with tragic consequences for one family.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported two Lanoue wives and a widow and four of her Lanoue sons to South Carolina aboard the British transport Hobson, the only vessel from Annapolis Royal to go to that distant colony.  The widow and her youngest son died "of stranger's fever," probably smallpox, "at the plantation of a Mr. Vanderhorst" soon after they reached the colony, but the other boys survived.  Henry Laurens, the future hero of the American Revolution, became young Basile Lanoue's patron and helped him become a tanner at Charleston.  Basile taught the trade to his brother Jean-Baptiste.  Under the influence of the Laurens and other wealthy Charlestonians, and perhaps remembering the faith of their ancestors, the Lanoue orphans converted to Protestantism; Basile became a Huguenot, Jean-Baptiste an Anglican/Episcopalian.  Basile, in fact, became an elder in his Huguenot congregation and later became a member of the Circular Congregational Church, also called the Old White Meeting House.  In South Carolina, their name evolved from Lanoue to Lanneau--Basile became Basil Lanneau, and Jean Baptiste John Lanneau.  They were among the few Acadians who remained in the British colonies after 1763.  John died at Charleston in 1781, in his early 40s.  He did not marry.  Basil became a man of substance in the new home he had chosen.  A descendant notes that he "became a wealthy and prominent citizen of Charleston.  He served three terms in the Legislature of South Carolina, 1796, 1798, and 1802."  Basil's first wife and their five children perished in a yellow fever epidemic and were all buried in the Huguenot churchyard.  From his second marriage, Basil created "an extensive progeny, the most distinguished of whom was his grandson, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, doubtless the greatest classical scholar America has produced."  The descendant continues:  "In 1793, after the loss of his first family, Basil Lanneau made the tedious journey to his childhood home [Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia] in the hope of finding one of his elder brothers.  He had nearly given up when he accidentally discovered his long-lost brother Amand, who had returned from exile.  Through Amand he located the widow of his brother, Pierre IV, and after much persuasion she allowed her son, Pierre V, and her daughter, Sarah, to return with him to Charleston.  From this Pierre, the fifth of the name, is descended the second branch of the family in South Carolina.  Known in Charleston as Peter Lanneau, he was the father of Fleetwood Lanneau, the latter a prominent merchant, banker, member of the legislature, officer of Governor Gist's staff and Captain of the Palmetto Guard."  One wonders if the Lanneaus of Charleston were even aware that their Cadien kinsmen living along the Acadian Coast above New Orleans even existed. 

When the war with Britain finally ended, the Acadians in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, only two were Lanoues.

Lanoues settled early in Acadia and were a large family there, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana, but they remained a relatively small family in the Bayou State.  Two brothers came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer on the river, where only one of them created a family of his own.  His descendants, except perhaps for a great-granddaughter, remained on the Acadian Coast.

Non-Acadian Lanoues do not appear in South Louisiana church records during the colonial period.  However, a Frenchman named de Lanoue de Vair, son of a count from the lower Pyrenees, settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1830s.  He and his two teenage sons died on a terrible day in May 1849, but he had older sons who could have carried on the line in the Bayou State.  A Laneau, probably Foreign French, appeared along Bayou Teche during the 1850s. 

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Lanouxs of the old Acadian Coast participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  None of them appears on either of the slaves schedules compiled by the federal census bureau in 1850 and 1860.  As wartime and post-war church records reveal, some of the Lanouxs of Ascension Parish settled in the Gonzales area, away from the river and its incomparable soil deposits, so they did not live in a location that was conducive to plantation agriculture. 

Only a few Lanouxs served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65. ...

In Louisiana, the Acadian family's name evolved from Lanoue to Lanoux and also is spelled D'Anous, Laneaux, Lanneau, Lannoux, Lanoir, Lanoire, Lanore, Lanorie, Lanou, LaNoüe, Lanue, Lenoux.  These Acadians should not be confused with French Creoles and Afro Creoles with similar-sounding surnames such as Lanau, Lanaud, Lanausse, Lanaux, Laneau, Laneaux, Laneur, Lanon, Lannon, Lanoesse, Lanois, Lanoix, Lanos, Lanoy, and Lanusse, some of whom, like the Lanoixs, settled near the Lanouxs and married Acadians.07

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The Acadian Lanoues of Louisiana descend from one of two brothers who came to the colony in 1765:

Joseph (c1743-?) à Pierre Lanoux

Joseph, older son of Michel Lanoue and Marie-Judith Belliveau, born at Annapolis Royal or Chignecto in c1743, followed his family into exile in the fall of 1755.  He likely was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Restigouche in October 1760 and was held as a prisoner of war at Halifax in the final years of the war with Britain.  He came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 with his younger brother Pierre and settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  In 1769, at Cabahannocer, Joseph, who the Spanish census taker described as a 23-year-old bachelor, was living on lot number 133 on the left, or east, bank of the river near his brother.  There was no one else in his household.  He probably did not marry. 

Pierre (c1746-1817) à Pierre Lanoux

Pierre, younger son of Michel Lanoue and Marie-Judith Belliveau, born at Annapolis Royal or Chignecto in c1746, followed his family into exile in the fall of 1755.  He likely was counted with his widowed mother and siblings at Restigouche in October 1760 and was held as a prisoner of war at Halifax in the final years of the war.  Pierre came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 with his older brother Joseph and settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  In 1769, a Spanish official counted Pierre on lot number 130 on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer near his brother.  There was no one else in his household, so he was still a bachelor.  Pierre married Catherine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine-Marie-Josèphe Forest of Minas, probably at Cabahannocer in c1770.  Catherine had come to the colony from Maryland in 1766.  They owned a slave in 1779.  Pierre died in St. James Parish in July 1817.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 72 when he died.  His daughters married into the Landry, Laudenbach, LeBlanc, Melançon, Mire, and Triat families.  Two of his three sons also married and settled in St. James and Ascension parishes.  His descendants, with the exception of a great-granddaughter, remained on the river.  One of his grandsons settling in Iberville Parish.  Several of his granddaughters and great-granddaughters married Foreign Frenchmen. 

Oldest son Simon, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in March 1771, married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Joachim dit Bénoni Mire and Madeleine Melançon and widow of Louis dit Luc Richard, at nearby Ascension in January 1798.  They evidently lived near the boundary between Cabahannocer and Ascension.  Simon died in Ascension Parish in June 1838.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was "ca. 60 yrs." old when he died, but he closer to 67.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois, Gassin, Jaume, LeBlanc, and Savoie families.  Four of his six sons married, but not all of the lines survived.  His sons and grandsons settled in St. James, Ascension, and Iberville parishes on what became known as the Acadian Coast. 

Simon's oldest son, name unrecorded, "recently born," died at Cabahannocer in October 1798.

Simon's second son Simon, fils born at Ascension in October 1798, married cousin Osite, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvain LeBlanc and Marguerite Gaudin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1819; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Simon, fils died in Ascension Parish in April 1845, age 46.  His daughter married into the Jaume family.  He probably fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, would have died with him. 

Simon, père's third son Augustin, born at Ascension in February 1801, married Célestine or Céleste, daughter of Martin Angèle, Anger, Angere, Auger, or Hinger and Céleste Wilson, at the Convent church  in November 1829.  Their son Auguste was born near Convent in September 1830, Félix in Ascension Parish in January 1834, Édouard in January 1838 but died at age 16 months in May 1839, Jean Baptiste in February 1840 but died at age 9 in April 1849, and François was born in February 1843 but died in April.  Augustin died in Ascension Parish either in July 1845 at age 44, or in November 1867 at age 65 (the Ascension church evidently "buried" him twice!)  If he died in November 1867, he would have been a widower.  His daughters married into the Balso, Gaudin, and LeBlanc families.  One of his sons settled upriver in Iberville Parish.  The other remained in Ascension Parish. 

Oldest son Auguste married Pucherie or Pulcherie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and Scholastique Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1853.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son Jim August was born in November 1855, Alphred in August 1865, and twins Joseph Arthur and Louis Albert in January 1869. 

Augustin's second son Félix married cousin Marie Eléonore, daughter of John Anger and his Acadian wife Delphine Louvière and widow of William Malbrough, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in March 1855.  During the War of 1861-65, Félix served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Félix's time with his unit was short-lived, however.  He enlisted in May 1861 but was discharged for reasons not revealed in his Confederate service record the following November or December.

Simon, père's fourth son Jordan or Jourdain, born at Cabahannocer in July 1802, died in Ascension Parish in September 1845, age 43.  He probably did not marry. 

Simon, père's fifth son Jean Dominique, called Dominique, born at Ascension in August 1805, married Sidalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Sylvain LeBlanc and Adélaïde Melançon and niece of Dominique's brother Simon, fils's wife Osite, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1841.  Their daughter married into the Grégoire family.  Did Dominique father any sons?

Simon, père's sixth and youngest son Romain or Roman, born at Ascension in August 1806, married Marie Émelie, called Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Savoie and Rosalie Duhon, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1827.  Their son Simon Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, was born in St. James Parish in 1828; Tiburce near Convent in April 1832; Romain, fils in Ascension Parish in April 1836 but died at age 12 in January 1849; and Simon Pierre was born in April 1843.  Their daughters married into the Grégoire and Pelletier families.  Two of Romain's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Bienvenu married Marie Eglantine, called Eglantine, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse LeBlanc and Célanie Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1851.  Their son Charles Eucher, called Eucher, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1856 but died the following November; and Joseph Flavien was born in February 1868.

Romain's fourth and youngest son Simon Pierre married Adeliar or Adelia L., also called Deleria, daughter of Joseph Yarbrough and Élisabeth Gonzales, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Roma was born near Gonzales in December 1867, and Henry Clay in February 1869. 

Pierre's second son Michel le jeune, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in May 1773, married Marie-Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Sonnier and Marie Breaux, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in February 1795.  Like older brother Simon's family, they must have lived near the boundary between Cabahannocer and Ascension.  Michel le jeune died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1843.  The priest who recorded his baptism said that Michel died at "age 72 yrs."  His daughters married into the Cazales, Gisclard, Hinger or Anger, and Hymel families.  Four of his six sons married, but one line, except for its blood, did not survive.  A granddaughter settled on Bayou Lafourche, but his other descendants remained on the river, in St. James and Ascension parishes. 

Oldest son Pierre-Élie, called Élie le jeune, born at Cabahannocer in February 1796, married Marie Apollone or Polonne, called Polonne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Louis Gautreaux and Marie LeBlanc, at the Convent church in January 1816.  Their son Magloire was born near Convent in November 1818; Edmond in November 1820; Paul Aristide, called Aristide, in January 1823 but died at age 13 in February 1835; Zéphirin Anselme was born in April 1827; and Narcisse Trasimond, called Trasimond, in Ascension Parish in April 1829.  Élie le jeune died near Convent in October 1847.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Élie died at "age 53 yrs."  He was 51.  His daughters married into the LeBlanc and Melançon families.  Two of his five sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Magloire married Odalie, daughter of Jean Louis Parent and his Acadian wife Marie Rose Dupuy, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1853.  Their son Louis Augustin was born near Convent in December 1858, Louis Euphémon in May 1861, Élie Sainteville in October 1863 but died at age one in September 1864, and Joseph was born March 1866.  They were living near Gonzales in the late 1860s.

Élie le jeune's fourth son Zéphirin Anselme may have died near Convent in April 1852.  If so, he would have been age 25.  Or he may have died in September 1864 at age 37, though the priest who recorded his burial said that Zéphirin died at age 30.  In either case, he probably did not marry. 

Élie le jeune's fifth and youngest son Trasimond married Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Gaudin and Colastie Hébert, at the Convent church in May 1853.  Trasimond died near Convent in October 1855.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Trasimond died at "age 27 yrs."  He was 24.  His daughter married into the Louvière family.  Did he father any sons? 

Michel's second son André-Decomine, called Decomine and Alexandre, born at Cabahannocer in September 1803, married Elise or Lise, daughter of Nicolas Gisclard and Charlotte Morvant, at the the Donaldsonville church in August 1829.  Their son André Zéphirin was born near Convent in September 1830 but died at age 5 months the following January; André Émile, called Émile, was born in January 1832; Jean Baptiste in January 1841; and Michel le jeune was born in March 1834.  André Decomine died in Ascension Parish in August 1868.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that André D., as he called him, died at "age 75 yrs."  André Decomine was a month shy of age 65.  His daughter married into the Brasset family.  His surviving sons also created families of their own. 

Second son Émile married Virginie, daughter of Bartheleme Hamilton and his Acadian wife Mélanie Dupuy and widow of Marius Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1854, and remarried to Alide, Alzide, or Alcida Thomlett or Tomelette at the Donaldsonville church in March 1864.  Their son Robert Lee was born in Ascension Parish in July 1867.

André Decomine's third son Jean Baptiste married Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Aristide Theriot and Célestine Mire, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1867.   Their son Jean Adélard was born in Ascension Parish in March 1868. 

André Decomine's fourth and youngest son Michel le jeune married cousin Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Bourgeois and Augustine Arceneaux, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1864; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Michel's third son Michel Marine, born at Ascension in April 1805, died in St. James Parish, age 4, in July 1809.

Michel's fourth son Jacques, baptized at the Donaldson church, age 27 months, in September 1809, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Savoie and Rosalie Duhon, at the Convent church in April 1828.  Jacques died in Ascension Parish in January 1868.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jacques J., as he called him, died at "age ca. 64 years." Jacques was age 60.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux, LeBlanc, Marchand, and Martin families, one of them on Bayou Lafourche.  Did he father any sons? 

Michel's fifth son Louis Zéphirin, born in Ascension Parish in April 1809, may have died near Convent in April 1852.  If so, he would have been age 43.  He did not marry. 

Michel's sixth and youngest son Jean Casimir, called Casimir, born in St. James Parish in June 1813, married first cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat Landry and Marie Marthe Lanoux, his uncle and aunt, at the Convent church in September 1831; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Adam was born in Ascension Parish in June 1836 but died at age 8 months in March 1837; Michel Douradoux, called Douradoux, was born in near Convent in April 1838; a son, name unrecorded, who had been baptized at age 5 weeks, died, age unrecorded, in December 1842; Louis Landry, called Landry, was baptized at the Convent church, age 4 months, in February 1845; Joseph Casimir was born in October 1847; and Louis Benjamin in October 1850.  Casimir died near Convent in December 1858, age 45.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Michel Douradoux married cousin and fellow Acadian Philomène Boudreaux at the Donaldsonville church in February 1861; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Douradoux died near Convent in October 1867, age 29.  He fathered a daughter who died very young, but did he father any sons? 

Casimir's fourth son Landry married cousin Louisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Richard and Adèle Mire, at the Convent church in February 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for second and third degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Fortune was born near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in May 1870. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Élie, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1781, died at St.-Jacques at age 14 in May 1795.  

Lebert

Jean dit Jolycoeur, son of Jean Lebert and Marie DuFay of St.-Laurent, Paris, reached Annapolis Royal by May 1714, when he married Jeanne, 30-year-old daughter of Vincent Breau dit Vincelotte and Marie Bourg.  Jean dit Jolycoeur and Jeanne moved to the Minas Basin in c1720.  They had eight children, four daughters and four sons.  Two of their daughters married into the Gautrot and Hébert families.  Their four sons married into the Lapierre and Robichaud families and into two families whose name has been lost to history. 

In 1755, Jean dit Jolycoeur's descendants could still be found at Minas.  Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family to the winds.  The fate of Jolycoeur's oldest son Jean-Baptiste and youngest son Honoré has been lost to history, but the records allow one to follow middle sons Paul and Charles into exile. 

Paul Lebert and his family, living at Rivière-aux-Canards, suffered terribly for it.  In the fall of 1755, the British rounded up most of the Acadians at Minas and transported them to Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and several New England colonies.  Paul and his family ended up on one of the five British transports headed for Virginia.  As a result, they endured a fate worse than most of the other Acadian refugees from Minas.  The Virginia governor, Robert Dinwiddie, refused to allow the 1,500 Acadians sent to him to remain in the colony.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests and over the mountains, to French territory, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Governor Dinwiddie and Virginia's House of Burgesses made their decision ... the Acadians must go!  In May, the first shipment of Acadians left for England, and in two weeks all of them had gone.  Their ordeal only worsened in the English ports, where British authorities treated them like common criminals.

Brother Charles Lebert and his family escaped the British roundup at Minas probably by escaping to one of the Maritime islands still controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the British stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and on nearby Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Charles and his family were among the island Acadians whom the British deported on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  The result was disaster for the family.  Charles, age 38, took with him wife Anne-Marie Robichaud, age 31, two daughters and two sons.  Charles and Anne-Marie survived the crossing, but most of their children perished.  The two sons died at sea.  A daughter died in June 1759, a few months after the family reached St.-Malo, doubtlessly from the rigors of the voyage.  Only Anne-Josèphe, the oldest child, survived the crossing with her parents.  They settled at Plouër near St.-Malo.

Paul and Charles's younger sister Jeanne also endured the crossing to St.-Malo in one of the Five Ships.  She was age 36 at the time, still single, and traveled with the family of widower Jean Bugeaud.  Two of the Bugeaud children, ages 5 and 3, died at sea, but Jean and Jeanne survived.  Jeanne also settled at Plouër, where she married Honoré, son of fellow Acadians François Gautrot and Louis Aucion and widower of Marguerite Robichaud, in January 1761.  They settled at nearby Pleslin.  Jeanne's husband Honoré Gautrot also had endured the crossing to St.-Malo aboard one of the Five Ships.  His first wife had died in Acadia, and he crossed with three children and a sister.  He lost his sister, who died in a St.-Malo hospital, but his three children survived.  Jeanne gave Honoré three more children before she died at Hotel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in February 1767, age 45.  

Paul and Charles's youngest sister, Marie-Josèphe dit Jolycoeur, born probably at Minas in c1726, had married Jean-Désiré, son of Louis Hébert, at Grand-Pré in October 1746.  In  August 1752, she and her family were counted at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the interior of Île St.-Jean, where they had gone in c1749 to escape British authority in Nova Scotia.  Mary-Josèphe died at Québec in December 1769, so she and her family had escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean in late 1758 while older brother Charles and sister Jeanne had endured the terrible deportation to France.  

Meanwhile, Paul Lebert, wife Marie-Madeleine Lapierre, their son, and two daughters, who had made the crossing from Virginia to England in 1756, were held at Liverpool.  Two more sons were born to them there.  Like most of the Acadians being held in England, Paul and his family were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763.  They landed at Morlaix in Brittany.  In October 1765, when Paul sailed from Morlaix to St.-Malo to settle near his brother, his wife was not with him; she had died either in England or at Morlaix.  Paul and his children, now three sons and two daughters, settled in the suburb of Plouër.  The younger sons died young.  Oldest son Pierre, now a sailor, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Boudrot and Claire Comeau, at Plouër in February 1770.  Marguerite gave Pierre two daughters and a son at Plouër.  Paul's younger daughter Marie-Josèphe married Pierre-Janvier, son of fellow Acadians Claude Guédry and his first wife Anne Lejeune of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, at Plouër in February 1773.  His older daughter Marguerite married Pierre-Janvier's brother, Jean-Baptiste Guiédry, at Plouër in January 1774.  Paul Lebert died at nearby La Mettrie Paumerais in August 1770, age 52.  

Paul's younger brother Charles and his wife Anne-Marie Robichaud, meanwhile, had more children at Plouër, three sons and a daughter, but one of the sons died young.  Oldest daughter Anne-Josèphe married Pierre, son of fellow Acadians Victor LeBlanc and Marie Aucoin of Grand-Pré, at Plouër in February 1767.  

In 1773, a few years after Paul had died, his brother Charles, daughter Anne-Josèphe, nephew Pierre, and nieces Marguerite and Marie-Josèphe and their families signed on to a new settlement in the Poitou region.  After two years of effort, most of the Acadians gave up the venture and demanded to be returned to the port cities.  Charles Lebert was not one of them; he had died at Archigny, Poitou, in August 1775, age 55.  Four months after his death, in December 1775, the surviving Leberts retreated from Châtellerault to the port city of Nantes with other Poitou Acadians.  There they lived as best they could on government handouts and what work they could find.  Pierre Lebert and wife Marguerite Boudrot had another son at Nantes.  Pierre, age 30, died at La Gour Bannien, probably near Nantes, a week before a son was baptized; for some reason Pierre's burial was recorded at Plouër not Nantes.  Marguerite died and was buried at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, in April, age 34.  Their infant son and his three older siblings, ages 8, 5, and 6 when their parents died, were raised by relatives.  Two of them may not have survived childhood.  Marguerite Lebert and her husband Jean-Baptiste Guédry "adopted" niece Marguerite-Marie.  Marie-Josèphe Lebert and her husband Pierre-Janvier Guédry "adopted" nephew Pierre-Jean-Joseph-Joachim.  At Nantes, Charles Lebert's daughter Marie-Madeleine, who had left Poitou after her father's death, married her sister Anne-Josèphe's husband's brother, Olivier LeBlanc, in June 1781.  Then everything changed for the long-suffering Leberts.  In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Most of the Leberts and their spouses agreed to take it.

A Lebert settled fairly "late" in Acadia, and his descendants--eight of them--also came "late" to Louisiana, in 1785 aboard four of the Seven Ships from France.  Only two of them were males.  They both married, but only one of them, a son of Pierre Lebert, had sons who created families of their own.  All of the Acadian Leberts of South Louisiana, then, are descended from the immigrant from France who settled at the northern edge of present-day Lafayette Parish. ...  

Only two Acadian Leberts--Pierre, son of Charles, and Louis, son of Jean-Louis, first cousins and grandsons of Pierre-Jean-Joseph-Joachim Lebert --served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Both survived the war.  They enlisted at the same time, in March 1862, and served in the same unit, Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1862-63.  Pierre and Louis were captured at Vicksburg in July 1863 when the Confederates there surrendered to Federal General Ulysses S. Grant.  The 26th Louisiana Infantry was paroled a few days after the surrender and its men sent home to await exchange.  Pierre had been married for six years and was the father of two sons when he and cousin Louis had enlisted.  Pierre's daughter Marie Émilie had been born in July 1862, while he was serving with his regiment.  Another daughter, Clarisse, no doubt named for Pierre's sister who had died at age 25 in December 1862, was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1864.  Cousin Louis married in late January 1864 while he and Pierre waited for word from Confederate authorities that their regiment had been exchanged.  When orders came that spring to go to Alexandria to rejoin their unit, Louis the newlywed reported for duty, but Pierre the father did not.  Louis's first child, a son, was not born until December 1865, six months after he had signed his end-of-war parole papers at Washington, north of Opelousas .  ...

Leberts can be found today in the city of Lafayette, only a few miles from where their Acadian ancestor settled near Carencro.  The majority of Leberts in South Louisiana, however, can be found farther to the west in Calcasieu Parish, especially at Lake Charles, Westlake, Sulphur, and Vinton.  

Originally, the family's surname was spelled Leber, even in Louisiana, but it evolved into Lebert by the early 1800s.  The family's name also is spelled Le Ber, Lebere, Leberre.  They should not be confused, as they sometimes were, with the much more numerous Héberts.  They are also sometimes confused with the French-Canadian Levert family, who settled in St. James Parish on the river and on Bayou Lafourche.08

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Eight Leberts came to Louisiana aboard four of the Seven Ships from France in 1785.  The first of them, two wives and their families, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late July.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge. 

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Two more members of the family--a wife and her bachelor brother--crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, but the brother did not remain there.  No lasting Lebert family line came of it:

Pierre-Joseph (c1767-?) à Jean dit Jolycoeur Lebert

Pierre-Joseph, fifth son of Charles Lebert and Anne-Marie Robichaux, born at Plouër, France, in December 1767, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  He followed her perhaps to upper Bayou Lafourche and then to Baton Rouge, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dugas and Marie Grossin, in February 1794.  Marie-Josèphe had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  Their daughter Élise, or Lise, born at Baton Rouge, date unrecorded, married Zéphirin, son of fellow Acadians Jacques Blanchard and Modeste-Aimée Bourg, probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1813.  Pierre-Joseph and Marie-Josèphe either had no sons, or none of their sons created families of their own.  Marie-Josèphe died near Baton Rouge in April 1825, age 51.  Her burial record calls her the wife, not the widow, of Pierre Lebert, so Pierre-Joseph may still have been alive then.  If so, he would have been in his late 50s.  His daughter Lise died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1858, age 62.  After her death, Leberts disappear from the church records of the river parishes. 

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Three more Leberts--two wives and another young bachelor, all siblings--crossed on Le Beamont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans the third week of August.  One of the wives may not have survived the crossing.  The other wife and her husband followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac and moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche in the late 1780s or early 1790s.  The bachelor brother, however, having gone with his sister and her family to Manchac, did not follow them to the upper Lafourche but chose to resettle on the western prairies.  A vigorous Lebert family line came of it: 

Pierre-Jean-Joseph-Joachim (1772-1823) à Jean dit Jolycoeur Lebert

Pierre-Jean-Joseph-Joachim, older son of Pierre Lebert and Marguerite Boudrot, born at Plouër, near St.-Malo, France, in June 1772, was a 13-year-old orphan when he came to Louisiana from France with his paternal aunt, Marie-Josèphe Lebert, and her husband, Pierre-Janvier Guédry.  He followed tem to Baton Rouge with the majority of their fellow passengers.  By the mid-1790s, Marie-Josèphe and Pierre-Janvier had moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, where other relatives had gone.  Pierre, now in his early 20s, did not follow his aunt and uncle to the upper Lafourche, however, but moved, instead, to the Attakapas District and settled in the community of Beaubassin on the upper Vermilion River east of Carencro, at the northern edge of the district.  He married Marie-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Jeanne De La Forestrie, probably at Beaubassin in May 1796.  Marie-Rose was a native of Nantes, France, and had crossed to Louisiana on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France, with her parents and four siblings.  Marie-Rose and her family had settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where her father died in the late 1780s.  Her mother remarried to Sébastien Benoit, a fellow Acadian exile from France.  After her mother died at Lafourche, Marie-Rose followed her stepfather and her brothers to the Opelousas District in the mid-1790s.  Sébastien Benoit moved on to the Calcasieu River country, at the far western edge of the huge Opelousas District, and was a pioneer of what is now the city of Lake Charles.  But Marie-Rose remained with husband Pierre on the upper Vermilion.  Pierre and Marie-Rose had at least 11 children, all born at Beaubassin.  Pierre died probably at his home at Beaubassin in March 1823.  The Grand Coteau priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 49 when he died.  His succession record was filed at the new Lafayette Parish courthouse in Vermilionville, south of Carencro, in June 1823.  His daughters married into the Léger and Gauthier families.  Three of his five sons married, but only two of them perpetuated this sole Acadian Lebert family line in the Bayou State.  Few of Pierre's descendants married fellow Acadians. 

Oldest son Pierre-Augustin, born at Attakapas in March 1797, was baptized at the home of the Widow Arceneaux in Carencro the following July, but died at age 16 months in July 1798 probably at his father's home at Beaubassin.  

Pierre's second son Charles, born at Attakapas in January 1799, married Amelie, called Melite, 19-year-old daughter of William Hayes and Madeleine Olivier, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1821.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Berwick, and Courville families.  

Only son Pierre, born probably at Beaubassin in the late 1820s, married Marguerite Caroline, called Caroline, daughter of Antoine Dorsin Delhomme and Marie Joséphine Bertrand, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1855.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that Pierre's father Charles was deceased at the time of the wedding.  Pierre and Caroline's son Antoine Charles was born near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, in October 1856; Joseph Léonard in March 1858; Louis Duclosel in March 1861; and Désiré in September 1867.  During the War of 1861, Pierre served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  As the birth date of son Désiré reveals, Pierre survived the war. 

Oldest son Antoine died in Lafayette Parish in November 1864.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial noted that he was age 91!  He probably was only 9.  One wonders if the boy's death was war-related. 

Pierre's third son Pierre-Zéphirin, born at Attakapas in June 1803, married Creole Marie Forestier probably in Lafayette Parish in the early 1820s.  Pierre-Zéphirin died by February 1824, when he was listed as deceased in the burial record of his 3-year-old daughter Carmelite, who was buried at Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, the closest church to Beaubassin at the time.  Pierre-Zephirin would have been age 20 at the time of his daughter's death.  Did he father any sons?

Pierre's fourth son Jean-Louis, called Louis, born at Attakapas in May 1808, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Thibodeaux and Marie Louise Cormier, probably at Beaubassin in July 1829; the marriage was recorded not at the church at Grand Coteau but at the newer one in Vermilionville, Lafayette Parish, south of Carencro.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 17-year-old black male--on Jean Louis Lebert's farm in the parish's western district.  Jean Louis died probably at Beaubassin in June 1858, age 51.  In late June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted probably the same slave--now recorded as a 24-year-old black male--on Widow Jean Louis Lebert's farm.  His daughters married into the Bernard and Pens families.  One of his two sons also created his own family.

During the War of 1861, older son Louis, fils, born probably at Beaubassin in June 1838, served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  While waiting for his regiment to be exchanged, Louis, fils was supposed to have married Marie Denise, daughter of Alexandre Durio and Adeline Chotin, at the Grand Coteau church in January 1864, but the marriage was recorded at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, instead, later that same month.  Their son Pierre Kleber, called Kleber, named no doubt after his dead uncle, was born in December 1865; Jean Clet, called Clet or Clay, in February 1873 but died at age 10 in July 1883; Louis Cleopha, called Cleopha, was born in December 1876 but died at age 15 months in April 1878; Louis Chireac was born in February 1885; and Alexander Cleus in August 1886.  

Oldest son Kleber died in Lafayette Parish in January 1888.  He was age 22 and probably did not marry.  

Louis, père's younger son Pierre Kleber, born probably at Beaubassin in May 1848, died at age 16 in February 1865. 

Pierre's fifth and youngest son, name unrecorded, born at Attakapas in September 1817, died nine days after his birth.  

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The last of the Lebert family, an 11-year-old young orphan, crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early September.  She followed the family she crossed with to upper Bayou Lafourche.  If she survived childhood, she did not marry. 

LeBlanc

Daniel LeBlanc, born in France in c1626, was a young farmer when he arrived at Port-Royal in c1645, among the earliest settlers of French Acadia.  Five years later, in c1650, he married Françoise, older daughter of Jean Gaudet and his first wife and widow of ____ Mercier.  They "settled on the north bank of the Port-Royal River (today the Annapolis River), to the northeast of the marsh at Bélisle, about nine miles above the fort at Port-Royal, and a half mile below the chapel of Saint-Laurent, where he died between the years 1693-98."  Daniel and Françoise had seven children, six sons and a daughter, all born at Port-Royal.  Their daughter married into the Blanchard family.  Five of Daniel's sons married into the Hébert, Bourgeois, Dugas, and Thériot familes, which, like the Blanchards, were among the oldest families in the colony.  After they married, the four older LeBlanc sons moved to the Minas area, where they created a large extended family.  The youngest son remained on his father's lands near Port-Royal.  (According to family genealogist Lucie LeBlanc Consentino:  "... as was the usual way for the Acadians, the youngest son inherited the father’s land.").  By 1755, descendants of Daniel LeBlanc and Françoise Gaudet had, according to Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White, created the largest family in greater Acadia.  Most of them could be found in the Minas Basin at Grand-Pré, Rivière-aux-Canards, Pigiguit, and Cobeguit, but they also could be found at Chignecto, Chepoudy, Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes. 

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this huge family to the winds.  ...

LeBlancs were among the first families of Acadia, and they were some of the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them came to the colony from Halifax via Cap-Français in February 1765.  They ollowed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche and remained there.  Later that year, even more LeBlancs from the prison compounds of Nova Scotia came to Louisiana.  They settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Dozens of LeBlancs came to the colony from Maryland in the late 1760s, and they, too, settled on the river at Cabahannocer, Ascension, San Gabriel.  A few of their sons joined their cousins on the western prairies later in the colonial period, but the great majority of the Maryland exiles remained on the Acadian Coast and settled in what became St. James, Ascension, Iberville, and West Baton Rouge parishes.  Even more LeBlancs came to Louisiana in 1785.  Some of these refugees from France joined their cousins on the river, but most of them settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, which became a third center of family settlement.  During the late colonial period and continuing well into the antebellum years, LeBlancs migrated from the river parishes to the upper Lafourche and added substantially to the family lines already there.  During the antebellum period, a few LeBlancs from Bayou Lafourche reversed the usual Acadian migration pattern and "returned" to the Acadian Coast, while others drifted down bayou into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.  Meanwhile, on the western prairies, LeBlancs spread out from their base along Bayou Teche and settled in what became St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, St. Landry, Vermilion, and Iberia parishes.  During the late antebellum and immediate post-war periods, LeBlancs from the river and the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley moved to the lower Atchafalaya, to Bayou Teche, and even out to the St. Landry prairies.  But, despite all this moving about, the old Acadian Coast, especially Ascension Parish, remained the largest center of LeBlanc family settlement. 

Non-Acadian LeBlancs came to Louisiana as early as the 1720s.  Some of them were colonial officials; most of them remained at New Orleans; and, until 1775, none of them married Acadians.  A young naval officer from southeastern France with the aristocratic surname LeBlanc de Villeneuve, married a local girl and fathered at least eight sons.  His oldest son moved to Pointe Coupée and established a prominent family there and in the Baton Rouge area.  His other sons remained at New Orleans.  Like their father, the LeBlanc de Villeneuve sons served as officers in the Louisiana regiment under the Spanish.  They also served as officers in the colonial militia.  During the late colonial and early antebellum periods, two non-Acadian LeBlancs, one of them probably a French Creole, the other a French Canadian, settled among their Acadian namesakes on the western prairies, and two more French-Canadian LeBlancs settled on the Acadian Coast.  One of the French Canadians on the river moved to the upper Lafourche later in the antebellum period, but his line did not survive there.  Living in predominantly-Acadian communities, most of these relative late-comers married Acadians.  Throughout the antebellum period, Foreign-French LeBlancs emigrated to Louisiana from France and the Caribbean Basin.  Most of them remained in the New Orleans area.  At least one non-Acadian LeBlanc living in Lafayette Parish during the late antebellum period was a free man of color. 

Despite the impressive numbers of non-Acadian LeBlancs who settled in South Louisiana, the great majority of LeBlancs in the Bayou State are Acadians.  In fact, no Acadian family other than the Landrys brought more individuals to Louisiana than the LeBlancs.  By the late antebellum period, the descendants of Daniel LeBlanc emulated their Acadian forebears by settling in nearly every community of Acadiana.  ...

Despite its simple construction, the family's name also is spelled Leblan, Leblance, LeBlanche, and Oblanc. ...09

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The first members of the family--seven of them from a single family, including two brothers and two sisters--came to Louisiana with the Broussards in February 1765.  All but one of them followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche.  The one who remained at New Orleans--ironically, the widow of Broussard--remained at New Orleans and became a Ursuline nun.  Her brothers, sister, nephew, and nieces, remained on the Teche, and the sister, also married to a Broussard, died in the mysterious epidemic that struck the Teche-valley Acadians that summer and fall.  Ironically, the sister who remained at New Orleans died of small pox there in the early 1770s.  Her brothers created vigorous family lines on the Attakapas prairies: 

Simon (1736/37-1815) à Antoine à Daniel LeBlanc

Simon-Joseph, called Simon, second son of René LeBlanc le jeune and Anne Thériot, ...

René dit Petit René (c1751-1809) à Antoine à Daniel LeBlanc

René, called Petit René, seventh and youngest son of René LeBlanc le jeune and Anne Thériot and brother of Simon, ...

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Sonnier

Louis Saulnier, a sailor born in France in c1663, came to Acadia by c1684, the year he married Louise Bastineau dit Peltier at Grand PréLouis died in c1730, in his late 60s, probably at Minas.  He and Louise had 14 children, six sons and eight daughters, at Minas.  Five of their daughters married into the Boudrot, Boisseau dit Blondin, Lapierre, Oudy, and Hébert families.  Five of their sons married into the Hébert, Breau, Trahan, Comeau, and Darois families.  In 1755, the sailor's descendants could be found not only at Minas, but also at Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières region west of Chignecto, at Annapolis Royal, and on Île St.-Jean. 

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  British and New-English forces attacked Fort Beauséjour at Chignecto in June 1755, and Saulniers from Petitcoudiac may have been among the local Acadians who were serving in the fort as militia.  If so, they, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant-Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport these Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Residents of the trois-rivières ended up in South Carolina and Georgia.  Saulniers from Petitcoudiac were not among them.  Escaping the British roundup, some of them sought refuge in Canada.  Joseph, son of René Saulnier, died at Québec in December 1757, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area.  Joseph's first cousin, Pierre, fils of Annapolis Royal, and members of his family also escaped to Canada.  Three of Pierre, fils teenage daughters died at Québec in 1757, victims, perhaps, of smallpox.  Evidently most of the trois-rivières Saulniers who escaped the British at Chignecto ended up on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they likely joined their fellow exiles at Shediac and Miramichi.  Some of them also made their way up to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  One suspects that some of these Saulniers may have joined the Acadian resistance preying on British garrisons at Chignecto. 

Not all of the Saulniers who escaped the British were from the trois-rivières and Annapolis Royal.  In 1755, most members of the family were still living at Minas, where the family's progenitor had settled in the 1680s.  One Saulnier and his family also fled to Canada, where he remarried at St.-Joachim on the lower St. Lawrence below Québec.  His younger brother and his family also escaped the British but likely sought refuge with their cousins on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

Some of the Saulniers at Minas were not as lucky as their cousins.  The British deported several Saulnier families to Virginia.  In mid-November 1755, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, the Virginia governor, Robert Dinwiddie, protested their deportation to his colony without his consent.  The following spring, the Virginians shipped the Acadians, including the Saulniers, to England, where they were treated like common criminals and where hundreds of them died of smallpox.  Saulniers were held at Liverpool.  In May 1763, after tortured negotiations between the French and British governments, the Saulniers in England were repatriated to France with hundreds of other Acadian exiles who had survived the ordeal there. 

Already in France were hundreds of Acadians, including a few Saulnier women, who had been deported to St.-Malo and other coastal cities from the Maritime Islands in 1758.  At least one of their Saulnier kin had not survived the crossing.  One of the surviviors married a Frenchman from the Bordeaux area in c1768, place unrecorded.  She followed him to Poitou in the early 1770s and to Nantes in December 1775.  Between 1776 and 1785, she gave him three sons in the coastal city.  Another Saulnier and her Aucoin husband settled at Plouër near St.-Malo, where, between 1763 and 1779, she gave him more children. 

A Saulnier from England and his extended family chose to leave the mother country soon after they got there.  In 1764, he took his family to French Guiane on the northeast coast of South America with other Acadian exiles.  French officials counted them at Sinnamary on March 1.  The tropical climate and its fevers took its toll on the family during their first months in the colony.  The family head, perhaps a widower again, returned to France later in the decade, remarried--again--to a French widow at Rochefort in August 1769, and died a few years later.  One of his sons may have accompanied him back to France, but his three others sons remained in Guiane.  Each of them married and died in the colony, and their children remained. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Most, if not all, of the few Saulniers still there agreed to take up the offer.  One Saulnier newly did not go to the Spanish colony.  Her parents, if they were still living, also may have chosen to remain in the mother country. 

In North America, Saulniers who had escaped the British at Chignecto, Annapolis Royal, and Minas appear on a list of 1,003 Acadians, dated 28 October 1760, who escaped the British attack at Restigouche that summer but who were surrendered to the British in October.  During the early 1760s, other members of the family were either captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area and also held in prisoner compounds in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  Some may have joined their kinsmen who had fled to Canada.  After the war ended, Saulniers could be found at St.-Joachim and Baie St.-Paul on the lower St. Lawrence in present-day Québec Province, while their cousins who had remained in greater Acadia settled in Nova Scotia first at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, before moving on to Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the peninsula's southwest coast.  Saulniers were especially plentiful at Pointe-de-l'Église, today's Church Point, and, one suspects, at nearby Saulnierville.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed.

When the war with Britain finally ended, Acadians being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, as some of the Saulniers were about to do, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, 13 were Saulniers who reached New Orleans in 1765.

Saulniers settled early in Acadia and were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Most of them--and all of the males who created family lines--came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 on at least two expeditions.  The first settled on the Opelousas prairies, where two vigorous lines of the family emerged.  Others who came that year settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, later called the Acadian Coast, where two more lines began.  Among the 1765 arrivals were seven Saulnier females who were already a part of, or soon married into, the Babin, Cormier, Thibodeau, Chrétien, Forest, Lescossier, Layur, and Léger families.  Three Saulnier wives and their Hamon, Aucoin, and Boutary husbands came to the colony on two of the Seven Ships from France in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche or joined their cousins on the prairies.  By the early antebellum period, Sonniers on the river had moved either to lower Bayou Teche or to Bayou Lafourche, where a small center of family settlement emerged.  Throughout the late colonial and antebellum periods, however, the great majority of Sonniers, most of them descended from two of the brothers from Petitcoudiac who had settled at Opelousas in 1765, lived in prairie communities from the Opelousas area down to lower Bayou Teche.  They were especially numerous at Bellevue and Grand Coteau in St. Landry Parish; at Carencro, La Butte, and Grand Prairie in Lafayette Parish; and at Fausse Pointe in St. Martin and Iberia parishes. 

French Sauniers, two of them from Paris, settled in Louisiana as early as the 1730s, and settlers with similar-sounding surnames lived on the river and on upper Bayou Lafourche during the late antebellum period.  Nevertheless, the great majority of the Sonniers of South Louisiana are descendants of Louis Saulnier and his sons from Minas and Petitcoudiac. ...

In Louisiana, the family's name evolved from Saulnier to Saunier and then to Sonnier, perhaps because of Spanish influence.  The family's name also is spelled Saugnier, Saulnié, Saulny, Sauniae, Saunié, Saunnier, Sogné, Sognet, Sognier, Sogny, Sognyer, Soigné, Soignée, Soignet, Soignez, Soignié, Soignier, Soinier, Solnier, Sommé, Somnier, Soné, Sonia, Sonié, Sonier, Sonné, Sonner, Sonnié, Sounier, Suanier.  These humble Acadians should not be confused with a French-Creole family named Songé, also spelled Sogny, Songi, Songy, Sonsi, and Sonsy; and the aristocratic French Creoles named Soniat Duffosat, also spelled Sognac, Sonac, and Soniac.66

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The Acadian Sonniers of Louisiana descend from two sets of brothers who came to the colony in 1765.  The first set of brothers--actually, half-brothers--arrived at New Orleans from Halifax either with the Broussards in February or soon afterwards and followed them to the western prairies:

Sylvain (c1736-1801) à Louis Sonnier

Sylvain, oldest son of Étienne Saulnier and his first wife Jeanne Comeau, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1736, escaped the British roundup of 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He and his family ended up as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  If he was a son of Étienne Saulnier, British officials counted his family at Halifax in August 1763.  Sylvain came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765, still a bachelor, with a younger half-brother and followed his kinsmen to the Opelousas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where he married fellow Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Bourg and Anne Boudrot of Île St.-Jean, in the late 1760s.  They settled on Prairie Bellevue south of the present city of Opelousas.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Dugas, Martin, Missonnier, and Thibodeaux families.  Sylvain was one of the 11 Opelousas settlers who petitioned Spanish Governor Ulloa in March 1768 for assistance with oxen and plows to grow wheat in the district.  In 1771, he owned 43 head of cattle and 15 horses on 6 arpents of land without title.  In 1774, he was running 120 head of cattle with eight horses and mules and owned 30 swine.  In 1777, his herd had increased to 150 head, and he owned two slaves, 11 horses, and 45 hogs.  By 1788, he owned eight slaves, 300 head of cattle, and 34 horses on 32 arpents of land.  The number of his slaves had increased to 11 by 1796.  Sylvain, père died at Opelousas in January 1801, in his mid-60s.  Most of his seven sons created families of their own and settled in St. Landry and Lafayette parishes. 

Oldest son Sylvain, fils, born at Opelousas in February 1771, married Emilie, called Humile, Humilde, and Melite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Comeaux and Anastasie Savoie, at Opelousas in May 1789, and remarried to Judith, daughter of Italian Donatto Bello and his Creole wife Susanne Moreau, at Opelousas in December 1802.  Sylvain, fils's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1821.  He died "at the home of Charles Saunier," probably his younger brother, in Lafayette Parish in September 1829.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Sylvain was age 63 when he died, but he was 58.  Eight of his 11 sons by both of his wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Sylvain III, by first wife Emilie Comeaux, born at Opelousas in April 1789, died at age 5 in January 1796.

Sylvan, fils's second son Louis dit Valière, by first wife Emilie Comeaux, born at Opelousas in August 1797, married Denise, daughter of Creoles Pierre Carrière and of St. John the Baptist Parish and Marie Louise Vivarene of Illinois, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1816.  They settled at Bois de Mallet.  Their son Louis, fils was born in November 1816 but died the following March, Sylvain le jeune was born in February 1822, and Valérien in April 1834.  They also had sons named Aurelien and Adrien.  Louis's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in March 1862.  He would have been age 65 that year.  His daughters married Derbonne and Sonnier cousins.  At least two of his five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Aurelien married first cousin Émeline, called Meline, daughter of French Creole Michel Derbonne and his Acadian wife Melite Sonnier, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1848.  Their son Dutil, also called Agelus and Angelus, was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1851.  Aurelien's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1865. 

Only son Angelus died in St. Landry Parish in January 1867.  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial said that Angelus died "at age 16 yrs.," but he was only 15 1/2.  His succession record, calling him Agelus, "a minor," was filed at the Opelousas courthouse the following April.  One wonders why a minor would need a succession record.  His father's family line may have died with him. 

Louis dit Valière's second son Adrien married Unibonne, also called Oniléone, daughter of Jean Baptiste Lebleu and his Acadian wife Marguerite Lejeune and widow of Martin Daigle, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1862.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Colombe was born in January 1866. 

Sylvain, fils's third son Gilbert, by first wife Emilie Comeaux, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in October 1800, married Louise Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Anastasie Melançon, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1826.  Their son Joseph Vileor was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 5 months, less 8 days, in October 1829.  Gilbert remarried to Madeleine Elise, called Elise, daughter of fellow Acadians Valentin Landry and Céleste Bourgeois and widow of Alexandre Breaux, at the St. Martinville church in July 1838.  Their son François Alcide, called Alcide, was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1839 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1840; Gustave or Augustave was born in December 1840 but died at age 4 1/2 in September 1845; and Charles Numa, called Numa, was born in September 1843 but died at age 2 in October 1847. 

Oldest Joseph Vileor, by first wife Louise Céleste Babin, married Mathilde, daughter of Spanish Creole Joseph Castille and his Acadian wife Céleste LeBlanc, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1849.  Their son Joseph Hertel was born near Breaux Bridge in June 1850, and Jean Derneville in March 1852.  Joseph Vileor remarried to Anglo American Emérante McBride in the 1850s.  Their son Joseph W. was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1859, and Gustave in February 1860. 

Sylvain, fils's fourth son Joseph le jeune, perhaps by first wife Emilie Comeaux, birth or baptismal date unrecorded, may have died young.  

Sylvain, fils's fifth son Sylvain III, perhaps by first wife Emilie Comeaux, birth or baptismal date unrecorded, the second with the name, took up with Joséphine, also called Josette, daughter of Joseph Bello, in the 1810s, and sanctified the union at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1839.  Their son Sylvain IV was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1818, and Carlos in August 1821.  Sylvain III's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1851. His daughters married into the Carrière, Derbonne, Miller, Rivière, and Sabadie or Savadie families.  

Oldest son Sylvain IV married first cousin Marie Louise, called Louise, 17-year-old daughter of his uncle Louis dit Valière Sonnier and his aunt Denise Carrière, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1837.  Their son Valérien Sylvain or Sylvain Valérien was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1840, Carlos le jeune in August 1847, and Joseph Unique in August 1862.  Marie Louise's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1866; she would have been 46 years old that year.  Sylvain IV likely remarried to Marie Ozea, daughter of Sylvain Benoit and Joséphine Belles, at the Eunice church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1869. 

Oldest son Sylvain Valérien, called Sylvain V. by the recording clerk, married Valentine Ygnace Fontenot in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1863.  Their son Arthur Frange was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1865.  Sylvain Valérien, called Valérien by the recording clerk and the recording priest, remarried to Joséphine, daughter of Joel Kinny and Clementine LeBoeuf, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in April. 

Sylvain, fils's sixth son Donat, by second wife Judith Bello, baptized at Opelousas, age 5, in February 1808, married cousin Émilie, Émilite, Carmelite or Melite Françoise, daughter of Spanish Creole François Casanueva and Brigitte Bello, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1824.  Their son Donat, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1837, and Jean in July 1842.  Their daughter married into the Miller family. 

Only son Donat, fils married French Creole Flavie Lacase probably in St. Landry Parish in the late 1850s or early 1860s.  They settled between Ville Platte and Eunice. Their son Valérien was born in November 1861, Donat III in August 1864, and Donatien in January 1870. 

Sylvain, fils's seventh son Valéry, by second wife Judith Bello, baptized at Opelouasas, age 4, in February 1808, married Arthémise, "natural" daughter of Pierre Carrière and Jacente Carrière, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1824.  Their son Valéry, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1829, Paulin in June 1831, Don or Jean Louis Valéry near Grand Coteau in January 1838, and Sylvain le jeune in April 1841.  Their daughters married into the Lacase and Moreau families.  At least three of Valéry's sons seem to have created their own families. 

Oldest son Valéry, fils may have married cousin Zelima Sonnier in the late 1840s. 

Valéry, père's second son Paulin married Marie Gimber.  Their son Olivier Jemes was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1862. 

Valèry, père's third son Don Louis Valéry married Zéolide, daughter of François Ignace Fontenot and Lucie Derouen, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1861.

Sylvain, fils's eighth son Don or Jean Louis, by second wife Judith Bello, born in St. Landry Parish in March 1808, married Carmelite, called Émilite and Mélite, daughter of Urbin Carrière and Émilite Lacase, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1827.  Their son Don or Jean Louis, fils was born in October 1837 but may have died in St. Martin Parish at age 12 in October 1849.  Don Louis's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1854; he would have been 46 years old that year.  His daughters married into the Charlot, Doguet, and McDaniel families. 

Sylvain, fils's ninth Bélisle, also called William B., by second wife Judith Bello, baptized at Opelousas, age 9 months, in September 1812, married Rosaline, 18-year-old daughter of Anglo American William McKay and his Creole wife Françoise Carrière, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1834, and remarried to Éloise or Louise, 19-year-old daughter of Michel Lacase and Éloise Carrière, at the Opelousas church in April 1839.  Their son Charles Bélisle, called Bélisle, fils, was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1846, and Bélisaire in May 1862. 

Older son Bélisle, fils, by second wife Éloise Carrière, married Clementine, daughter of Pierre Mouille and Félicité Durio, at the Eunice church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1870. 

Sylvain, fils's tenth Florian or Floriant, by second wife Judith Bello, born in St. Landry Parish in April 1814, married 17-year-old Sephalie, Sephalide, or Syphalide, another daughter of Ursin Carrière and Émilite Lacase, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1834.  Their son Octave was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1837, Gerand in August 1854, and Étienne in March 1861.  Their daughter married into the François family. 

Oldest son Octave married Julienne, Juliana, or Julie, daughter of Jean Louis Miller and Zuline Bello, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1861.  Their son Octave, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1865.  

Sylvain, fils's eleventh and youngest son Léandre, by second wife Judith Bello, born in St. Landry Parish, in February 1837, if he survived childhood probably did not marry. 

Sylvain, père's second son Joseph, born at Opelousas in April 1776, probably died young.

Sylvain, père's third son Étienne, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in August 1779, died at age 1 in August 1780. 

Sylvain, père's fourth son Charles, baptized at Opelousas, age 4 1/2 months, in August 1781, took up with Sophie, daughter perhaps of Donatto Bello and Susanne Moreau and a sister of his older brother Sylvain, fils's second wife, in St. Landry Parish in the early 1800s.  Their "natural son" Charles, fils was born at Opelousas in April 1805 but died at age 14 in July 1819, and Sylvain le jeune was born in December 1807.  Their daughters married into the Richard and Winkler families.  Charles died in Lafayette Parish in September 1853.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Charles died "at age 65 yrs.," but he was closer to 72.  One wonders if, except for its blood, this family line endured.

Sylvain, père's fifth son Leufroi, also called Godefroi, born at Opelousas in May 1788, married Marie Céleste Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Comeaux, fils and Perpétué Broussard of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1809.  They settled at Côte Gelée and Grand Prairie in what became Lafayette Parish.  Leufroi died in Lafayette Parish in December 1848.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Leufroi died "at age 65 yrs.," but he was "only" 60.  His daughter married into the Chiasson and Richard families.  Four Leufroi's nine sons created their own families; three of them married to Landrys. 

Oldest son Leufroi, fils, born in St. Martin Parish in October 1811, married Françoise Aureline, called Aureline, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Landry and Marie Brasseaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1834.  Their son Symphorien was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 18 months, in May 1840; and Guillaume was born in December 1848.  Their daughter married into the Comeaux family. 

Leufroi, père's second son Éloi le jeune, born in St. Martin Parish in August 1813, married Marie Basilise, called Basilise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Françoise Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1834.  Their son Pierre Edgar, called Edgar, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in April 1835; Jean Hopar or perhaps Azenor at age 6 months in February 1837; Charles le jeune was born in January 1839; Olivier in July 1846; and Euclides in May 1849.  Their daughter married into the Bellaire family. 

Oldest son Edgar married Amelia or Emelia Fabre probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1850s.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Leufroi le jeune was born in May 1859.  Edgar's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1870.  He would have been age 35 that year. 

Éloi le jeune's second son Jean Azenor, perhaps second son Jean Hopar, married Marie Julia Coulard and settled near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Éloi le jeune's third son Charles le jeune may have married Elizabeth Bellaire at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in January 1861.  They settled on the lower Vermilion.  Their son Albert was born in April 1867. 

Éloi le jeune's fourth son Olivier married Léontine, also called Cléontine, daughter of Treville Fabre and his Acadian wife Clementine Broussard, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1868.  They also settled on the lower Vermilion.  Their son Cléobule was born in January 1869, and Edgar le jeune in November 1870. 

Leufroi, père's third son Charles, born in St. Martin Parish in August 1815, may have died young.

Leufroi, père's fourth son Félix, born in St. Martin Parish in January 1821, may have died young. 

Leufroi, père's fifth son Valéry, born in Lafayette Parish, in January 1824, also may have died young. 

Leufroi, père's sixth son Sosthène, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 1/2 months, in February 1827, died at age 16 in October 1842,

Leufroi, père's seventh son Jacques Euclide, called Euclide, born in Lafayette Parish August 1829, married Eugènie Besida, Lesida, or Resida, daughter of fellows Acadian Éloi Landry and Marie Berthilde Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1853.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Leufroi le jeune was born in November 1861, and Éloi in December 1866. 

Leufroi, père's eighth son Sevigne, baptized at Vermilionville, age 1, in July 1834, died at age 1 1/2 in March 1835.  

Leufroi, père's ninth and youngerst son Alfred, baptized at Vermilionville, age 3 months, in July 1837, married Marie, Marine, or Maxine Frederick.  They settled on the prairie between Vermilionville and Church Point.  Their son Leufroi le jeune was born in November 1858; Augustave in August 1863; Valéry in September 1864; Jacques le jeune in February 1867; and Albert in July 1869. 

Sylvain, père's sixth son Éloi, born probably at Opelousas in c1791, died in Lafayette Parish in July 1836, age 45.  One wonders if he married.     

Sylvain, père's seventh and youngest son Joseph dit Cadz, born at Opelousas in August 1792, married Marie Adeline, called Julienne, Juliette, and Zéline, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph dit Mines Guidry and Scholastique Hébert of Bayou Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1811.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their daughters married Guidry cousins. Five of Cadz's six sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles Émile, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1815, married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Hébert and Marguerite Richard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1838.  Their son Ursin Théodule, called Théodule, was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1840; Aurelien in February 1841; Adrien near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1852; and Joseph in Lafayette Parish in February 1854. 

Oldest son Théodule married Marie Coralie, called Coralie, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Breaux and Cleorine Richard and widow of Valérien Breause, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in July 1869. 

Cadz's second son Joseph, fils, born in St. Martin Parish in June 1818, married Carmelite or Camille, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Boudreaux and Marie Hébert, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1837.  Their son Joseph III died in Lafayette Parish at age 12 days in June 1838, and Sevenne was born in December 1842. 

Cadz's third son Eusèbe dit Cadet, born prematurely in St. Martin Parish in November 1822, died at age 3 1/2 in June 1826.

Cadz's fourth son Jean, also called John, born in Lafayette Parish in December 1826, may have married Émelie Fontenot at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1849.  Their son Ignace was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1856.  They were living near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the early 1860s. 

Cadz's fifth son Sosthène, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1830, may have married Célestine Natalie, called Natalie, Broussard, in the late 1840s and lived near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, before moving to Bayou Queue de Tortue by the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph Adras was born near Grand Coteau in July 1852. 

Cadz's sixth and youngest son Edward, Eduard, or Edval, born in Lafayette Parish in May 1836, married Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Cormier and his Creole wife Susanne Ledoux, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in July 1869.  They settled on the prairie between Church Point and Vermilionville.  Their son Antoine had been born near Church Point in December 1868. 

Olivier (c1752-?) à Louis Sonnier

Olivier, second son of Étienne Saulnier and his second wife Anne Darois, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1752, escaped the British roundup of 1755 and was taken to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He and his family ended up at prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted his family at Halifax in August 1763.  Olivier came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 with older half-brother Sylvain and followed him to the Opelousas District.  Olivier's succession record was filed at what became the Opelousas courthouse in August 1775, though a census at Opelousas in May 1777 counted him as a bachelor who owned no slaves, 15 head of cattle, and four horses.  Olivier does not seem to have married. 

Joseph (c1756-1820) à Louis Sonnier

Joseph, third and youngest son of Étienne Saulnier and his second wife Anne Darois and Sylvain's half-brother, born in Acadia in c1756 during exile, followed his family to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and also ended up as a prisoner in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted them at Halifax in August 1763.  Joseph came to Louisiana in 1765 with an older sister and followed her to the Opelousas prairies.  Spanish officials counted him at Opelousas in 1771 with the family of sister Françoise, wife of Pierre Thibodeaux.  By 1774, while still a young bachelor living alone, he owned five head of cattle and three horses and mules.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Thibodeaux and Madeleine Broussard, at Attakapas in January 1779.  They settled on Prairie Bellevue, south of present-day Opelousas.  In 1788, Joseph owned 10 head of cattle and 30 horses on 13 arpents of land at Bellevue.  In the early 1800s, he and Marie lived to Grand Prairie, now downtown Lafayette; at La Butte between Lafayette and Breaux Bridge on upper Bayou Vermilion; and then at Carencro at the northern edge of the old Attakapas District.  Their daughters married into the Chiasson, Constantin, Dugas, and Guilbert families.  Joseph died at Carencro, then in St. Martin Parish, in October 1820.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 60 when he died, but he was closer to 64.  Most of his six sons created families of their own and settled in St. Martin and Lafayette parishes. 

Oldest son Joseph dit Padillau, also called Joseph, fils, baptized at Opelousas, age 6 months, in August 1781, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Arceneaux and Anne Braud of St. James Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1818.  They settled at Carencro.  Joseph, fils died probably at Carencro in September 1829, a widower; he was only 49 years old; his succession records were filed at the Vermilionville courthouse later that month. 

Older son Joseph Rosémond, called Rosémond, was born in August 1819 but died at age 11 months in July 1820.

Padillau's second son Achille or Alcide, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age unrecorded, in August 1825, married Marguerite Cléonide or Cléonise, daughter of Joseph Allegre and his Acadian wife Marie Denise Cormier, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1842.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1845; and Omar or Aymar, also called Ernest, near Breaux Bridge in February 1849.  Alcide's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in April 1849.  He would have been in his mid-20s that year.  Both of his sons created their own families. 

Older son Joseph le jeune married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Duclise Broussard and Célestine Broussard, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1868.  Their son Alcide was born near Breaux Bridge in January 1869. 

Achille's younger son Aymar, called Eymar by the recording priest, married cousin Aline, daughter of fellow Acadian Théogène Melançon and his Creole wife Cléophine Allegre, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1869. 

Joseph, père's second son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Attakapas in March 1785, married Marie Clémence, called Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Athanase Breaux and of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1810.  They settled at Prairie Basse near Carencro.  Jean Baptiste died probably at Carencro in November 1827, age 42.  His daughters married into the Breaux and Guidry families.  Four of his seven sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Hippolyte Bienvenu or Bienvenu Hippolyte, born near Carencro in March 1813, Angélique, daughter of French Canadian Joseph Primeaux and widow of ____ Newman, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  The priest noted in the marriage record that Angélique's first husband was "an unbaptized American," and that "She was in danger of death and was living with this man [Hippolyte] for 5 years."  Their son Théodule le jeune was born near Grand Coteau in February 1845 but died at age 7 1/2 in November 1852, Hippolyte, fils was born in February 1847, and Joseph Alexandre in April 1851.  Their daughter may have married into the Domingue family.  Hippolyte remarried to Spanish Creole Carmelite Dominguez, widow of Éloi Mouton, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1854. 

Second son Hippolyte, fils may have married Louisa Brisco, Briscoe, or Briscau.  Their son Hippolyte Bienvenu le jeune was born near Grand Coteau in November 1866, and Onésime in February 1868 but died "at age 7 days." 

Baptiste's second son Joseph Théodule, called Théodule, born near Carencro in April 1817, married Marie Valsaine or Valsene, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Leger and and his Creole wife Merante Meche, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1842.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Augustin Ernest was born in September 1844, Joseph Honoré in September 1849, and Jules in June 1853 but died at age 9 in November 1862.  Their daughters married into the Colligan or Collogan, Fale or Fall, and Richard families. 

Baptiste's third son Jean dit Euclide, born near Carencro in June 1819, died in Lafayette Parish in May 1838, age 18.  He did not marry. 

A succession record for Baptiste's fourth son Pierre Mortimer, born near Carencro in May 1822, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in December 1865.  He would have been age 43 that year.  One wonders if he married. 

Baptiste's fifth son Cyprien, born near Carencro in August 1824, married cousin Céleste Anathalie or Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Julien Comeaux and Céleste Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1849.  Their son Joseph Clairfait was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in January 1852.  Cyprien remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Anglo Creole John Caruthers or Credeur and his Acadian wife and his Acadian wife Adélaïde Hébert and widow of Oscar Chiasson, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1864.  Their son Marc was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1865, and Euchariste in March 1867.  Cyprien died in Lafayette Parish in September 1870; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial said that Cyprien died "at age 45 yrs.," but he was 46.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in October. 

Baptiste's sixth son Sylvestre Lucain died at age 7 days in November 1826.  

Baptiste's seventh and youngest son Simon Eugène, called Eugène, born posthumously in January 1828, married Marie Euzèide or Merida, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Rosémond Breaux and Calixte Arceneaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1855.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Lafayette Parish "shortly after birth" in September 1856; and Alexandre Adam was born in July 1859.  Eugène remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond Mouton and Estelle Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church in February 1868. 

Joseph, père's third son Placide, born probably at Opelousas in c1789, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Dugas and Marie Duhon of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1813.  They settled at La Butte and Grand Prairie.  Placide died in Lafayette Parish in April 1835, age 46.  His daughters married into the Cart, Hernandez, and Trahan families. His two older sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph Léonard, born in St. Martin Parish in June 1818, married Céleste or Célestine, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Hébert and Céleste Trahan, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1837.  Their son Placide le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1845, and Pierre near Grand Coteau in December 1859.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Trahan families. 

Older son Placide le jeune married Odalie, daughter of Firmar, perhaps Firmin, Fuselier, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in February 1868.  They settled on the prairie between Church Point and Eunice. 

Placide's second son Gédéon, born in St. Martin Parish in August 1820, married Célestine, 15-year-old daughter of Anglo American William Berwick and his Acadian wife Céleste Lejeune, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1839.  Their son Gédéon, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in April 1843, and Valentin in November 1848.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family.  Gédéon remarried to Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Doucet and Carmelite Richard, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1856. 

Older son Gédéon, fils married Adélaïde, called Délaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Onésime LeBlanc and Adélaïde Landry, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1867, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in April 1869.  They settled on the prairie between Church Point and Grand Coteau.  Their son Joseph Alceus was born in February 1869, and Adam Jean in November 1870. 

Placide's third son Jean died a day after his birth in St. Martin Parish in June 1825. 

Placide's fourth and youngest son François died at age 3 weeks in St. Martin Parish in August 1826. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Alexandre, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in July 1790, died "at his parents' home" at La Butte in January 1809.  He was only 18 years old and probably did not marry. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Pierre, born probably at Opelousas in the early 1790s, married Marie Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Dugas and Geneviève Robichaux of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1813.  They settled at La Butte and then at Grand Prairie, now downtown Lafayette.  Pierre died in Lafayette Parish in November 1850.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre died "at age 70 yrs."  At least two of his eight sons created their own families. 

Their oldest son, name unrecorded, died at age 1 month in St. Martin Parish in November 1816.

Pierre's second son Pierre Hermas or Darmas, called Darmas, born in St. Martin Parish in May 1822, married cousin Julie or Julienne, daughter of fellow Acadians Célestin Dugas and Julie Chiasson, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1840.  Their son Placide le jeune was born probably in Lafayette Parish in c1847, Alfred in June 1853, and Pierre, fils in November 1860. 

Oldest son Placide le jeune died in Lafayette Parish in November 1863, age 16. One wonders if his death was war-related.   

Pierre's third son Jean Moléon, born in Lafayette Parish in May 1824, died at age 4 1/2 in March 1829.

Pierre's fourth son Narcisse, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 months, in May 1827, died at age 2 in March 1829. 

Pierre's fifth son Joseph le jeune, born in Lafayette Parish in June 1829, died at age 1 1/2 in September 1830. 

Piere's sixth son Norbert, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in March 1831, married cousin Zoe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Anaclet Richard and Carmelite Sonnier, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in September 1859. 

Pierre's seventh son Maximilien, born in Lafayette Parish in February 1833, may have died young. 

Pierre's eighth and youngest son Treville died in Lafayette Parish at age 3 months in August 1834.

Joseph, père's sixth and youngest son Cyrille, baptized at Attakapas, age 8 months, in May 1795, married Susanne, called Susette, 16-year-old daughter of Thomas Parr and his Acadian wife Marie Melançon, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1822.  Cyrille died in Lafayette Parish in April 1859.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Cyrille died "at age 63 yrs."  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August.  At least seven of his 13 sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Cyrille, fils, born in Lafayette Parish in July 1823, died at age 2 in September 1825,

Cyrille, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born in Lafayette Parish in March 1825, also may have died young. 

Cyrille, père's third son Antoine, also called Éloi, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1826, married Sylvanie, also called Eleonie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joachim Dugas and Marguerite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1848.  Their son Antoine Numa was born in Lafayette Parish November 1854, and Joachim in April 1862. 

Cyrille, père's fourth son Louis, born in Lafayette Parish in April 1828, Emelia, called Melia, daughter of fellow Acadians Théovide Broussard and Marie Arthémise Hébert, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1849.  Their son Alcides was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1850, Paul Arthur in June 1854, and Élois in November 1870. 

Cyrille, père's fifth son Siméon or Simon, born in Lafayette Parish in February 1830, married Marie Rosalie, called Rosalie, daughter of Pierre Domingue and Marie Josèphine Hernandez and widow of Pierre A. Domingue, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1861.  Their son Joseph Numa was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1862, Edgar in October 1865 but died at age 2 in November 1867, and Amédé was born in March 1870.

Cyrille, père's sixth son Basile, also called Baptiste, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1831, married Philomène, daughter of François Guilbert and Émilie Begnaud, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1854.  Their son Honoré was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1855, and Théophile in February 1868. 

Cyrille, père's seventh son Joseph, born in Lafayette Parish in June 1833, died at age 1 in June 1834.

Cyrille, père's eighth son Olivier, born in Lafayette Parish in March 1835, died at age 18 months in September 1836.

Cyrille, père's ninth son Émile, born in Lafayette Parish, died, age unrecorded, in December 1835.

Cyrille, père's tenth son Thomas Estel, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 3 months, in January 1837, may have married Marcellite Riggs in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1870. 

Cyrille, père's eleventh son Paulin was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1840.

Cyrille, père's twelvth son Alexandre, born in Lafayette Parish in August 1841, married Marie Emelise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Chiasson and Julie Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1861.  Their son Cyrille Esseus was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1866, and Julien Eucharis in October 1868.   

Cyrille, père's thirteenth and youngest son Marcel, born in Lafayette Parish in January 1844, married Marie Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Louvière and Séraphine Delphine Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1866. 

.

A second set of Saulner brothers reached New Orleans from Halifax later in 1765.  They went not to the western prairies but to an established Acadian settlement on the river above New Orleans: 

Joseph (c1739-1812) à Pierre à Louis Sonnier

Joseph, oldest son of Pierre Saulnier, fils and Madeleine Haché-Gallant, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1739, escaped the British roundup of 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He and his family ended up as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  He may have married a fellow Acadian by then.  He and two of his siblings came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Spanish officials counted him with widowed sister Anne and two nieces on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1766.  He married, or remarried to, fellow Acadian Marie Landry, widow of Alexis Granger, at Cabahannocer in November 1767.  They were living on the east bank of the river there in 1769.  Eight years later, in January 1777, he and his family were still living on the east bank of the river at Cabahannocer, but by then he was a widower.  His daughter by wife Marie married into the Bourgeois family.  Joseph remarried to fellow Acadian Marie Breaux, widow of Amand Richard, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in August 1777.  In 1779, they held three slaves on their holding along the river.  Their daughter married into the Lanoux family.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in December 1812.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 82 when he died, but he was closer to 72.  His older son's line did not survive.  His younger son settled on Bayou Lafourche and created a third center of family settlement.  They were, in fact, the only Sonniers to settle there during the antebellum period. 

Older son Donat, by first or second wife Marie Landry, perhaps also called Simon, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in July 1773, may have married Françoise, a woman whose surname has been lost to history, probably at St.-Jacques in the late 1790s or early 1800s.  Their son, name and age unrecorded, died at St.-Jacques in October 1806.  Simon's wife died the next day, age 35.  Simon himself died at St.-Jacques in April 1807.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Simon's parents' names, mention his wife, or give his age at the time of his death, but this probably was him.  One wonders if his family line survived.

Joseph's younger son Joseph-Édouard, called Édouard, by second or third wife Marie Breaux, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in May 1780, married Denise, also called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Charles Arceneaux and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at St.-Jacques in February 1799.  Most of their children were born in what became St. James Parish.  They moved to Bayou Lafourche in the early 1820s, creating a third center of family settlement, and were the last of the Acadian Sonniers to abandon the river settlements.  Édouard died in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1842.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Édouard died "at age 64 to 65 yrs.," but he was closer to 62.  His daughters married into the Authement and Bourg families.  Four of his six sons created their own families, but at least one line did not survive. 

Oldest son Joseph le jeune, born at St.-Jacques in December 1802, married Marie Josette or Rosette, daughter of François Percle and Marie Triche, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1827.  Their son Joseph Omere was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1830 but died at age 3 in October 1833; Édouard or Jean Amédée was born in December 1832 but died at age 1 in October 1833; Zéphirin Aristide, called Aristide, was born in Ascension Parish in August 1834; and Joseph Léonidas in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1836 but died at age 1 in December 1837.  Their daughters married into the Lasseigne and LeBlanc families. 

Third son Aristide married Honorine, daughter of Henri Lirette and his Acadian wife Marie Breaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in December 1851.  Their son Joseph Alcide, called Alcide, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1852.  Aristide, père died in Lafourche Parish in September 1853 "during [a] yellow fever epidemic,"age 19.  A "petition for tutorship" for his son was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in July 1855, and a "family meeting" was held at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1856.  Aristide, père's daughter Victorine Ernestine was born posthumously in March 1854. 

Édouard's second son Jean Baptiste le jeune, born at St.-Jacques in October 1804, died at age 1 1/2 in January 1806.

Édouard's third son Simon le jeune, born in St. James Parish in c1812, died near Convent, St. James Parish, at age 3 in July 1815. 

Édouard's fourth son Marcellin or Onésime, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1814, married Anne Marie, daughter of Antoine Vicknair and Dolothe Cuvillier and widow of Pierre Lasseigne, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in December 1846.  Onésime died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1847, age 33. A "petition for administrator" in his name was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in May 1848.  He and his wife had no children, or least none who appear in local church records, so his line of the family probably died with him. 

Édouard's fifth son Julien or Jules, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1819, married Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breaux and Marie Félicité Richard, at the Thibodaux in June 1855. 

Édouard's sixth and youngest son Jean Charles, called Charles, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in November 1821, married Marie Rosalie, called Rosalie, another daughter of Joseph Breaux and Marie Félicité Richard, at the Thibodaux church in September 1846.  Their son Joseph Édouard Octave, called Octave, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1849; Édouard Timothée or Timothée Édouard in October 1851 but died at age 1 in December 1852; Adam Arthur was born in November 1853; and Édouard Clinton in February 1861.  Their daughter married into the Bergeron family. 

Oldest son Octave married Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of Zenon Roussel and Carmelite Grégoire, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in April 1869; the marriage also was registered in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1870. 

Jean-Baptiste (c1746-?) à Pierre à Louis Sonnier

Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, second son of Pierre Saulnier, fils and his first wife Madeleine Haché-Gallant, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1746, escaped the British roundup of 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He and his family ended up as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  Jean and two of his siblings came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer.  Spanish officials counted him on the right, or west, bank of the river there in 1766 and on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1769.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Roy and his first wife Anne Aubois, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in May 1773.  They were still living on the east bank of the river there in 1777.  A daughter, born in August 1784, was baptized at New Orleans the following March.  The family was living on upper Bayou Lafourche in the late 1780s and early 1790s, the first Acadian Sonniers to settle there, but few, if any, of their children remained on the bayou.  Their daughters married into the Cuvillier, Duval, Henrique, Martin, and Nopper families; most of them settled on the western prairies.  Jean-Baptiste's two sons, like his daughters, followed their Roy relatives to the western prairies and settled on Bayou Teche.

Older son Jean-Baptiste, fils, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in August 1776, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Come LeBlanc and Isabelle Broussard of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1813.  They remained on Bayou Teche.  Their daughters married into the Broussard and Daniel families.  Two of Jean-Bapitste, fils's four sons created their own families, but only one of the family lines seems to have endured. 

Oldest son Marcellin, born in St. Martin Parish in March 1814, married cousin Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Raphaël Broussard and Modeste LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1834.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Philemon was born in July 1839; and Marcellin, fils in November 1840.  Marcellin remarried to Sidalise Dubois.  Their son Joseph Adam was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1853; Jean Baptiste le jeune in September 1854 but died at age 7 in November 1861; Jean Cibley, perhaps Sibley, called Cibley, was born in December 1862 but died at age 4 1/2 in September 1867; Paul Jefferson Davis, called Davis, was born in December 1864 but died at age 2 1/2 in May 1867; and Pierre Noël was born in December 1867. 

Jean-Baptiste, fils's second son, name and age unrecorded, died "at the home of [Scotsman John] Martin, his [Jean-Baptiste, fils's] brother-in-law [husband of sister Françoise] at L'île Labbé," in St. Martin Parish in January 1818. 

Jean-Baptiste, fils's third son Jean Onésime, called Onésime, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1819, married cousin Louise, also called Marie Elisa, Sonnier, at the St. Martinville church in November 1841.  Their son Jean Baptiste le jeune was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1847 but died at age 1 in October 1848.  One wonders if the family line survived.   

Jean-Baptiste, fils's fourth and youngest son Jean Baptiste III, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1825, died at age 3 1/2 in March 1829. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's younger son Jean-L'Esprit, born at Ascension in July 1791, married Félicité, daughter of French Creole Louis Saucier, probably in the 1820s.  They, too, settled on Bayou Teche.  Their only son created his own family there. 

Jean, fils, perhaps also called Jean Azenor or Azenor Jean, born in St. Martin Parish in April 1828, may have married Élizabeth, daughter of Gilbert Amy and his Acadian wife Élizabeth Landry, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1861, remarried to Marie Julia Coulard, and settled near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Villejoin

The Rousseau de Villejoins came late to greater Acadia, and, as Villejoins, they were among the last Acadians to go to Louisiana.  Moreover, during their time in L'Acadie they were far from typical Acadians; none of them helped build aboiteaux on the edge of the Fundy marshes.  They lived, instead, on Newfoundland, Île Royale, and Île St.-Jean, but they were not simple fishermen or boat builders or even prominent merchants there.  As their name implies, they were proud descendants of French nobility.  They served in the Maritime garrisons as military officers, some of them chevaliers of the Order of St.-Louis, and one of them was commandant of Île St.-Jean on the eve of the island's dérangement.  Their noble status did not spare them from the tragedy of the Great Upheaval.  Back in France, to which they were forcibly deported, they again served their monarch as military commanders.  The former commandant of Île St.-Jean, in fact, rose to the rank of general, and his eldest son became governor of a French island in the West Indies. 

Gabriel-Louis, son of Gabriel Rousseau, sieur de la Gorre et de Villejoin, gentlehomme servant son altesse royale Gaston de France, and Dame Marie Baudron, was born at St.-Honoré, Blois, France, in c1683.  Gabriel-Louis inherited his father's title, sieur de Villejoin, and served as an officer in the troupes de la marine at Fort-Louis, Plaisance.  Gabriel-Louis married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Sr. François Bertrand, colonel of militia and a member of the Order of St.-Louis, and Jeanne Giraudet, at Plaisance in April 1708.  Their wedding must have been a big affair; Newfoundland governor Pastour de Costebelle and dozens of other distinguished guests witnessed the ceremony.  Marie-Josèphe gave Sr. Gabriel-Louis six children, at least two sons and three daughters, including two sons who married daughters of fellow French aristocrats and who also were their cousins.  Two of Gabriel-Louis's daughters married into the Le Coutre de Bourville and Tarride du Haget families at Louisbourg on Île Royale.  Two of his sons married.  Gabrie-Louis served not only at Plaisance, Newfoundland, but also at the French citadel of Louisbourg and at Port-La-Joye on Île St.-Jean, where died in September 1718, in his mid-30s.  Gabriel-Louis and Marie-Josèphe's descendants served or settled at Louisbourg and on Île St.-Jean.  Needless to say, members of this family were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  Gabriel-Louis's older son Gabriel de Villejoin, fils married Anne-Angélique, daughter of Louis-Joseph de Gannes de Falaise and Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, at Louisbourg in January 1733, and remarried to Barbe, daughter of Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière and Renée Bertrand and widow of Louis Delort, at Louisbourg in December 1753.  Gabriel, fils, like his maternal grandfather, became a chevalier of the Order of St. Louis.  He died at St.-Jean-d'Angély, Aunis, France, in November 1781, age 72, after serving the King as a brigadier.  Gabriel-Louis's younger son Michel d'Orfontaine married Angélique, another daughter of Michel Le Neuf de Vallière and Renée Bertrand, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in May 1757, on the eve of the islands' Grand Dérangement.

Living in territory controlled by France, the Rousseau de Villejoins and Rousseau d'Orfontaines escaped the roundup of the Acadians in British Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Gabriel-Louis and Marie-Josèphe's older son Gabriel, fils, in fact, had been commandant of Île St.-Jean for a year when Governor Lawrence and the colonial council in Halifax ordered the deportations.  Three years earlier, in 1752, a French official had counted 2,223 inhabitants on Île St.-Jean, up from 735 four years earlier.  It was Gabriel Rousseau de Villejoin's sad duty, as commandant of island, to care for the hundreds of Acadian refugees who fled to Île St.-Jean in the autumn and winter of 1755, most of them with little more than the shirts on their backs.  (The entire population of Cobeguit, for instance, escaped to Île St.-Jean that autumn when they heard the British were rounding up their fellow Acadians north and west of them.)  Governor-General Vaudreuil at Québec did his best to send relief to the island.  In an August 1756 letter to the Minister of Marine, Vaudreuil painted a dismal picture of conditions on the island:  "Misery is great on Île Saint Jean," he wrote.  "Most of the inhabitants are without bread, M. de Villejoin having fed 1,257 refugees since last autumn."  That same year, Commandant Villejoin informed the governor that there were now 4,400 Acadians on the overcrowded island! 

But the suffering of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean had only just begun.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the inhabitants on the island and deported them to France.  Commandant Villejoin and his family did not escape the deportation.  They crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Gabriel and his wife Barbe Le Neuf de La Vallière survived the crossing, but their 18-month-old son Louis-Melchior died at sea.  Younger brother Michel, his wife Angélique Le Neuf de La Vallière, and their family also were deported to France, from Île Royale. 

Most of the island Acadians exiled to France languished in the nation's port cities, relying largely on the King's charity to feed their families.  Not so the Rousseau de Villejoins.  Their status as nobles and their good service in greater Acadia led to promotions, not poverty.  In 1760, a year after he and his family returned to France, Gabriel became commandant des troupes des colonies at Rochefort.  When the war with Britain finally ended and there were no more colonial troops in North America to administer, Gabriel was named governor of Île de la Désirade, Guadeloupe, in the French Antilles, in 1763.  Fives years later, after Désirade came under the governorship of Guadeloupe, Gabriel returned to France, where he was appointed brigadier des armées du roi.  He died at St.-Jean-d'Angély, Aunis, France, in November 1781, in his early 70s.  Meanwhile, Gabriel's younger brother Michel sieur d'Orfontaine served as capitaine dans les troupes nationales in Guiana, South America, before retiring from the King's service in 1765. He died probably in France after1789, in his 70s. 

Gabriel-Michel, called Michel, Gabriel, fils's second son by his first wife Anne-Angélique de Gannes de Falaise, had fought in greater Acadia during the war with Britain while in his 20s.  In the late 1760s, Michel emigrated to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, probably from France.  Like his father and grandfather, he served as an officer in both the militia and the King's forces.  During his long military career, he was lieutenant pour le roi and capitaine aide-major des milices du quartier at Cayes du Fond and major commandant pour le roi at Tiburon on the island.  He married Anne-Félicité, called Félicité, daughter of Joseph-Cyprien Reynaud, a prominent planter and militia officer, and Marthe Nicolas, at Cayes du Fond, today's Les Cayes, on the southwest coast of the island in October 1771.  Michel and Félicité had at least three children, including two sons.  Michel was still alive when the slave revolt in St.-Domingue erupted in 1791.  He died at Les Cayes in February 1799, age 65.  His family left St.-Domingue probably soon after his death.  At least three of his children--sons Louis-Joseph, called Joseph, and Grégoire-Michel, both unmarried; and married daughter Marie-Josèphine, wife of ____ Salle or Salleo of France and Haiti--emigrated to Louisiana from Haiti via Cuba perhaps in 1809 with hundreds of other Haitian refugees.  They chose to settle not at New Orleans with the great majority of their fellow exiles but on the western prairies, where they called themselves Villejoin, not Rousseau.  The family's noble de also disappeared in republican Louisiana. 

Gabriel-Michel's children would have been considered French Creole or Foreign French by their Acadian neighbors though his family had lived in greater Acadia.  Older son Joseph, age 37 in 1809, evidently did not marry.  Younger son Grégoire Michel married a French Creole in 1812 in what was then St. Martin Parish and settled at Côte Gelée near present-day Broussard.  One of his sons created a family of his own and settled on the prairie west of Vermilionville.  Although the family had lived in the old Attakapas District for decades, no Villejoin appears in the federal slave census schedules for 1850 and 1860.  Nor does a Villejoin appear in Confederate service records during the War of 1861-65.  The family remained a small one.  According to a descendant, the Villejoins today consider themselves Cajuns, and "the surname is often still found from Vermillion westward," especially in the Kaplan/Crowley area of Vermilion and Acadia parishes.72 

Grégoire-Michel (1777-1847) à Gabriel, fils à Gabriel de Villejoin

Grégoire-Michel, son of Gabriel-Michel Rousseau de Villejoin and Anne-Félicité Reynaud of Les Cayes, French St.-Domingue, born in June 1777, was the son of a well-to-do planter and military officer.  Grégoire-Michel was a teenager when the Haitian slave revolt broke out in the early 1790s.  Later in the decade or in the early 1800s, he and his family fled to Cuba or Jamaica to escape the violence in Haiti.  Grégoire and two of his older siblings likely were among the thousands of Haitian refugees whom the Spanish deported to New Orleans in 1809.  Grégoire would have been age 32 that year and was still a bachelor.  In Louisiana, he used his family's seigneurial name, not its surname Rousseau, as he probably had done in Haiti, but he did not use the noble de; he was simply Grégoire Villejoin, a reflection, perhaps, of his residence in a republic, not a royal colony.  Unlike most of the Haitian refugees in American Louisiana, who tended to remain at New Orleans, Grégoire chose to live on the western prairies.  At age 35, he married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Baptiste Jeannot and his Acadian wife Madeleine Hébert of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1812.  They settled at Côte Gelée, which became part of the newly-created Lafayette Parish in 1823.  Like his noble ancestors, Grégoire must have been a shaker and a mover in his community.  In the 1820s, he served as the first sheriff of Lafayette Parish.  A succession record in his name was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in August 1833.  He died at New Orleans in May 1847, age 69.  His daughters married into the Istre and LaFosse families, and perhaps into the Miller family as well.  Only his older son created a family of his own, but the line endured on the western prairies. 

Older son Prosper, born probably at Côte Gelée in May 1813, married Clementine LaFosse probably in the 1830s. They settled near Carencro at the northern edge of the old Attakapas District.  Their son Joseph Alcide was born in the late 1830s or early 1840s, and Prosper, fils in May 1854.  Their daughter married into the Caruthers/Credeur and Cormier families. 

Older son Joseph Alcide married Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Lejeune, fils and Adeline Hébert, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1860, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in July 1867.  They settled probably near Church Point.  Their son Émile was born in September 1861. 

Grégoire Michel's younger son Paulin, born at Côte Gelée in August 1817, may have died young.

[to Book Ten]

[to Book Ten-2]

 

INTRODUCTION

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK THREE:     Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats"

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:        The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK TEN:          The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

BOOK ELEVEN:  The Non-Acadian "Cajun" Families of South Louisiana

BOOK TWELVE:  Acadians in Gray

SOURCE NOTES - BOOK TEN-3

01.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 185.  See also AGE, May 2005, 10; Arsenault, Généalogie, 607-09, 2517-19; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249; White, DGFA-1, 416, 620-21, 873-75; White, DGFA-1 English, 130; Books One, Three, Six, & Eight; Jeansonne family page. 

02.  See 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, St. James, & West Baton Rouge parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, Iberville, Pointe Coupee, St. James, St. Mary, & West Baton Rouge parishes, & Jackson County, Texas; Arsenault, Généalogie, 610, 1007-08, 1195-98, 1660, 2519-20; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Dixon, "Who Owned Last Island?," 431; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 262; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Menn, Large Slaveholders of LA, 1860, 240, 244-45; NOAR, vols. 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family Nos. 33, 34; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Families No. 72, 181; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 775; White, DGFA-1, 884-90; White, DGFA-1 English, 188-89; Books One, Three, Four, Six, & Eight; Labauve family page. 

03.  See 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette Parish; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette Parish; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1660, 2119, 2520; Brasseaux, ed. Quest for the Promised Land, 54; BRDR, vols. 1b, 2, 3; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vol. 1; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; NOAR, vol. 2; Books Three, Six, & Eight; Lachaussée family page. 

04.  See 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Assumption, Lafayette, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, & St. Landry parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, Lafayette, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, St. Landry, & St. Martin parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 611-12; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:312; Brasseaux, Foucault and the Rebellion of 1768, 26, 58n3, 77; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, Acadians in Exile, 269 ; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 2, 3; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vol. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, CD; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249, 253; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, "Family" No. 58; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 61; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 101-02; White, DGFA-1, 907-08; White, DGFA-1 English, 192-93; Books One, Three, Four, Six, & Eight; Lalande family page. 

05.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1008, 2028, 2520-21; BRDR, vols. 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Bunnell, French & Native North American Marriages, 66; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:25; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Milling, Exile Without End, 21, 41, 43, 44;  NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 49; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Reine_d_Espagne.htm>, Family No. 16; White, DGFA-1, 909-11; White, DGFA-1 English, 193; Books One, Three, Four, Six, & Eight; Lambert family page. 

06.  Quotatons from West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 92, 94.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 448, 612-26, 1009-10, 1198-1215, 1401-11, 1562, 1606-07, 1660, 2241, 2280-81, 2355-56, 2521-35; Eric Beerman, "Victory on the Mississippi, 1779," transl. & ed. by Gilbert C. Din, in Din, ed., The Spanish Presence in LA, 199; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:316, 2:202; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Jane B. Chaillot, "Landry, Joseph," in DLB, 480; Jane B. Chaillot, "Landry, [Jean] Trasimond," in DLB, 481-82; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 15-17, 39, 55-57, 65-66, 68, 77-81, 94, 97, 118-20, 152-53, 155-58, 175, 177-78, 205-06, 217-18, 231-33, 236, 249, 252, 263, 267-68, 284; Marchand, Old Settlers of Ascension, 55-67; Marshall, M., Gallant Creoles; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 4, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 8, 51, 52, 140, 141, 144, 162, 172, 183; Riehm & White, "Elie Landry Estate Record Book"; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 93, 174-75; White, DGFA-1, 914-52; White, DGFA-1 English, 194-204; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 134-54; Books One, Three, Four, Six, & Eight; Landry family page. 

07.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 628-34, 2535; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 176, 204, 234-35, 249; White, DGFA-1, 958-60; White, DGFA-1 English, 204; Books One, Three, Five, Six, & Eight; Lanoux family page. 

08.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 646-47; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 9; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 281; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vol. 1; Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 8, 36; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 66; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 110-11; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 345, 549-52; White, DGFA-1, 981-82; Books Three, Eight, & Ten; Lebert family page. 

09.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 647-58, 1216-60, 1411-14, 1564, 1661, 1904, 2243-44, 2282, 2304, 2357-62, 2536-46; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:22, 38, 97-98, 112, 127, 159; "Fort Cumberland, 24 Aug 1763"; "Fort Edward, 1761-62"; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 281-89, 565-70; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 15-17, 47, 56-57, 66-67, 69, 78-80, 93, 108-09, 119, 151, 154, 156-58, 175-78, 205-06, 217-18, 232-34, 236, 251-52, 263, 267-68, 275, 290, 307, 310, 312; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family Nos. 12, 17, 22, 23; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Tamerlan.htm>, Family Nos. 4, 7, 10; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 14, 47, 89, 98, 107, 110, 136, 166;  "Ristigouche, 24 Oct 1760"; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 66-69; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 111-22; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 553-79; White, DGFA-1, 983-1022; White, DGFA-1 English, 209-17; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 154-64; Books One, Three, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; LeBlanc family page. 

66.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1285-88, 1569-72, 2585-88; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5 (rev.), 8, 9, 10, 11; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:107, 132; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 402-03, 589; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249, 251, 307-08, 310-13, 315-20, 322; "Ristigouche, 24 Oct 1760"; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 82; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 11-12; White, DGFA-1, 1446-51; White, DGFA-1 English, 304-05; Books One, Three, Four, Six, & Eight; Sonnier family page.

72. See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1698, 1966-67, 2138; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 392; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; <lagenealogy.net/RousseauVillejoin.aspx>; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 53; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 777; Andrew Rodger, "Rousseau de Villejouin (Villejoin, Villejoint), Gabriel," in DCB, online; <rootsweb.ancestry.com/~htiwgw/familles/fiches/004820.htm>; White, DGFA-1, 1070, 1422-23; Books Four, Five, Six, & Eight; Villejoin family page. 

Interestingly, Grégoire-Michel Villejoin's hometown, Les Cayes, Haiti, also is the birth place of John James Audubon, the famous ornithologist & painter, who was born at Les Cayes (birth name Jean Rabin) in Apr 1785. 

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