BOOK THREE:  Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats"(b)

 

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:         The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK TEN:          The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

BOOK ELEVEN:  The Non-Acadian "Cajun" Families of South Louisiana

BOOK TWELVE:   Acadians in Gray

 

The Passing of the Acadian Pioneers

By the end of French control in peninsula Acadia, many of the colony's progenitors had breathed their last.  Most had lived to a ripe old age, witnessing the birth of grandchildren and even great-grandchildren.  Some were not so lucky.  Most of them died on their farms along the basin above and below Port-Royal.  Some passed their final days at Chignecto, Minas, Pigiguit, Cobeguit, in the trois-rivières, even in Canada and France.  Sadly, the loss of Acadian records during the colonial wars and especially during Le Grand Dérangement prevents us from determining the exact date and place of many of their burials:   

Germain Doucet, sieur de La Verdure, had been forced by the English to leave Acadia in 1654, when he was in his late 50s.  He did not return to the colony, and his death date is unknown.  As far as is known, the very first family founder to die in Acadia was the fisherman turned farmer Jean Poirier, who died probably at Port-Royal in c1654, age unknown.  Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour died in the spring of 1663, probably at Port-Royal, age 70.  Étienne, the younger of the two Hébert brothers, died at Port-Royal between 1669 and 1671, on the eve of the first census; his birth year is unknown, but he probably died in his middle age.  François Guérin probably was in his middle age, also, when he died before the first census. 

Other early-family progenitors died in the colony during the 1670s.  Jean Gaudet died in the middle of the decade, over 100 years old.  Several progenitors were counted in the colony in 1671 but not in 1678 or 1686, so they probably died during the 1670s.  Jean Thériot would have been in his 70s.  François Savoie would have been in his 50s.  Vincent Brun would have been in his 60s.  François Pellerin died in c1678, age 43.  Antoine Gougeon also died that year, age 52.  Pierre Martin, père died late in the decade, in his 70s.  René Landry l'aîné died between 1678 and 1686, perhaps in his early 60s.  Étienne Robichaud also died between 1678 and 1686, in his mid- or late 40s.  Pierre Lejeune dit Briard may have died during the decade, age undetermined.  Pierre Cyr died probably at Chignecto in c1679, age 35. 

More family founders died during the peaceful 1680s.  Pierre Vincent died perhaps early in the decade, in his early or mid-50s.  Guillaume Trahan died in c1684, age 83.  Vincent Breau died in c1685, in his mid-50s.  Pierre Godin dit Châtillon died on the eve of the 1686 census, in his mid-50s.  Pierre Comeau was counted at Port-Royal in 1686; the census taker, Sr. de Meulles, said he was age 88 at the time; Pierre died before the next census in 1693, in his late 80s or, more likely, his early 90s.  Antoine Hébert died in the late 1680s or early 1690s, in his late 60s or early 70s.  Jean Blanchard died between the censuses of 1686 and 1693, in his late 70s or early 80s.  Olivier Daigre died about the same time, in his early 40s.  Barnabé Martin also died about then, probably in his late 40s.  Michel Richard dit Sansoucy died between 1686 and 1689, in his late 50s.  Jean Pitre died after the census of 1686, perhaps later in the decade, in his early 50s.  Antoine Babin died between 1686 and 1688, in his late 50s.  Antoine Belliveau may have died late in the decade, in his 60s.  Michel Boudrot died between August 1688 and 1693, in his late 80s or early 90s.  René Rimbault was age 70 in 1686, so he may have died later in the decade. 

More progenitors died during the turbulent 1690s.  Antoine Bourg died between October 1687 and 1693, in his late 70s or early 80s.  Thomas Cormier died at Chignecto in c1690, in his mid-50s.  His father-in-law, François Girouard, died at Port-Royal in the early 1690s, in his early 70s.  Guyon Chiasson dit La Vallée died probably in the early 1690s, in his mid-50s.  Michel/Geyret de Forest died probably in the early 1690s, in his early 50s.  Claude Petitpas died in c1691, in his mid-50s.  Jacques Leprince died at Pigiguit in either 1692 or 1693, in his mid-40s.  René Landry le jeune died at Port-Royal by 1693, in his mid- or late 50s.  Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, former governor and seigneur of Port-Royal, died at his home near the Acadian capital in c1693, in his early 50s.  François Gautrot died in c1693, age 80.  Mathieu D'Amours, sieur de Chauffours et de Matane, a member of Canada's Superior Council, died at Québec in October 1695, in his late 70s, probably never having lived in greater Acadia.  Daniel LeBlanc died between 1695 and 1698, in his late 60s or early 70s, probably at Port-Royal.  Abraham Dugas died probably at Port-Royal during the 1690s, in his late 70s or early 80s.  Martin Benoit dit Labrière was still alive at Port-Royal in 1694, the year his youngest child was born; he would have been in his early 40s that year; he died at Port-Royal, date unrecorded. 

Family founders died during the final days of French control of peninsula Acadia.  Pierre Chênet, sieur Dubreuil, an important French official, died probably at Port-Royal by 1700, in his late 40s or early 50s.  Jacques Triel dit Laperrière died probably at Port-Royal by 1700, in his early 50s.  Philippe Mius d'Entremont, retired seigneur of Pobomcoup, died either at Port-Royal or at a daughter's home at Minas in 1700 or 1701, age about 91.  Charles Melanson dit Le Ramée also died in 1700 or 1701, in his late 50s.  Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois, founder of the Chignecto settlement, died probably at Port-Royal in 1701, in his early 80s.  Laurent Granger died between 1700 and 1703, in his late 50s.  Michel Dupuis may have died early in the 1700s, perhaps in his early 60s.  Pierre Guilbeau died probably at Port-Royal in November 1703, age 64.  Pierre Thibodeau, founder of the Chepoudy settlement, died at Prée-Ronde, near Port-Royal, in December 1704, in his early 70s.  Jean Serreau, sieur de Saint-Aubin, seigneur of Ste.-Croix and Passamaquoddy, died at Port-Royal in March 1705, age 85.  Pierre Bézier dit Joan dit Larivière died at Port-Royal in March 1706, age 80.  François Lapierre dit Laroche died at Chignecto by 1707, in his mid- or late 50s.  Emmanuel Mirande dit Tavare, the Portuguese, died by January 1707, when his wife remarried at Port-Royal.  Étienne Rivet died at Pigiguit by 1707, in his early or mid-50s.  Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie, third baron de Saint-Castin, the French officer turned capitaine de sauvages, died at Pau, France, in 1707, in his mid-50s.  René Bernard died probably at Chignecto after 1707, in his mid- or late 40s.  Pierre Cellier dit Normand died at Minas in January 1710, in his early 60s.  Philippe Pinet died in October 1710, in his late 50s. 

However, many family progenitors, most of them 1670s and 1680s arrivals, were still living years, even decades, after the British seized the colony in 1710.  Pierre Lanoue died between 1707 and 1714, in his late 50s or early 60s, place unrecorded.  François Moyse dit Latreille, described as an inhabitant at Passamaquoddy, died on the haute rivière, above Annapolis Royal, in January 1711, in his late 50s.  Martin Aucoin died at Minas in May 1711, age 60; the priest who buried him noted in the church record:  "mort subitement le jour de l'Ascension au retour de la messe, ayant toujours vécu fort chrétiennement et avec édification"--that is, he died suddenly on Ascension Day returning from mass, having always lived a very Christian and edifying life.  Jean-Aubin Mignot dit Châtillon died at the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec in September 1712, age 62.  Jean Corporon died in February 1713, age 66.  Master surgeon Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine was living at Cappe, near Annapolis Royal, in 1714; he would have been in his early 50s that year; the date of his death, likely at Annapolis Royal, has been lost.  The same is true for butcher André Simon dit Jacques Le Boucher, who would have been the same age in 1714.  Pierre Arseneau died at Chignecto by 1714, in his early 60s.  François Levron dit Nantois died at Annapolis Royal in June 1714, in his early 60s.  Mathieu de Goutin, former French official at Port-Royal, died at his new post on Île Royale on Christmas Day 1714, in his early 50s.  Pierre Melanson dit La Verdure, fils, the son-in-law of the old seigneur of Pobomcoup, and the pioneer of Grand-Pré, died at Minas after the 1714 census, probably in his early 80s.  Roger dit Jean Caissie died probably at Chignecto perhaps in the mid-or late 1710s, in his late 60s; he, along with Pierre Melanson, were the last of the family progenitors counted in the first census to return to our ancestors.  Robert Henry died probably at Minas after 1714, in his 70s.  Five years after he was imprisoned by the British in Fort Anne, François Brossard died suddenly at his farm on haute rivière in December 1716, in his early 60s.  François Michel dit La Ruine was still living at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in 1717 when his youngest child was born there; he would have been in his late 60s that year.  Étienne Pellerin died at Annapolis Royal in November 1722, in his mid-70s.  Nicolas Babineau dit Deslauriers died probably at Annapolis Royal by November 1723, in his late 60s.  Claude Guédry dit Grivois dit Laverdure died somewhere on the Atlantic coast after January 1723, in his late 70s.  Julien Lord died at Annapolis Royal in February or March 1724, in his early 70s.  Claude Bertrand died by February 1727, perhaps at Cap-Sable, in his 70s.  Louis Saulnier died probably at Minas after April 1730, in his late 60s or early 70s.   Jean Préjean dit Le Breton died at Annapolis Royal in June 1733, in his early 80s.  Jean or Joannis Bastarache dit Le Basque died at Annapolis Royal in September 1733, in his mid-70s.  Jean Doiron died at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, between April 1735 and June 1736, in his mid-80s.  Michel Haché dit Gallant died at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in July 1737, in his early 70s.  Former privateer Pierre dit Baptiste Maisonnat died by August 1732, when his third wife's burial record called her his widow; he had been counted at Chignecto in 1714, when he would have been in his early 50s.  Louis Allain died at Annapolis Royal in June 1737, in his early 80s.  Sr. Jacques Michel dit Saint-Michel died at Annapolis Royal in February 1748, age 90. 

Louis-Noël Labauve was still living, probably at Minas, in 1707, the year his youngest child was born; he would have been in his late 40s that year.  François Amireau dit Tourangeau was still living at Cap-Sable in 1708, in his mid-60s.  Jean Roy dit La Liberté was still living at Port-Royal in 1708, when his last child was born there; he would have been in his late 50s that year.  Similarly, the places and dates of Jean Labarre's, René Lambert's, and Guillaume Le Juge's passing have been lost to history.31

Acadian Migration and the Fracturing of a Culture

By the time the British seized control of the colony, some of the oldest Acadian families were in their third and even fourth generations.  They could be found at Pobomcoup near Cap-Sable, and at Mirliguèche and other small fishing settlements on the Atlantic side of the peninsula; in the basin above and below old Port-Royal, now Annapolis Royal; at a dozen settlements in the Minas Basin, including Grand-Pré, Pigiguit, and Cobeguit; and in a half dozen more settlements, including Beaubassin, Rivière-des-Héberts, Maccan, Nappan, Vechkock, and Menoudy, east of the Missaguash at Chignecto.  Others could be found in territory claimed by both France and Britain north and west of the Missaguash:  at Aulac and Tintamarre, on the west side of the Missaguahs; at Chepoudy, Petitcoudiac, and Memramcook, collectively called the trois-rivières; at Shediac and Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence; along the middle reaches of Rivière St.-Jean; along Rivière Ste.-Croix and the shores of Passamaquoddy Bay; and along the Maine coast at Machias and other distant places, all the way down to the mouth of the Kennebec.  After three quarters of a century of settlement, these fecund Acadians, along with more recent arrivals, could be counted in the hundreds--at least 2,500 of them in 1714.  Most importantly, during times of both peace and conflict, they had created a culture of their own.  Naomi Griffiths reminds us that during the 40 years the French controlled Acadia under royal governance, "the Acadian settlements created their own particular pattern of social relationships, bringing together a network of kin relationships, economic activity, political habits, and religious practices that would evolve over the succeeding generations into an enduring community identity."  But it was not until a 12-year-long war brought peace to the region that the Acadian culture finally could thrive.  After the Treaty of Utrecht was signed in 1713, thirty years of relative peace descended on North America.  To be sure, seventeenth-century Acadia had seen years of quiet in the struggle between the region's imperial rivals, but after a quarter century of nearly continuous warfare, burdening an entire generation, the Acadians welcomed another respite of peace, even under the rule of their former enemies.123 

Griffiths notes that the 1730s and early 1740s were as close to a golden age for the Acadians as a beleaguered people could expect.  A long frontier war was over.  No imperial conflict in Europe with the potential to spread to North America erupted during the period.  And the annoying agitation over an unqualified oath seemed finally behind them.  The Acadian population had increased dramatically in the generation since Britain had gained control of the colony and would continue to do so for another generation, almost entirely by natural increase; one estimate for 1737 places 1,406 of them at Annapolis Royal, 1,623 at Pigiguit, 2,113 in the rest of the Minas Basin, and 1,816 at Chignecto, a total of 6,958--nearly three times as many as had been counted in 1714.  The progenitors of the oldest and largest families, their wives, and children, had appeared in the early French censuses of 1671 and 1686, and most of them were gone now.  By the "golden age," some of these families could boast a presence in the colony of nearly a century, with members living in every Fundy community, as well as on the Atlantic shore, along the North Shore, in the French Maritimes, and even in distant Canada.  Their children tended to marry into other established families, spinning a dense web of familial connections that strengthened the perception of cultural unity.265a 

But one could make a case that Acadian cultural unity had become elusive, if not illusion, by its "golden age."  A subtle fracturing began early in the culture's development.  Acadians moved from Port-Royal to other communities as early as 1672, primarily because of the shortage of dykable marshes on Rivière-au-Dauphin, but also to escape the prying eyes of French officials.  Nevertheless, Chignecto, Minas, Pigiguit, Cobeguit, even the trois-rivières, emerged as thriving communities where Acadians built more aboiteaux to tame the raging tides.  The subtle socioeconomic differences that had developed among the Fundy settlements beginning in the 1680s was, by the 1730s, overshadowed by an even more pronounced contrast between the Acadians still living along the Fundy marshes and their cousins who had left the bay entirely.  Beginning in the mid-1710s, French officials in their new Maritimes colony of Île Royale, headquartered at Louisbourg, did their best to lure Acadian farmers from British Nova Scotia to the new French province.  The Fundy Acadians would provide an agricultural base for Louisbourg, which the French intended to transform into a stone-walled fortress, and for the island's fisheries, its chief economic pursuit.  Despite the spectre of British rule over their Fundy settlements, few Acadians responded, at first, to the temptation of living in French territory.  Not even their priests could coax many into going.  Acadians preferred to trade illicitly with Louisbourg rather than move their families to a rocky, wooded island where weak tides prevented construction of more aboiteaux.  In the 1720s and 1730s, however, more and more Fundy Acadians, determined to escape British rule, packed up and moved to Île Royale and took up farming and fishing there.  Beginning in the 1720s, following the lead of Michel Haché dit Gallant of Chignecto, Acadians began to settle on Île St.-Jean, the other island in the Maritimes colony.  From Port-La-Joye on the island's south coast, they moved up the valley of what the French called Rivière-du-Nord-Est and joined French fishermen on the island's north coast at Havre-St.-Pierre. 

Here, by the time of their "golden age," was more than just a political dichotomy--British control on the peninsula, French control on the islands.  Here also was more than an economic divergence--reliance on aboiteaux along the Fundy shore, upland farming combined with fishing on the islands.  Acadian migration, like the struggle over neutrality, was alienating Acadians from one another, even within their own families.  In contrast to the earth-shattering temblors of their Grand Dérangement, only half a generation away, this familial splintering between bay and islands was a much more subtle thing.  Still, there was pain and suffering in it, and most Acadian families were touched by this fracturing of their culture.  How shocking it must have been to see loved ones pack up and move away, perhaps never to return to their ancestral village.  One can imagine the aging patriarch of the "golden age" about to breathe his last, lifting his head up to see his children and grandchildren, nieces and nephews, crowded around his deathbed.  But many are gone now, sadly unaware of their loved one's passing.  Here was a not-so-golden side of this short, peaceful period in the history of the Acadians--just one example of the cultural transformations burdening these people.

These transformations could have been detected not only in the collective experience of Acadian communities, but also in the individual stories within established families who by the "golden age" made up the great majority of the Acadian population.  Here, in the microcosm of their family genealogies, one can detect not only geographical fluidity, but also socioeconomic and political distinctions, masked, sometimes, by the complexities of their extended-family networks.02

The Families of Greater Acadia:  Economic, Social, and Political Elite 

Among the established families of greater Acadia were the colony's economic and political elite, some among the oldest, others among the newest, peninsula Acadians.  After the loss of the colony to Britain in the early 1710s, many of these elites moved on to the French Maritimes, where they continued their service to imperial France.  Others remained on their Acadian seigneuries, which the British tolerated until Le Grand Dérangement:02a 

De Saint-Étienne de La Tour 

The First Family of Acadia was still in the colony during the "golden age," but barely.  No longer as influential as it had been when its progenitor, Charles de Saint-Étienne, sieur de La Tour, was governor of French Acadia the century before, the family still clung to its seigneuries despite attempts by the British to wrest them away.  Charles La Tour's first wife, the Mi'kmaq woman whose name has been lost to history, gave him three daughters, two of whom became nuns in France, but his oldest daughter Jeanne remained in the colony and married Martin d'Aprendestiguy of Ascain, Guyenne, in c1655.  In October 1672, the intendant of New France awarded Martin and Jeanne a seigneurie at the mouth of Rivière St.-Jean once held by Jeanne's father.  A few years later, they received another seigneurie farther upriver at Jemseg.  Charles's second wife, the heroic Françoise-Marie, daughter of gentleman physician Jacques Jacquelin and Hélène Lerminier, gave him a son whose name has been lost to history.  The boy died young.  Charles's third wife, Jeanne, daughter of Louis Motin de Reux and Marie de Salims and widow of former governor Charles de Menou d'Aulnay de Charnizay, gave Charles five children, two sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Le Borgne de Bélisle, Mius de Pleinmarais, Villate, and Mius d'Entremont de Pobomcoup families, three of them also members of the colony's seigneurial class.  Both of Charles's younger sons married.  His female descendants remained with their families at Annapolis Royal and Cap-Sable, but his male heirs moved on to Île Royale, where they served in the French army.  None of the governor's descendants who emigrated to Louisiana took the family's name there. 

The governor's oldest son, name unrecorded, by second wife Françoise-Marie Jacquelin, born at Fort La Tour on Rivière St.-Jean, died young. 

The governor's second son Jacques, by third wife Jeanne Motin, born in Acadia in c1655, styled himself de La Tour. He married Anne, daughter of Charles Melanson dit La Ramée and Marie Dugas, probably at Port-Royal in c1685, and died after 1698, but not before Anne gave him seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the David dit Pontif, Rousseau de Souvigny, Bradstreet, Campbell, and Porlier families. 

Older sons Jean, born in Acadian in c1693, and François, born in c1695, died young. 

Jacques's third and youngest son Charles, who would have been called Charles le jeune to distinguish him from his paternal uncle by the same name, born in Acadian in c1696, married twice, each time at Louisbourg, Île Royale, first to Marie-Anne, daughter of Antoine Perré and Marie-Anne Pons, in September 1727, and then to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Richard and Marguerite Landry and widow of Joseph Dugas, in January 1736.  Charles le jeune died at Louisbourg by September 1746, in his late 40s, two years before the siege there.  The Acadian La Tours are descended from Charles le jeune The last remaining La Tour in British Nova Scotia, however, was his older sister Marie-Agathe, called Agathe, who was "allegedly the sole heiress" of her grandfather Charles.  Agathe, born at Cap-Sable in 1690, married two British officers stationed at Annapolis Royal.  She was only nine years old when her father died, so she was raised by her mother.  She married her first husband, Edmund Bradstreet, at age 22, but he died four years later, leaving her with a son, Jean-Baptiste, called John, Bradstreet.  She remarried to her second husband, Hugh Campbell, in c1724, but he died a few years later, leaving her a widow again.  Despite her young age, she did not take a third husband.  In 1729, Nova Scotia Governor Richard Philipps, seeking to annul former French seigneurial grants in the colony so that the land could be given to New English Protestants, ordered a survey of the properties in question.  Agathe, seeing an opportunity, asserted her rights to the seigneuries of her grandfather so that she could sell the land to the British on her own and secure her wealth.  She produced a copy of the decree, dated 20 March 1703, which her uncle, Charles, fils, had secured for the family from Louis XIV's Council of State, granting the La Tours "a fifth of the Cape Sable fief and two of the seven parts making up the seigneuries of Port-Royal and Les Mines...."  Though Agathe owned "only a quarter of what had fallen to her family...," she nevertheless had asserted through her second husband in June 1725 that "she had laid claim to all of her ancestor's seigneuries, alleging that her brother and sisters, as well as her uncles and aunts, had given their shares over to her when Acadia had become English territory."  In 1730, Philipps complained of the widow's efforts to assert her rights, which he refused to honor.  Agathe refused to give in.  She went to London, petitioned the Board of Trade and Plantations, and, in October 1733, won a substantial settlement in her favor and the right "to collect her own rents."  The following March, the Board "recommended that she be paid L2,000 for the purchase of all her seigneurial rights."  The widow, who, like other members of her family, obviously had inherited some of the finer qualities of her famous grandfather, had beaten the governor.  The Board of Trade warned Philipps that "the purchase of the La Tour lands was crucial if the government was to be able to grant any land in Nova Scotia, and the secretary of the Board, Popple, pointing out the widow's precarious state of health, urged an immediate purchase, which occurred a few years later.  "With the purchase of Mrs Campbell's rights, the seigneurial system came to an end in Nova Scotia, although other members of the La Tour family later demanded recognition of their inheritance rights" as well.  Agathe returned to Nova Scotia to secure her payment and then returned to Britain, where she settled at Kilkenny, Ireland, by 1737.

The governor's third and youngest son Charles, fils, by third wife Jeanne Motin, born in Acadian in March 1663, evidently was a fur trader, like his father, during his youth, working out of Cap-Sable.  According to a biographer, Charles, fils "incurred severe losses when General Phips took Acadia in 1690" during King Williams' War "and lodged a complaint with the Earl of Bellomont, governor of Massachusetts."  But, being his father's son, Charles, fils did more than complain about English depredations.  In late 1695, the war still on, he "was cited in dispatches by [Governor-General] Frontenac ... for bravery against the enemy."  After the war, which ended in 1697, Charles, fils resumed his trading activities.  In c1698, he was "fined for trading with the English."  Determined to protect his family's interests in the colony, in 1699 and 1700, he was empowered by an aunt and his siblings to go to Paris to secure their claims against the Le Borgnes, who, ironically, were their in-laws.  Charles, fils "was largely successful in his efforts, as is shown by an arrêt of the Consul d'État of 20 March 1703," which "gave the La Tour family land at Cape Sable, Port La Tour (near Cape Sable), Port-Royal, and Le Mines ..., " all of which "was divided among the La Tour children."  Charles, fils married Jeanne-Angélique, called Angélique, Loreau of Paris in c1700, during his visit to France.  He took his wife back to Acadia, where she gave him two sons.  In 1703, at age 40, he was appointed an ensign probably in the colonial troupes de la marine and began a successful military career.  He was seriously wounded at the fall of Port-Royal in October 1710.  By 1714, he had taken his wife and sons to the new French colony of Île Royale, where he continued his military career at Louisbourg as a lieutenant.  He received the Cross of St.-Louis in May 1728 "in consideration of his wounds" and was promoted to captain in March 1730.  He died at Louisbourg in August 1731, age 68.   

Older and younger sons Jean-Charles, born at Boston in March 1715, and Pierre-Charles, born probably at Louisbourg after 1719, survived childhood, but neither married.351

Denys

Brothers Simon and Nicolas, sons of Jacques Denys and Marie Cosnier, of Tours, France, came to French Acadia with Isaac de Razilly.  Simon was married with children, and Nicolas still a bachelor, when they arrived at La Hève in 1632.  Razilly, representing Cardinal Richelieu's Company of New France, awarded the brothers a fishing concession at Port Rossignol and a timber concession at La Hève.  After Razilly's death in 1636, during the power struggle between Charles d'Aulnay and Charles La Tour, the brothers attempted to maintain a neutral position, but d'Aulnay would have none of it.  Victims of d'Aulnay's efforts to seize complete control of the colony, the brothers retreated to France in the late 1630s and did not return to Acadia until the mid-1640s.  By then, Nicolas was no longer a bachelor.  When they returned to New France, the brothers eschewed peninsula Acadia and established a seigneurie at Île Miscou at the entrance to the Baie des Chaleurs, which d'Aulnay seized and burned in 1647.  After d'Aulnay's death in 1650, the Denyss reasserted their claims at Court and established seigneuries at forts Ste.-Anne and St.-Pierre on Cape Breton Island.  However, d'Aulnay's chief creditor, merchant Emmanuel Le Borgne of La Rochelle, siezed the island forts and took the brothers to Québec as prisoners.  Simon, weary of the conflicts, remained in Canada.  Nicolas, however, refused to give up.  He pleaded his case to the Court in France and won back his concessions, which he retained and even expanded.  He built a fort at Nepisiguit west of Île Miscou, and rebuilit his fort on Cape Breton Island.  But Le Borgne struck again, seizing both concessions in 1653 and holding Nicolas in the dungeon at Port-Royal.  After returning to France yet again to plea his case at Court, Nicolas established a new seigneurie at Chédabouctou near Canso and returned to Nepisiguit, where, except for frequent trips to France, he lived out his days.  Only Charles La Tour contributed more to the early history of French Acadia than the indefatigible Nicolas Denys.  None of the brothers' descendants who emigrated to Louisiana took the family's name there. 

Older brother Simon de La Trinité, born at St.-Pierre de Boyle, France, in January 1600, married Jeanne Dubreuil at St.-Vincent de Tours in May 1628, before going to Acadia.  She gave him seven children, three sons, three daughters, and an unidentified infant, all born at St.-Vincent de Tours.  One of their daughters, Anne, married into the Chartier de La Broquerie in Touraine, France.  Only one of Simon and Jeanne's sons created a family of his own.  Simon remarried to Françoise, daughter of Jean Dutertre, chief de la fruiterie dur roi, and Françoise Chotard, at St.-Vincent de Tours in June 1643, during his sojourn in France following his retreat from the chaos in Acadia.  Françoise gave him 16 more children, seven sons and nine daughters, the older ones at St.-Vincent de Tours, the younger ones in Canada.  Simon's branch of the Denys family was by far the larger one.  Five of his daughters married into the Cailleteau de Champfleury, Le Neuf de La Vallière, Cressé, Pécody de Contrecoeur, de Gannes de Falaise, Dupas de Braché, Boucher de Boucherville, Outlan or Outlaw, and Chartrain families in Canada and France.  Three of Simon and Françoise's daughters became nuns.  Three of Simon and Françoise's sons created families of their own, none in Acadia, and one of their sons became a deacon.  Simon de La Trinité died at St.-Barthélemy, La Rochelle, in November 1678, age 78. 

Oldest son Pierre de La Ronde, by first wife Jeanne Dubreuil, born at St.-Vincent de Tours in October 1630, married Catherine, daughter of Jacques Le Neuf de La Poterie and Marguerite Le Gardeur and sister of Acadian governor Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière et de Beaubassin, at Québec in August 1655.  Catherine gave Pierre a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters, at Trois-Rivières and Québec.  Six of their daughters married into the Tarieu de La Nouguère, Fleury Deschambault, Aubert de Chesnaye, Bouthier, d'Ailleboust, and de Ramesay families  Only two of Pierre de La Ronde's sons created families of their own, and one became a Récollet priest. 

Oldest son Jacques, born at Trois-Rivières in November 1657, was ordained in the Récollet order in June 1682 and, in the late 1720s, served as grand vicar of the order on Île Royale.  He died at Québec in January 1736, age 79. 

Pierre de La Ronde's second son Simon-Pierre, sieur de Bonaventure, born at Trois-Rivières in June 1659, became a naval officer, rising to the rank of capitaine de frégate.  In the 1680s, he fathered two sons, Jean and Pierre, by a woman whose name has been lost to history.  Simon-Pierre married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Jannier or Jannière and Jeanne Émangeard and widow of Jean-François Bourdon de Dombourg, at St.-Saveur, La Rochelle, in February 1693.  She gave him three more children, all sons.  Simon-Pierre remarried to Louise, daughter of Simon Guyon and Louise Racine and widow of Charles Thibault and Mathieu D'Amours de Freneuse, in c1702.  She gave him another son, Antoine, his sixth.  In 1705-06, Simon-François served as King's lieutenant in Acadia, second only in rank to governor.  Two of his sons by wife Jeanne created families of their own.  

Oldest son Pierre-Louis by wife Jeanne Jannier survived childhood but did not marry. 

Simon-Pierre's second son Simon-Philippe de Bonaventure by wife Jeanne Jannier, born at St.-Sauveur, La Rochelle, in September 1696, married Élisabeth, daughter of Edmé de Godé de Saint Germain and Élisabeth Boulomé, at St.-Jean, La Rochelle, in February 1728.  Simon-Philippe died by August 1733. 

Simon-Pierre's third and youngest son Claude-Élisabeth by wife Jeanne Jannier, born at St.-Sauveur, La Rochelle, in June 1701, married cousin Louise-Marguerite, daughter of Louis Denys de La Ronde and Marie-Louise Chartier de Lotbinière, Québec in November 1748.  He served as commandant of Île St.-Jean from 1749 to 1754.  He died at Rochefort, France, in May 1760, age 58. 

Pierre de La Ronde's third son Nicholas, born at Québec in March 1668, died an infant. 

Pierre de La Ronde's fourth son Pierre, a twin of sister Marie-Louise, born at Québec in January 1671, also died an infant. 

Pierre de La Ronde's fifth and youngest son Louis de La Ronde, born at Québec in August 1675, became a distinguished naval officer, serving in Louisiana, greater Acadia, and on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean.  He married Marie-Louise, daughter of René-Louis Chartier de Lotbinière and Marie-Madeleine Lambert, at Québec in July 1709.  She gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughtres married into the Denys de Bonaventure and Audet de Piercot de Bailleul families.  Three of his sons created families of their own.  Louis de La Ronde died at Hôtel-Dieu, Québec, in March 1741, age 66. 

Oldest son Louis-Philippe de La Ronde, born on Île Royale in c1714, married Louise-Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Gaillard and Louise de Jordy de Cabanac, at Québec in January 1753. 

Louis de La Ronde's second son Charles, born at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1718, survived childhood but did not marry. 

Louis de La Ronde's third son Pierre-François-de-Paul, born at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in July 1722, married Marguerite-Susanne, daughter of Alexandre Celles dit Duclos and Marguerite Perrot, at Montréal in July 1749. 

Louis de La Ronde's fourth and youngest son Pierre de La Ronde, born at Québec in November 1726, married Madeleine-Marguerite, daughter of Ignace-François Broutin and Marie-Madeleine Lemarie and widow of Louis-Xavier Martin de Lino de Chalmette, in c1757.  Pierre de La Ronde died at New Orleans, Spanish Louisiana, in May 1772, age 45. 

Simon's second son Charles de Vitré, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at St.-Vincent de Tours in March 1645, married Catherine, daughter of Charles de Lostelneau and Charlotte de Budéfroy, at Québec in October 1668.   In 1697, the governor-general of New France awarded Charles de Vitré a seigneurie at Antigonish on Acadia's north coast.  Charles remarried to Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Jean Chrétien and Geneviève La Chasseur, at L'Ancienne-Lorette, Canada, in March 1700.  He died at Québec in January 1703, age 58.  

Simon's third son Paul de Saint-Simon, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at St.-Sauveur, Paris, in June 1649, married Louise-Madeleine, daughter of Jean de Pieras and Denise Marion, at Québec in January 1678.  He died at Québec in October 1731, age 82. 

Simon's fourth son Simon-Pierre, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at Québec in February 1674, survived childhood but did not marry. 

Simon's fifth son Claude, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at Québec in October 1657, became a deacon and died at Hôtel-Dieu, Québec, in June 1724, age 66. 

Simon's sixth son Pierre Du Tartre, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at Québec in April 1660, married Geneviève, daughter of Louis Couillard and Geneviève Desprès, at Québec in September 1686.  He was burned to death by the Iroquois at Rivière-du-Loup, Canada, in July 1687, age 27. 

Simon's seventh son Jacques de La Broquerie, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at Québec in August 1664, became an ensign of troupes de la marine in 1691 and died at Pemiquid, present-day Maine, in 1692, age 28, during King William's War.  

Simon's eighth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste de La Bruère, by second wife Françoise Dutertre, born at Québec in July 1669, was killed near Laprairie, Canada, in October 1691, age 22, during King's William's War, before he could marry.

Younger brother Nicolas de La Ronde, born in St.-Saturnin Parish, Tours, France, in June 1603, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre de Lafitte, merchant of Bordeaux, and Béatrix Cabèce, at Notre-Dame, La Rochelle, France, in October 1642.  Marguerite gave Nicolas seven children, five sons and two daughters, at La Rochelle.  Older daughter Marie married into the Le Neuf de La Vallière.  Only one of Nicolas's sons created his own family.  Nicolas's line of the family, in fact, was much smaller than that of older brother Simon and did not survive beyond the early 1730s. 

Oldest son Nicolas, fils, born in St.-Barthélemy Parish, La Rochelle, in September 1644, probably died in childhood. 

Nicolas's second son Jacques, born in St.-Barthélemy Parish, La Rochelle, in September 1646, probably died in childhood.   

Nicolas's third son Richard de Fronsac, born in St.-Barthélemy Parish, La Rochelle, in August 1647, married Anne Patarabego, probably a Mi'kmaq, in c1680, settled on his father's seigneurie at Nepisiguit and then established a seigneurie of his own at Miramichi, down the coast, where he built a stone manor house.  Anne gave him two children, a son and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Merçan dit Lapierre family.  Their son created a family of his own.  Richard remarried to cousin Françoise, daughter of Jacques Cailleteau and Françoise Denys, at Québec in October 1689.  She gave him another son, who survived childhood but died before he could marry.  Richard de Fronsac drowned at sea in 1691, age 44, during King William's War. 

Older son Nicolas dit Fronsac by first wife Anne Patarabego, born probably at Miramichi in c1682, married Marie, probably a Mi'kmaq like his mother, in c1701.  She gave him four children, three sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Masson family.  None of their sons married.  Strangely, all three of them--François dit Fronsac, born in c1708; Gabriel dit Fronsac in c1716; and Jacques dit Fronsac in c1717--died at Beaumont, near Québec, in January, December and February 1732, respectively, in their early 20s and mid-teens, ending their grandfather's family line. 

Richard de Fronsac's younger son Antoine by wife Françoise Cailleteau, born in greater Acadia in October 1690, was killed in combat aboard the ship La Valeur in c1710, age 20, during Queen Anne's War. 

Nicolas's fourth son Charles, born in St.-Barthélemy Parish, La Rochelle, in September 1648, probably died young. 

Nicolas's fifth and youngest son Jacques, born in St.-Barthélemy Parish, La Rochelle, in December 1650, also probably died young.23

Mius d'Entremont

Former French army captain Philippe Mius d'Entremont, loyal associate of Governor Charles La Tour and seigneur and baron of Pobomcoup, and his wife Madeleine Hélie Du Tillet, early 1650s arrivals, created an important family that retained its seigneurial holdings in the colony until Le Grand Dérangement.   Madeleine gave Philippe five children, three sons and two daughters.  Their older daughter married into the Melanson dit Laverdure family.  All of their sons married.  Most of Philippe and Madeleine's descendants settled not only on the family's seigneurie at Pobomcoup, near Cap-Sable, but also at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Pentagouët, Mouscoudabouet, in the French Maritimes, and in France (before Le Grand Dérangement).  At least three of the captain's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but the great majority of Philippe's descendants could be found in greater Acadia and Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Jacques, who became sieur and baron de Pobomcoup, born in France or at Pobomcoup in c1654, married Anne, daughter of former governor Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour and his third wife Jeanne Motin de Reux, widow of former governor Charles d'Aulnay, in c1678.  As his name implies, Jacques inherited his father's seigneurie.  Jacques died between July 1735 and June 1736, in his early 80s.  Anne gave him nine children, four sons and five daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Dupont Duvivier and Dupont Duchambon, Landry, La Boulais de Saillans, Pastour de Costebelle, Navailles de Labatut, and Lafitte families, two of them settling on Île Royale and France (before Le Grand Dérangement).  All four of Jacques's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jacques, fils, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1679, married, age 44, Marguerite, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in September 1723. 

Jacques de Pobomcoup's second son Philippe, born probably at Pobomcoup in the 1680s, married Thérèse, daughter of Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, third baron of Saint-Castin, and Marie Pidiwammiskwa, at Pentagouët, Maine, in December 1707, but shortly after their marriage resettled at Béarn in the Pyrénées of southern France.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

Jacques de Pobomcoup's third son Charles, born probably at Pobomcoup in the 1680s, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Landry and Madeleine Robichaud, at Annapolis Royal in September 1712, and settled there and at Pobomcoup.  Marguerite gave Charles six children, three sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Couange, Dupont Duchambon, and Boudrot families.  Two of their sons married. 

Oldest son Charles, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in July 1716, married double cousin Marie-Josèphe, daughter of René Landry and Marie-Josèphe Mius de Pleinmarais, at Annapolis Royal in July 1747. 

Charles, père's second son Joseph le jeune, born in Nova Scotia in c1725, married cousin Anne, daughter of François Landry and Marie Belliveau, at Cherbourg, France, in February 1764, during Le Grand Dérangement.  Charles, père's third and youngest son Pierre died at Cherbourg, France, in July 1778, age 47, during Le Grand Dérangement; he did not marry. 

Jacques de Pobomcoup's fourth and youngest son Joseph l'aîné, born at Cap-Sable in c1688, married Cécile, daughter of Abraham Boudrot and Cécile Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in October 1717, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, in c1739. 

Philippe's second son Abraham, who became sieur de Pleinmarais, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1658, married Marguerite, another daughter of Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour and Jeanne Motin de Reux, in c1676, and settled at Cap-Sable.  He died by September 1704, in his late 40s.  Marguerite gave him nine children, three sons and six daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Crépeau, Channiteau, and Landry families.  Only second son Abraham, fils survived childhood, but he did not marry, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Philippe's third and youngest son Philippe, fils, who used the surname Mius d'Azy, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1660, married in c1678 to a Mi'kmaq woman whose name has been lost to history, remarried to another Mi'kmaq woman, Marie, in c1687, and settled on the Atlantic coast at Cap-Sable, Mouscoudabouet, and La Hève.  Philippe, fils's first wife gave him five children, three sons and two daughters.  His second wife Marie gave him nine more children, five sons and four daughters.  His daughters by both wives married into the Viger, Bonnevie dit Beaumont, Thomas, Guédry, Grand-Claude, and Cellier dit Charêt families.  Seven of Philippe, fils's eight sons by both wives created families of their own. 

Oldest son Joseph Mius d'Azy, by his father's first wife, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1679, married Marie, daughter of François Amireau dit Touragneau and Marie Pitre, in c1699, and died in December 1729, age 50.  They settled at Cap-Sable.  Marie gave Joseph 13 children, five sons and eight daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Grosvalet, Raymond, Hébert, Henry, Surette, Delage dit Langlois, Doucet, Guérin, and Lejeune families.  Some of them followed their husbands to Île St.-Jean.  All five of Joseph's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born at Cap-Sable in June 1700, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Préjean and Andrée Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in September 1726. 

Joseph Mius d'Azy's second son Charles dit Charles-Amand, born at Cap-Sable in December 1701, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Antoine Hébert and Jeanne Corporon, at Annapolis Royal in January 1731. 

Joseph Mius d'Azy's third son François, born at Cap-Sable in March 1703, married Jeanne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Duon and Agnès Hébert, at Annapolis Royal in February 1735. 

Joseph Mius d'Azy's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1713, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Surette and Jeanne Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in October 1735. 

Joseph Mius d'Azy's fifth and youngest son Charles-Benjamin, born at Cap-Sable in April 1728, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Augustin Guédry and Jeanne Hébert and widow of Amand Breau, in c1749, and settled in the French Maritimes.   

Philippe, fils's second son Maurice, by his father's first wife, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1680, married Marguerite, an Indian woman like his mother, in c1702, and settled at Mouscoudabouet, where she gave him two children, both daughters, whose fate has been lost to history.   

Philippe, fils's third son Mathieu, by his father's first wife, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1682, married Marie-Madeleine, an Indian woman, in c1706, and settled at Cap-Sable, where she gave him two children, a son and a daughter, whose fate also has been lost to history.  

Philippe, fils's fourth son Jacques, by second wife Marie, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1688, married in c1715 to a woman whose name has been lost to history. 

Philippe, fils's fifth Pierre dit Dasy, by second wife Marie, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1691, married Marguerite Lapierre in c1718.   

Philippe, fils's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie, born probably at Pobomcoup in the 1690s, married a woman named Marie in c1720. 

Philippe, fils's seventh son François, by second wife Marie, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1697, married a woman named Marie in c1726.  

Philippe, fils's eighth and youngest son Philippe III, by second wife Marie, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1703, probably died young.361

Le Borgne de Bélisle

Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, former governor of French Acadia and seigneur of Port-Royal, a late 1750s arrival, and his wife Marie de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, daughter of a former governor, created a small but significant family in the colony--as close to Acadian aristocracy, in fact, as the colony offered.  Between 1676 and 1690, Marie gave Alexandre seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Girouard dit de Ru, D'Amours de Plaine, Rodrigue dit de Fonds, and Duperié families.  Two of the seigneur's three sons married, but only one created a lasting family line.  Alexandre and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also in the French Maritimes, at Pentagouët in Maine, and at Minas.  At least two of the governor's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the late 1760s, but they did not create a lasting family line there.  The majority of the governor's descendants who did not return to France were living in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement.

Oldest son Emmanuel de Bélisle, born at Port-Royal in c1676, married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot, at Port-Royal in c1698.  Cécile gave Emmanuel only one child, a daughter, Marie de Bélisle, who married into the aristocratic Bertrand family on Île Royale. 

Alexandre's second son Alexandre de Bélisle, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1679, married Anastasie, daughter of Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, third baron Saint-Castin, and Mathilde, his Abenaki wife, at Pentagouët, present-day Maine, in December 1707 and settled Minas.  Between 1708 and the 1730s, Anastasie gave Alexandre, fils seven children, a son and six daughters.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, Anastasie gave Alexandre, fils a second son in c1710, but Stephen A. White disagrees.  Three of Alexandre, fils's daughters married into the Rondeau, Dupont Duvivier, and Robichaud families.  Alexandre, fils's sons, including the putative one, created families of their own.  

Older son Alexandre de Bélisle III, born at Port-Royal in c1708, married Marie, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, at Grand-Pré in January 1731, and died there in August 1744, age 36.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1744, Marie gave Alexandre III nine children, six sons and three daughters, at Minas.  Members of the family may have escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Marie and at least one of her sons, however, were deported to Maryland in 1755.  Two of her sons created their own families, one in Canada, the other in Louisiana.

Third son Alexandre IV, born at Minas in c1736, may have escaped the British in 1755, made his way to Canada, and married Geneviève, daughter of Guillaume Cloutier and Marie-Françoise-Élisabeth Bernier, at L'Islet, on the lower St. Lawrence, in April 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, Geneviève gave Alexandre IV at least two sons, Antoine-Alexandre in 1774 and Anselme le jeune in 1776.  The younger son created his own family. 

Anselme le jeune married Geneviève Gamache probably at L'Islet in c1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1801 and 1820, Geneviève gave Anselme le jeune at least four children, a son and three daughters.  Anselme le jeune moved his family down the St. Lawrence to Rivière Ouelle in 1807 and even farther down to L'Île-Verte in 1814. 

Alexandre III's fourth son Anselme, born at Minas in c1738, accompanied his widowed mother to Maryland in 1755.  He married Anne, daughter of Paul Babin and Marie LeBlanc of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, In Maryland in the late 1750s or the early 1760s.  Colonial officials counted the childless couple with his widowed mother and two siblings at Annapolis, Maryland, in July 1763.  Anne gave Anselme a son, Paul, probably at Annapolis in October 1766.  The following year, they emigrated to Louisiana and settled at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Anselme remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Dupuis and Élisabeth LeBlanc of Grand-Pré, probably at Ascension, now Donaldsonville, on the Mississippi above New Orleans in the late 1760s or early 1770s.  Between 1772 and 1781, she gave him five more children, two more sons and three daughters.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anselme owned three slaves at Assumption on the upper bayou in 1798.  He died in Assumption Parish in February 1817, age 80.  Two of his daughters married into the Landry family.  His three sons survived childhood, but only one of them married, twice, his second time into the Duhon family, but he evidently had no children by either of his wives.  As a result, only the blood of this aristocratic Acadian family survived in the Bayou State.

Alexandre, fils's putative younger son Jacques married Marie-Anne Maurice probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Anne gave Jacques a son. 

Jacques, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1731, married Cécile, daughter of Claude Doucet and Marie Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, Cécile gave Jacques, fils a son, Jacques III, at Annapolis Royal in c1754.  One wonders where Le Grand Dérangment took Jacques, fils and his family after 1755. 

Alexandre, père's third and youngest son Charles, born at Port-Royal in c1685, survived childhood but did not marry.367

D'Abbadie de Saint-Castin

Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, French army officier, capitaine de sauvages, third Baron de Saint-Castin, a 1670 arrival, and his two wives, Marie-Mathilde and Marie Pidiwammiskwa, daughters of a Penobscot sagamore, created a small but significant family in the colony.  First wife Mathilde gave Jean-Vincent 10 children, five sons and five daughters.  Second wife Marie, who he evidently married before her sister died, gave him two more children, both daughters.  Six of his daughters by both wives married into the Meunier, Meneux dit Châteauneuf, Le Borgne de Bélisle, D'Amours de Chauffours, and Mius d'Entremont families. Three of his sons, all by his first wife, married.  Jean-Vincent's descendants settled in Acadia not only at Pentagouët in Maine, but also at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Minas.  However, only the blood of this noble family seems to have survived in British Nova Scotia.  If any of the baron's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, they did not take the family's name there. 

Oldest son Bernard, by first wife Mathilde, born probably at Pentagouët in c1688, was a student at the Petit Séminaire in Québec in October 1696 during King William's War.  He died in November 1704, age 16, while traveling in France. 

Jean-Vincent's second son Bernard-Anselme, by first wife Mathilde, born at Pentagouët in c1689, was, like several of his brothers, educated at the Petit Séminaire in Québec.  In May 1707, when he was still a teenager, Bernard-Anselme, now his father's oldest surviving son, was appointed by Governor Subercase as head of the Abenaki contingent in the defense of Port-Royal, which a New English force attacked in May and August.  In both actions, Bernard-Anselme and his fellow Abenaki performed brilliantly, and Bernard-Anselme was wounded in the August encounter.  At age 18, he married Marie-Charlotte, called Charlotte, 12-year-old daughter of Louis D'Amours de Chauffours and Marguerite Guyon of Rivière St.-Jean and the niece of one of his sisters, at Port-Royal in October 1707.  Charlotte gave him three children, all daughters.  Like his father, Bernard-Anselme served as a capitaine de sauvages.  Also like his father, his actual rank was lieutenant, granted to him by the French Court in June 1708.  Bernard-Anselme became fourth baron de Saint-Castin after his father's death at Pau, Béarn, France, the year of his marriage.  Unlike his father, Bernard-Anselme did not serve as a sagamore of the Penobscot.  After his marriage, he maintained a home at Port-Royal as well as a trading post at Pentagouët.  In c1709, he purchased a ship and turned to privateering.  After the fall of Port-Royal in October 1710, Governor-General Vaudreuil made him commander of French and Indian forces in greater Acadia, with headquarters at Pentagouët.  Bernard-Anselme and his Abenaki kinsmen helped defeat a small force of British marines at Bloody Creek on haute rivière, above his former home at Port-Royal, in June 1711.  In 1713, after the Peace of Utrecht was signed, Bernard-Anselme, with the assistance of younger brother Joseph, led the Abenaki in guerrilla warfare against the New English from a new base at the falls of the Penobscot.  He took his family to France at the end of 1714 to pursue the family business that had ruined his father.  It tormented him as well.  Nevertheless, on 28 April 1717, he was seated in the nobles' section of the Béarn assembly, representing the estate of Saint-Castin.  He died in Béarn in early autumn of 1720, age 31.  Two of his daughters married into the de Bourbon and de Sarthopon families in Béarn, so the blood, at least, of this family line survived, but not in British Nova Scotia.

Jean-Vincent's third son Jean-Pierre, by first wife Mathilde, born probably at Pentagouët in c1692, also was educated at the Petit Séminaire in Québec, where he was praised by his superiors.  He died in Québec in December 1702, age 11 or 12.

Jean-Vincent's fourth son Joseph, by first wife Mathilde, born probably at Pentagouët in the 1690s, succeeded his older brother Bernard-Anselme as fifth baron de Saint-Castin in 1720.  Unlike his father and brother, however, Joseph did not go to France to claim his family inheritance.  Evidently he considered himself more an Abenaki than a Frenchman, and the nation rewarded him with the rank of chief.  At the end of Queen Anne's War, the Abenaki refused to acknowledge the provisions of the Peace of Utrecht, so, after 1713, Joseph, along with older brother Bernard-Anselme and their fellow Abenaki, conducted guerrilla warfare against the New English in Maine.  Governor-General Vaudreuil quietly sanctioned Joseph's actions.  In 1720, the governor-general transferred to Joseph the lieutenant's pay that had gone to Bernard-Anselme.  The following year, the British captured Joseph by treachery and held him a prisoner at Boston from November 1721 until May 1722, when they released him in hopes that he would turn the Abenaki to the British, but he clung even tighter to the French.  Joseph became a French officer in 1726 and strove for the rest of life to maintain Abenaki friendship with the French in Canada.  Joseph married after 1728, place unrecorded, to a woman, most likely a fellow Indian, whose name has been lost to history, and died after March 1751, age and place unrecorded. 

Jean-Vincent's fifth and youngest son Barenos de Saint-Castin, by first wife Mathilde, born probably at Pentagouët in the 1690s or early 1700s, married in c1725, place unrecorded, to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and died in August 1746, age and place unrecorded, in a dispute with one of his nephews.  Judging by the date of his death, one wonders if Barenos, despite the circumstances of his passing, was a casualty of King George's War.411

Le Neuf de La Vallière et de Beaubassin

Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière of Trois-Rivières, Canada, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wives Marie Denys and Françoise Denys, the first a daughter of Nicolas Denys, the second of Nicolas's older brother Simon, created a large and influential family in the colony.  Although their claim to nobility did not approach that of the Saint-Castins, the progenitor of this family in Acadia was second only to Charles La Tour in his impact on the colony's history.  First wife Marie, a daughter of La Tour's contemporary, Nicolas Denys de La Ronde, gave Michel nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Michel's second wife Françoise, a daughter of Nicolas's older brother Simon Denys de La Trinité and his second wife Françoise Dutertre, and widow of Jacques Cailleteau de Champfleury, gave Michel no more children.  Michel and Marie's oldest children were born at Trois-Rivières, but their youngest, two daughters, were born at Beaubassin, Chignecto, where Michel had been granted a large seigneurie in October 1676, four years after the area had been settled by Acadians from Port-Royal.  Four of Michel's daughters, including the notorious Marie-Josèphe, married into the Le Gardeur de Saint-Pierre, Le Bassier de Villieu, de Ganne de Falaise, and Aubert de La Chesnaye de Forillon families, all members of the colonial aristocracy.  All of his sons survived childhood, but only the youngest created a family of his own.  If any of the governor's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, they did not take the family's name there. 

Oldest son Alexandre de Beaubassin, born at Trois-Rivières in June 1666, never married.  He became an ensign of troupes de la marine in 1690, a lieutenant in January 1694, a captain in May 1710, and was named a chevalier of the Order of St.-Louis in June 1712.  He died in the sinking of the ship Héros in September 1712, during the final months of Queen Anne's War, age 46. 

Michel's second son Jacques de La Poterie, born at Trois-Rivières in January 1670, also never married.  He, too, became an officer of troupes de la marine, becoming an ensign in 1691.  He died at Montréal in July 1792, age 22, from wounds suffered while fighting the Iroquois.

Michel's third son Jean-Baptite de Canceau, born at Trois-Rivières in October 1672, also remained a bachelor and became an officer of troupes de la marine.  He became an ensign in 1692, a lieutenant reformé in September 1694.  Leaving the army, he became a Récollet priest in 1700 and died at Québec in January 1702, age 29. 

Michel's fourth and youngest son Michel de La Vallière, fils, born at Trois-Rivières in October 1677, also became an officer of troupes de marine.  He was recorded as serving as an ensign in Canada in June 1706 and at Plaisance, Newfoundland, in July 1710.  He married Renée, daughter of François Bertrand, fils and Jeanne Giraudet, at Plaisance in 1710.  After the retrocession of Newfoundland to Britain in 1713, Michel, fils took his family to French-controlled Île Royale, where he served for the remainder of his long career.  He was promoted to lieutenant on Île Royale in March 1713.  In 1714, he assisted his first cousin Louis Denys de La Ronde in attempting to lure peninsula Acadians to the new French colony.  He was serving at Port-Toulouse on the island in c1715, became the port's assistant town major in July 1720, was promoted to captain in March 1723, named a chevalier of the Order of St.-Louis in June 1730, and was named town major of Louisbourg in April 1737.  Michel, fils died at Louisbourg in October 1740, age 63.  Renée gave him 15 childern, seven sons and eight daughters, the oldest born on Newfoundland, the others on Île Royale.  Five of their daughters married into the Maillet, Delort, Rousseau de Villejoin, La Butte Frerot, Martin de Lino, and Rousseau d'Orfontaine families, most of them members of the colonial aristocracy.  Only three of Michel, fils's seven sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Louis de La Vallière, born at Plaisance in c1711, married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Pierre Rousseau de Souvigny and Jeanne de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, a granddaugher of Charles La Tour, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in September 1739.  Louis died at Cayenne, French Guyane in South America, in May 1787, age 77.  

Michel, fils's second son, name unrecorded, born probably at Plainsance between 1711 and 1713, did not survive childhood. 

 Michel, fils's third son Philippe de Beaubassin, born at des Anges, Newfoundland in c1713, married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Miguel Daccarrette and his second Catherine de Gonillon, at Louisbourg in July 1743.  Philippe died on Île St.-Pierre, off the southern coast of Newfoundland, in June 1769, age 56. 

Michel, fils's fourth son, named unrecorded, born probably on Île Royale in the 1710s, may have survived childhood but did not marry.  

Michel, fils's fifth son Joseph-Alexandre de Boisneuf, born at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1719, married Marie, another daughter of Miguel Daccarrette and his second Catherine de Gonillon, at Louisbourg in August 1752.  Joseph-Alexandre died after July 1777, place unrecorded.  

Michel, fils's sixth son Jacques-Simon, a twin of sister Marie-Jeanne, born at Port-Toulouse in c1722, evidently died young.  

Michel, fils's  seventh and youngest son Charles-François, born at Port-Touluse in c1731, also did not create a family of his own.22

Serreau de Saint-Aubin

Jean Serreau de Saint-Aubin, seigneur of Passamaquoddy, and his wife Marguerite Boileau, late 1670s arrivals, created a small but significant family in the colony.  Marguerite gave the seigneur four children, two sons and two daughters, all born in Canada.  One of their daughters married into the Petitpas and Bergeron dit d'Amboise families.  Both sons married.  Jean, along with daughter Geneviève, wife of Jacques Petitpas, and her children were captured by New English raiders under Colonel Benjamin Church in the summer of 1692, during King William's War.  Jean was released a few months later, but Geneviève and her children languished for years at Boston before her father finally ransomed them for 30 livres in 1695.  Jean's descendants settled not only at Passamaquoddy, but also at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and on Rivière St.-Jean.  If any of the seigneur's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, they did not take the family's name there. 

Older son Pierre, born at Québec in June 1665, moved to Newfoundland, where he worked as a fisherman at Serau or Serro, Baraquet, Petite-Grave, and Petit-Plaisance.  He married Judith, daughter of Dutchman Pieter Van Winchel and Pieternelle Lievens, at Nantes, France, in February 1698, but was back at Plaisance in c1700, probably to oversee his fishing interests.  The names of his children remain unrecorded. 

Jean's younger son Charles, born probably at Québec in the late 1660s or early 1670s, married in c1690 to a Maliseet whose name has been lost to history and remained at Passamaquoddy.  His Indian wife gave Charles two children, both sons, Joseph and Jean-Baptiste, their fate unknown.398

D'Amours dit de Louvière

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours and his wife Marie Marsolet, who never lived in greater Acadia, nevertheless created an important family there, though only a few of them remained in the colony.  Marie gave Mathieu 15 children, 10 sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Charron, Céloron de Blainville, De Villedonné, and Testard de Montigny families, all in Canada.  Six of their sons married, two of them to sisters, but only one of them created a family in greater Acadia.  Beginning in the early 1680s, Mathieu and Marie's descendants settled on Rivière St.-Jean and at Port-Royal, and in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement, where they were especially numerous.  Needless to say, the few who settled in Acadia were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  At least seven of Mathieu, père's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785 and especially from Halifax in 1765, but the great majority of his descendants could be found in their native Canada after the Acadian Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Nicolas, born at Québec in April 1653, died 12 days after his birth.

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's second son Louis de Chauffours et de Jemseg, born at Québec in May 1655, married Marguerite, daughter of Simon Guyon and Louise Racine, at Québec in October 1686, remarried to Anne, daughter of Acadians Jean Comeau l'aîné and Françoise Hébert, at Port-Royal in January 1708, and died at Port-Royal the following May.  First wife Marguerite gave him three children, a son and two daughters.  Second wife Anne gave him no more children.  His daughters married into the Morpain and d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin families at Port-Royal.  His son evidently died young, so at least the blood of this family line survived in greater Acadia. 

Son Louis, by first wife Marguerite Guyon, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1698, was last counted with his family on the river in February 1707.  If he survived childhood, he did not marry. 

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's third son Mathieu de Freneuse, born at Québec in March 1657, married Louise, another daughter of Simon Guyon and Louise Racine and widow of Charles Thibault, at Québec in October 1686.  According to his biographer, Mathieu, fils "developed the best cultivated seigneury on the [St.-Jean] river...."   His brother Louis helped him construct a lumber mill on the river.  Mathieu de Freneuse "brought in settlers, erected a residence and barns, built up a herd of livestock and was soon raising crops."  In the early 1690s, while King William's War raged, Mathieu de Freneuse and his brothers clashed with Acadia's commander, Joseph Robinau de Villebon, who accused them and other local seigneurs of lacking respect for governmental authority and possessing an exaggerated sense of independence.  The irascible Villebon's criticism can be viewed in contrast to the actions of the D'Amours brothers in 1696.  A New English expedition under Colonel John Hathorne attacked Villebon's fort at Nashouat in late October of that year.  The D'Amourss--Louis held the rank of ensign--assisted in the fort's defense, and the New English forces suffered humiliating defeat.  "When Hathorne and his men withdrew" downriver, however, "they burned [Mathieu] Damours's home and killed his cattle.  Damours himself fell ill from exposure suffered during the attack" and died at the end of October; he was only 39 years old.  Louise gave Mathieu de Freneuse five children, all sons, three of whom created families of their own.  

Oldest son Joseph de Freneuse et de Courcelle, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1687, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Jean Léger de La Grange and Louise Fauvel, at La Rochelle, France, in February 1721, and died on Île Anticosti in the lower St.-Lawrence in February 1737, evidently from injuries suffered in the wreck of Le Renommée the previous November.  

Mathieu de Freneuse's second son Louis de Chaffours, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1689, married Ursuline, daughter of capitaine de sauvages Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, third baron of Saint-Castin, and his first wife Mathilde, in c1715, place unrecorded, and settled at Port-Royal and on Rivière St.-Jean, the only one of Mathieu de Freneuse's sons to remain in greater Acadia.  One of Louis de Chauffour's sons, or at least the son's widow and six of her Damours children--emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765. 

Jean-Baptiste, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean, settled on his grandfather's seigneurie along Rivière St.-Jean and used the family name D'Amours dit de Louvière. The last part of his name, interestingly, was a surname used by some of his cousins.  Jean-Baptiste dit de Louvière married Geneviève, daughter of Acadians Michel Bergeron dit de Nantes and his second wife Marie Dugas, probably on Rivière St.-Jean.  The British deported them to Massachusetts in the late 1750s.  In 1763, soon after the war with Britain ended, Jean-Baptiste took his family to Nova Scotia, where they were confined in the prison compound at Halifax with other Acadian refugees.  He died either at Halifax or on the voyage from there to Louisiana in 1765, on which he would have accompanied wife Geneviève and six of their children, four sons and two daughters, ages 15 to infant .  His older daughter married into a French-Canadian LeBlanc family in the Spanish colony.  Three of his four sons also created their own families there.

Oldest son Charles, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1750, followed his family into exile, to the prison camp at Halifax, and to Louisiana, where he married Anne-Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Melançon and Marguerite Broussard, probably at St.-Jacques on the Mississippi above New Orleans in the early 1770s.  Their daughters married into the Clouâtre, Godin, and Rouillier families.  One of his sons married into the Melançon family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Another son remained in what became St. James Parish and married into the LeBlanc family. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1754, followed his family into exile, to the prison camp at Halifax, and to Louisiana, where he settled with widowed mother and siblings at Cabahnnocer/St.-Jacques on the river.  He did not marry. 

Jean-Baptiste's third son François, born at Boston, Massachusettes in c1759, followed his family to the prison camp at Halifax and to Louisiana, where he settled with his widowed mother and siblings at Cabahannocer/St.-Jacques on the river.  He did not remain there.  In the late 1770s, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District and married Marie-Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Thibodeaux and Brigitte Breaux of Peticoudiac, in c1780.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Bonin, Broussard, Comeaux, and Prince families.  François remarried to Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Bourgeois and Anne-Osite Landry and widower of Pierre Arceneaux, at Attakapas in November 1799.  Their daughter married into the Robichaux family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.   Three of François's sons by first wife Marie-Louise Thibodeaux married into the Bonin and Hébert families and settled on the prairies. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's fourth and youngest son Isidore, born at Boston in c1763, followed his family to the prison camp at Halifax and to Louisiana.  He settled with his widowerd mother and siblings at Cabahannocer/St.-Jacques on the river and followed his older brother François to the western prairies.  He married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Landry and Théotiste Thibodeaux, at Attakapas in November 1787.  Their daughters married into the Granger and Steven families.  At age 49, Isidore remarried to Marie, daughter of Simon Picard and Marie Doré of St. Charles Parish and widow of Jacques Touchet, at St. Martinville, St. Martin Parish, in August 1812.  Their daughter married into the Abshire family.  Three of his five sons, all by first wife Françoise Landry, married into the Granger, Landry, and Breaux families and created lasting lines along the Teche and on the prairies. 

Mathieu de Freneuse's third son François-Mathieu de L'Îsle-Ronde, born at Québec in August 1692, married Marie-Angélique, daughter of Jean Coutard and Marguerite Nielle, at Québec in October 1726, and remained in Canada.  

Mathieu de Freneuse's fourth and fifth sons Nicolas, born at Québec or on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1694, and Jean, born in c1696, evidently died young. 

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's fourth son René de Clignancour, born at Québec in August 1660, married Charlotte-Françoise, daughter of Charles Le Gardeur and Geneviève Juchereau, at Québec in October 1689.  René became a merchant and was living on his seigneurie on Rivière St.-Jean in the 1690s.  Charlotte-Françoise gave him seven children, three sons and four daughters.  None of their daughters married, and all of them returned to Canada.  Only one of their sons married. 

Oldest son René, fils, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1691, died at age 12 in December 1702. 

René de Clignancour's second son Joseph-Alexis, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1692, died in French St.-Domingue in c1728, in his mid-30s, and did not marry.   

René de Clignancour's third and youngest son Louis-Mathieu, born probably on lower Rivière St.-Jean in c1699, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Guyon dit Després and Marie-Madeleine Petit, at Terrebonne, near Montréal, in November 1729, and died at Montréal in December 1753, in his early 50s. 

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's fifth son Charles de Louvières, born at Québec in March 1662, married Marie-Anne, daughter of François Genaple and Marie-Anne de La Porte, at Québec in January 1688, remarried to Anne-Marie, daughter of Acadians Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot, in c1697 perhaps at Port-Royal, settled in Canada, and died in November 1716, in his early 50s, probably in a flood, no place given.  First wife Marie-Anne gave him four children, two sons and two daughters.  Second wife Anne-Marie gave him 10 more children, five sons and five daughters.  Three of his daughters from his second wife married into the Janvin dit Dufresne, Raimbault de Piedmont, Le Fournier Duvivier, and Villedonné families, all in Canada.  Six of his sons created families of their own, in Canada or Illinois.   

Oldest son Charles-Nicolas-Joseph de Louvières, by first wife Marie-Anne Genaple, born at Québec in July 1692, married Angélique-Hyacinthe, daughter of Augustin Rouer de Villeray and Marie-Louise Le Gardeur, at Ste.-Foy, near Québec, in May 1717, and died there in April 1728, age 35.  

Charles de Louvières's second son Jean-Baptiste de Louvières, by first wife Marie-Anne Genaple, born at Québec in October 1694, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Louis-Joseph Morel de La Durantaye and Élisabeth Rasné, at Beaumont, below Québec, in May 1719, and remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Ambroise Renoyer and Olive-Pélagie Arguin, at Québec in April in 1735.   

Charles de Louvières's third son Louis-Bertin de Louvières, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Ste.-Foy near Québec in July 1698, married Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Gédéon de Catalogne and Marie-Anne Lemire, at Montréal in December 1730, remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alphonse Tonty and  Marie-Anne Picoté, at Montréal in April 1755, and died there in January 1755, age 56.   

Charles de Louivière's fourth son René-Louis de Courberon, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Québec in September 1705, married Louise-Angélique, daughter of Jacques Couillard dit Després and Élisabeth Lemieux, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny below Québec in October 1736, remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Pelletier and Angélique-Marguerite Ouellet, at St.-Roch-des-Aulnaies below Québec in October 1755, and died in September 1759, age  54, from wounds suffered at the hands of the English.   

Charles de Louvière's fifth son Louis-Michel, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Ste.-Foy in July 1707, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Boulogne and Catherine Becquet, at Fort-de-Chartres in Illinois on the upper Mississippi in January 1737, and died in 1757, age 50, perhaps, like his older brother, a casualty of the war with Britain.  

Charles de Louvière's sixth son Pierre de Louvières, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Ste.-Foy in February 1712, was described by Louisiana Governor Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, in 1740 as a "Gentil homme of Canada."  Pierre had gone to Illinois as a cadet in c1736 and was still serving there in that rank when Bienville, a fellow Canadian, made his report.  The governor described the 28-year-old Pierre as "very wise."  Pierre married Marie-Anne Richaume in c1743 probably at Illinois.  He died at Prairie-du-Rocher, Illinois, in March 1768, age 56, and was buried in the chapel there.  

Charles de Louvière's seventh and youngest son Louis, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Ste.-Foy in June 1716, probably died young. 

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's sixth son Joseph-Nicolas, born at Québec in May 1664, died there in November 1690, age 26, before he could marry.

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's seventh son Claude-Louis, born at Québec in January 1666, died young.

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's eighth son Bernard de Plaine, born at Québec in December 1667, married Jeanne, daughter of Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle and Marie de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at Port-Royal in September 1697, remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Jacques Couillard dit Després and Élisabeth Lemieux, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1716, and died there in December 1749, age 82.  First wife Jeanne gave him five children, four sons and a daughter.  Second wife Élisabeth gave him 10 more children, six sons and four daughters.  Three of his daughters married into the Douaire de Bondy, Aguin, Fournier, Trottier dit Beaumont families, all in Canada.  Only three of his sons created families of their own in Canada.  

Oldest son Joseph de Plaine, by first wife Jeanne Le Borgne de Bélisle, born probably in Canada in c1700, married Catherine, daughter of René-Jean Boucher de Montbrun and Françoise-Claire Charet, at Lauzon near Québec in July 1735, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Nicolas-Antoine Coulon de Villiers and Angélique Jarret de Verchères and widow of François Lefebvre Duplessis and Claude Marin de Lamarque de La Perrière, at Québec in July 1754. 

Bernard's second son Alexandre-François, by first wife Jeanne Le Borgne de Bélisle, born at Port-Royal in October 1702, died at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1733, age 31, before he could marry.   

Bernard's third Louis-Jean, by first wife Jeanne Le Borgne de Bélisle, born at Québec in March 1706, probably died young.  

Benard's fourth son François, by first wife Jeanne Le Borgne de Bélisle, born at Québec in August 1711, died at nearby Beauport, age 4, in April 1716.   

Bernard's fifth son Jean-Baptiste Du Jour, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny below Québec in June 1719, married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Jacques Vallerand and Thérèse Bonnier, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in April 1746.  

Bernard's sixth son Joseph, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny in April 1721, died at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in December 1749, age 28, before he could marry.   

Bernard's seventh son Bernard-Régis, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny in October 1727, died there at age 3 in August 1730.  

Bernard's eighth son Augustin, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny in January 1732, died at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in January 1784, age 51, but did not marry. 

Bernard's ninth son François, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny in December 1733, died there a few weeks after his birth.  

Bernard's tenth and youngest son Michel, by second wife Élisabeth Couillard, born at St.-Thomas de Montmagny in May 1736, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Pierre Joncas and Marthe Fournier, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1762, and remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Charles Bélanger and Élisabeth Fournier, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1788, age 52.  He died probably in Canada in February 1823, in his late 80s. 

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's ninth son Daniel, born at Québec in December 1669, died there a few weeks after his birth.

Mathieu d'Amours de Chauffours's tenth and youngest son Philippe, born at Québec in February 1680, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Mesnage and Anne LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Gauvreau, at Québec in February 1722, and remarried to Marie-Anne-Louise, daughter of Ignace Juchereau and Marie-Catherine Peuvret, at Beauport, below Québec, in March 1728.  Philippe died in February 1747, age 67, place unrecorded.410

Chênet Dubreuil

Pierre Chênet, sieur Dubreuil of Mégais/Machia in Maine, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Louise dite Jeanne Doucet created a small but significant family in the colony.  In March 1687, while still unmarried, Pierre was appointed King's attorney at Port-Royal.  He received another seigneurie, this one on Rivière St.-Jean, in January 1689.  In 1690, Governor Meneval recommended him for appointment as judge at Port-Royal.  Pierre married Louise dite Jeanne, a daughter of Pierre Doucet, at Port-Royal in c1691; he was 45 years old, and his bride was only age 16 at the time of their marriage.  Pierre died most likely at Port-Royal by 1700, probably in his early 50s.  Louise gave him three children, two sons and a daughter.  Only one of his sons married.  Pierre's illegitimate daughter Marie-Madeleine dit Bouchard, born to Marguerite Boissel at Québec in July 1682, married into the Bourgoin family.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Older son Pierre, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1692, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean Denis dit Jean and Cécile Berteau, in c1724, place unrecorded. 

Pierre's younger son François, born probably at Port-Royal in c1693, evidently died young.413

Godin dit Châtillon dit Bellefontaine

Pierre Godin dit Châtillon, an early 1680s arrival, and wife Jeanne Rousselière created a large family in the colony, though many of them did not remain there.  Jeanne gave Pierre dit Châtillon nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Magdelaine dit La Douceur, Fortin dit Lagrandeur, Nepveu, Henry, and Martin families, two of them in Canada and two in greater Acadia.  Three of their four sons created families of their own, but only two of the lines survived.  Pierre dit Châtillon and Jeanne's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, Minas, Rivière St.-Jean, in the French Maritimes, and especially in Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement).  Needless to say, few of them were "typical" Fundy Acadians.  At least 22 of Pierre dit Châtillon's descendants, all from son Gabriel, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and Maryland in the late 1760s. 

Oldest son Laurent dit Châtillon dit Beauséjour married Anne, daughter of François Guérin and Anne Blanchard, in c1677, place unrecorded, perhaps Port-Royal, took his family back to Chignecto in the early 1690s (the important Chignecto settlement of Pointe-de-Beauséjour, where the famous French fort appeared in the early 1750s, was named for Laurent, who owned the site), returned to his native Canada, remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brunet dit Lestang and Marie Blanchard and widow of Antoine Pilon, at Pointe-Claire, near Montréal, in June 1719, age 64, and died at Rivière-des-Prairies in May 1737, age 82.  First wife Anne gave him 13 children, seven sons and six daughters.  Second wife Marie-Anne gave him no more children.  Five of his daughters married into the Marchand or Marcheguay, Mercier dit Caudebec, Carrière dit Carcassonne, Gareau dit Legarde, Rainville, Barthelet dit Le Savoyard, and Quévillon families, all but one of them in Canada.  Only three of his sons created families of their own.  

Oldest son Pierre married Catherine, daughter of François Pellerin dit Caudebec and Andrée Martin, in c1697 probably at Chignecto, moved to Canada, and died at St.-François-du-Sud, below Québec, in July 1733, in his mid-50s.  Catherine gave him a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Rouleau, Thibault, Larrivé, Dumas, Fontaine, and Dubé families, all in Canada.  Only two of their sons married.  Oldest son Pierre, fils married Angélique, daughter of Denis Proulx and Marie-Anne Gagné, in Canada in January 1725.  Pierre, père's second son Claude died young.  Third son Jean-Baptiste married Marguerite, daughter of François Audet dit Lapointe and Marguerite Bernard, on Île d'Orléans in November 1733.  Pierre, père's fourth son Antoine died an infant.  Fifth and youngest son Antoine died at Berthier-sur-Sud and was buried at St.-François-du-Sud in April 1732, in his late teens, before he could marry.   

Laurents second son Guillaume survived childhood but did not marry.  

Laurent's son Charles died at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in June 1714, in his mid-20s, before he could marry.  

Laurent's fourth son François died at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly, Canada, in February 1718, age 20, before he could marry.  

Laurent's fifth son unnamed, died young.   

Laurent's sixth son Joseph married Madeleine Roy in c1733, place unrecorded.   

Laurent and Anne's seventh and youngest son Jacques-Joseph dit Châtillon married Marie Anne, daughter of Pierre Verdon and Marie-Anne Averty, at Montréal in September 1732.

Pierre dit Châtillon's second son Gabriel dit Châtillon, later sieur de Bellefontaine, born at Montréal in July 1661, lived at Charlebourg near Québec when he was young and at Port-Royal during the 1680s before returning to his native Montréal, where he married Andrée-Angélique, daughter of Robert Jeanne or Jasne and Françoise-Madeleine Savard, in July 1690.  Soon after his marriage, Gabriel took his family to Rivière St.-Jean, where French authorities had granted him a seigneurie.  He died perhaps on the St.-Jean or perhaps at Montréal by August 1730, in his 60s.  Andrée-Angélique gave him a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Saindon, Dugas, and Part families in greater Nova Scotia.  All of Gabriel dit Châtillon's sons married, most of them to sisters, and most of them not in Canada but in greater Acadia.   

Oldest son Louis dit Bellefontaine married in c1736 to a woman whose name has been lost to history, moved to Canada, and died at St.-François-du-Lac in February 1749, in his mid-50s.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's second son Joseph dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour married Marie-Anne, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Geneviève Serreau de Saint-Aubin, on Rivière St.-Jean in c1726, and settled there.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's third son Jacques-Philippe dit Bellefeuille married Anne-Marie, another daughter of Barthélémy Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Geneviève Serreau de Saint-Aubin, in c1730 probably on Rivière St.-Jean, and settled there.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's fourth son Pierre-Joseph dit Châtillon dit Préville married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite Melanson, at Grand-Pré in August 1730, and died by January 1745, no age or place given.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's fifth son Jean-Baptiste dit Lincour married Anastasie, another daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite Melanson, in c1729 probably at Minas, and likely remained there.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's sixth son Charles dit Bellefontaine dit Boisjoli married Marie, daughter of Charles Melanson and Anne Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in August 1735, and remained there.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's seventh son René dit Jean-René dit Valcour married Françoise Dugas in c1734 perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of Barthélémy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, fils and Marguerite Dugas, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743.   

Gabriel dit Châtillon's eighth and youngest son Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine married in c1739 to a woman whose name has been lost to history, remarried to Marguerite, another daughter of Barthélémy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, fils and Marguerite Dugas, in c1740 probably on Rivière St.-Jean, and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.  

Pierre dit Châtillon's third son Pierre dit Châtillon dit Desrochers returned to his native Canada, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Cochon and Barbe-Delphine Le Tardif, at Château-Richer, below Québec, in July 1689, and died at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly in April 1739, age 72.  Marie-Jeanne gave him three children, a son and two daughters, who married into the Genest dit Labarre and Croteau families at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly. 

Son Jean-Baptiste died at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly in February 1723, age 18, before he could marry, so the blood of this line, at least, survived in Canada. 

Pierre dit Châtillon's fourth and youngest son Jean died young probably at Montréal.408

De Goutin

Mathieu de Goutin, French official, who arrived in 1688, and his wife Jeanne Thibodeau created a small but influential family in the colony.  Jeanne gave him 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Dupont de Renon, Hertel de Cournoyer, de Saint-Rémy, Duboisberthelot, Boucher, and Sabatier families, most, as their names imply, with aristocratic connections.  Only two of Mathieu's sons married.  His status as colonial official held it perquisites, but also its hazards.  In 1691, after a brief imprisonment at the hands of the conquering New English, Mathieu was granted a seigneurie at Mouscoudabouet, today's Musquodoboit, on the Atlantic side of the peninsula.  In 1692, he felt compelled to return to France to undo the damage to his reputation at the hands of former governor Meneval.  After regaining the favor of French authorities, Mathieu returned to Acadia, where he received a second seigneurial grant at Pointe-aux-Chênes, or Oak Point, on Rivière St.-Jean, in June 1695.  He got along well with Meneval's successor, Commander Joseph Robinau de Villebon.  Mathieu continued to serve in his various positions at Port-Royal until the British captured the place in 1710.  After a short time in France, he was given an official position in the new French colony of Île Royale.  Needless to say, these were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  One of Mathieu's descendants, youngest son Joseph, settled in Louisiana decades before his Acadian cousins sought refuge there--the first native of French Acadia to live in that colony. 

Oldest son François-Marie, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie-Angélique, daughter of Charles Aubert de La Chesnaye and Marie-Angélique Denys de la Ronde, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in May 1719, where he was serving as an army officer.  He remarried to Marie-Angélique, daughter of Antoine Puypéroux de La Fosse and Françoise Petit de Boismorel, at Louisbourg in April 1736.  François-Marie and his family were deported from Louisbourg after it fell to a New English force in late spring of 1745.  They remained as refugees at St.-Malo, living on a government gratuity, until Île Royale was returned to the French in 1748.  François-Marie was given a new post, this time on Île St.-Jean, where he died in January 1752, in his early 60s.

Mathieu's second son Alexandre-Abraham de Brécourt, born probably at Port-Royal in c1692, died after November 1750, place unrecorded, in his late 50s or early 60s, and did not marry.

Mathieu's third son Mathieu, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1698, died after November 1750, place unrecorded, probably in his early 50s, and also did not marry.

Mathieu, père's fourth son Jacques, born probably at Port-Royal in c1702, died after November 1750, place unrecorded, probably in his late 40s or early 50s, and did not marry.

Mathieu, père's fifth son Antoine, born at Port-Royal in July 1703, died after November 1750, place unrecorded, in his late 40s or early 50s, and remained a bachelor.

Mathieu, père's sixth and youngest son Joseph de Ville, born at Port-Royal in March 1705, became an officer in the King's Mousquetaires and was posted to New Orleans in August 1732 as a young lieutenant.  He was, as far as the records show, the first native of French Acadia to settle in French Louisiana.  He married French Creole Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean Caron and Marie-Anne Monique, at New Orleans in July 1747.  She gave him at least eight children, five sons and three daughters.  After retiring from active military service, though not from militia duty, he went into business at New Orleans.  He received a land grant from the French colonial government in the Attakapas District during the late 1750s or early 1760s, but there is no evidence that he developed his claim.  He may have been instrumental in luring some of his Acadian cousins to Louisiana in 1764 and 1765.  Only one of his sons, fourth son Joseph, fils, who took the surname Bellechasse, married, into the Lalande d'Alcour family.  Joseph, fils served as a high-ranking officer in the Spanish colonial armed forces, became a successful businessman in New Orleans, served in the General Assembly of the American Territory of Orleans, was elected president of the territory's legislative council, and was a member of Louisiana's first state constitutional convention, but he did not remain in the Bayou State.  He and his family moved to a sugar plantation in Matanzas province, Cuba, in c1815, and there they remained.428

Le Bassier de Villieu

Claude-Sébastien Le Bassier de Villieu, an early 1690s arrival, and wife Judith Le Neuf de La Vallière created a small family in the colony that did not survive. 

Son Charles-Claude dit Sébastien, born at Québec in June 1693, served as a cadet in his father's company in Acadia from the age of five.  In 1701, Governor Bouillan recommended the boy for a commission as sub-lieutenant, but Sébastien's age prevented the appointment.  In May 1704, at Rochefort, Sébastien, still not yet in his teens, was appointed a naval midshipman.  In 1712, at age 19, he commanded the 16-gun Providence on Hudson Bay and defeated a 32-gun English frigate in ship-to-ship combat.  Sébastien died aboard the ship La Paix at La Rochelle in July 1715.  He was only 22 years old and still unmarried, so his line of the family died with him.27

De Gannes

Louis-Joseph de Gannes, sieur de Falaise, a late 1690s arrival, and two of his three wives, Barbe Denys and Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, created a large, influential family in the colony, but, typical of their class, they did not remain in peninsula Acadia.  After the fall of Port-Royal in October 1710, Louis-Joseph took his family to France before returning to Canada.  In June 1713, while serving at Québec, he was made a chevalier de St.-Louis for his service to the King.  Later that year, he was appointed major of the new French colony, Île Royale, but died at La Rochelle in February 1714 before he could report to his new post.  Third wife Marguerite, who spent her widowhood at Louisbourg and Trois-Rivières and lived to April 1760, gave Louis-Joseph a dozen children, nine sons and three daughters.  None of their children remained in peninsula Acadia after it became British Nova Scotia in 1713.  Two of their daughters married into the de Couagne and Rousseau de Villejoin families.  Only three of Louis-Joseph's nine sons, all by his third wife, created their own families.  Two of his sons became noted priest.  If any of the sieur's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Louis-François de Falaise, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in May 1701, married cousin Louise, daughter of Victor de Sainte-Marthe and Catherine Le Neuf de Boisneuf, at Grenada in the West Indies in October 1720.  

Louis-Joseph's second son Michel, chevalier de Gannes de Falaise, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in May 1702, married Élisabeth, daughter of Gédéon de Catalogne and Marie-Anne Lemire, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in November 1730.  

Louis-Joseph's third son Louis-Joseph, fils, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in March 1704, became a priest.  He, in fact, was Premier prêtre régulier acadien--the first "regular" priest to serve in Acadia (he was a Récollet)--born in the colony.

Louis-Joseph, père's fourth son Pierre, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in November 1705, also became a priest.  He has been described as Premier prêtre séculier acadien--the first secular priest in Acadia born in the colony.

Louis-Joseph, père's fifth son Jacques, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in October 1706, died there at 4 in October 1710.

Louis-Joseph, père's sixth son Simon de La Chancellerie, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in November 1707, married to a woman whose name has been lost in history in c1740, place unrecorded.

Louis-Joseph père's seventh son, name unrecorded, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Port-Royal in July 1708, died the day of his birth. 

Louis-Joseph, père's eighth son Charles-Thomas, chevalier de Falaise, born at St.-Nazaire, France, in November 1710, married Madeleine-Angélique, daughter of Nicolas-Antoine Coulon de Villiers and Angélique Jarret de Verchères, at Trois-Rivières, Canada, in October 1749.  During the 1740s, son Michel served in Acadia with distinction during King George's War. 

Louis-Joseph, père's ninth and youngest son Louis, by third wife Marguerite Le Neuf de La Vallière, born at Québec in November 1711, died there at age 3 in February 1714.26

Loppinot

Jean-Chrysostôme Loppinot, clerk of court, notary, and procurator, a late 1690s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Doucet created a small family in greater Acadia.  In May 1704, Jean-Chrysostôme became King's attorney in Acadia, and in December 1706 he was granted a seigneurie at Cap-Forchu, up the western Atlantic coast from Pobomcoup.  When Port-Royal fell to the English in 1710, Sr. Loppinot was one of the colonial officials whom they transported out of the colony.  In 1712, he was serving as clerk of court at Plaisance, Newfoundland, then controlled by France but soon to be handed over to Britain.  Jeanne gave him five children, four sons and a daughter.  Only two of his sons married.  Jean-Chrysostôme died by January 1733, place and age unrecorded, perhaps on Île Royale.  His and Jeanne's descendants settled at Louisbourg.  At no time were any members of this family "typical" Fundy Acadians.  If any of Jean-Chrysostôme's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.

Oldest son Jean-Chrysostôme-Nicolas-Sébastien, born at Port-Royal in January 1703, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Nicolas Boitier dit Bérichon and Marie-Charlotte Brouillé, at Louisbourg in January 1733.  Jean-Chrysostôme-Nicolas-Sébastien died at Rochefort, France, in February 1765, age 62. 

Jean-Chrysostôme's second son Louis, born at Port-Royal in June 1705, evidently died young. 

Jean-Chrysostôme's third son Louis de La Frésillière, born at Port-Royal in October 1707, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Seigneur dit La Rivière and Marie-Madeleine Corporon, at Louisbourg in May 1738.  Louis de La Frésillière died in the siege of Louisbourg in July 1745, age 38.

Jean-Chrysostôme's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born at Port-Royal in January 1710, died a few days after his birth.454

Dupont Duvivier/Dupont Duchambon

Brothers Francois Dupont Duvivier and Louis Dupont Duchambon, officers of troupes de la marine and early 1700s arrival, created with their wives, sisters Marie and Jeanne Mius d'Entremont, two influential families in greater Acadia who contributed much to the region's history.  If any of the brothers' descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

François, second son of Hughes Dupont and Marie Hérault de Gourville, born at Sérignac, France, in October 1675, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Mius d'Entremont and Anne de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at Port-Royal in January 1705.  Between 1705 and 1715, Marie gave François seven children, five sons and two daughters, born at Port-Royal and Port-Dauphin, Île Royale.  After the fall of Port-Royal in August 1710, François Duvivier was among the garrison's officers who were repatriated to France later that summer.  From Nantes, which they reached on December 1, the family went to François's birthplace, Sérignac-sur-Garonne, southeast of Bordeaux.  After the cession of French Acadia to Britain in 1713, François, still a captain of troupes de la marine, was sent to the new French colony of Île Royale, where he and his family arrived in January 1714.  He died there in October or November 1714, in his late 30s.  Only three of François's children created their own families.  Their older daughter married into the Tarade d'Entremont family.  Two of their five sons married into prominent Acadian families. 

Oldest son François, fils, who used the surname Dupont Duvivier, born at Port-Royal in April 1705, became, like his father, an officer of troupes de la marine.  Despite undistinguised service in King George's War, he was named a chevalier of the Order of St.-Louis in 1745.  By 1750, he had risen to the rank capitaine de frégate and King's lieutenant of Île St.-Jean.  He did not marry. 

François Dupont Duvivier, père's second son Joseph-Michel was born at Port-Royal in April 1706 but died the following August.

François Dupont Duvivier, père's third son Joseph, who used the surname Dupont Duvivier, born at Port-Royal in November 1707, also became a officer of the Marine, commanding the small garrison at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, during the first two years of King George's War.  At age 43, Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, former governor of Acadia, and Anastasie d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin and widow of Jacques-Philippe-Urbain Rondeau, in October 1750 at Louisbourg. 

François Dupont Duvivier, père's fourth son Louis, born at Port-Royal in October 1708, may have died young.  

François Dupont Duvivier, père's fifth and youngest son Michel, who used the surname de Gourville, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of merchant Joseph-Nicolas Gauthier, then the wealthiest man in British Nova Scotia, and Marie Allain, at Louisbourg in September 1737. 

Louis, fourth son of Hughes Dupont and Marie Hérault de Gourville, born at Sérignac, France, in January 1780, married Jeanne, another daughter of Jacques Mius d'Entremont and Anne de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at Port-Royal in February 1709.  Between 1710 and 1734, Jeanne gave Louis 10 children, six sons and four daughters, born in France and on Île Royale.  Louis was serving as a lieutenant in his older brother's company at Port-Royal in August 1710, so he and his family also went to France to await his reassignment.  He followed older brother François to Île Royale and rose to the rank of captain in July 1720.  In March 1723, he was named commander of Port-Dauphin on the island's Atlantic coast and was made a chevalier of the Order of St.-Louis in June 1730.  In June 1733, he was named major of Île Royale, became commandant on Île St.-Jean in April 1737, and King's lieutenant for the entire colony in April 1744.  Upon the sudden death of Governor Jean-Baptiste-Louis Le Prévost Duquesnel the following October, Louis assumed the duties of acting governor.  More adept at administration than tactical command, in June 1745, after a month-and-a-half-long siege, he surrendered the citadel at Louisbourg to a combined naval and land force under William Pepperell of Maine.  The capitualation ended his long career.  He returned from the King's service in March 1746 and remained in France, where he died at Curat, France, in August 1775, age 97.  All but one of his 10 children created families of their own.  Three of his daughters married into the Brunet de La Socetière, Decoux, and d'Averhoult de Martimont families. 

Oldest son François l'aîné, who also used the surname Dupont Duchambon, born at Sérignac, France, in March 1712, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Mius d'Entremont and Marguerite Landry and widow Jean-Baptiste de Couage, at Louisbourg in October 1750.  

Louis Dupont Duchambon's second son Louis, fils, who used the surname Duchambon de Vergor, born at Sérignac in September 1713, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Canadians Jean-Joseph Riverin and Marie-Josèphe Perthuis, at St.-Foy, near Québec, in July 1752.  Like his father, Louis served as an officer in the troupe de la marine.  Before his marriage, he served with his father on Île St.-Jean, and in June 1755 he was the hapless officer who surrendered Fort Beauéjour at Chignecto.  After repatriation to France, he returned to New France in 1757 and served without distinction in Canada.  It was his negligence that contributed to the British victory at Québec in September 1759.  He was wounded and captured on the eve of the September 13 battle and returned to France, where he did not suffer censure.  His wounds, however, ended his career, and he retired on a King's pension in April 1760.  His wife Marie-Josèphe died at La Flèche in April 1770.  He did not remarry.  He moved on to Saintonge, his family's home province, and made frequent trips to "the baths" to ease the pain from his wounds.  Despite a 2,510-livre indemnity for his property losses in Canada, he died "in poverty" at Curat in August 1775, age 97.  

Louis Dupont Duchambon, père's third son François le jeune, who took the surname Duchambon Duvivier, born at Sérignac in c1714, married ____ Sérioux de Mailly in c1745.   

Louis Dupont Duchambon, père's fourth son François, who took the surname Dupont de Mézilliac, born at Louisbourg in October 1720, married Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Claude Hertel de Beaulac and Geneviève Mirambeau, at St.-Louis de Rochefort, France, in December 1760.  

Louis Dupont Duchambon, père's fifth son Jean-Baptiste-Ange, who used the surname Dupont Duchambon, born at Port-Dauphin, Île Royale, between 1723 and 1727, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean-Pierre Roma and Marie-Madeleine Moreau, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in June 1757.  

Louis Dupont Duchambon, père's sixth son Mathieu, who called himself Duchambon du Maine, born at Port-Dauphin in c1728, married Barbe-Blanche, daughter of Pierre-André Carrot and Marie-Josèphe Carron, at Louisbourg in April 1758, on the eve the island's dérangement.   

Louis Dupont Duchambon, père's seventh and youngest son Charles-François-Ferdinand, who used the surname Dupont Duchambon, born at Louisbourg in November 1734, married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Rodrigue and Marguerite Lartigue, at St.-Jean Parish, La Rochelle, France, in May 1764.05

Jacau de Fiedmont

Thomas Jacau de Fiedmont, the master cannonier, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Anne Melanson created a small but significant family in greater AcadiaAnne gave him eight children, four sons and four daughters.  After Port-Royal fell to the British in October 1710, Thomas moved his family first to Plaisance, Newfoundland, and then to Port-Dauphin and Louisbourg on Île Royale, where he continued his military career.  They may have lived for a time in France, at La Croix d'Ars, Saintes, where his wife gave birth to one of their daughters during the late 1710s or early 1720s.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, d'Allard de Sainte-Marie, Rodrigue, and Augier de Charente families at Louisbourg.  None of their sons married.  The old master gunner died at Louisbourg in March 1737, age 60.  Needless to say, members of his family were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  If any of the master cannoneer's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest and second sons Daniel, born at Port-Royal in May 1708, and Joseph, born in January 1710, may have survived childhood but evidently did not marry. 

Thomas's third son Louis-Thomas de Fiedmont, born at Plaisance in c1712, began his military career in the ranks, like his father, but became an officer of troupes de la marine.  As a lieutenant, beginning in April 1753, he served as chief engineer for the Chignecto forts--Beauséjour and Gaspereau--and left a self-serving account of the fall of the forts to British and New English forces in June 1755.  In 1756, after his release from captivity, he served under Montcalm at Oswego, Canada, for which he was promoted to captain.  He served with distinction during the rest of the Seven Years' War, including the defense of Québec in 1759.  For his service in Canada, he was named a chevalier of the Order of St.-Louis in February 1760.  After serving as a lieutenant-colonel in command of the artillery in French Guiane on the northern coast of South America, he served as second in command and then as governor of the colony.  As acting governor of Guiane in the late 1760s, he looked in favor on the dozens of his fellow Acadians who had come to the colony from France earlier in the decade.  After enduring the rigors of the tropical climate and burying many of their own, they thrived in their coastal settlement at Sinnamary north of Cayenne.  Fiedmont was especially impressed with the ability of the former aboiteaux builders to capture runoff from the surrounding hills and transform it into compost for their riverside farms.  In 1780, while still serving as governor of Guiane, he was promoted to major-general.  He died at Belleville near Paris in August 1788, age 64, on the eve of the Revolution, having never married.

Thomas's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Louisbourg in November 1714, died at Annapolis Royal in April 1730, age 16, before he could marry.  One wonders what the young aristocrat was doing in British Nova Scotia at the time of his death.470

Fontaine

Sr. René Fontaine, an early 1700s arrival, clerk in the bureau de la Marine and secretary to the last royal governor of French Acadia, fathered a "natural" son by Isabelle Corporon and unwittingly created a small family line in British Nova Scotia.  One suspects that Sr. René left the colony with the other French officials after the British captured Port-Royal in October 1710.  None of his descentants emigrated to Louisiana. 

Louis dit Beaulieu, born at Port-Royal in August 1707, remained with his mother at Annapolis Royal and adopted his father's surname.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Roy dit La Liberté and Marie Aubois, at Annapolis Royal in September 1730.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1744, Marie-Madeleine gave Louis seven children, a son and six daughters.  The family was deported to New England in 1755.  After the war with Britain ended, the family chose to resettle in Canada.  They arrived at L'Assomption, on the north bank of the St. Lawrence below Trois-Rivières, in 1767 and settled there.  Three of Louis's daughters married into the Janson dit Lapalme, Lefebvre, and Lord families at L'Assomption and nearby St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan.  Louis's son created his own family in New England and at L'Assomption. 

Louis-Thadée, born at Annapolis Royal in c1736, followed his family to New England and married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Prudent Robichaud and Françoise Bourgeois, in Massachusetts in c1763.  They followed his family to Canada.  Their marriage was blessed at L'Assomption in November 1767 soon after their arrival.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1767, Marie-Thérèse gave Louis-Thadée three sons.  The family remained in the area.489

The Families of Greater Acadia:  Outliers, Migrants, and Islanders

Many Acadian families saw children and grandchildren join the steady migration out of the Fundy settlements, but most members of established families chose to remain in the land of their ancestors.  The following families saw the majority of their children take the outward path, most of them moving on to the French Maritimes as early as the mid-1710s.  As a result, by the "golden age" of the 1730s, most of these families were no longer "typically" Acadian.  Also atypically Acadian by the "golden age" were families who eschewed the Fundy settlements, living, instead, on mainland rivers or on the Atlantic side of the peninsula, some from the earliest days of the colony.  One Chignecto family, as a result of the indiscretion of one of its sons, was forced to leave the colony entirely: 

Martin

Pierre Martin and his wife Catherine Vigneau, 1636 arrivals, created the first of the Martin family lines in the colony.  Catherine gave Pierre seven children, four sons and three daughters, all of whom were counted in the first Acadian census.  Their three daughters married into the Morin dit Boucher, Bourg, Pellerin, and Mercier dit Caudebec families.  Only two of their fives sons survived childhood.  Both married, but only one of them created a family line of his own.  Pierre and Catherine's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and in the trois-rivières area, but also at Cobeguit and Pigiguit, before moving on to the French Maritimes in the 1710s.  As a result, few members of this family became "typical" Fundy Acadians.  And few, if any, of the 20 Acadian Martins who emigrated to Louisiana were members of Pierre's branch of the family. 

Oldest son Étienne died at age 5 soon after the family reached Acadia.

Pierre's second son Pierre, fils married first to Mi'kmaq Anne Ouestnorouest dit Petitous, in c1660, and, in his late 50s or early 60s.  Anne gave Pierre, fils nine children, five sons and four daughters.   Pierre, fils remarried to Jeanne, daughter of Louis Rousselière and Isabelle Parisé and mother-in-law of his oldest son Pierre III, in c1686 probably at Port-Royal.  Jeanne gave him no more children.  One of Pierre, fils's daughters married into the Pellerin family.  Four of his sons survived childhood, but only two of them, the oldest and youngest, created families of their own.  

Oldest son Pierre III married Anne, daughter of Pierre Godin dit Châtillon and Jeanne Rousselière, in c1686, and remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, where Pierre III was a farmer; in the early 1730s, he took his family to Île St.-Jean, where he farmed the uplands and also fished.  Anne gave Pierre III 17 children, eight sons and nine daughters, all born at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal.  Four of their daughters married into the Bertaud dit Montaury, de Glain dit Cadet, Fortin dit La Fortune, Gourdon, Blouet, Martinez dit Espagnol, and Le Metayer families, and all of them settled in the French Maritimes.  Six of their sons married, several of whom joined their sisters in the French Maritimes.  Pierre III's oldest son Étienne did not survive childhood.  His second son Pierre IV married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Clémenceau and Anne Roy, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1727.  Pierre III's third son François returned to Nova Scotia, married Angélique, daughter of Claude Bertrand and Catherine Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in February 1725, and died there soon afterwards, in his early 30s.  Pierre III's fourth son Joseph married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson and widow of Joseph Doucet, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in April 1750, when he was in his early 50s, and remarried to Anne-Marie Michel in c1758, during Le Grand Dérangement, when he was in his early 60s.  Pierre III's fifth son Barthélemy married Madeleine, another daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson, in c1731, and settled at Rivière-du-Nord-Est on Île St.-Jean.  Pierre's III's sixth son Paul married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Dubois and Anne Vincent, in c1739, and settled at Annapolis Royal and Petitcoudiac.  Pierre III's seventh son Charles married Françoise, yet another daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson, in c1742, and settled at Port-Lajoie.  Pierre III's eighth and youngest son Jean survived childhood but evidently did not marry.  Pierre III died at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in December 1739, in his late 70s. 

Pierre, fils's second son René did not survive childhood.   

Pierre, fils's third son André survived childhood but did not marry.   

Pierre, fils's fourth son Jacques became a fisherman but did not marry.   

Pierre, fils's fifth and youngest son Jean married Madeleine, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier, in c1696, settled at Pigiguit, and by c1715 moved on to Île Royale, where they settled at Port-Toulouse.  Madeleine gave Jean 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Plessis or Précis, Trunet dit Francoeur, Jehannot, Bourhis, Pineau dit Lajeunesse, and Guiton dit La Roche families; as their husbands' names imply, all settled in the French Maritimes.  Only one of their sons married.  Oldest son Jean-Baptiste probably died young.  Second son Joseph married Julienne, daughter of Noël Paul and Marie de La Vigne, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in January 1735; noting the place and time of their marriage, one wonders if Joseph was a sailor or a merchant and if he and his family remained in France.  Jean's third son François, a fourth son whose name has been lost to history, fifth son Pierre, and sixth son Louis, all born at Port-Toulouse from c1715 to c1724, died young. 

Pierre, père's third son Urbain, like his oldest brother Étienne, died soon after the family reached Acadia; Urbain was only 2 years old at the time of his death. 

Pierre, père's fourth and youngest son Mathieu, "the first Frenchman born in Acadia," though he worked in Port-Royal as a simple weaver, became the seigneur of Cobeguit in March 1689.  In the 1690s, while in his 50s, he married at Port-Royal, but his wife, whose name has been lost to history, died only a few years after their marriage and gave him no children.  Mathieu did not remarry.  By the 1710s, he was living on his seigneurie at Cobeguit, where he died before 1724, leaving his grant to several of the original habitants who had settled there in the early 1700s.336

Petitpas

Claude Petitpas, sieur de La Fleur, the notary, who arrived in c1645, and his wife Catherine Bugaret created an influential family in the colony.  Catherine gave Claude 13 children, eight sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Dugas, Guédry dit Grivois dit Laverdure, Forest, Boudrot, Richard, Robichaud, and Girouard families.  Only three of their sons created families of their own.  In the summer of 1680, Claude Petitipas, père was serving as royal notary at Jemseg on lower Rivière St.-Jean.  His and Catherine's descendants, however, settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Mirliguèche and Musquodoboit on the Atlantic coast, and on Île Royale in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous.  If any of Claude's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none carried the family's name there. 

Oldest son Bernard, born probably at Port-Royal in c1659, married a woman whose name had been lost to history in c1685 and settled at Mirliguèche on the Atlantic coast.  They likely were that rare Acadian couple who had no children.

Claude's second son Claude, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1663, married Marie-Thérèse, a Mi'kmaq, after 1686, settled at Musquodoboit up the coast from Mirliguèche and became an interpreter and Indian agent for the British.  Claude, fils remarried to Françoise, daughter of Pierre Lavergne and Anne Bernon, at Annapolis Royal in January 1721, in his late 50s, moved to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, and died there in c1731, in his late 60s.  First wife Marie-Thérèse gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Second wife Françoise gave him four more children, all sons, all of whom married.  Claude, fils's daughters, all from his first wife, married into the Marres dit La Sonde, Moyse dit Latreille, and Coste families, and all of them settled in the French Maritimes.   

Oldest son Barthélemy, by first wife Marie-Thérèse, born probably at Miramichi in c1687, married Madeleine, daughter of François Coste and Madeleine Martin, in c1715.  Barthélemy also served as agent-interpreter among the Mi'kmaq, befriended the British, but later turned against them.  As a result, they captured him in 1745, about the time the British took Louisbourg, and he died in a Boston prison in January 1747, age 60.  

Claude, fils's second son Paul, by first wife Marie-Thérèse, born in c1695, became a navigator at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, but did not marry. 

Claude, fils's third son Joseph, by first wife Marie-Thérèse, born in c1699, also became a navigator at Port-Toulouse and did not marry.   

Claude, fils fourth son Isidore, by first wife Marie-Thérèse, born in c1706, was sent by his father to Boston to attend Harvard divinity school, dropped out, escaped to Québec, from whence Canadian authorities sent him to Rochefort, France, to train for a naval career, but Isidore was a reluctant student, so the French sent him to Martinique as a soldier, where he likely died before he could marry, age unrecorded.   

Claude, fils fifth son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Françoise Lavergne, born at Port-Toulouse in c1722, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Bertaud dit Montaury and Marie Martin, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in September 1742.   

Claude, fils's sixth son Jacques, by second wife Françoise Lavergne, born at Port-Toulouse in c1724, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Breau and Anne Gautrot, at Port-Toulouse in c1749.   

Claude, fils's seventh son Louis, by second wife Françoise Lavergne, born at Port-Toulouse in c1726, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Pouget and Françoise Moyse, in c1752 in the French Maritimes, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe dite Rosette, daughter of Joseph Dugas and Marguerite Coste and widow of Pierre Boudrot, in c1761 during Le Grand Dérangement.  

Claude, fils's eighth and youngest son Joseph, by second wife Françoise Lavergne, born at Port-Toulouse in c1731, married Louise, daughter of Jean Fougère and Marie-Madeleine Belliveau, in c1754 probably on Île Royale, and remarried to Marguerite, another daughter of Jean Breau and Anne Gautrot and widow of Georges Manet, at Chezzetcook, near Halifax, in c1767, after Le Grand Dérangement

Claude, père's third son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1664, probably died young.

Claude, père's fourth son Jacques, born probably at Port-Royal in c1666, married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Serreau de Saint-Aubin, seigneur of Passamaquoddy, and Marguerite Boileau, in c1690 probably at Port-Royal, but likely settled with Geneviève's family at Passamaquoddy.  In August 1692, during King William's War, Jacques and brother-in-law Charles Serreau de Saint-Aubin and their families were captured by New English raiders under Colonel Benjamin Church.  They were still being held at Boston in November when Jacques and Charles were released in a scheme to capture capitaine de sauvages Jean-Vincent de Saint-Castin.  Despite their families being held as hostages, Jacques and Charles alerted the French authorities to the desperate scheme. Jacques died at Port-Royal in c1694, in his late 20s, a year before his wife and children were ransomed from their Boston prison by her father, the seigneur; one wonders if Jacques's wartime activities and his concern for his family hastened his death.  In the two years between their marriage and their capture, Geneviève gave Jacques two children, both sons, only one of whom created a family of his own.   

Older son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1691, died at Annapolis Royal in June 1713, in his early 20s, before he could marry.  

Jacques's younger son Nicolas, born probably at Port-Royal in the 1690s, married Madeleine, daughter of André Simon dit Boucher and Marie Martin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714 and moved on to the French Maritimes, where he settled Petit-Dégrat on Île Royale, near Port-Toulouse.  Madeleine gave him eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Nicolas, well into his middle age, remarried to Osite-Blanche, daughter of Jean Benoit and Marie-Josèphe Thériot, on Île Royale in March 1756.  Osite-Blanche gave him three more children, two sons and a daughter.  His daughters by his first wife married into the Guyon dit Dion, Mulot, Ozanne, and Vergues dit La Sagette families, on Île Royale, in France, and in French Guiane during Le Grand Dérangement.  Only four of his eight sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Nicolas, fils, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1714, probably died young. 

Nicolas, père's second son François, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Port-Toulouse in c1718, also died young. 

Nicolas, père's third son Nicolas-François, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Petit-Dégrat in c1722, married Marie, daughter of Claude Harot and Julienne Chancerel, on Île Royale in November 1751.  He died at St.-Louis de Rochefort, France, in July 1761, age 38, during Le Grand Dérangement

Nicolas, père's fourth son Jean-Jacques, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Petit-Dégrat in c1726, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean Darembourg and Marie-Anne Pichot, in c1748 on Île Royale.  He died at Sinnamary, French Guiane, in June 1765, age 39. 

Nicolas, père's fifth son Dominique, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in May 1732, died a few days after his birth. 

Nicolas, père's sixth son Germain-Sébastien, by first wife Madeleine Simon, born at Louisbourg in February 1725, died at Restigouche after January 1761, in his late 20s or early 30s, before he could marry. 

Nicolas, père's seventh son Barnabé dit Nicolas, by second wife Osite-Blanche Benoit, born at Louisbourg in c1756, married Agnès, daughter of Jean-Jacques Clory and Marie-Josèphe Josse, in c1787 and settled at D'Escousse, Cape Breton Island. 

Nicolas, père's eighth and youngest son Joseph-Michel, by second wife Osite-Blanche Benoit, born at Louisbourg probably on the eve of the island's dérangement in late 1758, followed his family into exile, and spent time at Caraquet in present-day northeastern New Brunswick.  He married Madeleine, daughter of David Downey dit Downing and Dorothée Boudrot, in c1788, place unrecorded, and settled at Grande-Digue, Shediac, today's eastern New Brunswick. 

Claude, père's fifth son Paul, born probably at Port-Royal in c1675, was counted there in 1693, age 22, but evidently did not marry.

Claude, père's sixth son Charles, born probably at Port-Royal in c1676, also was counted there in 1693, age 18, but evidently did not marry. 

Claude, père's seventh son Martin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1677, was counted there in 1693, age 15, but evidently did not marry.

Charles, père's eighth and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1681, was counted there in 1693, age 10, but probably did not marry.360

Pinet

Philippe Pinet, born at Port-Royal in c1654, and wife Catherine Hébert, despite the number of their children, created a relatively small family in the colony.  Between 1680 and 1701, Catherine gave Philippe a dozen children, six sons and six daughters, at Port-Royal.  Five of their daughters married into the Corporon, Doucet dit Lirlandois, LeBlanc dit Jasmin, Jacquemin dit Lorrain, and Simon dit Boucher families.  All of Philippe's sons married.  He, Catherine, and their descendants settled at Minas, Chignecto, in the French Maritimes, and in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement.  They were especially numerous in the Maritimes.  At least five of Philippe's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Jean emigrated to Canada and married Marie, daughter of Pierre Morin and Marie-Madeleine Martin and widow of Jacques Cochu, at Québec in February 1710, and remained there.  He died at the city's Hôpital général in July 1744, in his early 60s.  Marie gave him no children.

Philippe's second son Antoine married Marguerite, daughter of André Célestin dit Bellemère and Pérrine Basile, at Grand-Pré in April 1709, and moved on to the French Maritimes, where he died on Île Royale in September 1738, in his mid-50s.  Marguerite gave him 10 children, at least three sons and six daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Ballé, Bouillé, Arnoux, and Harnois families on Île Royale.  Only one of Antoine's sons married.  

Oldest son Paul died an infant at Québec in October 1714. 

Antoine's second son, name unrecorded, also died young. 

Antoine's third and youngest son Alexis also emigrated to Canada and married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Gaffé and Marie-Anne Simon, at Québec in November 1750. 

Philippe's third son Noël married Rose, daughter of Robert Henry and Marie-Madeleine Godin, at Grand-Pré in September 1710, remained there for a time, lived in Canada, moved on to the French Maritimes.   Rose gave him 11 children, six sons and five daughters, born at Minas, in Canada at Québec and Rimouski, at Petit-Dégrat, on Île St.-Jean, at Chignecto, and again on Île St.-Jean.  A French official counted Noël, Rose, and five of their children at Pointe de l'Est, on the eastern end of Île St.-Jean, in August 1752.  Noël died on the island in May 1755, in his early 70s.  Two of his daughters married into the Vallet dit Langevin, Porcheron, and D'Etcheverry families, in the Maritimes and in France.  Four of his sons married.   

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste married Jeanne-Isabelle, daughter of Antoine Pilon and Jeanne Charion, at Beaubassin in January 1746 and settled at Pointe de l'Est.   

Noël's second son Joseph married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Bertrand l'aîné and Marie-Françoise Léger, in c1748, place unrecorded.   

Noël's third son Pierre married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Trahan and Marie Girouard, in c1748, place unrecorded, and settled at Pointe de l'Est.  

Noël's fourth son Philippe dit Pinel died at Cherbourg, France, in his late 20s, before he could marry.  

Noël's fifth son Charles dit Pinel married Anne-Marie, daughter of Charles Lacroix dit Durel and Judith Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, near Pointe de l'Est, in April 1753 and emigrated to Louisiana from France.  

Noël's sixth and youngest son Michel died young. 

Philippe's fourth son Charles l'aîné married Marie, daughter of Louis Marchand and Marie Godin, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1724, and died probably in the Maritimes by 1752. 

Philippe's fifth son Charles le jeune dit Petit-Charles married Marie-Louise, daughter of François Testard dit Paris and Marie Doiron, at Port-Toulouse in c1723, and died on Île Royale in May 1743, in his early 40s.

Philippe's sixth and youngest Philippe, fils married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, Michel in c1726 probably on Île Royale and died there at the home of Jean Martin in January 1733, in his early 30s.358

Viger

François Viger, fils, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1662, and his wife Marie Mius d'Azy created a small family in the colony.  François and Marie were living at Ouimakagan, near Pobomcoup, in 1705 and were counted at Cap-Sable, probably Pobomcoup, in 1708, near her family.  Marie gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters, including a set of twins.  Two of their daughters married into the Corporon, Benoit, and Boutin families, and one of them perished with her entire family during the deportation to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Only one of François's sons married.  The date and place of François's death has been lost to history.  His and Marie's descendants settled not only at Pobomcoup and Cap-Sable, but also on Île St.-Jean.  As a result, the members of this family were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Charles, born at Port-Royal in January 1698, evidently died young.

François, fils's second son François III, born at Port-Royal in August 1699, married Claire, daughter of Martin Lejeune and Marie Gaudet, in c1722, place unrecorded, and setteld at Cap-Sable.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1724 and 1738, Claire gave François three children, a son and two daughters.  Other records give them two more sons.  One his daughters married into the Hébert families probably at Cap-Sable.  The British captured François III and his family at Cap-Sable in the fall of 1758, held them at Halifax, and deported them to Cherbourg, France, in late 1759.  François III died there in March 1760, age 60.  His daughter Anne-Théotiste remarried into the Landry family at Cherbourg.  At least one of his sons created his own family.

Oldest son Jean-Charles-Guillaume, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1729, followed his family to Halifax and Cherbourg, where he became a "huissier de la Miraute de cette ville."  He died at Cherbourg in September 1773, age 44.  One wonders if he married. 

François III's second son François IV, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1730, married Anne, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, probably at Pobomcoup in c1750.  They followed his father's family to Cherbourg in 1759.  Son Isidore was born at sea in December 1759, baptized at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in January, and died at Cherbourg, age 9 months, the following September.  His line of the family may have died with him. 

François III's third and youngest son Stanislas, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1745, followed his family to Halifax and Cherbourg, where he died in February 1760, age 17. 

François, fils's third son Joseph l'aîné, born at either Port-Royal or Cap-Sable in c1701, probably died young.

François, fils's fourth and youngest son Joseph le jeune, twin of his sister Marie, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1707, evidently died young, as she did.451

Morin

Pierre Morin dit Boucher, an early 1660s arrival, and his wife Marie-Madeleine Martin created a large family, but, because of a peculiar circumstance, it did not remain in the colony.  Marie-Madeleine gave Pierre a dozen children, nine sons and three daughters, most of whom married.  Sometime during the 1670s or early 1680s, the family left Port-Royal and settled at Chignecto.  In the late 1680s, one of their sons scandalized the community by engaging in an indiscretion with the seigneur's daughter.  The son was exiled to France.  Even worse, the entire Morin family, including in-laws, was compelled to leave the colony.  They settled first in Gaspésie on the Baie des Chaleurs, at the edge of greater Acadia, and then moved on to Mont-Louis, on the north shore of the Gaspé peninsula.  Pierre dit Boucher died in c1690, age about 56, probably at Gaspésie.  Marie-Madeleine died at Québec in Sep 1714, in her early 70s.  Their younger children married in Canada, where they settled at various places above and below Québec.  None seems to have returned to Acadia.  Pierre dit Boucher and Marie-Madeleine's daughters married into the Cochu, Louet, and Boissel families, all in Canada.  One wonders if any of Pierre and Marie-Madeleine's descendants emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1662, married Françoise, daughter of Guyon Chiasson dit La Vallée and Jeanne Bernard, at Beaubassin in November 1682, and died at St.-François-du-Sud below Québec in April 1741, in his late 70s. 

Pierre dit Boucher's second son Louis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1664, ended the family's welcome at Chignecto after impregnating Marie-Josèphe, daughter of seigneur and former royal governor Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière and Marie Denys, in c1688.  Louis likely spent the rest of his days in France. 

Pierre dit Boucher's third son Antoine, born probably at Port-Royal in c1666, died probably in Canada in February 1724, in his late 50s, and did not marry.

Pierre dit Boucher's fourth son Jacques l'aîné dit Boucher, born probably at Port-Royal in c1672, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Canadians Louis Lavergne and Marie-Anne Simon, at Québec in February 1699, and died at the city's Hôtel Dieu in December 1704, in his early 30s.

Pierre dit Boucher's fifth son Charles de Cloridan, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Anne-Thérèse, daughter of Canadians Jean Minet and Anne Bonhomme, at Québec in May 1719, and died in Canada by September 1724, probably in his late 40s. 

Pierre dit Boucher's sixth son Jean dit Ducharme, born at Chignecto in August 1680, married Marie-Élisabeth, daughter of Canadians François Hubert and Geneviève Fuquel, at Québec in November 1715 and died there in January 1717, age 36.

Pierre dit Boucher's seventh son Jacques-François dit Bonsecours, born at Chignecto in September 1682, was counted at Mont-Louis, Canada, in 1699, age 17, working as a fisherman.  He evidently did not marry.  Towards the end of Queen Anne's War, Bonsecours, at age 30, served as a corsair captain on his ship, Le Trompeur.

Pierre dit Boucher's eighth son Simon-Joseph, born at Chignecto in January 1685, evidently died young.  Ironically, Simon-Joseph's godmother was the Marie-Josèphe Le Neuf de La Vallière with whom his older brother Louis got in so much trouble.

Pierre dit Boucher's ninth and youngest son Jacques le jeune, born at Chignecto in March 1686.  His godmother also was Marie-Josèphe Le Neuf de La Vallière.  Jacques le jeune married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Canadians Robert Jeanne and Françoise-Madeleine Savard and widow of Étienne Rocheron dit Rochon, at Lauzon near Québec in August 1704 and died there in April 1737, age 51.377

Triel dit Laperrière

Jacques Triel dit Laperrière, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wife Marie Savoie created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave him five children, three sons and two daughters, who married into the La Chaume dit Loumeray and LeBlanc dit Jasmin families.  Only one of their sons married, but he had no sons of his own.  Jacques and Marie's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and in the French Maritimes.  If any of Jacque's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Triquel dit Patron, born probably at Port-Royal in c1677, married Catherine, daughter of Jean Bourg and Marguerite Martin and widow of Jean Turpin dit La Giroflée, in c1720 probably at Annapolis Royal, moved on to Île Royale after their marriage, and settled on Île Madame.  Their daughter Agnès and husband Pierre Guédry came to the colony in August 1751 and were living with her parents on Île Descoust when a French official counted them there in February 1752. 

Jacques's second son Nicolas, born probably at Port-Royal in c1682, became a fisherman at Annapolis Royal but probably did not marry. 

Jacques's third and youngest son Alexis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1684, died at Port-Royal in February 1708, in his mid-20s, before he could marry.401

Lambert

René Lambert, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife, whose name has been lost to history, created a small family in the colony.  She gave him two children, both sons, both of whom married.  René and his descendants settled not only on Rivière St.-Jean, but also in the French Maritimes.  If any of René's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Older son René, fils, born in Acadia in c1687, married Marie, daughter of Vincent Longuépée and Madeleine Rimbault, in c1723, place unrecorded, and moved to the French Maritimes.  A French official counted them at the Île Madame fishery south of Île Royale in February 1752. 

René's younger son Jean, born in Acadia in the late 1680s or early 1690s, married in c1720 to a woman whose name also has been lost to history, place unrecorded.418

Haché dit Gallant

Michel Haché dit Gallant, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Anne Cormier created a large family in the colony.  Between 1691 and 1716, Anne gave him a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  In c1720, Michel moved his family to Port-La-Joye, today's Rocky Point, across from present-day Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.  They may have been the first Acadians to settle on the island.  Their daughters married into the Poirier, Rassicot, Prétieux, Jacquemin dit Lorraine, Hango dit Choisy, Duval, and Belliveau families, many on Île St.-Jean.   All of Michel's seven sons created families of their own, and each resulted in vigorous lines of the Haché dit Gallant family.  At least 17 of Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but the vast majority of the Hachés, who also called themselves Gallant, remained in greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement.  In Louisiana, their named evolved from Haché to Achée

Oldest son Michel dit Gallant, fils, born at Chignecto in c1691, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine Hébert, at Grand-Pré in October 1711.  They settled at Chignecto.  In the late 1720s, however, they joined his family at Port-La-Joye, returned to Chignecto in c1734, and settled at Veskak, west of the Missaguash.  Between 1712 and 1738, Madeleine gave Michel, fils 13 children, four sons and nine daughters, most of them born at Chignecto.  Six of their daughters married into the Savoie, Saulnier, Doucet, Girouard, and Cormier families, all in Canada.  All of Michel, fils and Madeleine's sons created families of their own.  Strangely, Michel dit Gallant, fils died in Ste.-Croix Parish, Bordeaux, France in September 1765, age 74, four years after his wife Madeleine LeBlanc had died at Trois-Rivières, Canada in October 1761.  One wonders how he and Madeleine had become separated and how he ended up in France. 

Oldest son Michel dit Michaud dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1714, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Joseph Gravois and Marie Cyr, in c1737.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1748, Marie-Anne Michaud seven children, two sons and five daughters.  Michaud remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of René Blanchard and Marie Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in June 1749.  They settled at Chignecto.  One wonders if she gave him any children.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported Michaud, Marie-Madeleine, and their children to South Carolina, but they did not remain there.  Allowed to return to greater Acadia via sea, they took refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs with many of their Haché kinsmen.  Michaud and his family evidently were among the 300 Acadians captured at Restigouche in the summer of 1760.  The British held them as prisoners of war at Fort Cumerberland, formerly Beauséjour, in the early 1760s.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they settled at Grande-Digue, in today's eastern New Brunswick, where Michaud died in c1768, age 54.  Three of his daughters married into the Bonnevie, Downing, Léger, and Caissie families.  Both of his sons created their own families

Older son Michel III, born in c1738, married Anne, daughter of Charles Melanson and Anne Breau of Annapolis Royal, at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1787, Anne gave Michel III nine children, three sons and six daughters.  They, too, settled at Grande-Digue, where Michel III died in October 1809, age 71.  Five of Michel III's daughters married into the Haché/Gallant, Boudreau, Poirier, Goguen, and Arsenault families at Grande-Digue.  All three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Isaac, born in c1772, married Scholastique Arsenault at Grande-Digue in c1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, Scholastique gave Isaac eight children, a son and seven daughters, at Grande-Digue between 1799 and 1816. 

Michel III's second Laurent, born in c1773, married Nathalie, daughter of François Bourque and Élisabeth Broussard, at Grande-Digue in c1803.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1804 and 1829, Nathalie gave Laurent 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Laurent died at Grande-Digue in July 1847, age 74. 

Michel III's third and youngest son Maurice, born in 1787, married Gertrude, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Després and Madeleine Bourg, at Grande-Digue in July 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1810 and 1832, Gertrude gave Maurice 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Maurice died at Grande-Digue in June 1861, age 74. 

Michel dit Michaud's younger son Basile, born in c1742, married in c1765 a woman whose name has been lost to history.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1766 and 1770, she gave Basile three sons.  He and his family settled at Mont-Carmel and at Rustico on St. John's Island, formerly Île St.-Jean, where his great-grandfather had settled half a century earlier.  Two of Basile's three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, born in c1766, married Théotiste, daughter of Pierre Arsenault and ____ Chiasson, in c1790.  After living for a time on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, they resettled at Mont-Carmel, on southwest shore of St. John's Island, which the British renamed Prince Edward Island in 1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1825, Théotiste gave Joseph eight children, four sons and four daughters. 

Basile's third and youngest son François, born in c1770, married Marie Arsenault.  They settled at Rustico, on the north side of Prince Edward Island, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave him a son in 1800. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's second son Jean dit Gallant, born in the late 1710s, married Marguerite, another daughter of Joseph Gravois and Marie Cyr, in c1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1760, Marguerite gave Jean five children, a son and four daughters.  Unlike his oldest and youngest brothers, who the British deported to South Carolina in 1755, Jean and his family escaped the British roundup at Chignecto and took refuge at Restigouche.  Jean's youngest daughter was born there in February 1760, and two of his older daughters married into the Bourgeois and Tardif families there in January 1761.  Evidently Jean's only son did not create a family of his own. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's third son Joseph le jeune, born in c1728, evidently remained on Île St.-Jean and was deported to France, perhaps with his father, in 1758.  Joseph le jeune married Anne, also called Agnès, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Élisabeth Lord, perhaps at Bordeaux, France, in c1766.  Joseph le jeune became a ship's carpenter and settled at Morlaix in Brittany before returning to Bordeaux.  Between 1768 and 1783, Anne gave Joseph le jeune at least six children in France, five sons and a daughter.  Joseph le jeune died at Bordeaux in January 1785, age 57.  His family remained in France. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's fourth and youngest son Pierre le jeune, born at Chignecto in June 1734, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Madeleine Gaudet, in c1755, probably at Chignecto and also ended up in South Carolina.  They, too, returned to greater Acadia by boat and joined their kinsmen at Restigouche.  After the British attacked Restigouche in the summer of 1760, Pierre le jeune and Marguerite moved on to Canada and settled at Pointe-du-Lac, near Trois-Rivières.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1766, Marguerite gave Pierre le jeune three children, two sons and a daughter.  Pierre le jeune died at Louiseville, between Trois-Rivières and Montréal, in March 1766, age 32. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's second son Joseph dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1693, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Gaudet and Cécile Mignot, at Beaubassin in July 1721, and moved on to Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1740, Marie gave Joseph 10 children on the island, eight sons and two daughters.  Joseph died on the island between October 1743 and November 1747, in his late 40s or early 50s.  One of his daughters married into the Deveau family on the island.  Four of Joseph dit Gallant's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1722, died at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on the north shore of island in October 1743, age 21, still a bachelor. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's second son Jean-Charles, called Charles, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1725, married Anne, daughter of Jacques Deveau and Marie Pothier of Chignecto, at Port-La-Joye in November 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him a son, Charles, fils, also called Louis, born on the island in October1754.  After surviving the crossing to France in 1758, Charles, père remarried to Marie, daughter of Charles Hébert and Marie-Claire Daigre, at Cherbourg in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1776, Marie gave Charles, père a dozen more children, five sons and seven daughters.  Charles, père died in France before 1784, in his 50s or early 60s.  Two of his sons and a daughter emigrated to Louisiana.  Daughter Bonne by second wife Marie married into the St. Germain family in the Spanish colony.  Only one of his two sons married there, but no lasting line came of it. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste-Charles, called Jean-Charles, born at Cherbourg, France, in December 1762 and followed his family to Nantes.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Pinet dit Pinel and Anne-Marie Durel, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1784.  They followed his brother and sister to Louisiana and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  They had a daughter, Martine, born soon after they reached the colony.  Jean-Charles died probably at Lafourche in c1786, age 24, soon after reaching the colony.  He fathered no sons.  Daughter Martine married into the Thibodeaux family and lived to a ripe old age.  She was, in fact, one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join her ancestors. 

Charles's younger son Frédéric, born at Nantes in c1770, followed his brother and sister to Louisiana and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but he did not remain there.  Frédéric died at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, on the Mississippi above New Orleans, in March 1839, age 69.  He did not marry, so his father's line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's third son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1728, married Anne Pitre on the island in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him two sons.  He, too, survived the crossing to France in 1758, remarried to Anne Comeau in c1766, and settled at St.-Servans, near St.-Malo.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune three more children, two sons and a daughter, between 1767 and 1772.  Meanwhile, his two sons from his first marriage died at St.-Servan in the late 1760s.  In 1772, Jean-Baptiste le jeune took his family to La Rochelle.  None of them emigrated to Louisiana. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's fourth son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1729, married Marguerite Montaury on the island in c1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him at least one son.  

Joseph dit Gallant, père's fifth son François le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1730, survived the crossing to France in 1758 and was living at Cherbourg in 1767, still a bachelor.  He may not have married .  

Joseph dit Gallant, père's sixth son René-François, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1732, evidently died young. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's seventh son Jacques le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1736, also survived the crossing to France in 1758.  He married Anne, daughter Paul Boudrot and Marie Doiron, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, in November 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1782, Anne gave Jacques le jeune 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Jacques le jeune died in France in c1782.  Two of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's eighth and youngest son Louis, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1740, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's third son Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1696, married Anne-Marie or Marie-Anne, daughter of Élie Gentil and Cécile Martin, at Beaubassin in February 1719 and followed his family to Port-La-Joye.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1743, Marie-Anne gave Jean-Baptiste a dozen children, nine sons and three daughters, on Île St.-Jean.  Jean-Baptiste died on the island by 1752, in his 40s or 50s.  Two of his daughters married into the Olivier, Deveau, and Gautrot families on Île St.-Jean and in France.  Seven of Jean-Baptiste's nine sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born probably at Chignecto in c1720, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie of Annapolis Royal, at Port-La-Joye in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1766, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste, fils eight children, six sons and two daughters, on Île St.-Jean and at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, where the family was deported in 1758.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in February 1767, age 47.  Daughter Anne-Marie married into the Benoit family in France and emigrated to Louisiana.  In 1785, Jean-Baptiste's widow also emigrated to Louisiana from France with one of his nieces. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1725, married Marie, daughter of Charles Doiron and Anne Thériot of Pigiguit, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1758, Marie gave Pierre le jeune four children on the island, three sons and a daughter.  After losing his wife and all four of his children on the crossing to St.-Malo, Pierre le jeune remarried to Anne, daughter of Joseph Dumont and Marie-Madeleine Vécot, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, in July 1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1765, Anne gave Pierre le jeune four more children at St.-Énogat and nearby St.-Servan.  Pierre le jeune remarried again--his third marriage--to Madeleine, daughter of surgeon Jacques Dingle and Marguerite Landry of Grand-Pré and widow Charles Pellerin, at St.-Servan in September 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine gave Pierre le jeune three more children there between 1768 and 1772.  Pierre le jeune died at Nantes in June 1777, age 52.  Two of his sons and a daughter emigrated to Louisiana from France.  Daughter, Marie-Anne, by second wife Anne Dumont, married into the Charrié, de St. Angel, and Barre families in the Spanish colony.  His older son created a vigorous line there.

Older son Pierre-Alexis, by third wife Madeleine Dingle, born at St.-Servan, France, in March 1768, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Dantin and his French wife Jeanne Gemier, at Assumption in June 1795.  Their daughters married into the Ledet, Marlbrough, Pitre, Roger, and Usé families.  Three of Pierre-Alexis's five sons, all born on the Lafourche, married into the Ayraud or Aymond, Boutary, and Simoneaux familes. 

Pierre le jeune's younger son Joseph-François, also called Joseph dit Canawche, born at St.-Servan in June 1772, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He married Anne-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste LeBlanc and his second wife Marguerite Célestin dit Bellemère of Grand-Pré and Belle-Île-en-Mer, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in January 1803.  He moved to the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin in the early 1800s and remarried to Anastasie, daughter of François Guilbeau and Madeleine Broussard and widow of Donat Breaux, at St. Martinville, St. Martin Parish, in October 1819.  Joseph died in nearby Lafayette Parish in December 1831, age 59.  His daughters, all by first wife Marguerite, married into the Daigle, Hébert, and L'ascange or Lascourieges familes.  His only son Jean-Pierre, also from first wife Marguerite, may not have married. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's third son François le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1726, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie of Annapolis Royal, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave François le jeune a daughter the following year.  After a French official counted them on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752, they disappear from the historical record.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's fourth son Michel le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1731, evidently did not create a family of his own.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's fifth son Antoine, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1734, married Marie Clémençeau on the eve of island's dérangement.  Antoine and Marie, with his youngest brother and their widowed mother, survived the deportation to St.-Malo in 1758.  Between 1760 and 1769, at St.-Énogat and St.-Servan, Marie gave Antoine six children, two sons and four daughters; all but two of them died in childhood.  She gave him another son at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1777, but he, too, did not survive childhood.  Antoine died near Nantes in c1782, in his late 40s.  One of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France and married into the Heusé family there. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's sixth son, another Michel le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1736, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's seventh son Joseph le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1738, survived the deportation to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, moved on to St.-Malo to join his family, and married Marie, another daughter of Joseph Dumont and Marie-Madeleine Vécot, at nearby St.-Énogat in June 1760.  Between 1761 and 1771, at St.-Servan, she gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  She gave him another son at Châtellerault in Poitou in 1774, and another daughter at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1776.  Joseph le jeune worked as a master ship's carpenter at Nantes and drowned at nearby Paimboeuf, the city's port, in January 1778, age 40.  Four of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France, one of them with brother Jean-Baptiste's widow.  Three of his daughters married into the David, Ramirez, and Calandrot families in the Spanish colony.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's eighth son Louis, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in June 1741, survived the deportation to Cherbourg, France, in 1758 and also moved on to St.-Malo to be near his family.  After being held as a prisoner of war in England in 1760-63 following his capture on a French privateer, Louis married Anne, daughter of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, at St.-Servan in February 1765.  She gave him two children, a son and a daughter, in 1766 and 1767.  Louis remarried to Françoise, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret and widow of Alexis Renaud, at St.-Servan in February 1770.  She gave him two more children, a son and a daughter, at St.-Servan in 1771 and 1772.  Françoise gave him another son at Châtellerault in Poitou in 1774, and four more children, three sons and a daughter, at Chantenay near Nantes between 1776 and 1781.  Louis was the only member of his father's family to emigrate to Louisiana.  With him went his second wife, one of his sons, two nephews and a niece.  He settled in the Bayou Lafourche valley and died there after 1798.  His son Pierre-Charles, by second wife Françoise, married into the Bourgeois family and settled on the bayou. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's ninth and youngest son Georges, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in December 1743, survived the deportation to St.-Malo with his older brother Antoine and their widowed mother.  Georges married Perrine, daughter of Pierre Basset and Louise Mace, at St.-Servan in January 1768.  Between 1768 and 1771, she gave him three children, a son and two daughters, at St.-Servan, a daughter at Châtellerault in 1774, and a son and a daughter at Chantenay in 1776 and 1781.  Georges worked as a seaman at Chantenay and died there, or at sea, in c1782, in his early 40s.  None of his children emigrated to Louisiana. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's fourth son Charles dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1698, married Geneviève, daughter of Pierre Lavergne and Anne Bernon, at Annapolis Royal in February 1727, joined his family at Port-La-Joye, and then settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the center of the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1750, Geneviève gave Charles seven children, four sons and three daughters, most of them born on Île St.-Jean.  When the British rounded up the Acadians on the island in 1758, Charles and most of his family were among the habitants there who escaped to present-day eastern New Brunswick.  They also were among the Acadians who returned to St. John's Island, today's Prince Edward Island, after Le Grand Dérangment.  Their daughters married into the Richard, Chiasson, and Melanson families.  Three of Charles's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jacques-René, born in c1727, married Anne, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Judith Belliveau of Chignecto, in October 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1759, Anne gave Jacques seven children, including one son and five daughters.  While the rest of his family escaped the British in 1758, Jacques-René and his family were deported to St.-Malo.  Three of his children, including an unnamed newborn, died at sea or from the rigors of the crossing.  Jacques-René survived the crossing but died at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in May 1759, not long after reaching the mother country.  Anne remarried at nearby St.-Énogat four years later.  Two of her Haché daughters emigrated to Louisiana, and one of them married into the Sevin and Babin families in the Spanish colony.   

Charles dit Gallant's second son Charles-Hyacinthe, born on Île St.-Jean in 1733, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Charles dit Gallant's third son Joseph, born on Île St.-Jean in c1744, escaped the British roundup with his parents and younger siblings in 1758 and took refuge with them at Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Joseph married Marie-Madeleine, daughter Charles Doucet and Anne Arseneau, in c1765 probably at Nepisiguit, today's Bathurst, New Brunswick, where the marriage was blessed in June 1772.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1792, Marie-Madeleine gave Joseph 14 children, six sons and eight daughters, most of them born at Nepisiguit/Bathurst, where Joseph died in November 1822, age 78.  Six of his daughters married into the DeGrâce, Boudreau, Morrison, Pitre, Lavigne, Landry, and Godin families at Bathurst.  Five of his six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Michel, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1766, married Marie, daughter of Ambroise Godin and Madeleine Bergeron, at Bathurst in October 1791.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Michel 10 children between 1792 and 1811.  Michel remarried to Madeleine Cormier, widow of Béloni Thériot, at Bathurst in April 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him another daughter in 1814. 

Joseph's second son Gabriel, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1770, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Joseph's third son Sylvain, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1772, married Anastasie, daughter of Canadians Jean Lavigne and Isabelle Baudry, at Bathurst in September 1796.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1797 and 1818, Anastasie gave Sylvain a dozen children, all born at Bathurst. 

Joseph's fourth son Joseph, fils, born at Bathurst in c1780, married Hélène Landry probaby at Bathurst in c1802. 

Joseph's fifth son Simon, born at Nepisiguit in c1782, married Vénérande, daughter of Simon Arseneau and Marie Melanson, at Bathurst in September 1706.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1808 and 1825, Vénérande gave Simon eight children, five sons and three daughters, all born at Bathurst. 

Joseph's sixth and youngest son Antoine, born at Nepisigiut in c1784, married Céleste, daughter of Rémi Landry and Charlotte Doiron of Grande-Anse, at Bathurst in April 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, Céleste gave Antoine seven children between 1813 and 1823.  They settled at Caraquet, near her home at Grande-Anse, New Brunswick.   

Charles dit Gallant's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born on Île St.-Jean in c1750, escaped with his family to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Hélène, daughter of Paul Richard and Renée Boudrot, in c1774 and settled at Île Miscou on the Baie des Chaleurs in c1775.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie, daughter of Joseph Goguen and Anne Arseneau, date unrecorded, probably on Île Miscou.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1775 and 1784, Jean-Baptiste's two wives gave him six children, one son and six daughters.  In 1798, Jean-Baptiste took his family to Rivière-Platte on Prince Edward Island, and moved on to Grand-Ruisseau, today's Egmont Bay, on the island's southwestern coast, in 1812.  Four of Jean-Baptiste's daughters married into the Gallant, Arseneau, Pineau, and Poirier families at Mont-Carmel and Rustico on the island.  His only son created a family of his own. 

Charles le jeune, born probably at Miscou in c1776, married cousin Juliette, daughter of Pierre Gallant and Modeste Arseneau, at Rustico in c1800.  They remained at Rustico, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Juliette gave him eight children, four sons and four daughters, between 1802 and 1823.

Michel dit Gallant, père's fifth son Pierre dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1701, married Cécile, another daughter of Pierre Lavergne and Anne Bernon, in c1726, moved on to Île St.-Jean, and settled at Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the interior of the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1743, Cécile gave Pierre dit Gallant nine children, three sons and six daughters, on the island.  Cécile died in 1743; Pierre did not remarry.  Like older brother Charles dit Gallant, Pierre dit Gallant and most of his family also escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where Pierre died before 1760 while in exile.  Four of his and Cécile's daughters married into the Deveau, Lejeune, Chiasson, Ruelle, and Boudrot families at Port-La-Joye, Petit-Bras-d'Or on Cape Breton Island, and at St.-Servan and St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, France, so not all of the family escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean.  All three of Pierre dit Gallant's sons escaped the British and created their own families. 

Oldest son Louis, born on Île St.-Jean in c1727, married Anne, daughter of François Chiasson and Anne Doucet of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in January 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1768, Anne gave Louis eight children, seven sons and a daughter.  Louis and his family escaped the British twice, on Île St.-Jean in 1758 and at Restigouche in 1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, one of their children was born at Restigouche in February 1761.  After the war with Britain finally ended two years later, they settled at Shippagan, present-day northeastern New Brunswick, on the south shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where Louis died in April 1814, age 87.  His daughter Anastasie married a Doucet cousin from St. John's Island.  All seven of Louis's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Alexandre, born at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in c1753, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph Gallant, in c1775 probably at Shippagan and settled at Egmont Bay, on the southwest coast of St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, Scholastique gave Alexandre six children, all sons, between 1776 and 1821. 

Louis's second son Xavier, born at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in c1755, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of Michel Doucet and Louise Belliveau, in c1778 probably at Shippagan and also settled at Egmont Bay.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1780 and 1792, Madeleine gave Xavier seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

Louis's third son Firmin, born in c1758, married Madeleine Poirier probably at Shippagan in c1780 and remarried to Marie Bernard

Louis's fourth son Fabien, born probably at Restigouche in c1760, married Marie, daughter of Jean Doucet and Marguerite Gaudet, probably at Shippagan in c1782.  Fabien followed his older brothers to St. John's Island and settled at Rustico, on the island's north shore.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1820, Marie gave Fabien 10 children, five sons and five daughters. 

Louis's fifth son Joseph, born in exile in c1762, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph Chiasson and Anne Haché, at Île Miscou.  They settled with his family at Shippagan.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1793 and 1797, Scholastique gave Joseph four children, two sons and two daughters. 

Louis's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, born in exile in c1764, married cousin Françoise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and his first wife Hélène Richard, in c1786.  They also settled at Shippagan.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave Jean-Baptiste three sons between 1788 and 1792.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie Vautour, who, according to Bona Arsenault, gave him another son in c1828. 

Louis's seventh and youngest son Louis, fils, born in exile in c1766, married cousin Judith, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and Hélène Richard, in c1786.  They remained at Shippagan, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Judith have him seven children, four sons and three daughters, between 1791 and 1814.  

Pierre dit Gallant's second son Pierre, fils, born on Île St.-Jean in c1728, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Deveau and Marie Pothier, at Port-La-Joye in November 1753.  They also settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est, where, According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre, fils two daughters in 1756 and 1758.  One wonders what happened to them during the island's dérangement

Pierre dit Gallant, père's third and youngest son Jean-Baptise le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1734, escaped the British in 1758.  He married Anne, daughter of Pierre Doiron and Anne Forest of Chignecto, in c1760 on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1779, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune eight children, four sons and four daughters.  He took his family down to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières in 1769, moved on to Amherst, formerly Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, in 1770, to nearby Nappan in c1780, and then to Bédèque, on the south shore of St. John's Island in 1788.  One of Jean-Baptiste le jeune's daughters married into the Roussel family.  At least two of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-François, born in c1766, married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Marguerite Lavigne, in c1788.  They also settled at Bédèque on St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave Jean-François a son in c1790.  Jean-François remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Michel Brun and Marguerite Comeau, in c1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Jean-François three more children, a son and two daughters, between 1802 and 1806.  Jean-François died at Bédèque in May 1821, age 55. 

Jean-Baptiste le jeune's third son Pierre, born in c1775, married Esther Brun in c1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, Esther gave Pierre three children, a son and two daughters, between 1790 and 1802.  Pierre remarried to Marie, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Rosalie Léger, at Richibouctou, eastern New Brunswick, in September 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre two more children, a son and a daughter, in 1818 and 1824.

Michel dit Gallant, père's sixth son François dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1707, married Anne, daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry of Tracadie, at Port-La-Joye in June 1735 and settled near her family at Tracadie, on the north shore of the island.  By August 1752, however, they had moved to upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the island's interior.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1763, Anne gave François dit Gallant 14 children, 10 sons and four daughters.  One of their daughters, Marie-Rose, married into the Blanchard family.  All 10 of François's sons escaped the British in 1758 and created their own families. 

Oldest son Sylvestre, born on Île St.-Jean in c1736, married Marie, daughter of Ambroise Poirier and Marie Gaudet of Chignecto, in c1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1798, Marie gave Sylvestre eight children, four sons and four daughters.  They settled at Grande-Digue, eastern New Brunswick, where Sylvestre died in November 1820, age 84.  Two of Sylvestre's daughters married Léger brothers whose mother was a Haché, and a third daughter married into the Arseneau family.  Three of Sylvestre's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Marin, born in c1760, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Michel Haché and Anne Melanson of Shédiac, in c1782.  They settled at nearby Grande-Digue.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1808, Marguerite gave Marin eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Marin remarried to Rosalie Babin, widow of Dominique Melanson, at Memramcook, New Brunswick, in July 1826, when he was age 66, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Caissie and Anastasie Léger, at Shédiac in August 1732, when he was 72.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marin fathered no children by his second and third wives.  He died at Grande-Digue in February 1743, age 83. 

Sylvestre's second son Thomas, born in c1762, married Hélène, another daughter of Michel Haché and Anne Melanson, in c1795.  They were among the pioneer settlers of Barachois, on the southern Gaspé peninsula near Percé.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1796 and 1814, Hélène gave Thomas six children, four sons and two daughters. 

Syvestre's fourth and youngest son Isidore, born in c1782, married Radegonde, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Rosalie Léger, at Richiboutou, eastern New Brunswick, in November 1803 but settled at nearby Grande-Dugue.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1804 and 1826, Radegone gave Isidore eight children, four sons and four daughters. 

François dit Gallant's second son Louis, born on Île St.-Jean in c1738, married Ursule Doucet in c1760 and, after the war with Britain, settled at Rustico on the north shore of St. John's Island.  

François dit Gallant's third son Jacques-Ange, called Ange, born on Île St.-Jean in c1740, married Marguerite Picard in c1766.  

François dit Gallant's fourth son Jean-François, born on Île St.-Jean in c1742, married Agnès, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carré in c1765 and also settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's fifth son René, born on Île St.-Jean in c1744, married Marguerite, daughter of Olivier Blanchard and Catherine Amireau of Petitcoudiac, in c1768.  They settled at Le Bocage, Petit-Rivière, near Caraquet, New Brunswick.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1790, Marguerite gave René 11 children, six sons and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Godin, Thériault, and Thibodeau families at Caraquet.  All six of René's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son François, born in c1770, married Nathalie Thibodeau in c1792 and remained at Caraquet.   According to Bona Arsenault, Nathalie gave François 10 children, six sons and four daughters, between 1795 and 1824. 

René's second son Isaac, born in c1772, married Madeleine Thibodeau in c1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1805 and 1823 at Caraquet, Madeleine gave Isaac nine children, three sons and six daughters. 

René's third son Eusèbe, born in c1784, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Charlotte Léger, at Caraquet in November 1809.  They also remained at Caraquet.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1810 and 1835, Marie-Blanche gave Eusèbe 11 children, six sons and five daughters. 

René's fourth son Jean, born in c1787, married Clothilde, daughter of Pierre Pinet and Barbe Dugas, at Caraquet in June 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, Clothilde gave Jean a son in 1814.  Jean remarried to Sophie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Léger and Claire-Félicité Robichaud, at Caraquet in September 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Sophie gave Jean five more children, two sons and three daughters, between 1817 and 1831. 

René's fifth son Isaïe, born in c1788, married Matie, daughter of Cyrille Léger and Vénérande Savoie, at Caraquet in November 1818.  According to Bona Arsenault, Matie gave Isaïe a son in 1819 and a daughter in 1821.  Isaïe remarried to Adèle, daughter of Jean Malais and Anne-Marie Gionnais, at Caraquet in November 1835, when he was 47.  According to Bona Arsenault, Adèle gave Isaïe four more children, a son and three daughters, between 1838 and 1854. 

René's sixth and youngest son Romain, born in c1789, married Félicité Léger at Caraquet in September 1819.  They, too, remained at Caraquet, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Félicité  gave Romain 10 children, six sons and four daughters, between 1822 and 1839.  

François dit Gallant's sixth son Joseph, born on Île St.-Jean in c1748, married Euphrosine, daughter of Jacques Arsenault and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, in c1775.  They settled with his older brothers at Rustico, on the north shore of St. John's Island. 

François dit Gallant's seventh son Charles, born on Île St.-Jean in 1752, married Anne, daughter of Paul Boudrot and Marie-Josèphe Doiron.  They settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's eighth son Pierre, born on Île St.-Jean in c1754, married Modeste, another daughter of Jacques Arsenault and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, in c1778.  They settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's ninth son Simon, born in c1759, married Marie Gaudet in c1780 and settled at Rustico.   

François dit Gallant's tenth and youngest son Basile, born in c1763, married Marguerite Boudrot in c1785 and also settled at Rustico.

Michel dit Gallant, père's seventh and youngest son Jacques dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1712, married Marie-Josèphe, called Josèphe, another daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry, at Port-La-Joye in June 1735, on the same day his brother Francois dit Gallant married Josèphe's sister Anne.  Jacques and Josèphe also settled at Tracadie.  They were still there in August 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1754, Josèphe gave Jacques dit Gallant 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Tracadie.  Jacques and his family also escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge at Restigouche, where they escaped another British roundup in the summer of 1760.  In 1773, Jacques took his family to Île Miscou on the southern shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Four of his daughters married into the Boudrot, Arsenault, Doucet, and Cormier families at Restigouche and Miscou and settled at Miscou and Bathurst in New Brunswick and on the îles de la Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Three of Jacques's six sons created families of their own. 

Second son Joseph le jeune, born at Tracadie in c1740, married an Arseneau in c1765 and settled at Egmont Bay on the southwest shore of St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1766 and 1780, she gave Joseph le jeune five children, two sons and three daughters. 

Jacques dit Gallant's fifth son Cyprien, born at Tracadie in c1748, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Bernard and Nathalie Arseneau, in c1770 and settled at today's Bloomfield in the far northwest corner of St. John's Island west of Cascumpec.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1790, Marie gave Cyprien a dozen children, 10 sons and two daughters.  

Jacques dit Gallant's sixth and youngest son Charles le jeune, born at Tracadie in c1749, married Félicité Gautrot in c1775.  They were at Miscou, near his father, between 1776 and 1779; moved down to Nepisiguit, today's Bathurst, New Brunwick, in 1784; and moved on to Margaree, on the west coast of Cape Breton Island, in 1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1776 and 1800, Félicité gave Charles le jeune 11 children, sox sons and five daughters.  Charles le jeune died at Margaree in June 1842, age 93.403

Mirande

Emmanuel dit Tavare Mirande, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Bourgeois created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave him nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Emmanuel died by January 1707, when Marguerite remarried--her third marriage--at Port-Royal.  Emmanuel and Marguerite's daughters married into the Caissie, Arseneau, Mignot, and Cordeau dit Des Lauriers families.  Only one of Emmanuel's sons married.  Beginning in the 1710s, Emmanuel's surviving children left Chignecto for Île Royale, where they remained.  If any of Emmanuel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Chignecto in October 1680, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Gaudet l'aîné and Anne Blanchard, in c1704 probably at Chignecto, and died between 1726 and July 1732, perhaps on Île Royale, in his late 40s or early 50s.  Marie gave him seven children, five sons and two daughters.  In 1713-14, Joseph, described as a fisherman/habitat, spent the winter at Baie-de-Miré on Île Royale with his brother-in-law, Michel Caissie.  In August 1714, Joseph received permission from officials at Louisbourg to settle on the island.  Evidently he liked what he saw there.  His family was counted at Baie-de-l'Indienne, up the coast from Louisbourg, in 1724 and 1725, and down the coast at Petit-Lorembec in 1734.  Joseph's daughter Marie married into the Chauvin family and settled at Lorembec.  Only two of Joseph's sons married.  

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto, married Gillette, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Grandin and Anne-Hyacinthe Dupuis, at Port-d'Orléans, Île Royale, in c1737, and died by 1749, probably on the island.  

Joseph's second, third, and fourth sons Jean-Baptiste, Paul, and Charles, born probably at Chignecto, evidently died young.  

Joseph's fifth and youngest son Joseph, fils, born at Baie-de-l'Indienne in c1720, married Marie-Barbe-Élie, daughter of Pierre-César-Alexandre Le Grand and Madeleine Dihars of Newfoudland, at Port-d'Orléans, up the coast, in c1748.  They settled at Lorembec, near Louisbourg, where, in April 1752, a French official counted them on a fishing concession granted to Joseph, père.  With Joseph, fils and Barbe-Élie were 3-year-old son Jean-Baptiste and 8-month-old daughter Josette.  Next to them lived Joseph, fils's sister Marie, her husband, Georges Chauvin, and two of their sons.

Emmanuel's second son François, born at Chignecto in October 1682, survived childhood but probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's third son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1689, survived childhood but did probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's fourth son Louis-Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1692, survived childhood but did probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's fifth son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1695, died at Port-Royal in July 1707.

Emmanuel's sixth and youngest son Alexis, born probably at Chgnecto in c1698, probably died young.404

Mignot

Jean-Aubin Mignot dit Châtillon, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Anne Dugas created another small family in the colony.  Anne gave him six children, five sons and a daughter, who married into the Gaudet and Poirier families.  Three of Jean-Aubin's five sons married but only a few of them remained at Chignecto.  Decades before Le Grand Dérangement, most of them moved on to Jean-Aubtin's native Canada and settled on the lower St. Lawrence.  If any of Jean-Aubin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1680, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Emmanuel Mirande dit Tavare and Marguerite Bourgeois, in c1703 probably at Chignecto, moved on to Canada, and died by June 1724 in his early 40s, no place given, but it may have been at Kamouraska on the lower St. Lawrence.  Marie-Madeleine gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Allaire, Paquet dit Lavallée, and Roy families at Kamouraska and Beaumont in Canada.  Three of their sons married.  

Oldest son Pierre, born probably in Canada in c1706, married Agathe, daughter of Canadians Jean-Pierre Roy dit Desjardins and Angélique Autin, at Kamouraska in February 1739.   

Jean's second son Jean-François, born at Rivière-Ouelle on the lower St. Lawrence in October 1708, evidently died young.   

Jean's third son Guillaume, born in Canada in the early 1700s, married Hélène, daughter of Canadians Pierre Michaud and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau, at Kamouraska in January 1735.   

Jean's fourth and youngest son Antoine, born in Canada in the early 1700s, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Canadians Jean Ouellet and Marie-Geneviève Tardif, at Kamouraska in January 1753.

Jean-Aubin's second son Alexis, born at Chignecto in September 1685, evidently died young.

Jean-Aubin's third son Jacques, born probably at Chignecto in c1689, died at Kamouraska in December 1755, in his his mid-60s, but never married.

Jean-Aubin's fourth son Louis-Joseph dit Aubin, born probably at Chignecto in c1692, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Pierre Michaud and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau, at Kamouraska in October 1714, and settled in Canada.  Marie-Anne gave Louis-Joseph nine children, three sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Talbot, Marot dit Labonté, Baguenard, Pilote, and Rolandeau dit Laurendeau families in Canada.  Two of their sons married.   

Oldest son Jean-François dit Aubin, his sister Marie-Claire's twin, born at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny below Québec in October 1732, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Louis Gagné and Marie-Marthe Rouau, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in February 1765.   

Louis-Joseph's second son Louis-Joseph, fils, born at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in July 1735, may not have married. 

Louis-Joseph, père's third and youngest son Jacques dit Aubin, born at St.-Pierre-du-Sud below Québec in April 1740, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Charles Rousseau and Marie-Catherine Talbot, at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in October 1763, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Gagné and Marie Métivier, at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in November 1782.

Jean-Aubin's fifth and youngest son Pierre dit Châtillon, born probably at Chignecto in c1695, married Jeanne, daughter of François Autin and Marie Boucher, at Kamouraska in November 1714, remarried to Marie-Catherine-Anne, daughter of Joseph Ouellet and Françoise Lizotte, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière above Québec in November 1718, and, at age 50, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Françoise, daughter of Pierre Roy dit Desjardins and Marie-Anne Martin and widow of François Sirois dit Duplessis, at Kamouraska in May 1745.  First wife Jeanne gave Pierre dit Châtillon one child, a daughter, who married into the Chassé family in Canada.  Second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne gave him 10 more children, nine sons and a daughter, who married into the Milville dit Deschênes family in Canada.  Third wife Marie-Françoise gave him no more children.  Seven of his nine sons, all by his second wife, created families of their own.   

Oldest son Jean, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1710s, married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Bernard and Cécile Gautrot, at Beaubassin in February 1744.  One wonders if they remained there. 

Pierre dit Châtillon's second son Pierre, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the late 1710s or early 1720s, married Madeleine, daughter of René Bernard and Anne Blou, at Beaubassin in August 1746 and died by 1749, no place given.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's third son Charles, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the 1720s, married in c1755 probably at Chgnecto to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Pélagie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Galerne and Marie-Josèphe Hébert, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in February 1763 during Le Grand Dérangement  

Pierre dit Châtillon's fourth son Étienne, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in July 1727, died there in October 1728, age 1 1/2.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's fifth son Jean-François, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in April 1729, married Marie Bourg in c1753, place unrecorded, perhaps at Kamouraska, remarried to Françoise, daughter of Ignace Lecours and Marie-Anne Hubert, at Québec in September 1758 during Le Grand Dérangement, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Antoine Gaboury and Françoise Cotin dit Dugal, at Ste.-Foy near Québec in October 1761, and remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Ambroise Roberge and Marie-Louise Goulet, on Île d'Orléans below Québec in July 1779.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's sixth son Alexis, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in February 1731, died in March.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's seventh son Étienne, the second with the name, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in May 1732, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie-Anne Cyr, in c1750 probably at Kamouraska, and remarried to Marie-Angélique, daughter of Louis Gazaille and Françoise Beaudreau and widow of Louis Minet dit Montigny, at St.-Denis-sur-Richelieu near Montréal in November 1782.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's eighth son Joseph-Marie, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in May 1734, probably died young.  

Pierre dit Châtillon's ninth and youngest son Michel dit Aubin, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in April 1736, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Deneau and Marie-Geneviève Morin, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1763, and remarried to Marie-Rose, daughter of Sébastien Hervé and Rosalie Tremblay, at St.-Roch-des-Aulnaies below Québec in February 1779.405

Moyse

François Moyse dit Latreille, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Vincent created a good-sized family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him six children, four sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Pouget dit Lapierre family.  Three of their four sons married.  Latreille and Madeleine and their descendants settled at Passamaquoddy, on Rivière St.-Jean, at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes, where they could be found as early as the late 1710s.  One of Latreille's sons married in the French West Indies on the eve of the Acadian Grand Dérangement, but he may not have settled there.  They were, then, not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  At least four of François dit Latreille's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son François dit Latreille, fils married Marie, daughter of Sébastien Brun and Huguette Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in September 1713, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Marie gave François, fils 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Ozelet, Pitre, Dugas, Bourg, Blanchard, LeBlanc, and Guédry families.  All of François dit Latreille, fils's sons married.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Blanchard and Anne Dupuis and sister of one of his sister's husbands, in c1744 perhaps at Annapolis Royal, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  

François, fils's second son François III married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Ambroise Hébert and Marie-Madeleine Bourg, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in September 1758, on the eve of the islands' Grand Dérangement, and remarried to Ursule, daughter of Joseph Bourg and Françoise Dugas, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, France, in November 1761, during exile 

François, fils's third son Joseph married Marie Hébert in c1758 probably on Île St.-Jean. 

François, père's second son Louis dit Latreille left Rivière St.-Jean or Annapolis Royal and moved to the French Maritimes, where he married Marie-Louise, daughter of Claude Petitpas and his Mi'kmaq wife Marie-Thérèse, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1718. 

François, père's third son Pierre married Marie-Rose, daughter of Paul Daniel and ____ and widow of ____ Mercier, at Grand-Bourg, Guadeloupe, in the French West Indies, in January 1753, so he likely was a sailor or merchant. 

François, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph died at Annapolis Royal, age 15, in September 1714, before he could marry.419

Bertrand

Claude Bertrand, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Catherine Pitre created a fairly large branch of the family in the colony.  Catherine gave him 10 children, at least seven sons and two daughters.  Both of their daughters married into the Comeau, Le Breton, Martin, and Blanchard families.  Four of their seven sons married, two of them to sisters.  Claude, Catherine, and their descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Port-Razoir near Cap-Sable on the Atlantic coast, and in the French Maritimes.  At least 13 of Claude's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but only one family line survived there.  Most of Claude's descendants could be found in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Claude, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1686, survived childhood but did not marry.

Claude, père's second son René, born at Port-Royal in c1688, also survived childhood but did not marry. 

Claude père's third son Jean l'aîné, born at Port-Royal in c1692, married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Jacques Léger dit La Rosette and Madeleine Trahan, in c1722.  They settled at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1739, Marie-Françoise gave Jean l'aîné three sons at Chepoudy.  Records show that a fourth son was born there in c1743.  Jean l'aîné and members of his family escaped the British in 1755 and made their way up to Canada, while others evidently found refuge in the French Maritimes.  Jean l'aîné died at Québec in late December 1757, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that fall and winter.  An older son created his own family in Canada.  One of Jean l'aîné's younger sons was deported to France in 1758 and created his own famliy there. 

Jean l'aîné's third son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Chepoudy in c1739, escaped the British with his family in 1755 and moved on to Canada.  He married Marie-Geneviève, daughter Daniel Chevigny and Marie-Rose Guertin, at Lavaltrie on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal in July 1768.   

Jean-Baptiste, fils married Josephte, daughter of François Filion and Marguerite Sarazin, at Ste.-Thérèse, near Montréal, in February 1803. 

Olivier married Julienne Welch of Ireland. 

Olivier, fils married Basilice, daughter of Olivier Nepveau and Angèle Richer, at Ste.-Scholastique, near Montréal, in November 1864.  One of their daughters, Bernadette, married Lorenzo-Calixte, son of Honoré Bertrand and Élise Mathieu, at Notre-Dame d'Ottawa in July 1908; Lorenzo-Calixte was from a French-Canadian branch of the Bertrand family.  Their son Jean-Jacques Bertrand served as the twenty-first premier of Québec Province from October 1968 to May 1970. 

Jean l'aîné's fourth and youngest son Eustache, born probably at Chepoudy in c1743, was deported to France in 1758 and became ship's carpenter.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Benjamin Landry and Marguerite Babin, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in March 1764.  She gave him at least three children, a son and two daughters, at Cherbourg between 1768 and 1772, but two of them died in infancy.  The family was part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Marguerite gave Eustache another daughter in Poitou in October 1774.  They retreated to Nantes with dozens of other Acadians in December 1775.  Marguerite gave him at least five more children, three sons and two daughters, at Nantes between 1776 and 1784, but three of them died young.  Eustache, Marguerite, and four of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marguerite gave him no more children in the Spanish colony.  His oldest daughter married into the LeBlanc and Dubois families on Bayou Lafourche.  His only remaining son Louis-Martin survived childhood but did not marry, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Claude, père's fourth son Jean le jeune, also called Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in c1696, married Anne, daughter of Toussaint Doucet and Marie Caissie and widow of Denis Gaudet, in c1731.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1732 and 1740, Anne gave Jean le jeune two children, a son and a daughter, at Chepoudy.  The family evidently escaped the British in 1755, retreated to the French Martimes, and the British deported them to France in 1758.  Jean le jeune died probably in France before September 1763, and wife Anne died there before February 1771.  Their only son created his own family there. 

Jean, born probably at Chepoudy in c1732, married first cousin Marguerite, daughter of Toussaint Blanchard and Angélique Bertrand, in France in c1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1767, Marguerite gave Jean four children, two sons and two daughters.  Records show that she gave him another daughter at Cherbourg in 1769.  The family was part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated to Nantes with dozens of other disgruntled Acadians in December 1775.  Jean died at Chantenay near Nantes in November 1781, age 49.  His widow and a son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where the created his own family.

Only surviving son Jean-Nicolas, called Nicolas or Colas, born in France in c1765, married Marguerite-Tarsille, daughter of Amand Pitre and Geneviève Arcement, at New Orleans on Chrismas Day, 1785, soon after they reached Louisiana from France on separate ships.  She gave him a son at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans in January 1789, and they settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Nicolas died at Opelousas, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, in February 1804, age 42, but his succession inventory was filed at the Interior Parish courthouse on Bayou Lafourche in December 1805, so he evidently was still a resident of that parish at the time of his death.  His only son Jean-Baptiste married into the Rassicot family on upper Bayou Lafourche and had a son of his own.  Nicolas's, in fact, was the only line of Acadian Bertrands to survive in the Bayou State.

Claude, père's fifth son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, in c1731.  They setteld at Chignecto before moving to Pobomcoup near Cap-Sable in 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre two children, a daughter and a son, in 1732 and 1734.  Pierre died probably at Pobomcoup between 1734 and 1739, in his late 30s or early 40s.  The family may have moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  The British evidently deported them to France in 1758.  Daughter Marie married into the Lamoureux dit Rochefort family of Île St.-Jean at Cherbourg in October 1763 and chose to remain in France in 1785.  Pierre's only son also created his own family in France but chose to resettle in Louisiana. 

Pierre-Jacques, born at Pobomcoup in c1734, became a sailor in France and married Catherine, daughter of Charles Bourg and Marguerite Landry, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in February 1764.  They lived for a time at Le Havre before returning to Cherbourg.  Between 1764 and 1772, Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques at least four children, three sons and a daughter, at Le Havre and Cherbourg.  They were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques another daughter in Poitou in March 1774.  In December 1775, they retreated to Nantes with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians.  They buried a son at Nantes in November 1777, and Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques four more children, two sons and two daughters, there between 1777 and 1785.  Pierre-Jacques, Catherine, and seven of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Catherine gave him no more children in the Spanish colony.  Three of their daughters married into the Caillier, Boudreaux, and Bourg families on Bayou Lafourche.  Only one of Pierre-Jacques's sons survived childhood, but he did not marry, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Claude, père's sixth son Jacques, born in c1704, married Madeleine, another daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, perhaps at Cap-Sable in c1740.  They may have moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752, and the British evidently deported them to France in 1758.  Jacques died in France before April 1766.  Wife Madeleine died in Poitou in August 1782, age 72.  Daughter Marie-Anne, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1742, died in Poitou less than a week later, age 40. 

Claude, père's seventh and youngest son Charles, born perhaps at Point-Razoir near Cap-Sable in c1706, evidently died young.415

Maissonat

Privateer Pierre dit Baptiste Maissonat, a 1680s arrival, and his three wives, Judith Soubiran, Madeleine Bourg, and Marguerite Bourgeois, created a small but influential family in the colony.  First wife Judith gave him five children, three sons and two daughters.  Second "wife" Madeleine gave him only one child, a daughter.  Third wife Marguerite gave him only one more child, a daughter.  His daughters married into the Cahouet, Le Grange, Tréguy or Treilli, Winniett, and Vincent dit Desmarets families.  None of Pierre dit Baptiste's sons married, so only the blood of this family survived in the colony.  If any of the privateer's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

But the privateer left more than his "blood" in the colony.  Baptiste's and Madeleine Bourg's "marriage" was annulled, date unrecorded, when it was discovered that his first wife was still alive.  First wife Judith, in fact, gave him his three sons during the late 1690s!  (Madeleine legitimately married Pierre, son of Daniel LeBlanc and Françoise Gaudet and widower of Marie Thériot, probably at Port-Royal in c1697.  She gave him eight more children.)  At age 16, in c1711, Baptiste and Madeleine's daughter Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste married William, also called Guillaume, Winniet, a lieutenant in the British garrison at Annapolis Royal.  William, who may have been born to Huguenot parents in France, was a decade older than his bride at the time of their wedding.  He resigned his commission soon after his marriage and settled in the community, where he became an important merchant and ship owner.  He fathered 13 children by Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste, including three daughters who married prominent Britons in the colony.  Winniet served on the Nova Scotia colonial Council during the 1730s and drowned probably on a business venture at Boston, Massachusetts, in April 1741.  Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste remained at Annapolis Royal, where, as a widow, she wielded as much political influence as her husband and sons-in-law. 

In 1714, after Queen Anne's War had ended, the old privateer was living at Chignecto with his third wife Marguerite Bourgeois, likely having put some distance between himself and the British authorities in Annapolis Royal.421

Savary

Mason and stone cutter François Savary, a 1680s arrival, and his wife Geneviève Forest created a small family in the colony.  Geneviève gave him only one child, a son, who married.  Their descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, and on Île St.-Jean in the French Maritimes.  At least one of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Son André, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Bernard Doucet and Madeleine Corporon, at Annapolis Royal in February 1712.  They moved on to Minas and then to the French Maritimes.  Between 1714 and 1739, Marie-Marthe gave André 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Doiron and Horne families, one on Île St.-Jean, the other two in Canada.  Three of André's fives sons created families of their own.  A French official counted André, now a widower, with some of his children at Petite-Ascension on the south coast of Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  Others were counted ont he island at Anse-à-Dubuisson and Anse-aux-Morts.  He and some of his children evidently left Île St.-Jean before the island's dérangement in late 1758.  André died in St.-Jean Parish on Île d'Orléans downriver from Québec City in November 1757, in his late 60s. 

Oldest son Bernard, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1714, married Marie, also called Madeleine, daughter of François Michel dit La Ruine and Marguerite Meunier, in c1734 perhaps at Minas, and moved on to the French Maritimes, where they were counted with his widowered father at Petite-Ascension in August 1752.  The British deported them to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  One of Bernard's daughters, Anne-Marie-Madeleine, born probably at Petite-Ascension in c1754, settled near St.-Malo, where she married.  She emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785 as a young widow.  

André's second Joseph, born at Minas in February 1721, married Françoise, daughter of Antoine Barrieau and Angélique Thibodeau, in c1747, place unrecorded.  They, too, moved on to the French Maritimes.  In August 1752, a French official counted Joseph and his family at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the interior of Île St.-Jean.  He died at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse across from Québec City in January 1758, age 37, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians in the Québec area that fall and winter. 

André's third Charles, born probably at Minas in c1727, was counted with his family at Petite-Ascension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  Charles married Louise-Geneviève, daughter of Louis Closquinet and Marguerite Longuépée, in c1755 probably on Île St.-Jean.  He and his family were deported to France aboard the British transport Supply in late 1758.  Charles died at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in April 1759, soon after his arrival. 

André's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Minas in c1732, was counted with his family at Petite-Acension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752 and then disappears from history. 

André's fifth and youngest son Charles-Olivier, born probably at Minas in c1739, was counted with his family at Petite-Acension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  He became a carpenter but evidently did not marry.  Along with other members of his family, he was deported to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  In February 1760, perhaps having become a sailor, he embarked on the ship Le Prince-Édouard and disappears from history.422

Simon dit Boucher

André Simon dit Jacques Le Boucher, the butcher, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie Martin dit Barnabé created a fairly large family in the colony.  Marie gave him nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Dubois dit Dumont, Viarrieu dit Duclos, Petitpas, Des Roches, and Préjean families, some of them in the French Maritimes.  Three of their sons created families of their own.  André and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also in the French Maritimes and on Newfoundland.  They were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale.  If any of André's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there, Bona Arsenault's assertions notwithstanding. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher, born probably at Port-Royal in c1689, became a carpenter and a fisherman.  He married Marie, daughter of Philippe Pinet and Catherine Hébert, in c1714 probably at Annapolis Royal, and moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  He died probably on the island after October 1742.  Marie gave Pierrot eight children, three sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Gaffé, Bernard, Hervé, Dubordieu, Des Roches, and Le Breton families, all in the French Maritimes or in Newfoundland.  Only one of Pierrot's sons married.  

Oldest son Michel, born at Port-Toulouse in c1715, likely died young. 

Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher's second son François, born probably on Île Royale between 1724 and 1726, married cousin Anne, daughter of Charles Doucet and Madeleine Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.   

Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher's third and youngest son Nicolas, born "dans le bois" on Île Royale in May 1733, probably died young.

André's second son Charles dit Boucher, born probably at Port-Royal in c1696, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in February 1730, moved on to the French Maritimes, and died on Île Royale in September 1743, in his late 40s.

André's third son Paul, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, evidently died young.

André's fourth and youngest son André dit Boucher, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1713, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Doucet dit Maillard and Marie Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in February 1742, and likely remained there.  He and his family evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  André, fils died at St.-Michel-de-Bellechasse across from Québec City in January 1758, age 46, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians in the Québec area that fall and winter.430

Cellier

Pierre Cellier dit Normand, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie-Josèphe-Aimée Lejeune created a small family in the colony.  Marie-Josèphe gave him 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Two of his daughters married into the Guénard or Gainer dit Gaudereau and Deguilla dit Villeneuve families, one of them on Île Royale.  Only two of their sons married, to sisters.  Pierre and Marie-Josèphe descendants settled at Chignecto, Minas, and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale in the French Maritimes.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

The oldest and second sons, name unrecorded, born probably at Minas in the 1690s, died young.

Pierre's third son Jacques dit Normand, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Marie-Blanche, called Blanche, daughter of Louis Hébert and Anne-Marie Labauve, at Grand-Pré in August 1744, and moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted in August 1752 on the south side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  Jacques dit Normand died before July 1761, place unrecorded, during Le Grand Dérangement.

Pierre's fourth son, unnamed, , born probably at Minas in the early 1700s, died young.

Pierre's fifth son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1706, married Anne, another daughter of Louis Hébert and Anne-Marie Labauve, at Grand-Pré in November 1741, and also moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted on the south side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752. 

Pierre's sixth and youngest son Antoine, born posthumously at Minas in February 1710, evidently died young.433

Bugeaud

Sr. Alain Bugeaud, surgeon, notary, churchwarden, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Élisabeth Melanson created a small but influential family in the colony.  Between 1695 and the early 1700s, Élisabeth gave the surgeon six children, fives sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Gautrot family.  Four of their sons created families of their own.  His oldest son's line was especially vigorous.  Sadly, the Great Upheaval destroyed two of his younger sons' family lines.  Sr. Alain died in c1708 probably at Minas, in his late 30s or early 40s.  His and Élisabeth's descendants settled not only at Grand-Pré, but also at Pigiguit and on Île St.-Jean after 1748.  Called sieur, dame, or madamoiselle when addressed by French officials, there was nothing "typically" Acadian about the members of this family.   At least 11 of Alain's descendants, all from his oldest son, emigrated to Louisiana from Pigiguit via Maryland in 1766, but the great majority of Sr. Alain's descendants, again from the oldest son, could be found at the northwestern edge of greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1699, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau, in c1720 probably at Minas, settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1746, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph 15 children, eight sons and seven daughters.  When Joseph took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749, his four oldest son, three of them married, remained in peninsula Acadia.  In August 1752, a French official counted Le sieur Joseph, his wife, and nine of their children on the north bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the interior of the island.  Joseph died on Île St.-Jean in c1758 in his late 50s on the eve of the island's dérangement.  The British deported members of the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Five of Joseph's daugthers married into the Gauthier, Arsenault, Allain, Gravois, and Dugas families on Île St.-Jean and in greater Acadia.  All eight of Joseph's sons created their own families in greater Acadia, Louisiana, and France, but not all of the lines survived. 

Oldest son Alain le jeune, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1721, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Chiasson and Marie Boudrot, at Beaubassin in October 1741.  One wonders what became of them after 1755. 

Joseph's second son Joseph, fils, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1723, married Anne, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois, probably at L'Assomption in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1767, Anne gave Joseph, fils six children, two sons and five daughters.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  Officials counted Joseph, fils, Anne, and four of their children at Oxford, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, in July 1763.  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Joseph's daughters married into the Constant, Vives, Buquoy, Prevost, Verret, and Landry families in Louisiana.  Reflecting the family's status in old Acadia, Joseph's youngest daughter Marie-Madeleine, born in Maryland in c1765, married Auguste, son of district commandant Don Nicolas Verret, at Ascension on the river in February 1784.  Oldest daughter Marguerite's two husbands also were colonial shakers and movers.  Both of Joseph's sons married into the Landry and Picou families and settled on the river and the western prairies.

Joseph, père's third son Étienne, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1724, may have remained at Pigiguit when his parents and younger siblings left for Île St.-Jean in 1749.  He married Brigitte, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Chênet and Anne Pothier of Île St.-Jean, in c1750 or 1751 perhaps at L'Assomption.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1761, Brigitte gave Étienne four children, two sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755, and they, too, were counted by colonial officials at Oxford in July 1763.  Brigitte died soon afterwards, and Étienne was a widower with four children when he followed older brother Joseph to Louisiana in 1766.  They also settled at Cabahannocer.  His twin daughters married into the Blanchard and Bourg families at Ascension and St.-Gabriel on the river.  Étienne remarried to fellow Acadian Anne Forest, widow of Pierre Babin, at New Orleans in c1768 and returned to Cabahannocer.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him another son in c1768.  Two of his three sons by both wives married into the Landry, Bourg, and Lambremont families, but only one of the lines survived, on the river. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Paul le jeune, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1726, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Agnès Cormier of Chignecto, at Beaubassin in June 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1770, Marie gave Paul le jeune six children, three sons and three daughters.  They remained at Chignecto, escaped the British in 1755, and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They were counted at Restigouche in 1759 and were still there in May 1760, when daughter Marguerite, born the previous October was baptized at the French outpost.  When the British attacked Restigouche that summer and defeated the French and Acadian forces there, evidently the family escaped again.  They took refuge on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in Gaspésie and settled with other refugees at Bonaventure.  Paul le jeune's daughters married into the Poirier, Savoie, and Bourdages families at Bonaventure.  Two of his three sons created their own families there.

Second son Firmin, born in c1766, married Marie-Esther, daughter of Raymond Bourdages and Esther LeBlanc, probably at Bonaventure in c1789.  Firmin worked as a navigator at Bonaventure.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1791 and 1811, Marie-Esther gave Firmin 15 children, eight sons and seven daughters.  Firmin died at Bonaventure in 1839, age 73.  Four of his daughters married into the Gauthier, Henry, Poirier, and Belliveau families at Bonventure.  Five of his eight sons created their own families. 

Third son Théophile, born at Bonaventure in c1799, married Reine, daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1824.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1824 and 1840, Reine gave Théophile 11 children, seven sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Firmin's fourth son Jacques-Triphon, born at Bonaventure in c1800, married Élizabeth, daughter of Fabien Poirier and Angélique Gauthier, at Bonaventure in January 1826.  According to Bona Arsenault, between in 1828 and 1829, Élizabeth gave Jacques two children, a son and a daughter.  Jacques remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jean Goulet and Apolline Comeau, at Bonaventure in September 1830.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1833 and 1846, Marguerite gave Jacques seven more children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Firmind's fifth son Joseph-Léonard, called Léonard, born at Bonaventure in c1802, married Marguerite Poirier.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave him a son in 1833.  Léonard remarried to Émilie, another daughter of Jean Goulet and Apolline Comeau, at Bonaventure in May 1834.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1835 and 1840, Émilie gave Léonard five more children, three sons and two daughters.  Léonard remarried again--his third marriage--to Séraphie, daughter of Jean-Urbain Bourg and Julienne Poirier, at Bonaventure in January 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1852, Séraphie gave Léonard seven more children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure.  He father 13 children in all. 

Firmin's seventh son François-Xavier, born at Bonaventure in c1808, married Angèle, another daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1834 and 1845, Angèle gave François-Xavier five children, four sons and a daughter.  François-Xavier remarried to Rose, daughter of Romuald Boudreau and Geneviève Mercier, at Bonaventure in April 1849.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1850 Rose gave François-Xavier another son. 

Firmin's eighth and youngest son Lazare, born at Bonaventure in c1811, married Charlotte, daughter of Joseph Couture and Anne Ferguson, at Grande-Rivière, near Percé in Gaspésie, in January 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1839 and 1850, Charlotte gave Lazare seven children, six sons and a daughter, at Grande-Rivière. 

Paul le jeune's third and youngest son Charles le jeune, born in c1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bernier and Euphrosine LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in April 1790.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1815, Marguerite gave Charles le jeune 14 children, eight sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Fournier, Vallée, Boutin, Pagé, and Bernard families at Bonaventure.  Four of Charles le jeune's eight sons created their own families. 

Second son Pierre-Hubert, born at Bonaventure in c1795, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Saint-Coeur and Euphrosine LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in January 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1825 and 1829, Marie gave Pierre three children, two sons and a daughter.  Pierre-Hubert remarried to Élizabeth, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Labrecque and Marguerite-Suzanne Deslauriers dite Babineau, at Bonaventure in January 1842.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1843 and 1849, Élizabeth gave Pierre three more children, a son and two daughters. 

Charles le jeune's fourth son Charles, fils, born at Bonaventure in c1799, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph-Alexis Porlier and Marthe Bujold of Carleton, at Bonaventure in August 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1839, Scholastique gave Charles, fils seven children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure.

Charles le jeune's sixth son Jacques, born at Bonaventure in c1803, married Sara, daughter of Hugh Colter and Brigit Kelly of Armagh, Ireland, at Bonaventure in September 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1856, Sara gave Jacques seven children, fives sons and two daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Charles le jeune's seventh son Jules, born at Bonaventure in c1805, married Basilice, daughter of Louis-Régis Essiambre dite Sans-Façon and Sophie Mercier of Carleton, at Bonaventure in September 1838.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1858, Basilice gave Jules eight children, fives sons and three daughters, including a set of  twins, at Bonaventure. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Jean, born at L'Assomption, Piguiguit, in c1729, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and married Anne, daughter of island pioneer François Douville and Marie-Élisabeth Roger, at Port-La-Joye in January 1751.  A French official counted them on Rivière-du-Nord-Est near his parents in the island's interior in August 1752; they had no children.  Between 1753 and 1756, Anne gave Jean three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Their sons died at sea.  Jean died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in March 1759, age 30, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  His line of the family died with him.  One wonders what happened to daughter Marie-Rose, born on Île St.-Jean in c1753, and Jean's widow Anne Douville.  Did she return to North America or remain in France? 

Joseph père's sixth son Charles, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1731, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749, was counted with them on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752, and married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Cormier and Marie Thériot of Chignecto in c1758 either in exile or on Île St.-Jean on the eve of the island's dérangement.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1759 and 1776, Marguerite gave Charles eight children, all daughters.  If Charles and Marguerite were on Île St.-Jean in 1758, they escaped the British and sought refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Daughter Marguerite-Pélagie was born at Restigouche in late December 1759 and baptized there the following May.  The British attacked the outpost that summer of 1760 and defeated the French and Acadian force there.  Charles and his family evidently escaped again and joined other refugees at Bonaventure in Gaspésie.  Charles died there in December 1798, age 65.  Seven of his daughters married into the Dugas, Doucet, Henry, LeBlanc, Boudreau, and Porlier families at Bonaventure, so the blood of this family line survived. 

Joseph, père's seventh son François-Placide, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1736, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  He evidently escaped the British in 1758, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, and married Marie-Josèphe Bernard in c1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1795, Marie-Josèphe gave François 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  François and his family also settled at Bonaventure in Gaspésie, where he died in 1807, age 71.  His daughters married into the Bourdages, Arsenault, Poirier, and Hébert families at Bonaventure.  All four of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Louis, born in c1766, married Modeste, daughter of François Arsenault and Anne Poirier, at Bonaventure in November 1791.  According to Bona Arsenault, Modeste gave Louis two children, a daughter and a son, in 1793 and 1795.

François-Placide's second son François-Placide, fils, born probably at Bonaventure in c1773, married Apolline, daughter of Pierre dit Cliche Poirier and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in January 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1799 and 1812, Apolline gave François-Placide, fils seven children, three sons and four daughters.  François-Placide, fils remarried to Agathe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste-Michel Lepage and Rose Arsenault, probably at Bonaventure in November 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1816 and 1829, Agathe gave François-Placide, fils seven more children, six sons and a daughter, so he fathered 14 children in all at Bonaventure.  Four of his daughters, all from his first wife Apolline, married into the Bernard and Lepage families at Bonaventure.  Six of his nine sons by both wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Sébastien, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1801, married Rose, daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, probably at Bonaventure in January 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Sébastien a daughter in 1828.  Sébastien remarried to Angélique, daughter of Amant Babin and Ursule Poirier, at Bonaventure in January 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1834 and 1835, Angélique gave Sébastien two sons.  He remarried again--his third marriage--to Mélanie, daughter of Vital Poirier and Louise Gauthier, at Bonaventure in May 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1841 and 1854, Mélanie gave Sébastien seven more children, four sons and three daughters.  He fathered 10 children in all. 

François-Placide, fils's second son Paul, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1805, married Rose, daughter of Alexandre Bernard and Élizabeth Amirault, at Bonavenure in May 1831, but he died at Bonaventure in the following October before he could father any children.

François-Placide, fils's third son François, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1812, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, at Bonaventure in May 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1840 and 1853, Marie gave François seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

François-Placide, fils's fourth son Marcel, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1816, married Geneviève, daughter of Hubert Bernard and Marie-Reine Cavanaugh and widow of Jean Hébert, at Bonaventure in January 1845.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1845 and 1856, Geneviève gave Marcel five children, a son and four daughters. 

François-Placide, fils's fifth son Fabien, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1821, married Véronique, daughter of Ange Poirier and Louise Arbour, at Bonaventure in January 1847.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1848 and 1849, Véronique gave Fabien two children, a son and a daughter.  Fabien remarried to Élizabeth, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, probably at Bonaventure in 1853.  According to Bona Arsenault, Élizabeth gave Fabien two more children, a son and a daughter, in 1855 and 1856. 

Oldest son François, by first wife Véronique Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1848, married Marie Anglehart in 1872.  Their son Fabien le jeune represented Bonaventure in the Québec legislature from 1921 to 1924, after which he served as provincial court judge for many years. 

François-Placide, fils's sixth and youngest son Olivier, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1825, married Agnès, daughter of Joseph Cayouette and Lucie Bernard, probably at Bonaventure in 1856. 

François-Placide, père's third son Étienne, born probably at Bonaventure in c1775, married Marie, daughter of Jean Hébert and Rose Cyr, at Bonaventure in July 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1800 and 1823, Marie gave Étienne 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Bonventure.  Two of their daughters married into the Poirier family at Bonaventure.  Five of Étienne's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Étienne, fils, born at Bonaventure in c1800, married cousin Marie, daughter of Maxime Poirier and Scholastique Bujold, at Bonaventure in January 1826.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1829 and 1840, Scholastique gave Étienne, fils six children, four sons and two daughters. 

Étienne, père's second son Jules, born at Bonaventure in c1802, married Marie, daughter of François Laviolette and Marie Gauthier of Carleton, at Bonaventure in January 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1827 and 1844, Marie gave Jules six children, three sons and three daughter, at Bonaventure.

Étienne, père's third son Joseph, born at Bonaventure in c1808, married cousin Charlotte, daughter of Joseph Lepage and Geneviève Bujold, at Bonaventure in January 1835.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1835 and 1849, Charlotte gave Joseph seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Étienne, père's fourth son Nicolas, born at Bonaventure in c1812, married cousin Marie, another daughter of Joseph Lepage and Geneviève Bujold, in January 1835, three days after his brother Joseph's marriage.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1839 and 1858, Marie gave Nicolas eight children, fours sons and four daughters. 

Étienne, père's sixth and youngest son Alexandre, born at Bonaventure in c1823, married Rose, daughter of Augustin Pitre and Marguerite Boudreau of Bathurst, formerly Nepisiguit, New Brunswick, in 1856.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Alexandre three children, two sons and a daughter, before 1860. 

François-Placide, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph-Alain, called Alain, born probably at Bonventure in c1792, married Geneviève, daughter of Joseph Cayouette and Élisabeth Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1834, Geneviève gave Alain 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Bonaventure.  Two of their daughters married into the Garant and Bourque families at Bonaventure.  Three of Alain's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre-Alain, born at Bonaventure in c1814, married Marie, daughter of Cyrille-Joël Lepage and Modeste Bernard, at Bonaventure in January 1842.

Joseph-Alain's second son Moïse, born at Bonaventure in c1816, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Fortin and Appoline Glazer, at Bonaventure in November 1850.

Joseph-Alain's third son François-Placide, born at Bonaventure in c1821 or 1825, married Sophie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, at Bonaventure in August 1846. 

Joseph, père's eighth and youngest son Mathurin, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1742, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  He evidently escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and in Gaspésie.  He married Marie, daughter of Joseph Bernard and Marguerite Arsenault of Chignecto, at Carleton, near Bonaventure in November 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1799, Marie gave Mathurin 10 children, four sons and six daughters, at Carleton.  Five of his daughters married into the Landry and Forest families, including five brothers, at Carleton.  Three of Mathurin's four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Romain-Sébastien, born probably at Carleton in c1778, married Vénérande, daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas and sister of five of his brothers-in-law, at Carleton in January 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1801 and 1819, Vénérande gave Romain 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Carleton.  Four of their daughters married into the Nadeau and Arsenault families, including two brothers, at Carleton.  All six of Romain's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Fidèle-Joseph, born at Carleton in c1801, married Marguerite-Nabée, daughter of Florent Arsenault and Nathalie-Rosalie Landry, at Carleton in January 1828.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1828 and 1846, Marguerite gave Fidèle 11 children, four sons and seven daughters, at Carleton.  Fidèle remarried to Félicité, daughter of Gabriel Audet and Charlotte LeBlanc, at Carleton in April 1847.  According to Bona Arsenault, she evidently gave him no more children.  

Romain-Sébastien's second son Fabien, born at Carleton in c1804, married Mélanie, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry, at Carleton in January 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1837 and 1846, Mélanie gave Fabien five children, two sons and three daughters, at Carleton.

Romain-Sébastien's third son Frédéric, born at Carleton in c1806, married Rosalie, daughter of Louis Allain and Madeleine LeBlanc, at Carleton in January 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1837 and 1849, Rosalie gave Frédéric seven children, four sons and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Romain-Sébastien's fourth son Joseph, born at Carleton in c1807, married Olympiade, daughter of Louis Vienneau and Marguerite Rochichaud, at Caraquet, New Brunswick, in May 1832 and remained at Caraquet. 

Romain-Sébastien's fifth son Charles, born at Carleton in c1808, married Julie, daughter of Sévérin LeBlanc and Angélique Nadeau, at Carleton in August 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1840 and 1849, Julie gave Charles five children, three sons and two daughters, at Carleton.

Romain-Sébastien's sixth and youngest son Louis-Lazare, born at Carleton in c1814, married Rose, daughter of Florent Arsenault and Nathalie-Rosalie Landry, at Carleton in February 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Louis-Lazare seven children, six sons and a daughter by 1850. 

Mathurin's second son Frédéric, born probably at Carleton in c1787, married Hélène, another daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carleton in January 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Hélène gave Frédéric a son at Carleton in 1815 who created his own family. 

Only son André, born at Carleton in c1815, married Joséphine, daughter of Sébastien Landry and Émérance Painchaud, at Carleton in February 1844.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1844 and 1849, Joséphine gave André five children, two sons and three daughters. 

Mathurin's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Carleton in c1799, married Rose, daughter of Lazare Allain and Luce Landry, at Carleton in January 1824.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1843, Rose gave Pierre seven children, four sons and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Sr. Alain's second son Louis-Amand, called Amand, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Granger and Isabelle Guilbeau, at Grand-Pré in February 1728.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1728 and 1730, Catherine gave Amand two children, a daughter and a son.  Amand remarried to Claire, daughter of Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in December 1730.  According to Bona Arsenault, Claire gave Amand another son in 1732, but he died an infant.  Amand moved his family to Île St.-Jean in 1748, the first of his siblings to go there.  The same French official counted Le sieur Amand, second wife Claire, and his son Amand-Louis from his first marriage on the north bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  In 1758, Amand and his family were among the island Acadians who escaped the British.  They found refuge at Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they were counted in 1759.  The escaped the British again in 1760 and found refuge in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  They were counted there at Bonaventure in 1765.  Amand's line of the family did not survive. 

Son Amand-Louis, born at Minas in c1730, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, Restigouche, and Gaspésie, where, as the only remaining son, he was counted with them at Bonaventure in 1765 and 1774.  After 1777, he disappears from the historical record, evidently not having married or fathered any children.   

Sr. Alain's third son Paul, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Marguerite, another daughter of Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in July 1726, and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1749, Marguerite gave Paul 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  At least two of their children, a son and a daughter, moved on to Île St.-Jean in the late 1740s or early 1750s.  The daughter, Mare-Madeleine, married into the Jousseaume family there, and they were deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Meanwhile, in 1755, the British deported Paul and the rest of his family to Pennsylvania.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania officials counted Paul, Marguerite, and three of their children, as well as one of their sons and his family, still in the colony.  They may have remained there.  Paul's daughter Marguerite married into the Dreux family at Philadelphia in September 1772. 

Fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born at Minas in c1743, was deported with his family to Pennsylvania in 1755.  He married Natalie, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Jeanne Martin of Annapolis Royal, at Philadelphia in February 1763.  Colonial officials counted them in the colony with an unnamed child the following June.  One wonders what became of them. 

Sr. Alain's fourth son Alain, fils, born probably at Minas in c1704, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Boudrot and Marie Corporon, at Grand-Pré in July 1727 and settled at nearby Pigiguit before moving on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1752, Madeleine gave Alain, fils 10 children, fours sons and six daughters.  In August 1752, the same French official counted Alain, fils, his wife, nine of their children, oldest son Alain III, his wife, and their infant son, at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Sci, a tributary of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  Two of their daughters married into the Thériot family of Cobeguit on the island.  Alain, fils and his family did not escape the British in 1758.  In December of that year, Alain, fils, wife Madeleine, and most of their children perished aboard the British transport Duke William, which sank in a North Atlantic storm on its way to St.-Malo. 

Oldest son Alain III, born in c1728, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Granger and Angélique Richard, probably at Pigiguit in c1750 or 1751 and followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  In c1751 and c1756, Marie-Madeleine gave Alain III two children on the island, a son and a daughter.  They, too, were deported to St.-Malo in 1758, but not aboard the Duke William.  The crossing aboard one of the so-called Five Ships nevertheless devastated the family.  Daughter Marie-Louise, age 2, died at sea, and Alain III and 8-year-old son Simon le jeune died at St.-Servan in February and March 1759, soon after reaching the Breton port.  With the death of young Simon, this line of the family ceased to exist.  A year later, in June 1760, Alain III's widow Marie-Madeleine remarried to widower Joseph Bourg and emigrated to Louisiana with her new family in 1785. 

Sr. Alain's fifth and youngest son, name unrecorded, born probably at Minas before1707, died young.435

Longuépée

Vincent Longuépée, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Rimbault created a small family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him six children, a son and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Dahy, Lambert, Papon dit Sans Regret, Closquinet dit Desmoulins, and Bénard families, many of them in the French Maritimes.  Vincent died by October 1714 probably at Minas, in his late 30s or early 40s.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled not only at Minas, but also at Cobeguit and in the French Maritimes; they were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  At least 12 of Vincent's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Only son Louis married Anne, daughter of Pierre Brassaud and Gabrielle Forest, in c1720, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Two of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from France. ...438

Bergeron

Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Geneviève Serreau de Saint-Aubin created a good-sized family in the colony.  Between 1696 and 1710, on Île d'Orléans near Québec, at Port-Royal, and Boston, Massachusetts, Geneviève gave the sailor-turned-merchant six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Roy and Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjeur and dit Bellefeuille families.  The date and place of Barthélemy dit d'Amboise's death has been lost.  His and Geneviève's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and on Rivière St.-Jean and were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  At least 30 of Barthélemy's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, but a substantial number of them also could be found in greater Acadia and Canada after Le Grand Dérangement.   

Oldest son Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils, born at St.-Françoise, Île d'Orléans, in January 1696, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Dugas and Marguerite Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in April 1721.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1743, Marguerite gave Barthélemy, fils four children, three sons and a daughter.  Other records say she gave him twice that many children, four sons and four daughters.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  Barthélemy dit d'Ambroise died probably in Nova Scotia while in exile.  His daughters married into the Godin dit Bellefontaine, Dugas, Lahure, Bernard, and Arseneau families in greater Acadia and Louisiana.  All four of his sons created their own families, but one of the lines did not survive.  After the war with Britain finally ended, Barthélemy, fils's widow and all of his children emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit d'Amboise, born at Annapolis Royal in c1722, married Marguerite Bernard.probably on Rivière St.-Jean in the late 1740s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1772, Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste six children, three sons and three daughters, in greater Acadia and Louisiana.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain ended, Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, their three sons and a daughter, with other Acadians under Jean-Baptiste's leadership, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingne, in 1764-65.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Their oldest daughter married into the De St.-German de Gournondage family at Cabahannocer and settled at New Orleans.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons married into the Forest and Gaudin dit Bellefontaine families, one of them to a first cousin, and settled in what became St. James Parish.  

Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils's second son Charles, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1728, married Isabelle, daughter of Jean Arceneau and Ann-Marie Hébert of Chignecto, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in the late 1740s or early 1750s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1763, Isabelle gave Charles three children, two sons and a daughter, on Rivière St.-Jean and at Halifax.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.   They followed brother Jean-Baptiste dit d'Amboise to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65 and settled at Cabahannocer.  Charles died there in c1766, age 38, soon after the family's arrival.  Isabelle also died that year.  Daughter Marguerite married into the Melançon family in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin but returned to the river.  Only one of Charles's two sons married, into the Forest family, and settled on Bayou Lafourche.

Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils's third son Barthélemy III, born probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas on Rivière St.-Jean in c1740, followed his family into exile and imprisonment and married Anne, another daughter of Jean Arseneau and Anne-Marie Hébert, probably at Halifax in c1762.  In 1764-65, they followed the Broussards from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and settled on Bayou Teche.  Both Barthélemy III and his infant son died on the Teche in late October, victims of an epidemic that struck the settlement that summer and fall, so this line of the family did not survive.  Anne, along with dozens of other Teche Acadians, fled to Cabahannocer on the river after the death of her loved ones and remarried to a LeBlanc there in November 1767. 

Barthélemy dit Amboise, fils's fourth and youngest son Germain, born probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743, followed his family into exile and imprisonment.  He followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1764-65 and settled at Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of Bénoni LeBlanc and Marguerite Hébert, in May 1768.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1780s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1774, Marguerite gave Germain three children, a son and two daughters.  Louisiana records show that she gave him at least seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Germain died on the upper Lafourche by November 1796, when his wife remarried there.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux and Metra families.  Two of his sons married into the Doiron and Thériot families on upper Bayou Lafourche and created vigorous lines.  One of Germain's grandsons may have been the only Acadian Bergeron who settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin during the antebellum period. 

Barthélemy, père's second son Michel dit de Nantes married in c1721 a woman whose name has been lost to history. According to Bona Arsenault, in 1722 and 1723, his wife gave Michel two children, a son and a daughter.  Michel remarried to Marie, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marie-Madeleine Landry, in c1727.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1741, Marie would have given Michel seven more children, five sons and two daughters.  Michel remarried again--his third marriage--in c1743 to another woman whose name had been lost to history, again at a place unrecorded.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1743 and 1747, his new wife would have given Michel two more daughters.  Michel remarried yet again--his fourth marriage!--to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot and widow of Jean Arseneau, in c1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1759, Marie-Jeanne would have given Michel four more children, two sons and two daughters--15 children in all.  According to Bona Arsenault, Michel dit de Nantes and his two youngest sons, Jean-Baptiste and Charles, went to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, but church and civil records there say otherwise.  Michel and his family evidently were captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  Four of his daughters married into the Landry, Godin, Louvière, Hébert, Part, and Bourgeois families in greater Acadia, Canada, and Louisiana.  Six of his eight sons created their own families.  Three of his daughters by his second and fourth wives emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Nantes, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Bourg and Marie Cormier of Chignecto, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1772, Marguerite gave Pierre 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  The British evidently captured the family in 1758 and held them as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  When the war with Britain finally ended, they chose to go not to Louisiana but to Canada.  They settled at Bécancour, on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, in 1764 and moved to nearby St.-Grégoire-dit-Nicolet in 1767.  At age 60, Pierre remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Lesieur-Duchesne and Françoise Moreau and widow of Jean-Baptiste Rivard-Bellefeuille, at Yamachiche, on the north shore of Lac-St.-Pierre, across from Nicolet, in October 1782.  She gave him no more children.  Five of his daughters married into the Prince, Massé, and Trudel families at Bécancour.  All four of his sons marrried. 

Oldest son David, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1749, married Angélique, daughter of Jean Morisette and Marie-Josèphe Houde, at Bécancour in November 1777.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1788, Angélique gave David five sons.  David remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Poirier and Marie Gaudet, at nearby Nicolet in February 1792.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave David another son.  All six of these sons created their own families. 

Oldest son David-Joseph, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1778, married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in January 1807. 

David's second son Pierre, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1781, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Madeleine Bergeron, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in May 1809. 

David's third son François-Sylvestre, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1783, married Esther, daughter of fellow Acadians Timothée Prince and Anne Richard, at Nicolet in April 1812. 

David's fourth son Charles le jeune, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1786, married Agathe, daughter of Ignace Pinard and Claire Richer, at Nicolet in August 1808, and remarried to Marie-Louise, daughter of Joseph Bourg, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1824. 

David's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1788, married Geneviève, daughter of Gabriel Martel and Marie-Anne Lyonnais, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in April 1812, and remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Belliveau and Marie Prince, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in February 1819. 

David's sixth and youngestson Joseph, by second wife Marie Poirier, born probably at Nicolet in the early 1790s, married cousin Marie-Victoire, another daughter Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in January 1807. 

Pierre dit Nantes's second son Charles, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1751, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexis LeBlanc and Marie-Josèphe Provencher, at Bécancour in April 1777.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1802, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles 15 children, seven sons and eight daughters.  At age 68, Charles remarried to Marie-Louise Baril, widow of Antoine Houde, at nearby Gentilly in January 1820, but they settled at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1821 and 1826, into Charles's mid-70s, Marie-Louise gave him four more daughters.   Between 1779 and 1826, then, Charles's two wives gave him 19 children, seven sons and 12 daughters.  Seven of his daughters married into the Tourigny, Doucet, Bourgeois, Pellerin, Belliveau, and Prince families at St.-Grégoire and Nicolet.  Six of his seven sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean-Charles, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1780, married cousin Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at nearby St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in May 1807. 

Charles's second son Joseph-Isaac, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1788, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians François Pellerin and Marie-Josèphe Poirier, at St.-Grégoire in October 1809.

Charles's third son Grégoire-Fabien, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1791, married Josephte, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Rosalie Bourg, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1818. 

Charlers's fourth son Michel-Élisée, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably Bécancour in c1795, married Thérèse, daughter of Jérôme Baril and Madeleine Kerbec, at Gentilly in July 1819. 

Charles's fifth son Jean-Hubert, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1797, married Marguerite, daughter of Augustin Hamel and Madeleine Prince, at St.-Grégoire in November 1818. 

Charles's sixth son Jean-Élisée-Isaïe, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1801, married Euphrosine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Prince and Élizabeth Hébert, at St.-Grégoire in November 1824. 

Pierre dit Nantes's third son Raphaël, born in c1758, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Amant Thibeau and Rosalie Cormier, at Bécancour in January 1780.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1781 and 1794, Marie-Josèphe gave Raphaël four children, a son and three daughters.  At age 69, Raphaël remarried Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Desruisseaux and Marie-Madeleine Boucher, at Bécancour in October 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him no more children.  One of his daughters married into the Beaudon family at nearby St.-Grégoire.  His only son created a family of his own. 

Pierre, born probably at Bécancour in c1791, married Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Belliveau and Geneviève Morin, at Nicolet in November 1801, and remarried to Esther Belliveau, widow of Joseph Hébert, probably at Nicolet in November 1840. 

Pierre dit Nantes's fourth and youngest son Pierre, fils, born in c1772, married Charlotte, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Marie Vignault, at Bécancour in February 1794. 

Michel dit de Nantes's second son François, born perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean in c1733, followed his family into imprisonment and to Canada, where he married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Bourg and Marie Belliveau, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, on the lower St. Lawrence, in August 1764.  They moved to Bécancour, on the upper St. Lawrence, in 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1776, Rosalie gave François seven children, six sons and a daughter.  François remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Joseph Richer and Jeanne Veillet, at Bécancour in August 1783.  The moved to nearby Nicolet in 1790.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1794, Marie-Jeanne gave François four more children, two sons and two daughters.  Three of François's daugthers by both wives married into the Belliveau and LeBlanc families at Nicolet and nearby St.-Grégoire.  Three of his eight sons by both wives created their own families.

Oldest son François, fils, by first wife Rosalie Bourg, born in c1766, married Agathe, daughter of Pierre Pellerin and Françoise Morin, at Nicolet in January 1792. 

François's fourth son David le jeune, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1772, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Pierre Belliveau and Félicité Richard, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1812.

François's son Joseph-Marie, by second wife Marie-Jeanne Richer, born probably at Bécancour in ,1786, married Pélagie, daughter of Joseph Lesieur-Desaulniers and Marguerite Tessier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in October 1814. 

Michel dit de Nantes's third son Michel, fils, born perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean in c1736, followed his family into imprisonment and married Madeleine, another daughter of François Bourg and Marie Belliveau, probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1774, Madeleine gave Michel, fils seven children, two sons and five daughters.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence and settled at Kamouraska in 1764.  They resettled at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence in 1768 and at nearby Nicolet in 1787.  Their daughters married into the Poirier, MacDonnell, and Desilets families, including three Poirier brothers, at Nicolet.  Both of Michel, fils's sons created their own familiies.

Older son François le jeune, born probably at Kamouraska in c1766, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Blanchard and Catherine Forest, at Nicolet in October 1789. 

Michel, fils's younger son Michel III, born probably at Bécancour in c1769, married Marguerite, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at Nicolet in January 1797. 

Michel dit de Nante's fourth son Simon, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1738, followed his family into imprisonment and married Marie, daughter of Michel Saindon and Marie Godin dit Bellefontaine, probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1784, Marie gave Simon a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters.  They, too, followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence in 1764 and settled at Kamouraska before moving to Bécancour in 1767 and Nicolet in 1793.  One of Simon's daughters married into the Michel family at Nicolet.  Four of his eight sons created their own families.

Oldest son Charles le jeune, born in c1761, married Angélique, daughter of Régis Part and Marie Belliveau, at Bécancour in November 1788. 

Simon's second son André, born in c1763, married Josèphe, daughter of François Élie and Josette Desrosiers, at Trois-Rivières in December 1787. 

Simon's third son Simon, fils, born in c1764, married Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marie-Rose LeBlanc, at Nicolet in June 1793.

Simon, père's fourth son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Bécancour in c1768, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marie Arsenault, at Nicolet in November 1799. 

Michel dit de Nante's fifth son Joseph dit d'Amboise, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1739, followed his family into imprisonment and married Angélique, another daughter of Michel Saindon and Marie Godin dit Bellefontaine, probably in Nova Scotia in c1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1768, Angélique gave Joseph five children, three sons and two daughters.  They followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence in 1764 and settled at Kamouska before moving farther down to L'Isle-Verte in 1770.  His daughters married into the Hudon, Simon, and Dubé families at L'Isle-Verte.  Two of his three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in c1762, married Marie-Judith, daughter of Pierre Hudon and Marie-Madeleine Dubé, at L'Isle-Verte in February 1786, and remarried to Geneviève Marquis at nearby Cacouna in January 1822.  They remained at Cacouna. 

Joseph dit d'Amboise's third son Michel le jeune, born probably at Kamouraska in c1768, married Anastaise Côté at L'Isle-Verte in June 1798. 

Michel dit de Nante's sixth son Étienne dit d'Amboise, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1741, may have followed his family into imprisonment in the late 1750s but did not follow them to the St. Lawrence valley after the war ended.  He married Claire, daughter of Pierre Couroit and Angélique Vautour, at Carleton on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in Gaspésie in February 1777.  They remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1793, Claire gave Étienne six children, a son and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the McIntyre, O'Connors, Cormier, Bernard, and Ahier families at Carleton.  Étienne's only son created his own family.

Nicolas dit d'Amboise, born probably at Carleton in c1793, married Marguerite-Olivette, daughter of François-Alexis Porlier and Euphrosine Landry, at Carleton in February 1821.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1821 and 1841, Marguerite-Olive gave Nicolas eight children, two sons and six daughters. 

Michel dit de Nantes's seventh son Charles, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1754, may have followed his family into imprisonment.  According to Bona Arsenault, he and younger brother Jean-Baptiste accompanied their father to Louisiana in 1764-65, but Louisiana records say otherwise.  One wonders what really became of Charles.

Michel dit de Nante's eighth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean, in c1756, may have followed his family into imprisonment.  According to Bona Arsenault, he and older brother Charles accompanied their father to Louisiana in 1764-65, but Louisiana records say otherwise.  One wonders what really became of Jean-Baptiste.

Barthélemy, père's third and youngest son Augustin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1710, married Marie, another daughter of Claude Dugas and Marguerite Bourg, in c1730 probably at Annapolis Royal.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1752, Marie gave Augustin three children, two sons and a daughter.  Other records show that Marie may have given him another son in c1730.  The family evidently was captured by the British in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia until the end of the war.  Daughter Élisabeth followed two of her brothers to Canada, where she married into the Boucher family at Kamarouska on the lower St. Lawrence in September 1771.  Meanwhile, Augustin, Marie, oldest son Jean-Baptiste, and Jean-Baptiste's family followed the Broussards to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1764-65 and settled with them on Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  Augustin died on Bayou Teche in late August 1765, age 55, victim of an epidemic that struck the Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  Widow Marie retreated to Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans that fall and lived with a widowed niece.  All three of Augustin's sons created their own families, one in Louisiana, the others in Canada.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, evidently followed his family to Rivière St.-Jean and married Catherine, daughter of Michel Caissie dit Roger and his first wife Catherine Poirier of Chignecto, in c1750 probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas.  Between 1750 and 1765, Catherine gave Jean-Baptiste six children, three sons and three daughters.  The family likely was captured in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia till the end of the war.  Instead of going to Canada with his younger siblings, Jean-Baptiste followed his parents to Louisiana via Cap-François in 1765-65 and settled with them on Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  Catherine was pregnant on the voyage from Halifax to Louisiana and gave birth to daughter Marianne on the Teche at the end of May.  The baby died in late August.  Jean-Baptiste and Catherine's year-old-son Joseph died on the Teche in late October 1765, probably a victim of the epidemic that had killed his paternal grandfather and perhaps his younger sister two months earlier.  Jean-Baptiste died on the Teche in early November 1765, one of the last victims of the epidemic.  After his death, Catherine retreated with her mother-in-law and her remaining four children to Cabahannocer on the river.  Her older daughter Madeleine married into the Renauld at New Orleans and settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons married into the Babin, Forest, and Benoit families and created vigorous lines on Bayou Lafourche. 

Augustin's second son Pierre, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1735, followed his family into imprisonment.  He married Genevièvie Poitevin probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1790, Geneviève gave Pierre seven children, three sons and four daughters.  When the war with Britain finally ended, Pierre did not follow his parents and oldest brother to Louisiana but chose to remain in greater Acadia.  He and his family were counted at Miramichi, present-day eastern New Brunswick, in 1776, moved on to Percé in Gaspésie in 1779, and settled at Bonaventure on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where he died in March 1823, age 88.  One of his daughters married into the Allain and Cormier families at Bonaventure and nearby Paspébiac.  Two of his three sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born in c1770, married Marie-Josette Huard, widow of Joseph Labrasseur, at New-Carlisle, near Bonaventure, in August 1795. 

Pierre, père's second son Jean-Baptiste, born in c1779, married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vienneau and Marie Marquis, at New-Carlisle in May 1802. 

Augustin's third and youngest son Charles-André, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743, followed his family into imprisonment but not to Louisiana in 1764.  When the war with Britain ended, Charles-André also chose to remain in greater Acadia, probably following his older brother Pierre to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marie Gaudet of Chignecto, in c1771 and moved on to Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1789, Madeleine gave Charles-André eight children, three sons and five daughters.  He died at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, in 1825, age 82.  Three of his daughters married into the Bergeron and Bourg families at Nicolet.  Two of his three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles-Alexis, born in c1772, married Marie-Madeleine Desrosiers dit Dargy at Trois-Rivières in June 1802, and remarried to cousin Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bourque and Marie Bergeron, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, across from Trois-Rivières, in April 1809.

Charles-André's second son Raymond, born in c1775, married Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Thibodeau and Josèphe Lavigne, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in October 1803.446

Coste

François Coste, carpenter, navigator, coastal pilot, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Le Roy dit L'Espérance, Bois, Petitpas, and Dugas families.  Only two of François's sons created families of t their own.  François died at either Port-Toulouse or L'Ardoise, Île Royale, by 1753, in his late 80s or early 90s.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse and L'Ardois.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisina, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest François, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, died young. 

François, père's second son Jean, born at Port-Royal in June 1703, died there in June 1705, age 2. 

François, père's third son Jacques dit Jacob, born at Port-Royal in November 1705, married Françoise, daughter of Claude Petitpas, fils and his Mi'kmaq wife Marie-Thérèse, at Port-Toulouse in c1727.  A French official counted Jacob and his family at Port-Toulouse in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

François, père's fourth son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in September 1707, evidently died young.

François, père's fifth and youngest son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1713, married Madeleine, daughter of Joannis Lefargue and Marie-Anne Ozelet, at Port-Toulouse in c1740.  A French official counted them at L'Ardois, near Port-Toulouse, in February 1752.  Jean died there by October 1758, in his mid-40s, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.447

Poitevin

Étienne Poitevin dit Parisien, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Anne Daigre created a small family in the colony.  Anne gave him a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Le Prieur dit Dubois, Fouquet, Petit, Despoués, and Royer dit Leroy families, the younger ones on Île St.-Jean, where the family went in the 1720s, among the first Acadians to go to there.  Only one of Étienne's sons married, in Canada, where he remained.  Étienne died at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in June 1742, in his late 60s, and Anne promptly remarried to a Norman fisherman/habitant.  As a result of the family's early departure from British Nova Scotia, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  In fact, only this family's blood survived in greater Acadia.  If any of Étienne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.

Oldest son Jacques-Christophe dit Cadien, born probably at Port-Royal in the late 1690s or early 1700s, moved to Canada, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Viau dit Lespérance and Hélène Charles, at Longueil across the river from Montréal in January 1731.  He died at Montréal in July 1747, in his late 40s. 

Étienne's second son Louis, born at Port-Royal in October 1703, died there on the haute rivière in April 1713, age 9.  

Étienne's third son, name unrecorded, born at Port-Royal in April 1706, died on the day of his birth.

Étienne's fourth son Louis, the second with the name, born at Port-Royal in September 1707, moved to Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean by 1734.  He died at Hôtel-Dieu de Nantes, France, in June 1753, age 46, and did not marry.  Was he a sailor?  Why else would he have been at Nantes years before his family was deported to France from Île St.-Jean.

Étienne's fifth and youngest son Étienne, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1712, became lost in the woods probably near his home at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, when he was eight years old.  He was never found.  His death was recorded in the local parish register three weeks after his disappearance.449

Chênet dit La Garenne

Louis Chênet dit La Garenne, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in the colony.  Jeanne gave him two children, a son and a daughter, both of whom married.  Their daughter married into the Charpentier and Morel families and settled at Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  Louis died probably at Port-Royal by April 1704, when his wife remarried there; he would have been in his late 20s that year.  Louis and Jeanne's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also on Île Royale and at Havre-St.-Pierre and Havre-aux-Sauvages on Île St.-Jean, to which they emigrated early.  As a result, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  One of Louis and Jeanne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in August 1785. 

Only son Jean dit La Garenne, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, married Anne, daughter of Jean Pothier and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in October 1728.  A French official counted them at nearby Havre-aux-Sauvages in August 1752.  The British deported them to France in late 1758. 

Jean's son Jean-Baptiste, born at Havre-St.-Pierre in October 1732, married Anne-Hippolythe, daughter of Paul Doiron and Marguerite Michel, either on Île St.-Jean or in France, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.450

LaVache

François LaVache, a late 1690s "arrival" (he was born probably at Port-Royal in c1697, illigimately) and his wife Anne-Marie Vincent created a small family in the colony.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1750, Marie gave François at least eight children, half of them sons, two of whom created families of their own, but other sources say she gave him six sons and three daughters between 1726 and 1753.  François took his family, including a married son, to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and settled at Anse-au-Matelot on the island's southeast coast.  The British deported most of the family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  François and three of his children died there the following year, victims, perhaps, of an epidemic that struck the port city.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Honoré, born in Nova Scotia in c1726, married Madeleine Daigle in c1746 perhaps at Minas.  They followed his father to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and were counted at Anse-au-Matelot near his parents in August 1752.  According to Bon Arsenault, Madeleine gave Honoré at least four sons between 1747 and 1757, but other sources say only two sons were born to them in 1755 and 1767.  Other sources say she gave him a daughter as well in c1750.  Honoré and his family either left Île St.-Jean before the island's dérangement in the summer of 1758, or they escaped the British roundup there that autumn.  According to Arsnenault, they made their way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence Shore, and, after Le Grand Dérangement, settled at Caraquet in present-day northeastern New Brunswick and at Bonaventure on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in present-day Québec Province.

François's second son Alexis, born in Nova Scotia in c1730, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Pierre Aucoin and Isabelle Breau of Cobeguit, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in February 1754.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him at least two daughters, in 1754 and 1756. 

François's third son Jean-Charles, born in Nova Scotia in c1732, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758 and died there, age 27, in November 1759, before he could marry. 

François's fourth son Joseph, born in Nova Scotia in c1742, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758 and died there, age 17, in December 1759.

François's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably in Nova Scotia in c1749, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  After the death of his father and three of his older siblings, he sailed aboard the brigantine Le Hazard with his mother and a younger brother to St.-Malo, where they arrived in May 1766. They settled at nearby St.-Servan.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean-Baptiste was born in c1747 and was the son not of François but oldest son Honoré.  Arsenault also says Jean-Baptiste married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Zacharie Doiron and Anne Vicaire, at Bonaventure on the Baie des Chaleurs in January 1793, and that, between 1794 and 1806, she gave him seven children there, three sons and four daughters. 

François's sixth and youngest son Firmin-Grégoire, born probably at Anse-au-Matelot in c1753, was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  After the death of his father and three of his older siblings, he sailed aboard the brigantine Le Hazard with his mother and an older brother to St.-Malo, where they arrived in May 1766. They settled at nearby St.-Servan.12

Pothier

Jean Pothier, a late 1690s arrival, and his wives Anne Poirier and Marie-Madeleine Chiasson created a good-sized family in the colony.  First wife Anne gave him three children, two sons and a daughter.  Second wife Marie-Madeleine gave him seven more children, three sons and four daughters.  Five of his daughters by both of his wives married into the Deveau dit Dauphiné, Chênet dit La Garenne, Renaud dit Arnaud, Oudy, and Lamoureaux dit Rochefort families, many of them in the French Maritimes.  Five of Jean's sons by both of his wives created families of their own.  Jean died in 1724 or 1725, in his early 50s, place unrecorded, but it likely was on Île St.-Jean.  His children and grandchildren settled not only at Chignecto, but also on Île St.-Jean, where they lived at Havre-à-l'Anguille and Havre-St.-Pierre.  At least 10 of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Anne Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie Doucet in c1730 probably at Tintamarre, Chignecto, and moved on to Île St.-Jean.  Their son Pierre, fils emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's second son Jean-Baptiste, by his first wife Anne Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Anne-Marie Boudrot, in c1729 probably at Chignecto, and died by 1752, place and age unrecorded.

Jean's third son Louis, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born probably at Chignecto in c1710, married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Jacques Nuirat and Marie-Jeanne Bourgeois and widow of Pierre Poirier, at Beaubassin in February 1733, and settled at Havre-à-l'Anguille on Île St.-Jean soon after their marriage.  Louis died by January 1751, when Cécile remarried to Norman fisherman/habitant Julien Compagnon at Port-La-Joye on the island.  In August 1752, a French official counted Cécile, her second husband, and four of Louis's children--Christophe le jeune, age 18; Louis, fils, age 16; Marie-Henriette, called Henriette, age 13; and Suzanne, age 5--at Havre-aux-Sauvages on the north shore of the island west of Havre-St.-Pierre.  Louis's daughter Marie-Henriette emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's fourth son Jacques-Christophe, called Christophe, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born probably at Chignecto in c1713, married Anne, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Anne Landry, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north side of Île St.-Jean, in February 1740.  In August 1752, a French official counted Christophe, Anne, and five of their daughters at Havre-au-Sauvage, on the coast west of Havre-St.-Pierre.  Their daughter Charlotte emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's fifth and youngest son Charles, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born posthumously on Île St.-Jean in January 1725, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Jean Caissie and his second wife Cécile Hébert, at Beaubassin in February 1746, but returned to his native Île St.-Jean.455

Moulaison

Gabriel Moulaison dit Recontre, an early 1700s arrival, and his legitimate wife Marie Aubois created what could have become a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie gave him nine children, four sons and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Gabriel's natural daughter Marie, by Marie Daigre, married into the Henshaw or Hansole family.  His daughters by Marie Aubois married into the Bertrand, Mius d'Entremont, Doucet, and Viger families.  Gabriel died by July 1753, place unrecorded, perhaps at Pobomcoup, in his mid- or late 60s.  His descendants settled at Pobomcoup, Cap-Sable, and Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal.  They were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  A least six of Gabriel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Doucet and Marie-Madeleine Robichaud, in c1750, place unrecorded.  Pierre's widow and one of his sons emigrated to Louisiana from France. 

Gabriel's second son Jacques married Cécile, daughter of Ambroise Melanson and Marguerite Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1743.  One of theirs sons and one of their daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Gabriel's third son Joseph married Jeanne, daughter of Augustin Comeau and Jeanne Levron, at Cap-Sable in July 1753.

Gabriel's fourth and youngest son Gabriel, fils married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Porlier and Anne-Marie de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at Cap-Sable in July 1753.462

Gentil

Élie Gentil, mason, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Cécile Martin dit Barnabé, created a small family in the colony.  Cécile gave him only two children, a daughter and a son.  Daughter Anne-Marie, or Marie-Anne, born at Port-Royal in February 1704, married Jean-Baptiste, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier of Chignecto, at Beaubassin in February 1719.  Anne followed her husband to Île St.-Jean in the early 1720s, among the first Acadians to go there.  A French official counted her, now a widow, on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior in August 1752, age 48.  With her were seven of her younger Haché children, including a son, Louis, then age 11, who emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Élie's son, name unrecorded, born probably at Port-Royal before 1717, died young, so the blood of this family, at least, survived in greater Acadia.463

Samson

Gabriel Samson, fils, navigator and carpenter, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in greater Acadia.  Jeanne gave him 11 children, three sons and eight daughters, including two sets of twins, at Port-Royal and they moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in the early 1720s.  Four of their daughters married into the Richard, La Chaume, Lécuyer dit Le Bénécat, Le Large, and Pinet families, all on Île Royale.  All of Gabriel's sons created families of their own on the island.  Gabriel, fils died at Port-Toulouse by 1757, in his 70s, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  The British deported his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  If any of his descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Michel, born at Port-Royal in July 1706, followed his family to Port-Toulouse in the early 1720s.  He married Anne dite Jeanne, daughter of François Testard dit Paris and Marie Doiron, at Port-Toulouse in c1729.  A French official counted them there in February 1752.  Oldest daughter Anne married a Prejean widower probably at Port-Toulouse after February 1752.  The British deported Michel and his family to France in 1758; they were living at La Rochelle in 1761.  Daughter Anne, along with her younger son, died at sea aboard the British transport Queen of Spain.  After the war ended, Michel and what remained of his family returned to North America and settled on Île St.-Pierre off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Michel drowned in the sinking of the Neptune, perhaps a fishing boat, in April 1764, age 57. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1734, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gervais Bricette and Marie L'Esperance, probably at Port-Toulouse in c1755.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., Marie-Josèphe gave Jean two sons--Jean, fils and Michel--on the island in 1756 and 1758.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo aboard the Queen of Spain in 1758.  Both of the sons died at sea, Marie-Josèphe died in the hospital at St.-Malo within a week of her arrival, and Jean, père died at St.-Malo the following March, age 25, probably from the rigors of the crossing. 

Michel's second son Jean-Fabien, called Fabien, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1741, was likely the Jean, age 17, who was counted with his family at Port-Toulouse in February 1752.  Fabien also was deported to France in 1758 aboard the Queen of Spain, but, unlike his older brother and sister, he survived the crossing.  He settled at St.-Malo probably with relatives.  In 1760, he volunteered for privateer duty.  The British took him prisoner that June aboard Le Hardy, after which he disappears from history.

Gabriel's second son Mathieu, born at Port-Royal in August 1709, followed his family to Port-Toulouse.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre and Françoise Moyse, in c1730 probably at Port-Toulouse.  A French official counted them there in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Gabriel's third and youngest son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1717, followed his family to Port-Toulouse, where he married Marie, daughter of Nicolas Préjean and his first wife Marguerite Broussard, after August 1752; Marie's father remarried to Charles's niece Anne Samson probably at Port-Toulouse after August 1752.  The British deported Charles and Marie to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport Queen of Spain in late 1758.  Charles died at sea, and Marie died at her father's home in St.-Malo three and a half months after her arrival.473

Pouget

Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre, coppersmith and retired soldier, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Françoise Moyse created a small family in greater Acadia.  Françoise gave the coppersmith 11 children, four sons and seven daughters, at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  Six of their daughters married into the Martel, Samson, Marchand dit Poitiers, Langlois, Bois, Josse, and Petitpas families, most of them at Port-Toulouse.  Two of Pierre's sons created families of their own.  Pierre and Françoise settled at Port-Toulouse, where the family was counted as early as 1726.  As a result, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre-Jacques, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1714, followed his family to Île Royale and married Madeleine, daughter of François Langlois and Madeleine Comeau and sister of one of his sister's husbands, at Port-Toulouse on the island in c1737.  A French official counted them on the north side of Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale in Feburary 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Pierre's second Charles-François, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1715, evidently died young.

Pierre's third son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1720, also died young. 

Pierre's fourth and youngest son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in June 1722, followed his family to Port-Toulouse and married Marguerite, another daughter of François Langlois and Madeleine Comeau, there in c1750.  A French official counted them on Île Madame in February 1752.  Jean remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Claude Girouard and Madeleine Vincent, at Port-Toulouse in c1753.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758.  Jean died before 1770, no place given.471

Marchand

Louis Marchand or Marcheguy dit Poitiers, former corporal, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Godin dit Châtillon created a small family in greater Acadia.  Marie gave him five children, two sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Pinet and Briand families, both at Port-Toulouse.  Both of Louis's sons created families of their own.  The time and place of Louis's death has been lost to history, but it likely was at Port-Toulouse, where he took his family by c1716 and where most of his descendants settled.  One of his sons also settled in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement.  One of Louis's Pinet granddaughters emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but none of his other descendants took the Marchand family's name there. 

Older son François-Louis, called Louis, born at Port-Royal in July 1706, probably followed his family to Port-Toulouse, but he did not remain there.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Vigneau and Madeleine Pichet, at Québec in June 1728.  They were still living there in 1744. 

Son Joseph, born probably at Québec in the late 1720s or early 1730s, left Canada and "returned" to Île Royale.  Described as a "second capitaine de navire," he married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Arrichoury Le Blanc and Anne Raux, at Louisbourg in October 1751.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Louis's younger son Jean dit Poitiers, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1711, followed his family to Port-Toulouse and married Marie-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of Pierre Pouget and Françoise Moyse, at the port in c1740.  A French official found them still there, with two young sons, in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758.474

Testard

François Testard dit Paris, carpenter and navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Doiron created a small family in greater Acadia.  Marie gave François seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Pinet, Daigre, Samson, Fizel, and Frétel families, all on Île Royale.  Only one of François dit Paris's sons created his own family.  François died in 1726 probably on Île Royale, where he had moved his family from Annapolis Royal by 1715.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son François, fils, born at Port-Royal in November 1708, died at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in January 1733, age 24, before he could marry.

François's second son Pierre-Joseph, born at Port-Royal in November 1710, died by October 1734, in his early 20s, probably on Île Royale before he could marry.

François's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste dit Paris, born at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1725.  In 1768, the British deported him to Cherbourg, France, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Marie LeBlanc and widow of Augustin Landry, at Cherbourg, France, in May 1759, but they did not remain in France.  Jean-Baptiste died at Fort-Royal on the French-controlled island of Martinique in September 1763, in his late 30s.  One wonders if he fathered any children.476

Part

Pierre Part dit La Forest, the soldier turned blacksmith, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Dugas created a small family in the colony.  Jeanne gave him six children, four sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Jobelet dit Bistoury and Benoit families, one of them at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  Three of Pierre's sons created families of their own.  Pierre and Jeanne left Port-Royal soon after it fell to the British and were among the earliest Acadians to move to the French Maritimes.  They and their descendants settled at Louisbourg and at Niganiche and Port-d'Orléans, far up the Atlantic coast, and on Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick.  At least six of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Angélique, daughter of Gabriel Godin and Andrée-Angélique Jeanne, in c1737 probably on Rivière St.-Jean.  Five of their children, all born on Rivière St.-Jean, emigrated to Louisiana as orphans. 

Pierre's second son Jean married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Roy and Marie Bergeron, in c1735 probably on Île Royale, and died in late May 1758, on the eve of the islands' Grand Dérangement

Pierre's third son Eustache married Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, in c1750, probably on Île Royale, and remarried to Anne, daughter of Jean Melanson and Marie-Madeleine Petitot dit Saint-Seine, at Cherbourg, France, in February 1761, during Le Grand Dérangement.  One of Eustache's daughters by his first wife emigrated to Louisiana from France.477

Langlois

François Langlois, goldsmith and navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Comeau created a large family in greater Acadia.  Madeleine gave him a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  François moved his family from Annapolis Royal to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, by 1722, and they remained in the French Maritimes.  Six of their daughters married into the Josse dit Saint-Brieuc, Lécuyer dit Langlois, Detcheverry dit Miquemak, Maillet, Pouget, Bénard, and Barrieau families, most of them at Port-Toulouse.  Four of François's sons created families of their own.  In February 1752, François and Madeleine were living on the north coast of Île Madame south of Île Royale, but their descendants settled also on Île St.-Jean.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre-François, also called François-Marie, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1712, married Henriette, daughter of Pierre Bénard and Cécile Longuépée and sister of one of his sister's husbands, on Île Royale in July 1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1741 and 1751, Henriette gave François two children, a son and a daughter.  A French official counted them on Île Madame in February 1752.  Pierre-François died there between 1753 and 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  In late 1758, the British deported his widow and two young children, a daughter and a son, on the British transport Duke William, which suffered a shipboard mishap on its way to St.-Malo.  The daughter died at sea, and Henriette and her son André died at the St.-Malo hospital in December soon after they reached the port, so this line of the family did not endure. 

François's second son Jacques dit Jacqui, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1818, married Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Prétieux and Anne Haché, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in November 1742, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Darembourg and Marie Mazerolle, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean, in April 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1746 and 1751, Marie-Josèphe gave Jacqui three children, a daughter and two sons, on the island.  A French official counted Jacqui and his family on the north bank of Rivière-de-Nord-Est in the island's interior in August 1752.  The British deported the family to Cherbourg, France, in 1758.  Older son Amable evidently died from the rigors of the crossing soon after they reached the French port.  Daughter Cécile, called Clothilde by the recording priest, married into the Henry family at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in August 1763 and died there in August 1770, age 24.  Jacqui, age 54, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Susanne Pouquet in c1772, place unrecorded, but it may have been at Cherbourg.  One wonders what happened to him and his family after 1772. 

François's third son Nicolas, born at Port-Toulouse in c1723, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Pouget and Françoise Moyse and sister of one of his sister's husbands, at Beaubassin in March 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, Isabelle gave Nicolas a son at Chignecto in c1750.  They did not remain there but returned to Île Royale, where they joined his family on Île Madame.  A French official counted them there on land owned by his father in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

François's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born at Port-Toulouse in c1734, was counted with his aging parents at Île Madame in February 1752.  Joseph evidently escaped the British roundup on the islands in 1758.  He took refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs and escaped the British again in the summer of 1760 after the British attacked the Acadians there.  Joseph married Henriette, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Cormier of Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, at Restigouche in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1770, Henriette gave Joseph three children, a daughter and two sons.  By 1772, they had settled at Port-Toulouse, renamed St.-Pierre, Joseph's birthplace on Île Royale, which the British had renamed Cape Breton Island.  Joseph died after 1811, place unrecorded.478

Bodart

François Bodart, navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Babin created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave him five children, all of them daughters.  Two of them married, so the blood of the family survived in the colony.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe, born at Grand-Pré in September 1710, married into the Tessé family at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1728 and remained on the island, where a French official counted them at Miré in April 1752.  Younger sister Marguerite married into the Vincent family at Minas in c1745, remained there with her parents and other sisters, was deported with her husband and children to Virginia and England in 1755-56, and repatriated to France in May 1763.  Now a widow, Marguerite followed other Acadian exiles to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany in November 1765.  She and her children settled at Kervarigeon near Bangor on the island. 

No member of this family took the name to Louisiana.  However, Marguerite Bodart's son Pierre Vincent, as well as her deceased daughter Marguerite Vincent's children--four sons and two daughters from her union with Frenchman Guillaume Monté or Montet of Périgaux, France, whom she had married at Liverpool, England, in c1763--did to go Louisiana in 1785 aboard two of the Seven Ships from France.20

The Families of Greater Acadia:  The Aboiteaux Builders of the Fundy Shore

And then there were the "typical" Acadians, the aboiteaux builders of the Fundy settlements who made up the great majority of the people of Nova Scotia.  Some of them left for the French Maritimes and even Canada before and during the "golden age," but most of them remained in their Fundy communities.  They, more than anyone, helped sustain the créole culture their ancestors created on the Great French Bay:

Doucet

The Doucets, whose progenitor arrived in 1632, were a small family in the beginning.  Germain, sieur de La Verdure, married twice, first in France in c1620 and then in Acadia in c1654.  Between 1621 and 1641, his first wife, whose name has been lost to history, gave him four children, two sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Lejeune dit Briard families, and both of their sons also created families of their own.  According to genealogist Stephen A. White, if Germain's second wife, perhaps the younger daughter of Guillaume Trahan and his first wife François Corbineau and sister-in-law of Jacques Bourgeois, gave him any children, they cannot be traced.  Germain's sons and most of their children remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but his grandchildren settled also at Chignecto, at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto, at Minas, in Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement), and in the French Maritimes.  At least 23 of the old soldier's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, from French-St.-Domingue in the late 1760s, and from France in 1785.  Most of the sieur's descendants, however, could be found in Canada and greater Acadia, as well as France and the French Antilles, after Le Grand Dérangement.

Older son Pierre, born in France in c1621, may have come to the colony with his mother and sister in the 1630s and worked as a mason when he came of age.  Bona Arsenault speculates that, after the fall of Port-Royal to the English in 1654, Pierre retreated to Québec, spent a few years there, and returned to Port-Royal.  In his late 30s, he married Henriette, daughter of Simon Pelletret and Perrine Bourg, at Port-Royal in c1660.  Between 1661 and 1685, Henriette gave Pierre 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Pierre died at Annapolis Royal in June 1713, in his 90s.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Bernard, Doiron, Chênet Dubreuil, and Comeau families.  Five of his six sons created families of their own.   

Oldest son Toussaint dit François, also called Toussaint dit Laverdure, born probably at Port-Royal in c1663, married Marie, daughter of Roger Caissie and Marie-François Poirier, in c1690 and settled at Chignecto, where Toussaint died by August 1733.  Between 1691 and 1717, Marie gave Toussaint 11 children, six sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Girouard, Gaudet, Bertrand, Doiron, Richard, and Bourel families.  Three of Toussaint's sons also created their own families. 

Toussaint's oldest son François, born probably at Chignecto in c1691, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Michel Poirier and Marie Chiasson, at Beaubassin in November 1715.  They remained at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1716 and 1734, Marie-Anne gave François eight children, four sons and four daughters.  They evidently escaped the British in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  François died in exile by December 1757, in his early or mid-60s.  One wonders if he was a victim of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the Québec area in the fall and winter of 1757-58.  Three of his daughters married into the Cormier, Vacher dit Lacerte, and Girouard families at Chignecto and at Trois-Rivières and Deschambault on the upper St. Lawrence.  Three of his sons also created their own families at Chignecto and settled in Canada and what became northeastern New Brunswick. 

Oldest son François, fils, born probably at Chignecto in c1716, married Anne, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Madeleine LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in July 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1745 and 1747, Anne gave François, fils two children, a son and a daughter.  Their son created his own family on the upper St. Lawrence.

Only son François III, born probably at Chignecto in c1745, followed his family into exile and to Canada,. where he married Geneviève, daughter of Joseph-Michel Beaudet and Angélique Bélanger of Lotbinière, at Trois-Rivières in January 1777.  They settled across the river at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1801, Geneviève gave François III 11 children, six sons and five daughters. 

François, père's second son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in c1718, married Germaine, daughter of Germain Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, probably at Chignecto in c1741.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1743 Germaine gave Pierre a son.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755. 

François, père's third son Charles, born probably at Chignecto in c1725, married Anne, daughter of François Arseneau and Marguerite Bernard, at Beaubassin in January 1746.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1768, Anne gave Charles nine children, four daughters and five sons.  They, too, evidently escaped the British in the fall of 1755, but they likely escaped to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the war with Britain, they settled at Nepisiguit, today's Bathhurst, New Brunswick, where Charles died in September 1782, in his late 50s.  One of their daughters married into the Haché dit Gallant family.  Four of Charles's sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in c1751, followed his family to the upper Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Haché dit Gallant and Josette Boudreau and widow of Joseph Arsenault, on Île Miscou at the entrance to the Baie des Chaleurs in September 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1776 and 1782, Marie gave Pierre five children, three sons and two daughters.  The family lived at Miscou from 1776 to 1780 and moved westward to Bathurst by 1782. 

Charles's second son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1754, followed his family to the upper Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreau and Anne Haché dit Gallant, "before witnesses" in September 1776 and "rehabilitiated" the marriage at Bonaventure in Gaspésie in November 1779.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1777 and 1793, Anne gave Michel five children, three sons and two daughters. 

Charles's third son Joseph, born in exile in c1756, followed his family to the upper Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Bujold and Marguerite Cormier, at Bonaventure in April 1779.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1780 and 1800, Victoire gave Joseph five children, four sons and a daughter.  They lived at Bonventure from 1779 to 1783 and crossed the Baie des Chaleurs to Bathurst by 1793. 

Charles's fourth son Charles, fils, born in exile in 1758, followed his family to the upper Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and married cousin Marie Arsenault.  They settled at Bathurst.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1792 and 1793, Marie gave Charles, fils two sons. 

Toussaint's second son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1694, married, according to Stephen A. White, Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brasseur dit Mathieu and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère, in c1725.  (Bona Arsenault, however, says Michel, son of Louis Doucet, married Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brasseau and Jeanne Bellemère, probably at Chignecto in c1733.  White is followed here.)  According to Arsenault, in 1734 and 1742, Anne gave Michel two children, a daughter and a son.  According to White, this Michel died probably at Chignecto by January 1752, in his late 50s.  The British evidently deported his family to South Carolina in the fall of 1755.  In August 1763, daughter Madeleine, age 16, was listed by colonial officials as an orphan.  She married into the Dumoulin and Mauge families and settled in French St.-Domingue. 

Toussaint's third son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in the late 1690s or early 1700s, married Marie, daughter of Germain Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, in c1724 and remained at Chignecto.  (Bona Arsenault, confusing this Pierre with his cousin Pierre, son of Louis, says Pierre à Toussaint married Marie, daughter of Martin Richard and Marguerite Bourg, but Stephen A. White, followed here, says this Pierre married Marie Cormier.)  According to Arsenault, between 1725 and 1748, Marie gave Pierre seven children, three sons and four daughters. One of their daughters married into the Bourgeois family.  One of their sons also created his own family.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born probably at Chignecto in c1725, married Marie, daughter of Paul Boudrot and Marie Hébert, at Beaubassin in November 1746.  They had at least one son. 

Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1751, followed his family into exile, perhaps to South Carolina or Georgia, and ended up on French St.-Domingue probably in the early 1760s.  He died at Môle St.-Nicolas in the sugar colony in May 1782, age 31.  One wonders if he married. 

Toussaint and Marie had triplet sons, names unrecorded, in c1707, but they did not survive childhood.  

Pierre's second son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1665, married Françoise, daughter of Martin Blanchard and Françoise LeBlanc, in c1692 and settled at Minas.  Between 1693 and 1712, Françoise gave Jean seven children, five daughters and two sons.  Bona Arsenault gives them two more sons in 1719 and 1721, but Stephen A. White, followed here, does not.  (The two other sons Arsenault gives this Jean were, in fact, sons of another Jean Doucet and that Jean's first wife Françoise Bourget, not Blanchard.)  Jean's daughters married into the Landry, Daigre, and Bugeaud families.  Only one of his two actual sons created his own family.

Older son Jean, fils, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, at Grand-Pré in January 1726 and remained at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1748, Isabelle gave Jean, fils four children, two sons and two daughters.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to Pennsylvania.  In June 1763, colonial officials counted Jean, fils, now a widower, with four children.  One of his sons emigrated to Louisiana. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Grand-Pré in August 1743, followed his family to Pennsylvania, was counted there with his widowed father in June 1763, moved on to Maryland soon afterwards, and emigrated to Louisiana from the Chesapeake colony in 1766 or 1767.  He was counted at New Orleans with other Acadian exiles in July 1767.  At age 29, Jean-Baptiste married Marianne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Comeau and Madeleine Henry, at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans in January 1773.  He died at St.-Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in May 1814, age 70.  His daughter married into the Dupuis and Wells families.  His younger son married into the Rils or Wiltz family on the river and settled on upper Bayou Teche. 

Jean, père's younger son, name unrecorded, born in the early 1700s, did not survive childhood.   

Pierre's third son, Pierre, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1667, survived childhood but did not marry.  

Pierre, père's fourth son Louis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Girouard and Marguerite Gautrot, in c1702 and, like oldest bother Toussaint, settled at Chignecto.  Between the early 1700s and 1722, Marguerite gave Louis seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Bona Arsenault gives them two more sons in 1710 and 1712.  Three of their four daughters married into the Poirier, Richard, Gaudet, and Orillon dit Champagne families.  Stephen A. White says two, and Bona Arsenault says three, of Louis's sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Martin Richard and Marguerite Bourg in c1724 and remained at Chignecto.  (Bona Arsenault days Marie, daughter of Germain Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, married this Pierre, but Stephen A. White, followed here, says Marie Cormier married Pierre's cousin Pierre, son of Toussaint.)  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1725 and 1742, Marie gave Pierre two sons.  Stephen A. White, followed here, says Pierre, husband of Marie-Anne Richard, died by November 1746, in his early 20s.  One of Pierre's sons created his own family.

Older son Bénoni, born probably at Chignecto in c1725, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Anne Bernard, at Beaubassin in November 1746.  Marguerite gave Bénoni at least three children before 1755.  The British deported the family to South Carolina aboard the transport Dolphin in the fall of 1755.  Bénoni died in the southern colony by August 1763, when his widow Marguerite and their 13-year-old son were counted by colonial officials.  The son, perhaps following his mother, moved on to French St.-Domingue. 

François, born probably at Chignecto in c1750, followed his family to South Carolina, where, at age 13, he was counted with his widowed mother in August 1763.  He emigrated to French St.-Domingue either later that year or in 1764 and became a carpenter when he came of age there.  He married Marie-Anne, daughter of Antoine Paris and Jeanne Batiny of St.-Louis Parish, Rochefort, at Môle St.-Nicolas in May 1779.  Between 1781 and 1786, at Môle, Marie-Anne gave François two sons and a daughter.  The older son died young. 

Louis's second son Louis, fils, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, evidently did not survive childhood. 

Louis's putative son François, born in c1710, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Anne, daughter most likely of Pierre Poirier and Agnès Cormier, probably at Chignecto in c1732.  According to Arsenault, in 1733 and 1740, Marie-Anne gave François two children, a daughter and a son.  The family evidently escaped the British in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  According to Arsenault, who seems to have confused her with a cousin of the same name, this François's daughter Madeleine married into the Cormier and Girouard families at Chignecto and on the upper St. Lawrence.  According to Arsenault, this François's son also created his own family in Canada.

Only son François dit Maillard, born probably at Chignecto in c1740, evidently followed his family to Canada, where he married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Lafond and Marie-Jeanne Lefebvre, at Trois-Rivières on the upper St. Lawrence in January 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jeanne gave Maillard a daughter in 1763.  He remarried to fellow Acadian Hélène Hébert at Trois-Rivières in July 1764.  According to Arsenault, in 1765 and 1767, Hélène gave Maillard two children, a son and another daughter.  His daughter by first wife Jeanne married into the Pépin family at Québec. 

Louis's putative son Michel, born in c1712, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brasseau and Jeanne Bellemère, probably at Chignecto in c1733.  (Stephen A. White, however, says Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brasseur dit Mathieu and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère, married Michel, son of Toussaint Doucet, in c1725.)  According to Arsenault, in 1734 and 1742, Anne gave Michel two children, a daughter and a son.  According to White, the Michel who married Anne Brasseau died probably at Chignecto by January 1752, in his late 50s.  The British evidently deported his family to South Carolina in the fall of 1755.  In August 1763, daughter Madeleine, age 16, was listed by colonial officials as an orphan.  She married into the Dumoulin and Mauge families and settled in French St.-Domingue. 

Louis, père's third son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1716, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson, in c1738 probably at Chignecto and moved on to Île St.-Jean.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1746, Isabelle gave Joseph five children, three daughters and two sons.  Joseph died on the island in c1747.  Isabelle remarried to a Martin at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on the island.  In August 1752, a French official counted Isabelle Carret, her husband Joseph Martin, and six children, including her two sons Joseph Doucet, fils, age 12 (actually 10), and Pierre Doucet, age 9 (actually 7), from her first marriage, on the southside of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  The British deported at least one of Isabelle's Doucet sons, if not the rest of the family, to France in late 1758.  

Older son Joseph, fils, born on Île St.-Jean in August 1742, was counted with his remarried mother and younger brother on the island in August 1752 and deported to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  He had become a seaman by then.  In April 1759, soon after his arrival, he went to Brest on the other side of Brittany to work on the ship Northumberland, on which he served for four months and 19 days.  He also worked on L'Apale for three months and 17 days.  He returned to St.-Malo in May 1760 and disappears from the historical record.  One wonders if he married. 

Pierre, père's fifth son René, born probably at Port-Royal in c1678, married Marie, daughter of François Broussard and Catherine Richard, probably at Port-Royal in c1702 and remained there.  Between 1703 and 1728, Marie gave René 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Landry, Pitre, Garceau, Arseneau, Babineau, and Bourg families.  All of René's sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Maillard, born at Port-Royal in December 1703, married Françoise, daughter of Claude Dugas and Jeanne Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in September 1725.  According to Bona Arsenault, they settled at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto and, between 1730 and 1754, Françoise gave Pierre nine children, seven sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  The British deported the family to Massachusetts in the fall of 1755.  After the war with Britain, members of the family settled at Yamachiche on the upper St. Lawrence.  At least three of Pierre's sons created their own families at Annapolis Royal, in Massachusetts, and at Yamachiche.

Oldest son Joseph, born in c1730, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Anne Granger, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1759, Anne gave Joseph three children, a son and two daughters.  They may have followed his family to Massachusetts, where colonial officials counted them in August 1763, and to Canada.  Joseph remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Thibeau and Jeanne Picot, at Yamachiche in May 1770.  According to Arsenault, between 1771 and 1776, this Anne gave Joseph four more children, a daughter and three sons.  Joseph remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie Girardeau at Yamachiche in c1790.  According to Arsenault, she gave him another son in 1791.

Pierre's third son Benoît-Béloni, born in c1738, followed his family to Massachusetts, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Bénoni Melanson and Marie Benoit of Grand-Pré, in c1762.  The marriage was "rehabilitated" at Trois-Rivières, Canada, in July 1767.  In August 1763, Massachusetts officials counted them still in the colony; they had no children.  A few years later, they followed his family to Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1772, Marie gave Benoît three children, a daughter and two sons.  Benoît remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Raymond and Marguerite Pellerin, at Yamachiche in February 1775.  According to Arsenault, between 1775 and 1782, this Marie gave Benoît five more children, three sons and two daughters--eight children in all by two wives. 

Pierre's sixth son Charles, born in c1750, followed his family to Massachusetts and to Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Babineau and Cécile Comeau, at Pointe-du-Lac near Trois-Rivières in October 1773.  They settled at Yamachiche.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1774 and 1799, Marguerite gave Charles a dozen children, four sons and eight daughters. 

René's second son François, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1715, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Denis Petitot dit Saint Seine and Marguerite Landry, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1742 and 1760, Marguerite gave François eight children, three daughters and five sons.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to Massachusetts.  Colonial officials counted them still in the Bay Colony in August 1763; with them were nine children.  A few years later, they returned to Nova Scotia and settled on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the peninsula's west coast, where British officials counted them in c1767.  One of their daughters married into the Amireau family.  At least one François's sons also created his own family on St. Mary's Bay.

Second son Joseph, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1748, followed his family to Massachusetts and Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre LeBlanc, at Baie Ste.-Marie in c1772, and remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Dugas and Brigitte Melanson

René's third son Charles, born probably at Annapolis Royal in the early 1720s, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Préjean and Marie-Louise Comeau of Chepoudy, in c1746 probably at Annapolis Royal and settled at Tintamarre, today's Upper Sackville, Chignecto, where French authorities counted them in 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1751 and 1756, Marguerie gave Charles two children, a son and a daughter.  (Arsenault notes that Acadian historian Édouard Richard, one of Charles's descendants, accepts the legend that Charles's son, born in 1751, was the "natural" son of Colonel Edward How, a member of the Nova Scotia colonial Council and Lieutenant Governor Lawrence's commissary; How, whose second wife was an Acadian, was "stationed" at Fort Lawrence, Chignecto, when he was murdered by Mi'kmaq near the fort in October 1750.)  Charles died in exile before August 1763, in late 30s or early 40s.  Members of the family were living at Trois-Rivières on the upper St. Lawrence above Québec in c1767.  Charles's daughter married into the Boivin family at Trois-Rivières.  His son also created his own family there.

Only son Jean le jeune, born probably at Tintamarre in c1751, followed his family into exile and to Canada.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Amireau and Marguerite Robichaud of Pobomcoup, at Trois-Rivières in February 1778.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1800, Marie-Madleine gave Jean le jeune 11 children, six sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  Four of their daughters married into the Blondin, Hélie, Dumoulin, and Prince families at Trois-Rivières.  At least two of Jean le jeune's sons also created their own families at Trois-Rivières, one became a priest, and the other a physician. 

Third son Nicolas-Benjamin, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1781, married Marie-Euphrosine, daughter of Pierre Kimber and Marie-Josèphe Robitaille, at Trois-Rivières in August 1807.

Jean le jeune's fourth son André, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1782, was ordained a priest in December 1805 and served as curé at Québec between 1807 and 1814. 

Jean le jeune's fifth son François-Olivier, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1787, became a physician, practiced at Kinsgton, Jamaica, and New York, and settled at Vera Cruz, Mexico, where he died. 

Jean le jeune's sixth and youngest son Basile, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1789, married Julie, daughter of Pierre Aubry and Catherine Thibeau, at Trois-Rivières in October 1810. 

René fourth son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1725, married Anne, daughter of Joseph Bourg and Louise Robichaud, at Annapolis Royal in January 1749 and probably remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1755, Anne gave Jean three children, a daughter and two sons.  The British deported the family to Connecticut in the fall of 1755.  Jean died at St.-Chriostophe, Antigua, in 1756 "de la picoté"--of the smallpox, so one wonders if he accompanied his family to Connecticut.  Anne remarried to an Hébert in Connecticut in 1762.  After the war with Britain, she settled with him at Laprairie across from Montréal.  Her Doucet daughter married into the Dupuis family in Connecticut, and the marriage was "rehabilitated" at Laprairie in April 1769.  Oddly, Anne's Bourg's remarriage was not "validated" until October 1774.  One wonders what happened to her Doucet sons. 

Pierre, père's sixth and youngest son Mathieu, born probably at Port-Royal in 1685, married Anne, daughter of Julien Lord and Anne-Charlotte Girouard, at Annapolis Royal in June 1712 and remained there.  Between 1713 and 1732, Anne gave Mathieu seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Mathieu died in exile probably in Canada before July 1760, in his early 70s.  Two of his four daughters married into the Thibodeau and Comeau families.  His sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in July 1713, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Bourg and Élisabeth Broussard, at Annapolis Royal in November 1735 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1737 and 1761, Anne gave Joseph a dozen children, seven daughters and five sons.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to Massachusetts.  Colonial officials counted them at Salisbury in 1758.  In July 1760, Joseph, Anne, and four of their children were living at Dansbury.  They moved on to Connecticut by 1763.  After the war with Britain, they settled at Bécancour across from Trois-Rivières on the upper St. Lawrence, where British officials counted them in c1767.  Joseph died at Trois-Rivières in May 1795, age 81.  Four of his daughters married into the Michel, Bourgeois, Belliveau, and Rheau families in New England and Canada.  Four of his five sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1743, followed his family to Massachusetts, where he married Marie-Josèphe-Luce, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul LeBlanc and Madeleine Forest, in c1760; their marriage was "rehabilitated" in September 1767 at Bécancour, where they settled after leaving New England.  They also had been counted by British authorities at nearby Trois-Rivières.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1766 and 1768, Marie-Josèphe-Luce gave Joseph, fils two children, a daughter and a son.  Joseph, fils remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Pellerin and Madeleine Robichaux, at Québec in April 1771.  His son by his first wife created his own family.

Only son Joseph III, by first wife Marie-Josèphe-Luce LeBlanc, born in Canada in c1771, married Marie Bouret, widow of François Cormier, at Bécancour in October 1791, and remarried to Marie, daughter of Alexis Blais and Marie-Josèphe Bellefeuille, at Bécancour in June 1794. 

Joseph, père's second son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1745, followed his family to New England and Canada.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Richard and Hélène Hébert, at Trois-Rivières in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1769 and 1787, eight children, four daughters and four sons.  They settled at Trois-Rivières.  Three of their daughters married into the Bourg, Lacourse, and Pinel dit Bellefeuille at Trois-Rivières.  Three of Jean-Baptiste's sons also created their own families around Trois-Rivières.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1771, married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Vigneau and Marie Bourg of Chignecto, at Bécancour in February 1795. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1782, married Marguerite Martel at Trois-Rivières in July 1811. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's fourth and youngest son Augustin, born probably at Trois-Rivières in c1787, married Théotiste-Catherine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Bourg and Reine Part, at Trois-Rivières in October 1808. 

Joseph, père's third son Louis, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1749, followed his family to New England and Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Belliveau and Marguerite Melanson, at Bécancour in January 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1771 and 1798, Marguerite gave Louis a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  The family also settled at Trois-Rivières and at nearby Nicolet and St.-Grégoire.  Three of their daughters married into the Prince, Bourg, and Richard families at Nicolet and St.-Grégoire.  At least four of Louis's sons also created their own families in the area.

Second son Louis, fils, born in Canada in c1780, married Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Ovila Bourgeois and Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, at St.-Grégoire in July 1806. 

Louis, père's third son Pierre, born in Canada in c1782, married Marie-Angèle Bergeron, probably at fellow Acadian, at St.-Grégoire on the same day his older brother Louis, fils married in July 1806. 

Louis, père's fourth son Joseph, born in Canada in c1786, married Marie-Desanges, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Prince and Marie Babineau, at Nicolet in February 1801. 

Louis, père's seventh and youngest son Charles, born in Canada in c1792, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Cormier and his French-Canadian wife Marie Champoux, at St.-Grégoire in October 1818. 

Joseph, père's fifth and youngest son Pierre-Abel, born in New England in c1761, followed his family to Canada and married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Prince and Marie-Madeleine Bourg, at Bécancour in February 1784.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1803, Marie gave Pierre-Abel nine children, seven sons and two daughters.  They also settled at nearby Trois-Rivières.  At least two of their sons created their own families in the area.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born in Canada in c1784, married Madeleine, daughter of Nicolas Grondin and Marie Dumas, at Nicolet in September 1811. 

Pierre-Abel's second son Joseph le jeune, born in Canada in c1786, married Marie, daughter of Antoine Marier and Marie Ducharme, at Bécancour in November 1813. 

Mathieu's second son Pierre, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1715, married Françoise, daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1743 and 1746 Françoise gave Pierre two daughters.  Pierre died probably at Annapolis Royal before January 1752, in his late 30s, and Françoise remarried to a Comeau

Mathieu's third and youngest son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in c1732, evidently moved to the French Maritimes, was deported to France in late 1758, and married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Lavergne and Françoise Pitre, probably in France in c1759.  French officials counted them at La Havre in 1772 and 1791, so they did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785.  Charles died at Le Havre in December 1795, age 63. 

Germain's younger son Germain, fils (who Bona Arsenault insists was his brother Pierre's oldest son, but Stephen A. White, followed here, says was Germain, père's second son), was born probably at Port-Royal in c1641.  Germain, fils was a farmer at Port-Royal when he married Marie, daughter of René Landry l'aîné and Perrine Bourg and widow of Simon Pelletret, at the Acadian capital in c1664.  (Perrine Bourg was Germain, fils's older brother Pierre's mother-in-law.)  Between 1665 and 1685, Marie gave Germain, fils nine children, seven sons and two daughters.  Germain, fils died at Port-Royal in c1698, in his late 50s.  His line of the family was even larger than his older brother's.  Both of Germain, fils's daughters survived childhood, but only one of them married, into the Loppinot family.  Five of his seven sons also created their own families at Port-Royal, but some of his grandsons moved on to Canada before Le Grand Dérangement.   

Oldest son Charles, born probably at Port-Royal in c1665, worked as a sailor and carpenter.  He married Huguette, daughter of François Guérin and Anne Blanchard, probably at Port-Royal in c1684.  Between 1685 and 1706, Huguette gave Charles nine children, eight sons and a daughter.  According to Bona Arsenault, Charles was counted with his family at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1725.  If so, he returned to Annapolis Royal, where he died in May 1739, in his mid-70s.  His daughter married into the Lavigne family.  Six of his eight sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Claude, born probably at Port-Royal in c1785, survived childhood but did not marry. 

Charles's second son Charles, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1688, married Cécile, daughter of Michel Poirier and Marie Chiasson, at Beaubassin in February 1718 and settled at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1720 and 1722, Cécile gave Charles, fils two children, a daughter and a son.  Charles, fils died probably at Chignecto by July 1733, in his mid-40s.  Arsenault says Cécile remarried to a Caissie after Charles, fils's death in c1730.  Charles, fils's daughter married into the Caissie family.  His son also created a family of his own.

Only son Charles III, born probably at Chignecto in c1722, married Jeanne, daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry of Annapolis Royal, probably at Chignecto in c1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1748 and 1750, Jeanne gave Charles III two daughters.  They moved on to Malpèque on the northwest shore of Île St.-Jean in c1741.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles III, Jeanne, and their daughters at Malpèque.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Charles's third son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie, daughter of Prudent Robichaud and Henriette Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in February 1714 and remained there.  In 1715 and 1717, Marie gave Jean two sons.  Jean died probably at Annapolis Royal in 1718, in his late 20s, and Marie remarried to a Thériot widower.  Both of Jean's sons created their own families.

Older son Jean dit Jean Prudent, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1715, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Thériot and Madeleine Bourg, at Grand-Pré January 1738.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1746, Madeleine gave Jean Prudent four children, two sons and two daughters.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to Virginia.  In the spring of 1756, Virginia authorities deported them all of the Acadians in the colony to England.  Jean Prudent and his family were held at Southampton, where his older son married.  One wonders what happened to other members of the family in England. 

Oldest son Pierre, born at Grand-Pré in c1738, followed his family to Virginia and England and married Marie-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Southampton in April 1763.  The following month, they were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport L'Ambition.  They settled St.-Servan and may have moved on to Boulogne-sur-Mer.  In November 1765, Pierre took his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany, where they settled at Anvort near Sauzon.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1772, Marie-Blanche gave Pierre five children, four sons and a daughter, at St.-Servan and on Belle-Île-en-Mer.  In 1785, they did not emigrate to Louisiana with other Acadians in France. 

Jean's second son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1717, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, at Grand-Pré in November 1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1748, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph three children, two daughters and a son.  They moved on to Chignecto in 1743 and were still there in 1748.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755. 

Charles's fourth son François, born probably at Port-Royal in c1692, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson, at Beaubassin in February 1722 and settled at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1749, Marie gave François a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in c1741.  In August 1752, a French official counted François, Marie, and eight of their children at Malpèque on the north shore of the island, next to their oldest son and his family.  They evidently escaped the British roundup on the island in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the war with Britain, members of the family returned to St. John's Island, formerly Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, and settled at Rustico on the north shore of the island near their old home at Malpèque.  François died at Rustico in c1765, in his early 70s.  Four of his daughters married into the Beaulien, Comeau, Renaud dit Provençal, Haché, and Gallant dit Mignon families, two of them probably at Rustico.  One of them emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.  Three of François's sons also created their own families, and two of them settled at Rustico.

Second son François, fils, born probably at Chignecto in c1726, followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Jacquemin and Marguerite Haché dit Gallant of the island, at Port-La-Joye in November 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave François, fils a daughter in 1752.  In August of that year, a French official counted François, fils, called a Dousset, Marguerite, and no children, so their daughter was born probably later in the year, at Rivière-de-Peugiguit in the island's interior.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

François, père's third son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1734, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and was counted with them at Malpèque in August 1752.  He followed them to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1758, unless he remained in hiding on the island.  He married Louise, daughter of Louis Belliveau and Louise Haché dit Gallant, "before witnesses" probably at St.-Louis on the island in c1762 before the war with Britain ended and validated the marriage on Île Miquelon in August 1765 after the war.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1774, Louise gave Michel nine children, six sons and three daughters, probably on Miquelon. In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British deported the family, with dozens of other island Acadians, to La Rochelle, France.  A four-month-old son died in the French port in August 1779.  Both Michel and Louise died at La Rochelle in August 1779 within days of one another.  Members of the family returned to greater Acadia and settled at Rustico. 

François, père's fifth son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1744, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and was counted with them at Malpèque in August 1752.  He followed them to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1758 and, after the war with Britain, followed his older brother to Île Miquelon.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Gaudet and Anne Richard, on Miquelon in August 1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1782, Marguerite gave Jean nine children, three sons and six daughters.  They, too, resettled at Rustico.

Charles's fifth son Germain le jeune, born probably at Port-Royal in c1697, married cousin Françoise, daughter of Alexandre Comeau and Marguerite Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in November 1726.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1734, Françoise gave Germain le jeune four children, three daughters and a son.  At age 44, Germain le jeune remarried to Françoise, daughter of Thomas Sauvage dit Forgeron and Anne Lapierre, at Beaubassin in October 1741.  According to Arsenault, in 1746 and 1750, this Françoise gave Germain le jeune two more sons.  Other sources give them another son.  According to Arsenault, the family also settled at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, but they evidently returned to Annapolis Royal, where Germain le jeune died in July 1747, age 50.  One of his sons by his second wife created a family of his own.

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Françoise Comeau, born at Annapolis Royal in c1740 or 1741, became a sailor.  He died at Basse-Terre on the French island of Guadeloupe in November 1771, age 30.  One wonders if he married. 

Germain le jeune's third and youngest son Simon, by second wife Françoise Sauvage, born perhaps posthumously in c1748 (Bona Arsenault says c1750, which would have been three years after his father's death), married Suzanne, daughter of Jacques-Joseph Villers and Françoise Miet, at Beauport near Québec in July 1778. 

Charles's sixth son Joseph, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Robichaud and Madeleine Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in November 1725.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1739, Marie-Madeleine gave Joseph six children, five daughters and a son.  Other sources give them two more daughters and another son.  Members of the family moved to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, probably after 1752, and may have moved on to Port-Dauphin on the eastern shore of the island.  In late 1758, the British deported the family to Le Havre, France.  Joseph died at Le Havre in July 1764, age 66.  Three of his daughters married into the Demar, perhaps Demarets, Bunel, and Michel families, and three of them died at Le Havre between 1764 and 1811.  His older son emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.  His younger son remained in the mother country with his sisters. 

Older son Joseph, fils, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married Marguerite, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois of Pobomcoup, at Annapolis Royal in July 1753 and settled at Cap-Sable.  Marguerite gave Joseph, fils a daughter in c1756.  In the fall of 1758, the British captured them and other Acadians at Cap-Sable, hold them briefly at Halifax, and then deported them to Le Havre, France, late that year.  In February 1759, soon after they reached the Norman port, their daughter died at age 2 1/2 probably from the rigors of the crossing.  From 1759 to 1770, at Le Havre, Marguerite gave Joseph, fils five more children, four daughters and a son.  In 1773, Joseph and Marguerite, with hundreds of other Acadians languishing in the coastal cities, became part of the settlement venture in Poitou.  They settled near Cenan.  When, after two years of effort, most of the Poitou Acadians retreated to the port city of Nantes, Joseph and his family remained at Cenan.  Oldest surviving daughter Emmanuelle-Victoire married into the Jaunon family at Cenan in September 1778, and daughter Adélaïde-Véronique married into the Arnaud family there in January 1781.  Wife Marguerite died at Cenan in April 1784, age 57.  The following year, Joseph, fils, having joined his fellow Acadians at Nantes, took his three youngest children, two daughters and a son, to Louisiana aboard the last of the Seven Ships from France.  Joseph and the two younger children chose to settle at the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Joseph, fils died at New Orleans in April 1797.  The St.-Louis Parish priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph, fils died at age 75, but he was in his late 60s.   His daughter Marie-Marguerite remained at New Orleans, where she married into the Arnaud family; her husband seems to have been a half-brother of older sister Adélaïde-Véronique's husband back in Poitou, France.  The younger children, including son Ange, evidently did not marry, so this line of the family, except perhaps for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Younger son Jean, born probably in greater Acadia, followed his family to Le Havre, where he became a sail maker.  Like at least one of his sisters, he did not follow his older brother Joseph, fils to Louisiana in 1785.  A Le Havre civil record, dated 29 December 1811, notes that his sister Cécile, widow of Basile Michel, died "at 3:00 A.M. in the house of Jean Doucet, her brother--a sail maker; on the small quai Notre Dame."  One wonders if Jean married. 

Charles's seventh son Michel, born at Port-Royal in April 1703, married Angélique, daughter of Claude Pitre and Marie Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1739, Angélique gave Michel three children, a daughter and two sons.  Other records give them another son and three more daughters from 1743 to 1753.  Michel and Angélique also moved to the French Maritimes probably after 1752.  In late 1758, the British deported them to France.  Michel died in Notre-Dame Parish, Le Havre, in February 1760, age 56.  Two of his younger daughters--Élisabeth, age 7; and Catherine, age 15--died at Le Havre in February and September 1760, so one wonders if the family was caught up in an epidemic in the Norman port.  Son Joseph died at Le Havre in July 1764, age 21.  An older son married at Le Havre in c1766.  Michel's daughter Euphrosine died at Chantenay near Nantes, France, in June 1785, age 41.  She evidently did not marry.  Michel's married son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.

Second son Michel, fils, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1744, followed his family to the French Maritimes and to Le Havre, France, where he worked as a carpenter.  He married Marie-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Cousin and Judith Guédry of Ministigueshe, Cap-Sable, at Le Havre in c1766.  Between 1768 and 1773, Marie-Blanche gave Michel, fils two children, a daughter and a son.  In 1773, they became a part of the settlement scheme in Poitou.  Another daughter was born to them at Cenan in March 1775.  Later that year, in November, with hundreds of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians, Michel, fils and his family retreated to the port city of Nantes.  Another son was born to them there in February 1777, but he died the following April.  In 1785, Michel, fils, Marie-Blanche, and their three remaining children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana aboard the last of the Seven Ships.  They were among the hand full of Acadians who chose to settle at San Bernardo, also called Nueva Gálvez, an Isleño community below New Orleans.  Michel, fils died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1792.  The St.-Louis Parish priest who recorded Michel, fils's burial said he died at age 54, but he was in his late 40s.  One wonders if any of his children married in the Spanish colony.  

Charles's eighth and youngest son Louis, born at Port-Royal in February 1706, probably died young.   

Germain, fils's second son Bernard dit Laverdure, born probably at Port-Royal in c1667, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Corporon and François Savoie, probably at Port-Royal in c1690 and settled there.  Between 1692 and 1698, Madeleine gave Bernard four children, a son and three daughters.  Bernard died at Port-Royal in August 1709, in his early 40s.  One of his daughters married into the Savary family.  His son also created his own family, in Canada. 

Only son Jean, born probably at St.-Royal in c1692, moved to Canada perhaps after the fall of the Acadian capital in 1710 and married Françoise, daughter of Claude Bourget and Marie Couture, at Québec in April 1714.  Between 1714 and 1725, at Québec, Françoise gave Jean six children, four sons and two daughters.  Neither of their daughters married.  Jean remarried to Catherine, daughter of Joseph Prieur and Hélène Méchin, at Québec in October 1726.  Between 1727 and 1736, Catherine gave Jean three more children, a son and two daughters, at Québec.  Their older daughter married into the Birolle family at Louisbourg, Île Royale.  Jean's sons by first wife Françoise created their own families.  Two remained in Canada.  The other two "returned" to greater Acadia before they married and, as a result, were scattered to the winds. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Françoise Bourget, born at Québec in July 1717, remained in Canada.  At age 30, he married Marie-Louise, daughter of Jean-François Delage dit Lavigeur and Marie-Madeleine Loisel, at Charlesbourg near Québec in January 1748 and remained there.  Jean-Baptiste died at Québec in November 1792, age 75. 

Jean's second son Augustin dit Justice, by first wife Françoise Bourget, born at Québec in July 1719, returned to greater Acadia and settled on Île St-Jean in c1734.  Justice married Cécile, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Azy and Marie Amireau, probably on the island in c1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, from 1743 to 1750, Cécile gave Justice four children, three sons and a daughter.  Cécile died on the island in January 1751, in her early 30s.  Justice remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Joseph Prétieux and Anne Haché, at Port-La-Joye on the island in February 1752.  The following August, a French official counted Justice, Marie-Anne, and two of his sons by first wife Cécile on the north side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  (One wonders what happened to his two younger children.)  In 1753 and 1755 on the island, Marie-Anne gave Justice two more children, a son and a daughter.  In late 1758, the British deported Marie-Anne and two of their children, Pierre and Marie, to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport Tamerlane.  Augustin dit Justice crossed to the Breton port on another, unidentified, vessel..  They settled at nearby St.-Énogat.  Between 1760 and 1770, at St.-Énogat and nearby St.-Servan, Marie-Anne gave Justice six more children, two daughters and four sons--10 children in all by his two wives.  Three of his younger children, two daughters and a son, died at St.-Servan while still very young.  In 1773, Justice and his family, along with hundreds of other Acadian exiles languishing in the coastal cities, became part of a new settlement scheme in Poitou.  Augustin dit Justice, in fact, was one of the Acadian leaders at St.-Malo invited by the Marquis de Pérusse to inspect his lands near Châtellerault.  Augustin reported favorably on what he saw.  Despite his dit, he likely had been paid to exaggerate the quality of the soil on the marquis's estate.  Ironically, Justice's son Pierre remained at St.-Servan, where he married in January 1775.  Meanwhile, Justice's second son by Marie-Anne died in Poitou in April 1774, age 9.  Their only surviving daughter, Marie, married into the Samie family at Cenan, Poitou, in April 1777, a year after the majority of the Poitou Acadians retreated to the port city of Nantes.  As the date of his daughters's marriage reveals, Justice and his family remained in Poitou.  Justice died probably at Cenan in the late 1770s or early 1780s, in his late 50s or early 60s.  By September 1784, his widow Marie-Anne and their unmarried children joined their fellow Acadians at Nantes.  In 1785, Marie-Anne and two of her Doucet sons, but not oldest son Pierre and daughter Marie, emigrated to Louisiana on one of the Seven Ships.  They followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where both of the sons created families of their own. 

Third son Pierre, by second wife Marie-Anne Précieux, born probably at Rivière-du-Nord-Est, Île St.-Jean, in c1753, followed his family to St.-Servan, France, where he married Jeanne, daughter of locals Jean Dautoville and Perrine Bellotte, in January 1775, while his family was in Poitou.  In 1775 and 1779, Jeanne gave Pierre two sons, Auguste-Pierre and Pierre-Michel, at St.-Servan.  In 1785, they did not follow his widowed mother and two younger brothers to Louisiana but likely remained in the St.-Malo area. 

Augustin dit Justice's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie-Anne Précieux, born at St.-Servan in September 1766, followed his family to Poitou and his widowed mother to Nantes and Louisiana, where he married Marie-Anne-Barbe, called Barbe, daughter of Nicolas Daublin and Catherine, a "free Indian," at Ascension on the river in June 1789.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Lenée, and Martin.  Jean-Baptiste's only son married into the Hébert family and remained on the Lafourche. 

Augustin dit Justice's seventh and youngest son François, by second wife Marie-Anne Précieux, born at St.-Servan in September 1770, followed his family to Poitou and his widowed mother to Nantes and Louisiana, where he married Marie-Adélaïde, daughter of Étienne-Joseph Angilbert or Engilbert of Nantes and his Acadian wife Félicité Hébert, at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in May 1802.  Their daughters married into the Barrios, Bernard, Lejeune, Molaison, Parks, and Scanlen families.  Two of François's three sons married into the Guidry and Bourg families.  One remained in the Bayou Lafourche valley, and the other moved on to lower Bayou Teche. 

Jean's third son Germain le jeune, by first wife Françoise Bourget, born at Charlesbourg in August 1721, also returned to greater Acadia and married Marguerite, daughter of François LeBlanc and Cécile Boudrot, at Grand-Pré in October 1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1743 and 1745, Marguerite gave Germain le jeune two children, a daughter and a son, at Grand-Pré.  Other records give them two other sons in c1748 and c1750.  They evidently moved to Chignecto.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to South Carolina.  At age 40, Germain le jeune remarried to Marguerite Comeau in c1761 probably in the southern colony.  Colonial officials counted Germaine, Marguerite, and three sons, ages 20, 15, and 12, still in the colony in August 1763.  They followed other Acadians from the southern colonies to French St.-Dominque later in the year or in 1764.  Germain le jeune died probably in the sugar colony by February 1776, in his early or mid-50s.  Two of his three sons married there.

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born in Acadia in c1743, followed his family to South Carolina in 1755 and was counted with his father, stepmother, and two younger brothers there in August 1763.  He likely followed his family to French St.-Domingue.  One wonders if he married. 

Germain le jeune's second son Anselme, by first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born in Acadia in c1748, followed his family to South Carolina and French St.-Domingue, where he married fellow Acadian Marie-Josèphe Melanson probably at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Between  1777 and 1785, she gave Anselme four children, a son and three daughters. 

Germain le jeune's third and youngest son Simon, by first wife Marguerite LeBlanc, born in Acadia in c1750, followed his family to South Carolina and French St.-Domingue, where he married cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre LeBlanc and Claire Benoit of Grand-Pré, at Môle St.-Nicolas, St.-Domingue, in February 1776.  Between 1777 and 1780, Madeleine gave Simon at least three children, two daughters and a son; the younger daughter borned posthumously.  Simon died at Môle in August 1780, age 30. 

Jean's fourth son, François-Clément, by first wife Françoise Bourget, born at Charlesbourg in October 1723, remained in Canada and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Garand and Marie-Madeleine Masson, at St.-François-du-Sud below Québec in November 1750.  François-Clément died at nearby St.-Pierre-du-Sud in April 1769, age 45. 

Jean's fifth and youngest son Charles-Joseph, by second wife Catherine Prieur, born at Québec in July 1734, died there at age 10 months in March 1736. 

Germain, fils's third son Laurent, born probably at Port-Royal in c1669, married Jeanne, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier and widow of Michel Richard dit Sansoucy, probably at Port-Royal in c1689.  The settled on the haute rivière above Port-Royal.  Between 1690 and 1713, Jeanne gave Laurent a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  Laurent died at Annapolis Royal by January 1728, in his late 50s.  Two of his daughters married into the Lord, Levron, and Garceau dit Boutin families.  Six of his sons also created their own families, one of them in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, moved to Canada perhaps after the fall of Port-Royal to the British in 1710 and married Élisabeth, daughter of Nicolas Sylvestre and Barbe Neveu, at Pointe-aux-Trembles near Montréal in February 1716.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1738, Élisabeth gave Pierre nine children, five daughters and four sons.  They settled at Chicot, Berthierville, on the upper St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivière and Montréal in 1721.  Three of their daughters married into the Chevalier, Moreau, and Pasquin families at nearby Sorel and Île Dupas.  Three of Pierre's four sons also created their own families in Canada.

Oldest son Athanase, born perhaps at Pointe-aux-Trembles in c1724, married Marie-Louise Boyer probably in Canada in November 1752. 

Pierre's second son Pierre, fils, born perhaps at Pointe-aux-Trembles in c1724, married Véronique, daughter of François Plante and Marie-Louise Joly, probably in Canada in February 1756. 

Pierre, père's fourth and youngest son Michel, born perhaps at Pointe-aux-Trembles in c1724, married Marie-Agathe Frappier, widow of François Plante, probably in Canada in January 1760, and remarried to Marguerite Aubin-Lambert probably in Canada in January 1779. 

Laurent's second son Laurent, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1696, married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie and widow of Abraham Brun, at Annapolis Royal in January 1722 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1727, Anne gave Laurent, fils three children, two sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Breau family.  Both of Laurent, fils's sons also created their own families.  The older one emigrated to Louisiana in 1765. 

Older son Michel-Laurent, born at Annapolis Royal in November1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Martin and Jeanne Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1749 and 1751, Marguerite gave Michel-Laurent two children, a son and a daughter.  Other sources give them five children, four sons and a daughter, born between 1752 and 1764.  They escaped the British in 1755 and fled to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They escaped the British again in the summer of 1760 when the Royal Navy attacked the French stronghold at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Sometime in the early 1760s, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces and were held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted Michel-Laurent, Marguerite, and eight children on Georges Island in Halifax harbor in August 1763.  Michel-Laurent, Marguerite, and five of their children, four sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana with the Broussards in 1764-65, the first members of the family to go there.  Their daughter died at age 1 in a Teche valley epidemic.  Their sons survived the ordeal, married into the Landry, Comeaux, and Voorhies familes, and settled on the western prairies. 

Laurent, fils's younger son Laurent III, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1727, married Ursule, daughter of Étienne Martin and Marie Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1752 Ursule gave Laurent III a son.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755. 

Laurent's third son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, married Marie, daughter of Charles Doiron and François Gaudet, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1723 and remained there. 

Laurent's fourth son Pierre-Paul dit Paul Laurent, born at Port-Royal in March 1704, married Anne, daughter of Claude Brun and Cécile Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in February 1738 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1751, Anne gave Paul Laurent seven children, five sons and two daughters.  They evidently escaped the British roundup in the fall of 1755.  After the war with Britain, they settled at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière on the St. Lawrence below Québec by 1770.  Paul Laurent died by November 1773, in his late 60s.  His daughters married into the Ouellet and Langlois families at St.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière and nearby Rivière Ouelle.  One of his sons also created his own family on the lower St. Lawrence.

Fourth son Amable, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1744, followed his family into exile and to Canada.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Landry and Madeleine Bergeron, at Kamouraska below Rivière Ouelle in October 1775. 

Laurent's fifth son Joseph, born on the haute rivière at Port-Royal in January 1708, may not have survived childhood. 

Laurent's sixth son Michel, born on the haute rivière at Port-Royal in October 1710, married, in his late 30s, Marie-Josèphe, daughter of René Babineau and Marie-Madeleine Savoie and widow of Olivier Egan, at Annapolis Royal in October 1748 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1749 and 1755 Marie-Josèphe gave Michel two daughters. 

Laurent's seventh and youngest son Claude le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in July 1713, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Étienne Martin and Marie-Jeanne Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in December 1742 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1745 and 1753, Marguerite gave Claude le jeune three children, two daughters and a son.  Claude died during exile before August 1763, in his late 40s or early 50s.    

Germain, fils's fourth son Jacques dit Maillard, born probably at Port-Royal in c1671, married Marie, another daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie, in c1695 probably at Port-Royal and remained there.  Between 1696 and 1723, Jeanne gave Jacques 11 children, three sons and eight daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Lord, Simon dit Boucher, and Landry families.  Jacques's sons also created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean, born at probably at Port-Royal by c1703, married Judith, daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite Melanson, by April 1728 and settled at Minas. 

Jacques's second son Alexis, born at Port-Royal in October 1704, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Léger and Madeleine Trahan, in c1729 and probably remained at Annapolis Royal.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1730 and 1748, Madeleine gave Alexis 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Evidently the family escaped the British in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  The family was counted at Sorel on the upper St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivières and Montréal in 1762.  Alexis died by February 1762, perhaps at Sorel, in his mid- or late 50s.  Two of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jacques le jeune, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married Anne, daughter of Jean Landry and Anne Petitot dit Saint-Seine, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1754, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  The family evidently escaped the British in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Members of the family were counted at Québec in 1757.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1757 and 1778, Anne gave Jacques le jeune five children, three sons and two daughters.  British authorities counted the family at Rivière-du-Loup, today's Louiseville, on the upper St. Lawrence above Trois-Rivières, in 1776, and at nearby Maskinongé in 1782.  One of their daughters married into the MacRay family at Maskinongé.  Two of Jacques le jeune's three sons also created their own families in the area.

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Québec in c1757, married Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Raymond and Marie-Claire Pellerin, at Rivière-du-Loup in January 1786. 

Third and yongest son Pierre, born probably at Rivière-du-Loup in c1778, married Marguerite Davis in March 1802. 

Alexis's fourth son Charles-Élisée, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1736, followed his family into exile and to Canada, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Anne Petitot dit Saint-Seine, at Sorel between Trois-Rivières and Montréal in February 1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1779, Marguerite gave Charles-Élisée seven children, four sons and three daughters.  They settled at Maskinongé.  At least two of their sons created their own families there.

Oldest son Michel, born perhaps at Maskinongé in c1768, married Geneviève Généreux there in c1791. 

Charles-Élisée's fourth and youngest son Louis, born probably at Maskinongé in c1779, married Hélène, daughter of Alexis Baril and Marie-Anne Thibodeau, perhaps a fellow Acadian, at Maskinongé in November 1802. 

Jacques's third and youngest son Pierre dit Maillard, born at Port-Royal in February 1707, married Anne-Marie, daughter of François Dugas and Claire Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in January 1749 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1762, Anne-Marie gave Pierre six children, three daughters and three sons.  The family was counted at Pointe-aux-Écureuils, today's Donnacona, on the upper St. Lawrence above Québec, in 1759, and upriver at Batiscan in 1762.  Pierre died in Canada between 1761 and 1766, in his early 50s.  One of his daughters married into the Gélinas family at Rivière-du-Loup, today's Louiseville. 

Germain, fils's fifth son Claude dit Maitre Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Marie, daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marie-Anne Lefebvre, probably at Port-Royal in c1696 and remained there.  Between 1697 and 1722, Marie gave Claude 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Claude died at Annapolis Royal in December 1754, in his late 70s.  Five of his daughters married into the Gaudet, Préjean, Chiasson, Grosvalet, and Le Borgne dit Cotte families.  Four of his five sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles, born probably at Port-Royal in c1697, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Préjean and Andrée Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in February 1725 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1745, Madeleine gave Charles seven children, three daughters and four sons, including a set of twins.  The British deported the family to Connecticut in the fall of 1755.  After the war with Britain, they resettled at L'Assomption on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal, where British officials counted them in 1767.  Two of their daughters married into the Simon and Granger families in Nova Scotia and Connecticut.  At least one of Charles's sons created his own family.

Fifth and youngest son Jean, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1745, followed his family to Connecticut and Canada.  He married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Amireau and Marguerite Robichaud of Pobomcoup, at Trois-Rivières in February 1778.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1800, Madeleine gave Jean 11 children, six sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  They remained at Trois-Rivières. 

Claude's second son Joseph, born at Port-Royal in March 1706, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Surette and Jeanne Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1731 and may have remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1754, Anne gave Joseph 13 children, 10 sons and three daughters, including a set of twins.  Another source gives them another son--their eleventh son and fourteenth child--in c1758.  The British deported them to Massachusetts in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted Joseph, Anne, and 10 of their children at Gloucester in July 1760.  After the war with Britain, the family returned to Nova Scotia and settled at Yarmouth, formerly Cap-Forshu, north of Cap-Sable, on the peninsula's southwest coast.  Two of their daughters married Mius d'Entremont brothers of nearby Pobomcoup.  At least six of Joseph's sons also created their own famliies in the area. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in c1731, married cousin Ludivine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Mius d'Entremont and Marie-Josèphe Surette, in c1754.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1755 and 1760, Ludivine gave Joseph, fils four children, two sons and two daughters.  They also settled at Yarmouth. 

Joseph, père's third son Dominique, born in c1733, followed his family to Massachusetts and married cousin Madeleine, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Mius d'Entremont and Marie-Josèphe Surette, in c1760 probably in Massachusetts.  Bay Colony officials counted them still in the colony in August 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1768 and 1769, Madeleine gave Dominique two sons.  Other records give them a child by August 1763.  After the war with Britain, they returned to Nova Scotia and settled on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay.  Their sons created their own families there.

Older son Dominique, fils, born probably on Baie Ste.-Marie in c1768, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Dugas and Brigitte Melanson, probably on the bay in c1788, and remarried to Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine-Salomon Maillet and Marguerite Blanchard, probably on the bay in April 1799.  The settled at Cap Ste.-Marie, today's Marvillette, near the mouth of St. Mary's Bay. 

Dominique, père's younger son Isidore, born probably on Baie Ste.-Marie in c1769, married Rosalie, daughter of Pierre Hériard and his Acadian wife Marie-Cécile Mius, in c1790. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Charles, born in c1735, evidently followed his family to Massachusetts and Yarmouth.  He married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Mius d'Entremont and Marie-Marthe Hébert of Pobomcoup, in c1770.  According to Bona Arsenault, Félicité gave Charles a daughter in c1772.  Their daughter married into the Corporon family. 

Joseph, père's sixth son Athanase, born in c1740, followed his family to Massachusetts and Yarmouth.  He married fellow Acadian Marie LeBlanc in c1763 and settled on Baie Ste.-Marie. 

Joseph, père's eighth son Magloire, born in c1745, evidently followed his family to Massachusetts and Yarmouth.  He married Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Amireau and Claire Dugas of Pobomcoup, in c1770. 

Joseph, père's tenth son Michel, born in c1754, followed his family to Massachusetts and Yarmouth.  He married Marie, another daughter of Charles Mius d'Entremont and Marie-Marthe Hébert, in c1775. 

Claude's third son Louis, born at Port-Royal in August 1708, died there a few days after birth. 

Claude's fourth son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in November 1709, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Prudent Robichaud and Henriette Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1732 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1753, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre eight children, four sons and four daughters.  Arsenault says French officials counted them at Québec in 1758, but they likely were deported to Massachusetts in the fall of 1755.  Colonial officials counted Pierre, Marie-Josèphe, and eight children at Marblehead in July 1760.  After the war with Britain, some of them chose to settle in Canada, and others returned to British Nova Scotia.  British officials counted members of the family at Trois-Rivières in 1772.  Pierre died of smallpox at Québec in late December 1775, age 66.  Two of his daughters married into the Loranger and Hébert families at Trois-Rivières and Québec.  At least one of his sons created his own family and settled in Nova Scotia.

Second son Amable, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1737, followed his family to Massachusetts but evidently not to Canada.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Gaudet and Gertrude LeBlanc, at Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the western coast of Nova Scotia.  One of their daughters married into the Saulnier and Dugas families. 

Claude's fifth and youngest son Claude, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in November 1714, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Pellerin and Marie Martin, at Annapolis Royal in November 1739 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1751, Marguerite gave Claude, fils five children, four sons and a daughter.  Claude, fils died in exile before August 1763, in his late 40s. 

Germain, fils's sixth son Alexis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1682, evidently did not survive childhood. 

Germain, fils's seventh and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1685, evidently died as a young man before he could marry.334

Comeau

Pierre Comeau the cooper, another 1632 arrival, started his family late in life, but his young wife Rose Bayon, 33 years his junior, helped create a large, influential family in the colony.  Between 1650 and 1665, Rose gave Pierre nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Pierre died at Port-Royal, date unrecorded.  His daughters married into the Gaudet, Hébert, and Rivet families.  All six of his sons survived childhood, and five of them created families of their own.  Pierre and Rose's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Minas and Pigiguit in the Minas Basin; Chignecto; the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto, especially at Chepoudy; and in the French Maritimes and Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement).  At least 54 of the cooper's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, from French St.-Domingue and Maryland in the late 1760s, and from France in 1785.  Most of the cooper's descendants, however, could be found in Canada and greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Étienne, born probably at Port-Royal in c1650, became a farmer at Port-Royal.  He married Marie-Anne, daughter of Martin Lefebvre and Barbe Bajolet, probably at Port-Royal in c1670.  Between 1671 and 1676, Marie-Anne gave Étienne three children, two daughters and a son.  Genealogist Bona Arsenault gives them another son.  Their daughters married into the Michel dit Saint-Michel and Doucet families.  Étienne, in his late 40s, remarried to Marie, daughter of René Landry l'aîné and Perrine Bourg and widow of Germain Doucet, fils, probably at Port-Royal in c1698.  She gave him no more children.  Étienne died at Annapolis Royal in January 1723, age 73.  His son created a family of his own. 

Only surviving son Alexandre, by first wife Marie-Anne Lefebvre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Doucet and Henriette Pelletret, in c1700.  They remained at Port-Royal.  Between 1703 and 1725, Marguerite gave Alexandre six children, three daughters and three sons.  In August 1715, Alexandre, called André in the record, received permission to go to French-controlled Île Royale, formerly Cape Breton Island, to look at land there, but he chose to remain in British Nova Scotia.  Alexandre died at Annapolis Royal, formerly Port-Royal, in July 1725, in his early 50s; his youngest child was born the following October.  His daughters married into the Doucet, Guilbeau, and Bourg families.  His three sons also created their own families at Annapolis Royal and in exile.

Oldest son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal June 1714, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Abraham Bourg and Marie Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in November 1835.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1752, Anne-Marie gave Joseph eight children, six daughters and two sons.  In 1755, the British deported the family to New York.  Colonial officials counted Joseph, his wife, and eight children there in 1763.  One wonders what happened to them after Le Grand Dérangement

Alexandre's second son François, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1722, married Françoise, daughter of Thomas Le Sauvage dit Forgeron and Anne Lapierre and widow of Gilles Massé and Germain Doucet, at Annapolis in February 1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1752, Françoise gave François three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported François and his family to New York in 1755.  Colonial officials counted François, his wife, and 10 children there in 1763.  They moved on to Champflore, Martinique, where colonial officials counted François, wife Françoise, and six of their children in January 1766.  François died on the island the following June, age 44.  Two of his daughters died on the island in June and July, and a stepdaughter died the following November.  Widow Françoise evidently remained on the island.

Alexandre's third and youngest son Charles, born posthumously at Annapolis Royal in October 1725, was still a bachelor when the British deported him to Connecticut in 1755.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babineau dit Deslauriers and Marguerite Dugas, in that colony in c1758.  Their marriage was rehabilitated at La Mirebalais, French St.-Domingue, in September 1764, where they had gone with dozens of other fellow Acadians the year before.  Marguerite used the surname Deslauriers, not Babineau.  Two of their sons, probably twins, died at age 5 at La Mirebalais in September and October 1764.  Another son, born at La Mirebalais in November 1766, died probably soon after his birth.  They were among the few Acadians who emigrated to Louisiana directly from St.-Domingue, probably in the late 1760s, perhaps with one of the Acadian parties from Maryland that transshipped at Cap-Français in 1767 or 1768.  With them was daughter Anne, who had been born probably in Connecticut in c1762.  They settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans had more children there, including another son.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1777.  Daughter Anne married into the Bernard, Gaudet, and Levert families.  Only one of Charle's four sons--François, the one born in Louisiana--created a family of his own.  He married into the Charpentier family and remained at Cabahannocer, later St. James Parish, one of the few Comeauxs to settle there.  His sons and grandsons settled near Convent. 

Pierre's second son Pierre l'aîné dit L'Esturgeon, born probably at Port-Royal in c1652, married Jeanne, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, probably at Port-Royal in c1677.  They settled on the haute rivière.  Between 1678 and 1705, Jeanne gave L'Esturgeon 18 children, eight sons and 10 daughters. Bona Arsenault gives them another daughter.  Pierre dit L'Esturgeon died at Annapolis Royal in April 1730, in his late 70s.  Eight of his daughters married into the Pitre, Vigneau, Raymond, Thébeau, Langlois, Lord, and Thibodeau families.  Five of his eight sons created famililes of their own.  

Oldest son Abraham, born probably at Port-Royal in c1680, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Pitre and Marie Pesseley, probably at Port-Royal in c1701 and remained at Port-Royal.  Between the early 1700s and 1727, Marguerite gave Abraham 13 children, eight daughters and five sons, including a set of twins.  Their daughters married into the Préjean, Saulnier, Léger, Vincent, Giraud, Doucet, Brun, and Bourgeois families.  Only two of Abraham's sons created their own families.  His two younger sons may have been casualties of King George's War in the late 1740s. 

Oldest son Jean le jeune, born at Port-Royal in September 1704, married Marguerite-Brigitte, called Brigitte, daughter of François Savoie and Marie Richard, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1732 and settled at Chepoudy.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1751, Brigitte gave Jean five children, two sons and three daughters.  Other records give them another son.  Jean le jeune took his family to Île St.-Jean perhaps to escape the British in 1755.  He died on the island soon after they arrived, in his early 50s.  His widow promptly remarried to his cousin Maurice Comeau le jeune at Port-La-Joye in August 1756.  Brigitte, her new husband, and her children escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean in late 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Most members of the family moved on to Canada and settled there.  Two of Jean's daughters married into the Landrot and Saintonge families at Trois-Rivières and Yamachiche.  His oldest son also settled there.  His younger sons, however, having becoming separated from the family, emigrated to Louisiana in 1765. 

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Chepoudy in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and his mother and stepfather to Canada.  Joseph married cousin Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Lord and Madeleine Comeau, at Québec in February 1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1784, Élisabeth gave Joseph a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  Joseph, in his early 50s, remarried to Amable, daughter of Pierre Saint-Cerny-Montour and Marie-Anne Camirand, at Yamachiche near Trois-Rivières in November 1790.  Arsenault says Amable gave Joseph another son in c1795. 

Jean le jeune's second son Victor, born probably at Chepoudy in c1740 (Bona Arsenault says c1733), followed his family to Île St.-Jean and into exile, but he probably did not follow his mother and stepfather to Canada.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, he either surrendered to, or was captured by, the British and held in a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia.  He married Anne, 30-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Michel and Jeanne Breau and widow of Michel Brun, probably at Halifax in c1763.  Anne gave him a son soon after their marriage.  In late 1764 and early 1765, they followed the Broussard dit Beausoleil party to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  Another son was born to them either aboard ship or at Cap-Français.  The boy was baptized in the island port, and the family, with the Broussards, reached New Orleans in February 1765.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche and survived the mysterious epidemic that struck the Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  Victor died either in Attakapas or nearby Opelousas by April 1771, when Anne remarried--her third marriage--to widower Joseph Cormier of Chignecto and Prairie Bellevue, at Opelousas.  One of Victor's sons, the younger one, married into the LeBlanc family and created a vigorous family line at Carencro at the northern edge of the Attakapas District. 

Jean le jeune's third and youngest son Charles le jeune, born probably at Chepoudy in c1742, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and into exile, but, like older brother Victor, probably did not follow his mother and stepfather to Canada.  He, too, ended up as a prisoner of war in Nova Scotia.  He married cousin Anastasie, daughter fellow Acadians Paul Savoie and Judith Michel of Chepoudy, probably at Halifax in c1763 or 1764.  They, too, emigrated to Louisiana via French St.-Domingue in 1764-65.  If they followed his brother Victor and the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche, they did not remain there.  By the spring of 1766, Charles le jeune and Anastasie were living in the Opelousas District, where they remained.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1781, Anastasie gave Charles eight children, five sons and three daughters, but Louisiana records give them three daughters and only four sons.  Charles died at Opelousas in August 1705, in his early 60s.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Langlinais, Mouton, and Sonnier families.  All four of his sons married, into the Broussard, Langlois, Sonnier, Préjean, and Mouton families, and created vigorous lines on the western prairies. 

Abraham's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in September 1708, married Angélique, daughter of Jacques Carne and Marie Arnault, at Grand-Pré in September 1729 and likely settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1743, Angélique gave Jean-Baptiste five children, three sons and two daughters. 

Abraham's third son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in November 1718, died young. 

Abraham's fourth son François, born at Annapolis Royal in September 1722, died there a bachelor in June 1747, in his mid-20s.  His death occurred in June 1747 during the final year of King George's War, so one wonders if he was a casualty of that conflict.  He did not marry. 

Abraham's fifth and youngest son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1724, also died at Annapolis Royal in June 1747, in his early 20s, two weeks before his older brother François died, so he, too, may have been a casualty of war.  He also did not marry. 

L'Esturgeon's second son Joseph dit Grandjean, born probably at Port-Royal in August 1685, married Marie, daughter of Jean Roy dit La Liberté and Marie Aubois, at Annapolis Royal in November 1710 and settled on the haute rivière.  Between 1712 and the late 1740s, Marie gave him seven children, five daughters and two sons.  Three of their daughters married into the Richard, Savoie, and Levron families, the youngest at Beaubassin.  One of Grandjean's two sons married.  

Older son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1716, probably died young. 

Grandjean's younger son Simon, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1722, married in c1746 probably at Annapolis Royal a woman whose name has been lost to history. 

L'Esturgeon's third son Pierre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1688, died at Port-Royal in December 1710, still a bachelor, in his early 20s, and was buried at the St.-Laurent chapel on the haute rivière.  One wonders if he was a casualty of the fight at Port-Royal the previous September. 

L'Esturgeon's fourth son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal at c1696, married Madeleine, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in October 1719 and settled at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1736, Madeleine gave Jean five children, two daughters and three sons.  Jean and members of his family evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Jean died at Québec in early December 1757, age 60, a victim perhaps of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area that fall and winter.  One of his daughters married into the Savoie family.  Two of his three sons created their own families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana in 1765.

Oldest son Grégoire, born probably at Chepoudy in c1723, married Marie Thibodeau probably at Chepoudy in c1750.  They evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Grégoire a daughter in 1757 probably in Canada.  Sadly, both Grégoire, age 34, and Anne died at Québec in 1757, victims of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area that fall and winter.  One wonders if their infant daughter also succumbed to the disease. 

Jean's second son Michel, born probably at Chepoudy in c1733, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Girouard and Marie Thibodeau, at Chepoudy in May 1756, so they likely had escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area the previous fall.  They probably sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore soon after their marriage.  In the late 1750s, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, the British and were held in the prisoner-of-war compound on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, where Marie-Madeleine gave Michel a son in c1760.  British authorities counted Michel, Marie-Madeleine, and three children at Halifax in August 1763.  Late the following year, they emigrated to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and reached New Orleans in the spring of 1765.  They brought only a single child with them.  However, Marie-Madeleine was pregnant on the voyage, and another son was born to them in late April 1765 either aboard ship, at La Balize, or in New Orleans.  After baptizing their newborn son on May 16, they followed 200 other Acadians to lower Bayou Teche but did not remain there.  They settled, instead, on upper Bayou Teche in the Opelousas District, where Marie-Madeleine gave Michel more children.  Michel died at Opelousas in the spring of 1804, in his early 70s.  His daughters married into the Bellard and Doucet families.  Only his youngest son, born at Opelousas, created a family of his own.  He married into the Latiolais family and created a vigorous line on the western prairies.  

L'Esturgeon's fifth son François, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, married Anne, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, at Annapolis Royal in February 1724 and also settled at Chepoudy.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1725 and 1754, Anne gave François 11 children, six daughters and five sons.  François and his family evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  François died at Québec in late April 1758, age 58, a victim perhaps of the smallpox that struck Acadian refugees in the area the previous fall and winter.  Four of his daughters married into the Rousse dit Languedoc, Michel dit Bécot, and Rivard-Dufresne families in Canada.  Four of his five sons also created their own families on the upper St. Lawrence. 

Oldest son Maurice le jeune, born probably at Chepoudy in c1732, evidently moved, or was driven, to Île St.-Jean after August 1752.  He married Marguerite-Brigitte, called Brigitte, daughter of François Savoie and Marie Richard of Annapolis Royal and widow of his cousin Jean Comeau, at Port-La-Joye on the island in August 1756.  They evidently escaped the British roundup on the island in late 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, or perhaps they went directly from the island to Canada.  Brigitte did not survive the ordeal.  Maurice le jeune remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Gaudet and Marie-Josèphe Darois of Pigiguit, at Yamachiche near Trois-Rivières in February 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1767 and 1769, Marie-Josèphe gave Maurice le jeune two sons.  He remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathieu Doucet and Anne Lord of Annapolis Royal, at Yamachiche in November 1771.  Evidently Isabelle gave Maurice le jeune no more children.  One of his two sons created his own family at Trois-Rivières.

Older son Joseph, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Gaudet, born probably at Yamachiche in c1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Duplessis and Françoise Laure, at Pointe-du-Lac near Trois-Rivières in November 1787. 

François's second son François, fils, born probably at Chepoudy in c1738, may have followed his parents to Canada in the late 1750s.  He married Françoise, daughter of Louis Paris dit Lamadeleine and Michelle David, at Bécancour, across from Trois-Rivière, in October 1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1772, Françoise gave François, fils three daughters.  He remarried to Geneviève, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Clément dit Dubois and Josephte Bourbeau, at Bécancour in June 1774.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1775 and 1791, Geneviève gave François, fils nine more children, six daughters and three sons, at Bécancour.  Six of François, fils's daughters by both wives married into the LeBlanc, Dubois, Bélanger, Tourigny, Piché, Deshaies, and Lacourse families at Bécancour.  His three sons also created their own families in the area.

Oldest son François III, by second wife Geneviève Clément, born probably at Bécancour in c1783, married Marie, daughter of François Bourbeau-Beauchène and Marie-Anne Provencher, at Bécancour in September 1808, and, in his early 50s, remarried to Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Cormier and his Canadian wife Marie-Angélique Ducharme, at Bécancour in September 1834. 

François, fils's second son Charles, by second wife Geneviève Clément, born probably at Bécancour in c1787, married Geneviève, daughter of Michel Beaudet and Louise Michel, at Gentilly in August 1812. 

François, fils's third and youngest son Michel-Jérôme, by second wife Geneviève Clément, born probably at Bécancour in c1791, married Angèle, daughter of Louis Provencher-Nourri and Angélique Roger, at Nicolet in c1814. 

François, père's fourth son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Chepoudy in c1745, evidently followed his parents to Canada in the late 1750s.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Vincent and Marie Daigle, at Yamachiche in 1774.

François, père's fifth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Chepoudy in c1754, followed his parents to Canada in the late 1750s.  He married Marie-Josèphe Boucher there probably in the 1770s and remarried to Marie-Josèphe Houde-Desruisseaux probably later in the decade.  They were living at Bécancour in 1783, at nearby Nicolet from 1785 to 1792, at St.-Pierre-les-Becquets below Bécancour in 1793, and at nearby Gentilly in 1797.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1780 and 1797, the second Marie-Josèphe gave Jean-Baptiste 10 children, four sons and six daughters, including two sets of twins.  One of Jean-Baptiste's daughters married into the Lévesque family at Nicolet.  One of his sons also created his own family there.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Houde-Desruisseaux, born probably at Bécancour in c1780, married Ursule Lacharité at Nicolet in October 1804. 

L'Esturgeon's sixth son Maurice, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau le jeune and Anne-Marie Aucoin, in c1732 and settled at Chepoudy.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1733 and 1737, Marguerite gave Maurice two children, a daughter and a son.  If the family escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in 1755, they likely were captured by, or surrendered to, the British in the early 1760s and ended up as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted them at Chédabouctou, present-day Guysborough, Nova Scotia, in 1763.  They joined other Acadian refugees on Île Miquelon in 1764 and were counted there in 1767.  That year, due to overcrowding on the island, French authorities evidently pressured them into emigrating to France.  Maurice died in the Hôpital de St.-Pol-de-Léon, Brittany, France, in January 1768, age 60.  His son created this own family in greater Acadia and emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Only son Benoît, born at Chepoudy in c1737, followed his parents into exile and into imprisonment in Nova Scotia.  Benoît married fellow Acadian Anne Blanchard of Petitcoudiac at Halifax in c1762.  They evidently followed his parents to Chédabouctou and to Île Miquelon in 1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Benoît two sons in 1763 and 1765.  They followed his parents to France in 1767 and settled at Cherbourg, where, from 1769 to 1773, Anne gave Benoît three daughters.  He worked at Cherbourg as a carpenter.  Along with hundreds of other Acadians in the coastal cities, Benoît and his family may have been part of a settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated to the port city of Nantes in late 1775 or early 1776.  Anne gave Benoît another daughter at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1779.  The family, which now included a son and three daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Anne was pregnant on the voyage and give birth to another daughter at sea.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Benoît's daughters married into the Richard, Hébert, LeBlanc, Guillot, and Chiasson families on the bayou and the river.  One of his daughters settled in the Opelousas District.  His youngest daughter was one of the last Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join our ancestors.  His only surviving son Jean, age 19 when he came to Louisiana. evidently did not create a family of his own. 

L'Esturgeon's seventh son Ambroise, born at Port-Royal in February 1704, married Marguerite, daughter of Germain Cormier and Marie LeBlanc of Chignecto, in c1732 and settled at Chepoudy.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1756, Marguerite gave Ambroise nine children, four sons and five daughters.  They, too, evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in the fall of 1755.  If they went to Canada with Ambroise's older brothers, they did not remain there.  After the war, they settled at Carleton on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province.  Three of Ambroise's daughters married into the Brun, Bourg, and Allard families.  Three of his four sons created their own families on the shores of the Baie des Chaleurs.

Second son Jean, born probably at Chepoudy in c1743, and followed his family into exile.  He married Esther, daughter of fellow Acadians Ambroise Babin and Anne Cyr, at Carleton probably in the late 1770s.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1778 and 1780 Esther gave Jean two children, a daughter and a son.  Jean died at Carleton in November 1780, in his late 30s.  His son created his own family. 

Only son Jean, fils, born probably at Carleton in c1780, married Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Marthe Dugas, at Carleton in January 1802.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1802 and 1821, Angélique gave Jean, fils nine children, five daughters and four sons. 

Ambroise's third son François dit L'Aîné, born probably at Chepoudy in c1745, followed his family into exile and to the shores of the Baie des Chaleurs.  He married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Madeleine Girouard of Carleton, probably at Carleton in c1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1793, Marie gave L'Aîné a dozen children, seven daughters and five sons.  Four of L'Aîné's daughters married into the Berthelot, Dugas, Mercier, and Goulet families at Carleton.  At least three of his five sons created their own families there. 

Oldest son Olivier, born probably at Carleton in c1779, married Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand LeBlanc and Marie Duon, at Carleton in November 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1800 and 1822, Euphrosine gave Olivier 10 children, five sons and five daughters. 

L'Aîné's third son Grégoire, born probably at Carleton in c1781, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, at Carleton in April 1808.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1809 Rosalie gave Grégoire a daughter.  Grégoire remarried to Angélique, daughter of François Tardif and Angélique Boivin of Québec, at Carleton in April 1814.

L'Aîné's fourth son Moïse-Osée, born probably at Carleton in c1784, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Bariault and Élisabeth Landry, at Carleton in January 1811.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1812 and 1824, Adélaïde gave Moïse-Osée eight children, five daughters and three sons.

Ambroise's fourth and youngest son François dit Le Jeune, born in exile in c1756, followed his family to the shores of the Baie des Chaleurs and married Marie, daughter of François Beaudry and Madeleine Boiselle, at Carleton in July 1778.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1790, Marie gave Le Jeune six children, three daughters and three sons.  Le Jeune remarried to fellow Acadian Isabelle Boudreau, widow of Michel Frenette, at Bathurst, New Brunswick, formerly Nepisiguit, on the south shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, in c1795.  According to Arsenault, in 1796 Isabelle gave Le Jeune another daughter.  Le Jeune's four daughters by both of his wives married into the Ferlatte, Beaudry, and Comeau dit Maza families at Carleton.  One of his three sons also created his own family there.

Third and youngest son Jean le jeune, by first wife Marie Beaudry, born probably at Carleton in c1786, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Johnson, probably Jeanson, and Geneviève Doiron, at Carleton in January 1808.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1809 and 1813, Marguerite gave Jean le jeune three children, two sons and a daughter. 

L'Esturgeon's eighth and youngest son Jacques, born at Port-Royal in October 1705, died three weeks after his birth. 

Pierre's third son Jean l'aîné, born probably at Port-Royal in c1656, married Françoise, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Marie Gaudet, probably at Port-Royal in c1675 and remained there.  Between 1678 and 1705, Françoise gave Jean l'aîné 19 children, including eight sons and nine daughters.  Jean l'aîné, in his mid-60s, remarried to Catherine, daughter of François Joseph dit Lejeune and Jeanne Lejeune, at Annapolis Royal in January 1720.  After a lengthy illness, he died at Annapolis Royal the following November.  Catherine gave him another child, a posthumously-born daughter, who married into the Daniel family.  Jean l'aîné's line of the Comeau family, through seven of his sons, was the largest of all.  Seven of his and Françoise's daughters married into the Girouard, D'Amours de Chauffours, Richard, Soulard, Trahan, Melanson, and Gisé dit Des Rosiers families.  One of them settled in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement and another at Minas.  The others remained at Annapolis.  Seven of Jean l'aîné's sons created famililes of their own, but not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, by first wife Françoise Hébert, a twin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1680, married Susanne, daughter of Pierre Bézier dit Joan dit Larivière and Madeleine Brun, at Port-Royal in January 1704.  They lived for a time at Minas before returning to the Annapolis valley.  Between 1705 and 1731, Susanne gave Pierre 13 children, eight sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  Four of their five daughters married into the Thibodeau, Dupuis, Lord, Dupaul, Bourgeois, and Mouton families.  One of them emigrated to Louisiana from the French Antilles.  Six of Pierre le jeune's eight sons created their own families.  Three of them married sisters. 

Oldest son Alexandre, born at Grand-Pré in November 1707, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Guillaume Blanchard and Jeanne Dupuis, at Annapolis Royal in January 1737.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1753, Marie-Josèphe gave Alexandre six children, four sons and two daughters.  Alexandre and his family evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Alexandre died perhaps still in exile before October 1764, place unrecorded.  His daughters married into the Dufault and Labossière families at St.-Ours on lower Rivière Richelieu northeast of Montréal.  Three of his four sons created their own families at St.-Ours and in coastal Nova Scotia.

Oldest son Alexandre, fils, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1739, followed his family to Canada in the late 1750s, where he married fellow Acadian Anne-Marie Pothier.  They did not remain in Canada but helped pioneer the new Acadian settlement on Baie-Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the southwestern coast of Nova Scotia. 

Alexandre, père's second son Joseph-Amable, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1741, followed his family to Canada and married Josephte dite Maranda ____ perhaps at St.-Ours, where he died in March 1814, in his late 60s or early 70s. 

Alexandre, père's third son Charles, born probaby at Annapolis Royal in c1747, followed his family to Canada and married Marie-Catherine, daughter of Joseph Plouffe and Marie-Ursule Rondeau, at St.-Ours in March 1772. 

Pierre le jeune's second son Pierre, fils, born at Grand-Pré in February 1712, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1734 (he also calls her Élisabeth Lord).  Arsenault says Marie-Madeleine/Élisabeth gave Pierre, fils a daughter in c1735.  According to Stephen A. White, Pierre, fils married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1739.  According to Arsenault, between 1730 and 1752, Élisabeth gave Pierre, fils eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Pierre, fils died perhaps while still in exile before August 1763, place unrecorded.  Arsenault says his widow remarried to Pierre Derayer of Beaubassin, widower of Françoise Arseneau, no place or date given.  One of Pierre, fils's daughters married into the Gaudet family perhaps while in exile; Arsenault says the marriage was rehabilitated "à Annapolis," perhaps in Maryland, in October 1769.  Arsenault says Pierre, fils's daughter Anne ended up at Bordeaux, France, where she married fellow Acadian Joseph Haché, a ship's carpenter, date unrecorded.  One wonders what happened to Pierre, fils's many sons. 

Pierre le jeune's third son Étienne le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1717, married Anne-Hélène, another daughter of Guillaume Blanchard and Jeanne Dupuis, at Annapolis Royal in January 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1745 and 1752, Anne-Hélène gave Étienne le jeune four children, all daughters.  In the autumn of 1755, Étienne le jeune and his family escaped the British roundup at Annapolis and sought refuge in Canada.  Étienne le jeune died at Québec in December 1757, age 40, a victim of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area that fall and winter.  Wife Anne-Hélène died 10 days later. 

Pierre le jeune's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1720, died at age 3 1/2 in May 1724. 

Pierre le jeune's fifth son Guillaume, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1723, married Élisabeth, yet another daughter of Guillaume Blanchard and Jeanne Dupuis, at Annapolis Royal February 1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1754, Élisabeth gave Guillaume three children, two daughters and a son.  Guillaume and his family escaped the British roundup at Annapolis in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Guillaume died at Québec in December 1757, age 34, a victim, like his older brother, of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area that fall and winter; the brothers, in fact, died on the same day. 

Pierre le jeune's sixth son Prudent, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1727, died four days after his birth. 

Pierrele jeune's seventh son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in September 1728, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Girouard and Anne Bastarache, at Annapolis Royal in February 1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1752, Madeleine gave Joseph three children, all daughters.  Joseph and his family also may have escaped the British roundup at Annapolis in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Cormier and Marie Arseneau of Chignecto, in c1762, place unrecorded, while in exile. 

Pierre le jeune's eighth and youngest son François dit Maza, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1731, married Félicité, daughter of Charles LeBlanc and Madeleine Girouard, in Canada in c1764.  The marriage was "rehabilitated" at Caraquet, present-day northeastern New Brunswick, in September 1769.  François dit Maza died between 1819 and 1823, in his late 80s, place unrecorded.  One of his daughters married into the Dugas family. 

Jean l'aîné's second son Étienne l'aîné, by first wife Françoise Hébert, brother Pierre le jeune's twin, was born probably at Port-Royal in c1680.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Forest and Jacqueline Benoit, probably at Port-Royal in c1705.  Between 1706 and 1722, Marguerite gave Étienne l'aîné nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Granger and Benoit families, three of them to Benoits.  Étienne l'aîné remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of François Levron and Catherine Savoie and widow of Michel Picot dit La Rigeur and Yves or Yvon Maucaïre, at Annapolis Royal in November 1730.  If she gave him anymore children, their names and gender have been lost to history.  According to Bona Arsenault, Étienne l'aîné and his family also settled at Minas and Pigiguit.  Three of Étienne l'aîné's four sons, by first wife Marguerite, created their own families.  One of them emigrated to Louisiana. 

The oldest son, whose name has been lost to history, from first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Port-Royal in c1706, did not live past 1714. 

Étienne l'aîné's second son Charles, by first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Port-Royal in c1709, married Madeleine, daughter of Germain Landry and Marie Melanson, in c1744 and settled at Pigiguit.  The British deported Charles and his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted Charles, now a widower, and three of his children, two sons and a daughter, at Port Tobacco on the lower Pototmac in July 1763.  They, along with a Comeau orphan, emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.  Charles's daughter married into the Doucet family.  One of his sons married into the Dugas and Boush families, settled on the river in Iberville Parish, and created the most vigorous Comeaux family line on what became known as the Acadian Coast.

Étienne l'aîné's third son Jean, by first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1715, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Turpin and Catherine Bourg, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1735.  He and his family emigrated to the French Maritimes in the late 1740s.  Marguerite died probably on Île Royale soon after they arrived.  In late February 1752, a French official counted Jean, still unmarried, and five of his children, three sons and two daughters, ages 16 to 4, on north shore of Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale.  One of his daughters married into the Dupont family of Louisbourg.  In c1754, Jean remarried on Île Royale to a woman whose name has been lost to history.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  Jean died probably in France before May 1765.  His youngest son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.

Second son David, by first wife Marguerite Turpin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1746, followed his family to Île Madame, where he was counted with his widowed father and siblings in February 1752.  In 1758, he was deported to France aboard the British transport Duke William with married sister Marguerite, her husband Jean Dupont, and his younger brother Charles.  They reached St.-Malo in December, and he settled in the port city.  In March 1760, at age 14, he embarked from Lorient aboard the privateer Le Tavignon.  The Royal Navy captured the vessel, and the British held the young Acadian in prison for the rest of the war.  In May 1763, David, now age 17, was repatriated back to St.-Malo with dozens of other Acadians being held in English prison compounds.  He was counted at St.-Malo the following year but then disappears from the  historical record.  One thing is certain--he did not emigrate to Louisiana with his younger brother Charles. 

Jean's third and youngest son Charles le jeune, by first wife Marguerite Turpin, born either at Annapolis Royal or on Île Royale in c1748, was counted on the north shore of Île Madame in February 1752 with his widowed father and four siblings.  In 1758, he, too, was deported to France with his kinsmen aboard the British transport Duke William and resided at St.-Malo from 1758 to 1761 and at nearby Plouër from 1761 to 1764.  He went to Cayenne, French Guyanne, in South America, aboard the ship Le Fort in April 1764 but soon returned to France, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Clossinet dit Moulin and Marguerite Longuépée and widow of Pierre-Mathurin Girard dit Dumoulin.  She was 21 years older than Charles le jeune!  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge.  Charles le jeune may have died downriver at Cabahannocer in February 1775, age 26.  He evidently fathered no children, so his line of the family probably died with him. 

Étienne l'aîné's fourth and youngest son Alexis, by first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Annapolis Royal in the late 1710s or early 1720s, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Babin and Marie Landry, in c1752 and settled at Minas.  The British deported the family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted Alexis, his wife, and four of their children, three sons and a daughter, at Port Tobacco, near the family of his older brother Charles, in July 1763.  Alexis died in Maryland before December 1767, when his widow and four children left Port Tobacco for Louisiana with the party of Acadian exiles led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit.  Alexis's daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  His three sons married into the Landry, Blanchard, and Breau families and settled on the Mississippi and on upper Bayou Lafourche, but not all of the lines endured. 

Jean l'aîné's third son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born probably at Port-Royal in c1683, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau l'aîné and Anne-Marie Bourg, at Grand-Pré in November 1713 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  Between 1714 and 1726, Anne-Marie gave Jean-Baptiste five children, three sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Martin dit Barnabé and Caissie dit Roger families.  One of them settled at Chignecto.  All three of Jean-Baptiste's sons created their own families at Pigiguit, Chignecto, on the French Maritimes, and in France. 

Oldest son Honoré, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1714, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Poirier and Marie Chiasson of Beaubassin, at Beaubassin in January 1735 and settled there or at Pigiguit before moving on to the French Maritimes in c1741.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1737 and 1751, Marguerite gave Honoré seven children, five daughters and two sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Honoré, his wife, and six children, five daughters and a son, at Malpèque on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  The family escaped the British roundup on the island in late 1758 and may have waited out the war somewhere in the Maritimes, or, more likely, they escaped from Île St.-Jean to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, fell into British hands, became prisoners of war in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, and followed other Acadians from Halifax to Île Miquelon in 1763.  French officials counted Honoré, Marguerite, and four of their children--Anne, Monique, Marguerite, and Joseph--on the island in 1767.  Soon Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre became overcrowded.  In 1767, French officials insisted the Acadians there be resettled in France.  By 1772, Honoré, now a widower, was living at Cherbourg.  A year later, he and his son Joseph participated in a settlement scheme in Poitou.  When the venture collapsed in 1775, they retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Meanwhile, Honoré's daughter Marguerite married into the Broussard family at Cherbourg, in July 1773.  Honoré's daughter Anne, widow of Grégoire Morin, remarried into the Le Clerc family of St.-Malo on Île Miquelon in October 1774, so some of his family must have returned there after the French "deportation" of the late 1760s.  Honoré, at age 70, remarried to Anastasie, 45-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Célestin dit Bellemère and Marie Landry and widow of Jean-Baptiste Boudrot, at St.-Martin de Chantenay near Nantes in August 1784.  He, his wife, and two Boudrot stepsons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Honoré, in fact, was one of the oldest Acadian exiles to go to the Spanish colony.  He died there by January 1788, in his early 70s, when his wife was called a widow in a Bayou Lafourche census.  His surviving son created a family in France, returned to Île Miquelon, and was deported to France again. 

Older son Pierre, by first wife Marguerite Poirier, born probably at Malpeque, Île St.-Jean, in March 1744, died by August 1752, when his family was counted at Malpèque without him. 

Honoré's younger son Joseph le jeune, by first wife Marguerite Poirier, born probably at Malpèque in c1748 (Bona Arsenault says c1724!), was counted with his family at Malpèque, age 4, in August 1752.  He followed his family into exile in 1758, to Île Miquelon in c1763, and to Cherbourg, France, in c1767.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians François Doucet and Marie Carret, in France, place and date unrecorded.  According to Arsenault, Anne gave Joseph le jeune a son, Jean, in 1769.  Joseph and his family accompanied his widowered father to Poitou in the early 1770s, and retreated to Nantes with his father and other Poitou Acadians in December 1775.  He did not remain at Nantes.  He and Anne returned to Île Miquelon soon after the venture in Poitou, and Anne died on the island.  During the American Revolution, in 1778, the British deported Joseph, his son, and other island Acadians to La Rochelle, France.  According to a French church record, Joseph, son of Honoré Comeau and Marguerite Poirier, died in St.-Nicolas parish, La Rochelle, in September 1782, age 33, three years before his father emigrated to Louisiana.  Arsenault insists that Joseph, son of Honoré, returned with his son Jean to Île Miquelon in c1783 and remarried to a much younger woman there.  Arsenault also insists that Joseph's son remained in France.

According to Bona Arsenault, only son Jean, born in France in c1769, married Thérèse, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Mouton and Angélique Héningre of Île Miquelon, at Bordeaux, France, in c1797.  Arsenault says Angélique gave Jean three children, perhaps at Bordeaux, by 1801. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born probably at Ste-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1720, married Marie, daughter of Germain Henry dit Robert and Cécile Deveau, at Beaubassin in February 1744.  They settled at Chignecto before moving on to the French Maritimes in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1745 and 1762, Marie gave Jean-Baptiste, fils four children, two sons and two daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, fils, his wife, and two of their children, a son and a daughter, ages 7 and 2, at Malpèque near his older brother Honoré.  Jean-Baptiste, fils and his family also escaped the British roundup on the island in late 1758.  They, too, may have fallen into British hands and become prisoners of war in Nova Scotia, or they may have moved on to Canada after escaping from Île St.-Jean and then returned to greater Acadia after the war.  According to Arsenault, in 1768 British officials counted Jean-Baptiste, fils and his family on Rivière-St.-Jean.  By 1770, they had moved on to Rivière Memramcook, near their former home at Chignecto. 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1726, married Anne, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret, at Beaubassin in May 1747 and also settled at Chignecto before moving to Île St.-Jean in the early 1750s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1769, Anne gave Joseph six children, three daughter and three sons.  In August 1752, a French official, calling Joseph an Arceneau, counted him, his wife, and their 18-month-old daughter at Malpèque on the north shore of the island near his older brothers.  Joseph and his family evidently escaped the British roundup on the island in late 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Perhaps after enduring a prisoner-of-war camp in British Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, they chose to move on to Île Miquelon, where French officials counted them in 1765, 1767, and 1776.  Anne died on the island in November 1776.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British captured Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre and deported the island Acadians to La Rochelle, France, including Joseph and his children.  He remarried to Marie-Henriette, daughter of Joseph Lejeune and Martine Roy, at La Rochelle in February 1780.  They returned to Île Miquelon by 1784.  Joseph died on the island in April 1785, age 55.  Evidently one of his children chose to remain in France:  daughter Louise, by first wife Anne, who would have been age 19 in 1785, married into the Brian family in France and died at Bordeaux in March 1808, age 42. 

Jean l'aîné's fourth son Augustin, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born probably at Port-Royal in the late 1680s, married Jeanne, daughter of François Levron dit Nantois and Catherine Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in February 1714.  Between 1714 and 1735, Jeanne gave Augustin 10 children, two sons and eight daughters.  Augustin died at Annapolis Royal in April 1741, in his early 50s.  Five of his daughters married into the Hébert, Boudrot, Moulaison, Duon, and Semme dit Siroux dit Saint-François families.  One of his two sons created a family of his own. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1724, married Anne, daughter of Guillaume Bourgeois and Catherine-Josèphe Thibodeau, at Annapolis Royal in February 1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1753, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported the family to Connecticut in 1755.  Colonial officials counted Jean-Baptiste and 12 other persons in his household still living in that colony in 1763.  Later in the decade, Jean-Baptiste followed other Acadian exiles from the New England colonies to Canada, where he died at L'Acadie near St.-Jean-sur-Richelieu on the middle Richelieu in February 1797, age 73.  His daughter married a Bourgeois cousin from Chignecto at Laprairie across from Montréal.  

Augustin's younger son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1730.  If he survived childhood, he did not marry.   

Jean l'aîné's fifth son Claude, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, was counted there in 1700, age 10.  If he survived childhood, he did not marry. 

Jean l'aîné's sixth son François, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born probably at Port-Royal in c1691, moved to Canada when he came of age and married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean Soulard and Adrienne Rolland de Saint-Georges, at Québec in January 1715.  François died at Québec in November 1717, age 26.  One wonders if he fathered any children.   

Jean l'aîné's seventh son Alexandre, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born probably at Port-Royal in c1695, married Marie, daughter of Claude Bertrand and Catherine Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in January 1722.  Alexandre died there in c1724, in his late 20s.    One wonders if he fathered any children. 

Jean l'aîné's eighth and youngest son Joseph, by first wife Françoise Hébert, born at Port-Royal in July 1703, married Brigitte, daughter of Jacques Levron and Marie Doucet, at Grand-Pré in August 1736, and remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Girouard and Anne Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in November 1739.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1752, Madeleine gave Joseph seven children, five daughters and two sons. 

Pierre's fourth son Pierre le jeune dit Des Loups-Marins, born probably at Port-Royal in c1658, married Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan, probably at Port-Royal in c1689 and remained there.  One wonders how Pierre le jeune earned his remarkable nickname.  Between 1690 and 1712, Jeanne gave the Sea Wolf 10 children, five or six sons and four or five daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Martin and Brun families.  One, perhaps two, of the Sea Wolf's sons created families of their own, and one of his daughters fathered a "natural" son who may have carried his mother's surname. 

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, died by 1703, age 11 or 12.

Des Loups-Marins's third daughter Anne, born probably at Port-Royal in c1696, gave birth to "natural" son Pierre at Grand-Pré in July 1709, when she was in her early teens.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism in December 1710 evidently did not name the father.  Anne drowned in the flood of November 1713, still in her teens.  Pierre evidently retained his mother's surname. 

Des Loups-Marins's second son François, born probably at Port-Royal in c1701, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, at Annapolis Royal in February 1726 and settled at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area in the early 1730s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1742, Marie-Madeleine gave François eight children, a daughter and seven sons.  François and his family evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in 1755.  They were counted probably with other Acadian partisans at Petitcoudiac, near their old home at Chepoudy, in 1760.  François remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Pitre dit Marc and Judith Thériot, in c1762 or 1763, place unrecorded.  According to Arsenault, Marie-Madeleine gave François another son in 1764.  François died after October 1784, in his late 70s or early 80s, place unrecorded.  His daughter married into the Bastarache family.  All eight of his sons by both wives created their own families.  After the war with Britain, they settled in Nova Scotia and Canada.

Oldest son Justinien, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1729, married Natalie, daughter of Pierre Bastarache and Marguerite Forest, at nearby Petitcoudiac in February 1756, which means they escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area the previous fall.  They could not remain there.  They sought refuge probably on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they may have escaped the British again.  After the war, British authorities counted them at Annapolis Royal in 1769.  They then moved south to Yarmouth near Cap-Forchu on the southwest coast of Nova Scotia.   According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1775, Natalie gave Justinien seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Three of Justinien's sons created their own families in the area.

Second son Bruno, born probably at Yarmouth in c1773, married Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Amirault and Marie Belliveau, probably at Yarmouth in c1795.  Two of their daughters married into the Dugas family. 

Justinien's third son François le jeune, born probably at Yarmouth in c1774, married Colette, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Lanoue and Marie Melanson, probably at Yarmouth in c1798. 

Justinien's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Yarmouth in c1775, married fellow Acadian Perpétué Babin at Lower Eel Brook east of Yarmouth in c1800. 

François's second son Amand, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1730, married Marie, daughter of René Babineau and Madeleine Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in May 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1757, Marie gave Amand two children, a son and a daughter.  Amand and his family escaped the British roundup at Annapolis in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Amand remarried to Marie, daughter of Alexis Coulombe and Marie-Madeleine Groissart, at Berthier, today's Berthier-sur-Mer, on the south bank of the St. Lawrence below Québec City, in January 1757.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1759 and 1764, this Marie gave Amand three more children, a son and two daughters.  Amand remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Anne, daughter of Jacques Taillon and Marie-Anne Béchard, at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse across from Québec City in c1772.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1773 and 1795, Marie-Anne gave Amand five more children, three daughters and two sons.  (By 1795, when Amand would have been in his mid-60s, he had fathered 10 children, four sons and six daughters, by three wives).  In his late 70s, Amand remarried again--his fourth marriage--to Marie-Louise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Jacques and Marie-Josèphe Bouchard, at nearby St.-François-de-Montmagny.  Arsenault says she gave him no more children.  Four of Amand's six daughters by two of his wives married into the Lacroix, Daigle, Pénin, and Brisson families on the lower St. Lawrence.  Three of his four sons by two of his wives also created their own families in the St. Lawrence valley.

Oldest son Antoine-Firmin, by first wife Marie Babineau, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1753, followed his parents into exile in Canada.  He married Marie-Antoinette, daughter of Jacques Aubry and Marie-Anne Baudet, at Trois-Rivièvers in November 1775.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1777 and 1805, Marie-Antoinette gave Antoine-Firmin 16 children, 11 daughters and five sons.

Amand's third son Joseph, by third wife Marie-Anne Taillon, born probably at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in c1776, married Agathe Pénin at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in c1801.

Amand's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, by third wife Marie-Anne Taillon, born probably at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in c1780, married Marie-Josèphe Mercier at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in c1807.

François's third son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1732, escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge probably on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married fellow Acadian Marie-Rose Robichaud in c1758, place unrecorded, while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1771, Marie-Rose gave Jean-Baptiste five children, three sons and two daughters.  After the war with Britain, they joined other Acadians at Baie-Ste.-Marie on the southwest coast of Nova Scotia, where Jean-Baptiste pioneered the village of Comeauville south of Pointe-de-l'Église, today's Church Point.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons created families of their own in the area.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in exile in c1762, married Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Yves Thibault and Françoise Melanson, probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1785, and remarried to fellow Acadian Marie Doucet probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie, date unrecorded. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Joseph, born in greater Acadia in c1766, married fellow Acadian Anne Thibodeau probably on Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1788. 

François's fourth son Pierre, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1733, married Anne-Marie Amirault in c1754.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne-Marie gave Pierre a son, Pierre, fils, in 1755.  They settled at nearby Petitcoudiac.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755.

François's fifth son Salvator, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1738, escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Anastasie, daughter of Jean Belliveau and Marie-Madeleine Gaudet of Annapolis Royal, at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs in June 1760, on the eve of the British attack there.  They may have escaped the British again.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1775, Anastasie gave Salvator four children, two daughters and two sons.  After the war, British authorities counted them at Annapolis Royal in 1769.  They then moved south to Baie-Ste.-Marie, where the British counted them in 1770 and 1774.  One of their daughters married into the Dugas family.  Salvator's two sons created their own families in the area.

Older son Jean, born probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1774, married fellow Acadian Marie LeBlanc probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1795. 

Salvator's younger son Frédéric dit Breau, born probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1775, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Melanson dit Barteau and Anne Trahan, probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1798. 

François's sixth son Joseph, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1740, may have escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Guillaume Jeanson and Marie Aucoin, in c1762 while in exile.  After the war with Brittain, theor marriage was rehabilitated at Pigiguit, today's Windsor, Nova Scotia, in August 1769.  One wonders if they were allowed to remain there. 

François's seventh son François, fils, by first wife Marie-Madeleine Lord, born probably at Chepoudy in c1742, may have escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the war with Britain, he married fellow Acadian Félicité LeBlanc in c1764, place unrecorded.  The marriage was rehabilitated at Baie-Ste.-Marie in September 1769 probably after they settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1774, Félicité gave François, fils five children, three sons and two daughters.  One of François, fils's three sons created his own family in the area. 

Third and youngest son Charles-David, born probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1769, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand Lanoue and Marie Melanson, probably at Baie-Ste.-Marie in c1795.  The marriage was rehabilitated at Baie-Ste.-Marie in August 1799. 

François, père's eighth and youngest son Firmin, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Pitre, born in c1764 soon after the war with Britain, married fellow Acadian Isabelle Dugas, place unrecorded, in October 1784.  One wonders where they settled. 

Des Loups-Marins's third son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in June 1706, died at Annapolis Royal, age 8, in March 1715. 

Des Loups-Marins's fourth and youngest son Alexandre, born at Annapolis Royal in July 1712, married, according to Bona Arsenault, a woman whose name has been lost to history.  Arsenault says Alexandre settled at Minas and was the father six children, four sons and two daughters, in 1755 on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement

Pierre's fifth son Antoine, born probably at Port-Royal in c1661, was counted at Port-Royal in 1686, age 24.  He evidently did not marry.

Pierre's sixth and youngest son Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1665, married Catherine, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier, in c1686 and settled at Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas.  Between 1687 and 1710, Catherine gave Jean-Augustin 15 children, five sons and 10 daughters.  Eight of their daughters married into the Breau, Boudrot, Landry, Saulnier, Aucoin, and Pitre families.  All of Jean le jeune's sons created families of their own.   

Oldest son Claude, born perhaps at Rivière-aux-Canards in the early 1700s, married Claire, daughter of Claude Landry and Catherine Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in November 1721 and remained at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1723 and 1724, Claire gave Claude two sons.  Other records give them five sons and a daughter born between 1723 and 1747.  In 1755, the British deported Claude, Claire, and some of their children to Virginia, and Virginia authorities deported to England in the spring of 1756.  Claude died in England.  In May 1763, Claire, two of her unmarried children, and a granddaughter were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée with the family of one of her married sons.  They setted at nearby St.-Servan, where daughter Marguerite died in November 1768, age 21.  Claire, still an unmarried widowed, was counted at St.-Servan in 1772.  At least three, maybe four, of her and Claude's sons created their own families in greater Acadia, England, and France, but not all of the lines endured.

Oldest son Eustache, born at Minas in May 1723, married Marie Landry probably at Minas in the late 1740s.  They had at least one children, daughter Marie-Josèphe, in c1750.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  If they were still alive, Eustache and Marie did not survive the ordeal in England.  In May 1763, Marie-Josèphe was repatriated to France aboard La Dorothée with the family of her uncle Alexis.  She settled with them at St.-Servan, where she died in April 1769, age 19. 

Second son Joseph, born at Minas in November 1724, married Anne, daughter of René Aucoin and Madeleine Bourg, probably at Minas in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1756, Anne gave Joseph two children, a son and a daughter.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755.  After the war with Britain ended in 1763, Joseph, perhaps now a widower, settled on Rivière Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area.  He remarried to Madeleine Hébert, widow of Jean Bourgeois, in the late 1760s.  The marriage was rehabilitated at Pigiguit in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1772, Madeleine gave Joseph three more children, a son and two daughters.  By 1774, Joseph had joined other Acadians on Baie-Ste.-Marie on the southwest coast of Nova Scotia. 

Claude's third son Alexis, born at Minas in c1733, followed his parents and younger siblings to Virginia in 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  Alexis married Dorothée, daughter of fellow Acadians François Richard and Marie Martin, in England in 1757.  Dorothée gave Alexis a son in England in c1758.  In May 1763, Alexis and his family followed his widowed mother to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée and settled with them at nearby St.-Servan.  Alexis died at St.-Servan in April 1767, age 35.  Dorothée remarried to a LeBlanc, twice widowed, at St.-Servan in June 1768 and joined him on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Britanny.  Alexis's son created his own family in France.

Only son Jean-Baptiste, born in England in c1758, followed his parents to St.-Malo, France, settled with them at St.-Servan, and followed his mother and stepfather to Belle-Île-en-Mer in 1768.  He did not remain there.  He married Marie-Madeleine-Adélaïde, called Madeleine, daughter of Jean Landry & his first wife Blanche LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques parish, Nantes, in January 1783.  Madeleine was a native of Boulogne-sur-Mer.  She gave Jean-Baptiste a son in St.-Similien parish, Nantes, the following December.  Jean-Baptiste may have been a sailor.  He may also have abandoned his family.  Madeleine and their son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 without him.  They followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Madeleine remarried to a French Canadians in August 1798 and to a Mexican in February 1803.  Her son Jean-Baptiste Comeau, fils, who would have been age 1 1/2 when he reached Louisiana, if he survived the crossing may not have survived childhood. 

Claude's fourth son Simon, born at Minas in c1738, evidently followed his parents and siblings to Virginia in 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  He may have been the Simon Comeau who married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry, in England in c1759.  Their son Mathurin was born at Bristol in August 1760.  Simon died probably at Bristol in the early 1760s.  In May 1763, Marie-Madeleine and her son were repatriated to France aboard La Dorothée and settled at Plouër, near St.-Malo, before moving to nearby St.-Servan in 1764.  Marie-Madeleine remarried to a Thériot cousin at St.-Servan in July 1765, but she died in May 1766, age 28.  Her Comeau son, raised by relatives, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.

Only son Mathurin, born at Bristol, England, in August 1760, followed his widowed mother to the St.-Malo suburbs, where he lived with her and her second husband until his mother's death.  He likely was raised by relative.  He became a sailor in France.  In 1785, still a bachelor, he emigrated to Louisiana.  He married Sophie-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and his second wife Marie Benoit, at New Orleans in October 1785, soon after they reached the colony on the same ship.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Mathurin died there by May 1805, when his wife remarried at Assumption.  His daughters married into the Bélanger family.  Only one of his four sons married, into the Crochet family, and was the first Comeaux to settle in Terrebonne Parish. 

Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin's second son Étienne, born perhaps at Rivière-aux-Canards in the early 1700s, married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Claude Landry and Catherine Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in February 1728 and also remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1730 Marie-Josèphe gave Étienne a daughter.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755.  Étienne died before August 1763. 

Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin's third son Pierre, born perhaps at Rivière-aux-Canards in the early 1700s, married Marguerite, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Catherine Thériot, at Grand-Pré in October 1729 and remained at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1730 Marguerite gave Pierre a son.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755.  Pierre died before January 1766. 

Son Amand, born at Minas in c1730, married Marie-Claire Thibodeau probably at Minas in c1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Claire gave Amand a son in 1755.  They evidently escaped the British roundup in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Amand and Marie-Claire died at Québec in 1757, victims of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in the area that fall and winter. 

Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born at Grand-Pré in November 1712, married Marie Aucoin probably at Minas in c1740.  They, too, remained at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1748 Marie gave Jean, as he calls him, a daughter.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France gives the couple three sons at Rivière-aux-Canards born between 1741 and 1750.  In 1755, the British evidently deported the family to Virginia, and Virginia authorities sent them on to England in the spring of 1756.  Jean-Baptiste and Marie, if they had survived the deportations, probably died in England.  In the spring of 1763, their sons were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée.  They settled nearby suburbs of Plouër and St.-Servan.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons created their own families in England and France, and one of them, along with his sister-in-law and her Comeau children, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Oldest son Simon, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards, in c1741, followed his family to Virginia in 1755 and to England in 1756.  He married cousin Marguerite-Geneviève Aucoin in England in c1763, on the eve of repatriation.  In May 1763, Simon, his bride, and his two younger brothers sailed aboard La Dorothée to to St.-Malo, France, with dozens of other Acadian refugees who had been held in England and repatriated to France.  Simon took his family to Plouër and to nearby St.-Servan in 1766.  Between 1764 and 1785, Marguerite gave Simon 11 children, six daughters and five sons, only one of whom, a son, died very young.  Two of their daughters also may have died young.  They did not follow their fellow exiles from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765, nor did they participate in the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Instead, they remained at St.-Servan, where Simon may have worked in the maritime trade.  Simon, Marguerite, and eight of their children, four sons and four daughters, ages 21 to infant, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge, but they did not remain there.  In the early 1790s, they moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marguerite either did not survive the voyage or their time at Bayou des Écores; she died by December 1795, when Simon was counted in an upper Lafourche census without a wife.  Simon died in Assumption Parish on the upper bayou in June 1818, age 77.  Three of his daughters married into the Bourg, Aucoin, Marion, Renaud, and Poulosky or Pulasky families at Bayou des Écores and on Bayou Lafourche.  All four of his sons married, into the Bourg, Blanchard, Simoneaux, and Hébert families at Bayou des Écores and on the Lafourche. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Joseph, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1744, followed his family to Virginia and to England and his brothers to St.-Malo, France.  He settled with them at Plouër, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry, in October 1764.  Between 1765 and 1779, at nearby St.-Servan, Marie gave Joseph nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Two of them, a son and a daughter, died as infants.  Joseph died at St.-Servan in June 1784, age 40.  A year later, Marie, who never remarried, and five of her Comeau children, three sons and two daughters, ages 20 to 6, the older ones still unmarried, emigrated to Louisiana.  If Marie survived the voyage, she and her children followed the majority of her fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores.  Neither of her and Joseph's daughters married.  Only one of their three sons created a family of his own in the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Élie-Marie, born at St.-Servan in November 1765, followed his widowed mother and younger siblings to Louisiana in 1785.  He did not remain at Bayou des Écores.  He married Marie-Renée, called Iréné, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon-Pierre Trahan and Marie-Josèphe Granger, at nearby Baton Rouge in April 1795.  Iréné's parents also were from Minas and had been exiled to Virginia, England, and St.-Malo during Le Grand Dérangement.  Iréné was a native of Bangor, Belle-Île-en-Mer, where her family had gone in November 1765.  She and Élie remained at Baton Rouge, where he died by July 1815, when she remarried there.  His daughters married into the Lopez and Martinez families.  His only son may have died young, so only the blood of this family line endured. 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Charles, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1750, followed his family to Virginia and to England, his older brothers to St.-Malo, France, and settled with them at Plouër and St.-Servan.  In 1770, at age 20, Charles, evidently a sailor now, embarked on L'Americain and deserted the ship in French St.-Domingue.  He evidently remained there, settling perhaps among the Acadians at Môle St.-Nicolas or La Mirebalais. 

Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin's fifth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in the 1710s, married Marguerite Hébert probably at Minas in c1743 and likely remained at Minas.  Joseph died before May 1763.335

Brun

Vincent Brun came to Acadia with Razilly in the early 1630s, returned to France, married, and resettled in Acadia in the late 1640s.  He and wife Renée Breau created a comparatively small family in the colony.  Renée gave Vincent five children, one son and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Trahan, Bézier dit Joan dit Larivière, Thériot, Hébert, Bourg, and Gautrot families.  Their son also married.  Unlike most of the early Acadian families, whose members spread out to other settlements, Vincent's descendants remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, one of those rare Acadian families that did not branch out to other communities or retreat to the French Maritimes.  At least two of Vincent's and Renée's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765. 

Only son Sébastien married Huguette, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, at Port-Royal in c1675, where he died in August 1728, in his early 70s.  Huguette gave him six children, five sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Pitre and Moyse dit Latreille families.  Four of Sébastien's sons created families of their own.  

Oldest son Claude married Cécile, daughter of Claude Dugas and Françoise Bourgeois, at Port-Royal in November 1709, in his early 30s, and remained there.  Cécile gave Claude 13 children, nine sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Martin, Doucet dit Paul Laurent, Lapierre, and Melanson families.  Six of their sons married. 

Oldest son Joseph-Vincent, called Vincent, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Léger dit La Rosette and Anne Amireau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1737, and died by May 1749, perhaps there. 

Claude's second son Michel died young. 

Claude's third son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of Bernard Pellerin and Marguerite Gaudet, at Annapolis Royal in July 1743, and likely remained there. 

Claude's fourth son Simon died in childhood. 

Claude's fifth son Charles dit Lebrun married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Lord and Marie Doucet, in c1750 probably at Annapolis Royal. 

Claude's sixth son Ambroise dit Lebrun married Marie, daughter of Michel Bergeron and ____, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1750. 

Claude's seventh son Claude, fils married Anastasie, daughter of Paul Melanson and Marie Thériot, in c1756, during Le Grand Dérangement

Claude, père's eighth son Michel married Anne, daughter of Jacques Michel and Jeanne Breau, in c1754 probably at Annapolis Royal. 

Claude, père's ninth and youngest son Pierre-Paul probably did not survive childhood.   

Sébastien's second son Abraham married Anne, daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie, probably at Port-Royal in c1701, where he worked as a fisherman, and died at Annapolis Royal in July 1713, in his early 40s.  Anne gave Abraham seven children, two sons and five daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Gaudet dit Varquel, Poirier, and Amireau dit Tourangeau families.  Both of their sons married. 

Older son Charles married Anne-Marie, daughter of Michel Caissie and Madeleine Gaudet, in c1732 probably at Annapolis Royal. 

Abraham's younger son Joseph married Françoise, daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre and widow of Pierre Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.   

Sébastien's third son Vincent survived childhood, became a fisherman, but did not marry.   

Sébastien's fourth son Jean-Baptiste married Anne, daughter of Claude Gautrot and Marie Thériot, at Port-Royal in October 1708, where they settled.  Anne gave Jean-Baptiste nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Préjean, Orillon dit Champagne, and Thibeau families.  All but one of their sons married. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Bernard Pellerin and Marguerite Gaudet, at Annapolis Royal in November 1737, and settled there. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Joseph married Nathalie, daughter of Pierre Lanoue and Françoise Thibodeau, at Annapolis Royal in February 1749. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's third son Pierre-Paul did not survive childhood. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's fourth son Amand-Grégoire married Marie, daughter of Louis Thibeau and Marie-Jeanne Picot, in New England in c1758, during exile. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's fifth and youngest son François married in c1755 a woman whose name had been lost to history.  

Sébastien's fifth and youngest son Antoine married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Pierre Comeau le jeune and Jeanne Bourgeois, at Annapolis Royal in October 1709, and remained there.  Marie-Françoise gave Antoine nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Lord, Dupuis, Blanchard, and Lanoue families.  All but one of their sons married. 

Oldest son Pierre did not survive childhood. 

Antoine's second son François dit Lebrun married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Dupuis and Anne Richard, at Annapolis Royal in October 1735, settled there, and remarried to Marguerite-Gertrude, daughter of Canadians François Deblois and Gertrude Vérieul, at Ste.-Famille, Île d'Orléans, below Québec, in November 1765, during Le Grand Dérangement

Antoine's third son Jean-Baptiste married Marguerite, daughter of Bernard Gaudet and Marguerite Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742, and remained there. 

Antoine's fourth son Charles married in c1752, probably at Annapolis Royal, to a woman whose name had been lost to history. 

Antoine's fifth and youngest son Simon married in c1750, probably at Annapolis Royal, to a woman whose name has been lost to history.344

Trahan

Guillaume Trahan and his first wife François Corbineau, 1636 arrivals, had two daughters, who married a Bourgeois and a Doucet.  Guillaume remarried in his mid-60s to 19-year-old Madeleine Brun, and she gave him his three sons and four more daughters.  Three of their four daughters married into the Doiron, Vincent, and Léger dit La Rosette families.  All three of their sons married and settled at Minas and Pigiguit, but some of their descendants settled at Petitcoudiac or moved on to the French Maritimes.  At least 126 of Guillaume's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in 1760s, and especially from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Guillaume, fils married Jacqueline dite Jacquette, daughter of Martin Benoit and Marie Chaussegros and widow of Michel de Forest, at Port-Royal in c1691, and helped pioneer the settlement at Pigiguit; they lived on the l'Assomption side of the river.  Jacquette gave Guillaume, fils eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Le Prince and LeBlanc families.  Five of Guillaume, fils's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Comeau l'aîné and Françoise Hébert, at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in September 1716, and remained there.   

Guillaume, fils's second son Jean, married Marie-Charlotte, another daughter of Jean Comeau l'aîné and Françoise Hébert, probably at Pigiguit in c1720, and likely remained there.   

Guillaume, fils's third son Joseph married Marie, daughter of René Blanchard and Anne Landry, at Grand-Pré in November 1731, and remained at Minas.   

Guillaume, fils's fourth son François married Angélique, daughter of Philippe Melanson and Marie Dugas, at Minas in c1728, and they remained there.  

Guillaume, fils's fifth son Charles married Anne-Marie, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Jeanne Comeau, at Grand-Pré in October 1725, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of Claude Thériot and Agnès Aucoin and widow of Michel Richard, at Falmouth, England, in 1758 during exile. 

Guillaume, père's second son Jean-Charles married Marie, daughter of Charles Boudrot and Renée Bourg, at Port-Royal in c1693, and settled at Minas.  Marie gave Jean-Charles a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Saulnier, Aucoin, Dupuis, and Thibodeau families.  All of Jean-Charles's sons created families of their own.   

Oldest son René married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of Jérôme Darois and Marie Gareau, at Grand-Pré in November 1717; René died at Minas by June 1734, his age unrecorded.   

Jean-Charles's second son Jean married Marie, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Jeanne Comeau, in c1720 probably at Minas, where they likely settled.   

Jean-Charles's third son Joseph married Élisabeth, daughter of Jean Thériot and Jeanne Landry, at Grand-Pré in November 1725, and settled there.   

Jean-Charles's fourth son Pierre married Jeanne, daughter of Olivier Daigre and Jeanne Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in October 1729, and settled there.   

Jean-Charles's fifth son Charles married Madeleine Aucoin in c1736 probably at Minas, and likely remained there.   

Jean-Charles's sixth and youngest son Alexis married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Levron and Françoise Labauve, in c1743 probably at Minas, and likely settled there.

Guillaume, père's third and youngest son Alexandre married Marie, daughter of François Pellerin and Andrée Martin of Pigiguit, at Port-Royal in c1689, and settled at Minas.  Marie gave Alexandre 14 children, nine sons and five daughters.  Alexandre's line of the Trahan family became the largest.  His and Marie's daughters married into the Lejeune, Hébert, Massier, Breau, and Benoit families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Eight of Alexandre's sons created famililes of their own.  

Jean, a twin, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Marie Comeau, in c1714, and settled at Minas before moving on to the French Maritimes.  Marie gave Jean a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters, all of them born at either Minas or Pigiguit.  Six of their daughters married into the Daguerre, Carret, Pinet, Boudrot, Princhard dit Potvin, Grénard, and Gosselin families.  Three of Jean's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Benjamin died in his mid-teens. 

Jean's second son Charles married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Cécile Corporon, in c1721 probably at Minas before moving on to the French Maritimes. 

Jean's third son Paul-Benjamin married Cécile, daughter of Joseph Lejeune and Cécile Pitre, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in October 1750. 

Jean's fourth son Olivier married Isabelle, or Êlisabeth, daughter of Jean Lejeune and Françoise Guédry, at Louisbourg in November 1751, and, like one of his paternal aunts, emigrated to Louisiana, where he remarried to Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Brasseur and Marie-Rose Daigre, at Ascension in January 1788, in his late 50s. 

Jean's fifth and youngest son Paul died in his early 20s, before he could marry.   

Alexandre's son Étienne, Jean's twin, married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Jean Roy and Marie Aubois, in c1725 probably at Minas, and they, too, moved on the French Maritimes.   

Alexandre's third son Alexandre, fils married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré November 1714, and settled at l'Assomption, Pigiguit.  Marguerite gave Alexandre, fils five children, all sons, all of whom married.  Alexandre, fils died probably at Minas by July 1746, in his mid-50s.   

Oldest son Claude le jeune married Anne, daughter of Claude LeBlanc and Madeleine Boudrot, at Grand-Pré in July 1746, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Alexandre, fils's second son Jean-Baptiste le jeune married first in c1748 to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Élisabeth, another daughter of Claude LeBlanc and Madeleine Boudrot, in c1756 probably in England during Le Grand Dérangement

Alexandre, fils's third son Alexis married Madeleine, daughter of Jérôme Darois and Marie Gareau, in c1749 probably at Minas, where they remained. 

Alexandre, fils's fourth son Joseph married Anne, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Anne LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in c1748, and remained there. 

Alexandre, fils's fifth and youngest son Pierre-Isidore married Madeleine, another daughter of Claude LeBlanc and Madeleine Boudrot, in c1752 probably at Minas, and settled there. 

Alexandre, père's fourth son Claude l'aîné married Marie-Louise, daughter of François Tillard and Marguerite Leprince, in c1724 probably at Minas, and they, too, moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Alexandre père's fifth son René married Marguerite, daughter of Philippe Melanson and Marie Dugas, at Grand-Pré in October 1725, and remained there.   

Alexandre père's sixth son Paul married Marie, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Cécile Corporon, in c1735 probably at Minas, and likely remained there.   

Alexandre père's seventh son Jean-Baptiste l'aîné married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Boudrot and Marie Corporon, in c1735 probably at Minas, but moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Alexandre père's eighth and youngest son Joseph married Anne, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, at Grand-Pré in October 1735, and moved on to the French Maritimes.337

Gaudet

Jean Gaudet, who arrived in the late 1630s, became the colony's oldest and most long-lived family progenitor.  He married twice, first to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and then to Nicole Colleson in Acadia.  His first wife gave him three children, a son and two daughters, born in France.  Jean's daughters from his first wife married into the Mercier, LeBlanc, Hébert, and Gareau families.  Jean's son from his first wife also created a family of his own.  Second wife Nicole gave Jean another son, who also created his own family.  Jean died at Port-Royal after 1678, at age about 103.  His descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Chignecto, and also at Minas, in Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement), and on Île St.-Jean in the French Maritimes.  At least 13 of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and five from France in 1785.  However, the majority of Jean's descendants could be found in Canada and greater Acadia, as well as in France, after Le Grand Dérangement.  

Older son Denis, by Jean's first wife, born in France in c1625, came to Acadia with his family in the late 1630s and married Martine Gauthier at Port-Royal in c1645; she was six years older he was.  Between 1646 and 1657, Martine gave Denis five children, two sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  Martine died probably at Port-Royal after 1678, in her late 60s or early 70s.  Denis, who did not remarry, died at Port-Royal in October 1709, in his mid-80s.  His daughters married into the Vincent, Daigre, Fardel, and Aucoin families.  Though he fathered only two sons, Denis's line of the family was by far the larger one. 

Older son Pierre l'aîné, born at Port-Royal in c1652, married Anne, daughter of Jean Blanchard and Radegone Lambert and widow of François Guérin, at Port-Royal in c1672.  Between 1673 and 1690, Anne gave Pierre l'aîné nine children, six sons and three daughters, including a set of twin daughters.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, Pierre l'aîné and his family were living at Chignecto 1714.  His daughters married into the Mirande, Lavielle, Caissie dit Roger, and Arseneau families.  One of them settled at La Baleine on Île Royale.  All of his six sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Bernard dit le Vieux, born at Port-Royal in c1673, married Jeanne, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marie Gautrot, at Port-Royal in c1693 and settled on the haute-rivière.  Between 1695 and 1720, Jeanne gave Bernard eight children, three sons and five daughters.  In June 1714, Bernard and his family, along with cousins Guillaume Gaudet and Denis Gaudet le jeune, sailed to Île Royale to look at land there.  They evidently did not care for what they saw on the French-controlled island.  Bernard died at Annapolis Royal in March 1751, age 77.  Jeanne died four days later, age 75.  Four of their daughters married into the Belliveau and LeBlanc families, two of them to brothers and another to their sisters' cousin.  Youngest daughter Isabelle, wife of Joseph LeBlanc of Grand-Pré, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  Two of Bernard's three sons also created their own families.  One of them joined his sister in Louisiana. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Pitre, born at Port Royal in c1695, married Marie, daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marie Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in November 1720 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1742, Marie gave Pierre eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Oldest daughter Anne married into the Dupuis family, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, and remarried into the Boudreaux family there.  Pierre dit Pitre died after November 1767, place unrecorded.  All six of his sons created their own families in greater Acadia and Canada. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1723, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of René Aucoin and Madeleine Bourg of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Grand-Pré in 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Madeleine gave Pierre, fils a son in 1763.  After exile, the family settled at Memramcook, present-dayWestmorland County, New Brunswick.  Pierre, fils was an ancestor of noted Acadian genealogist Placide Gaudet of nearby Cap-Pelé. 

Pierre dit Pitre's second son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in c1726, married Scholastique, daughter of Alexandre Hébert and Marie Dupuis, at Annapolis Royal in January 1750, and remarried to Nathalie Robichaud in 1755.  The British deported the family to Connecticut in 1755.  In 1763, colonial officials included Charles and his household of eight on a list of Acadian families in the colony "who desire to go to France."  They went, instead, to Canada and settled at L'Assomption on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal.  Charles died at L'Assomption in 1805, in his late 70s. 

Pierre dit Pitre's third son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married cousin Jeanne Gaudet probably while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1768, Jeanne gave Jean four children, all daughters.  The family was counted at Cap-des-Maringouins, today's Cap Maringouin, southeastern New Brunswick, in 1769. 

Pierre dit Pitre's fourth son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in c1732, married Anne-Gertrude, daughter of Charles LeBlanc and Madeleine Girouard, in c1756 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1758 and 1772, Anne-Gertrude gave Joseph seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Arsenault says that the family was living "at Annapolis," probably Annapolis Royal, in 1769 and had moved on to Baie Ste.-Marie, Nova Scotia, in 1774.  Joseph died on Bay St. Mary in 1802, age about 70.

Pierre dit Pitre's fifth son René-Poncy, born at Annapolis Royal in c1735, married Félicité, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Marie-Madeleine Lord, in c1766 while still in exile.  The marriage was revalidated at Baie Ste.-Marie, Nova Scotia, in October 1769.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1770 and 1773, Félicité gave René-Poncy two sons.  The family was counted at Baie Ste.-Marie in 1774. 

Pierre dit Pitre sixth and youngest son Bonaventure, born at Annapolis Royal in c1742, married Marie, daughter of Guillaume Bourgeois and Anne Hébert, in a civil ceremony in 1766 evidently while still in exile and revalidated the marriage at L'Assomption, Canada, in November 1767.  Bonaventure died at nearby St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan in 1816, in his early 70s.

Bernard's second son Claude, born at Port-Royal in c1698, evidently did not survive childhood. 

Bernard's third and youngest son, also named Claude, born at Annapolis Royal in November 1713, married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of René Forest and Françoise Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in August 1737 and likely remained there.  Claude, Catherine, and two of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Both of their sons married twice, into the Bourgeois, LeBlanc, and Comeaux families, but only one of the lines endured. 

Pierre l'aîné's second son Pierre, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1675, married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Aubin Mignot dit Aubin and Anne Dugas, in c1700 probably at Port-Royal.  According to genealogist Stephen White, in the early 1700s, Cécile gave Pierre, fils a daughter and a son.  Pierre, fils died at Port-Royal between 1707 and 1708, in his early 30s, during Queen Anne's War, so one wonders if his death was war-related.  Cécile remarried to Louis Poirier in c1708.  Pierre's daughter married into the Haché dit Gallant and Caissie families and settled at Chignecto.  His son also created a family of his own. 

Only son Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in c1707, married Marie, daughter of Louis Doucet and Marguerite Girouard, probably at Chignecto in c1731 and likely remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1742, Marie gave Jean-Baptistet six children, three sons and three daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge in Canada.  They were living at Québec in 1759.  According to Stephen White, Jean-Baptiste died after September 1762 perhaps while in exile.  After the war with Britain, his family settled at Nicolet, across the St. Lawrence from Trois-Rivières.  His daughters married into the Ratier, Richard, Simoneau, and Orillon families at Nicolet and at St.-Pierre-les-Becquets downriver from Nicolet.  One of his sons also created his own family.

Second son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1733, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Comeau and Brigitte Savoie, at Québec in January 1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1776, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph seven children, four sons and three daughters.  They settled at Nicolet.  Two of their daughters married into the Orillon and Lemire families there.  One of Joseph's sons also created his own family there.

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in exile in c1760, married Geneviève, daughter of Charles Orillon and Marie-Anne Richard, at Nicolet in February 1781. 

Pierre l'aîné's third son Claude, born at Port-Royal in c1677, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard, probably at Chignecto in c1700 and remained there.  According to Stephen White, between 1703 and 1721, Marguerite gave Claude eight children, three sons and five daughters.  Bona Arsenault awards the couple two more sons, the youngest born in c1724.  Claude died after 1754-55 probably in exile.  According to Stephen White, Claude's daughters married into the Bernard, Boudrot, Hébert, Richard, and Gauthier families.  Arsenault insists that two of Claude's daughters married into the Poirier and Girouard families as well.  All of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born at Port-Royal in c1703, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Isabelle Landry, probably at Chignecto in c1721 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1724 and 1733, Marguerite gave Pierre le jeune a son and two daughters.  Pierre le jeune died probably at Chignecto before June 1740, when Marguerite remarried to Pierre Cyr at Beaubassin.  One of Pierre's daughters married into the Poirier family.  His son created a family of his own.

Only son Michel, born at Chignecto in c1730, married Madeleine Arseneau probably at Chignecto in c1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1780, Madeleine gave Michel seven children, six sons and a daughter.  Michel died at Lotbinière, on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Trois-Rivières, in April 1800, in his late 60s or early 70s.  Two of his sons created their own families in Canada.

Oldest son Michel, fils, born at Chignecto in c1752, followed his family into exile and married Françoise, daughter of Joseph LeMay and Marie-Geneviève Auger, in January 1782.  They settled at Bécancour, farther upper the St. Lawrence from Lotbinière and across from Trois-Rivières.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1783 and 1805, Françoise gave Michel, fils 11 children, seven sons and four daughters. 

Michel, père's sixth and youngest son Pierre, born in Canada in c1780, married Thérèse, daughter of Antoine Auger and Marguerite Auger of St.-Jean-Deschaillon, at St.-Pierre-de-Montmagny on the lower St. Lawrence in November 1807 but settled on the upper river at Lotbinière. 

Claude's son Claude, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1706 (Arsenault says 1712), married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Germain Girouard and Marie Doucet, at Beaubassin in September 1734 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1748, Marie-Madeleine gave Claude, fils four children, two sons and two daughters.  Claude, fils died at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Canada, in January 1762, age 56.  His daughters married into the Cyr and Banlier families at St.-Denis-sur-Richelieu and St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on the Richelieu.  Both of his sons also created their own families.

Older son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1740, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Marie-Josephe, daughter of Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine III and Marie-Josèphe Granger, in Canada in c1765.  Joseph remarried to Catherine, daughter of Charles Bussières and Catherine LeBrodeur, at St.-Denis-sur-Richelieu in September 1800.

Charles, fils's younger son François, born at Chignecto in c1742, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Bousquet and Marie-Judith LeBrodeur, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in January 1768.

Claude, père's son Charles dit Marin, born at Chignecto in September 1716, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie-Anne Cyr, probably at Chignecto in c1739 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1758, Marie gave Charles seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Charles dit Marin died at Bécancour, across from Trois-Rivières on the upper St. Lawrence, in December 1794, in his late 70s.  Three of his daughters married into the Bourg, Belliveau, and Delisle families at Bécancour and St.-Charles-sur-Richelieu.  Two of his sons also created their own families at Bécancour and on the Richelieu. 

Second son François, born at Chignecto in c1743, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Antoine Poisson and Charlotte Deshaies-Tourigny, at Bécancour in January 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1774 and 1794, Marie-Françoise gave François a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  In his early 50s, François remarried Geneviève, daughter of Alexis Poisson and Madeleine Lavigne, at Bécancour in 1794.  One wonders if she gave him anymore children.  Three of his daughters by first wife Marie-Françoise married into the Dubois-Lafrance, Durand, and Desilets families at Gentilly and nearby St.-Grégoire above and below Bécancour.  Two of his sons also created their own families in the area.

Second son François, fils, by first wife Marie-Françoise Poisson, born in Canada in c1781, married Marie-Didace, daughter of Alexis Beaudet and Agnès Brunelle, at Gentilly in September 1805. 

François, père's third son Charles, by first wife Marie-Françoise Poisson, born in Canada in c1786, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Panneton and Françoise Rocheleau, at Gentilly in July 1805. 

Charles dit Marin's third and youngest son Charles, fils, born at Chignecto in c1747, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Marguerite-Marie, daughter of François Phaneuf and Marguerite Forget-Despaties, at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu in February 1773.

According to Bona Arsenault, Claude, père also had a son named Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1724, who married Anne, daughter of Charles Bourgeois and Madeleine Cormier, in c1756 while in exile.  According to Arsenault, between 1757 and 1775, Anne gave Joseph six children, three sons and three daughters.  Joseph died at St.-Ours on lower Rivière Richelieu, in June 1809, in his mid-80s.  Two of Joseph's daughters married into the Thibault and Ayot families at St.-Ours.  His sons also created their own families on the lower Richelieu. 

Oldest son Félix, born in exile in c1757, married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Joseph Blanchard and Marguerite LeBlanc, at St.-Ours in November 1779. 

Joseph's second son Amable, born in exile in c1761, married Élisabeth, daughter of Joseph Benoit and Françoise Daigle, at St.-Ours in March 1782, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Duguay and Marie Forest, at St.-Ours in October 1791. 

Joseph's third and youngest son Jean, born in c1768, married Marguerite, another daughter of Joseph Benoit and Françoise Daigle, at St.-Ours in June 1794. 

Pierre l'aîné's fourth son Abraham, born at Port-Royal in c1679, married Agnès, daughter of Germain Girouard and Marie Bourgeois, probably at Chignecto in c1701 and settled there.  Between 1703 and 1714, Agnès gave Abraham six children, three sons and three daughters.  In the summer of 1714, Abraham, along with fellow Acadians Charles and François Arseneau from Chignecto, sailed to Île Royale to look at land there.  Abraham evidently did not care for what he saw on the French-controlled island.  That same year, in his mid-30s, he remarried to Marie, daughter of Vincent Breau and Marie Bourg, probably at Chignecto.  Between 1716 and 1723, Marie gave him five more children, a son and four daughters.  Abraham witnessed a burial at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in August 1723, so he may have moved his family from Chignecto to the French-controlled island before taking them to Canada.  He died at Berthier-sur-Mer on the lower St. Lawrence in November 1728, in his late 40s.  His daughters from his first wife married into the Grenier or Garnier, Guénet, Giquet or Giguet, and Le Paulmier families in Canada.  Only one of his daughters from his second wife married, into the Huret dit Rochefort family at L'Islet on the lower St. Lawrence.  Only one of his four sons created his own families, also in Canada.

Abraham's oldest son, name unrecorded, from first wife Agnès Girouard, was born at Chignecto in c1703 and died there four years later. 

Abraham's second son Pierre, by first wife Agnès Girouard, born at Chignecto in c1706, followed his family to Canada and married Marie-Angélique, daughter of Noël Pelletier and Madeleine Matte, at Québec in January 1733.  He died at the Hôtel-Dieu, Québec, the following April, in his late 20s.  His line of the family evidently died with him. 

Abraham's third son Paul, by first wife Agnès Girouard, followed his family to Canada and died at Québec in April 1733, age 20.  He did not marry. 

Abraham's fourth and youngest Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie Breau, born probably at Chignecto in c1716, followed his family to Canada.  He married Marie-Félicité, another daughter of Noël Pelletier and Madeleine Matte, at Pointe-aux-Trembles, below Montréal, in September 1742 and remained there.  Jean-Baptiste died probably in Canada after January 1797, in his early 90s. 

Pierre, l'aîné's fifth son Augustin, born at Port-Royal in c1786, married Agnès, daughter of Sébastien Chiasson and Marie Blou, at Beaubassin in February 1713 and remained at Chignecto.  Between the early 1710s and 1742, Agnès gave Augustin 14 children, six sons and eight daughters.  Augustin died after 1754-55 probably in exile.  Five of his daughters married into the Poirier, Girouard, Gaudet, and Cormier families.  All six of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, born at Chignecto in December 1719, married Anne, daughter of Germain Girouard and Marie Doucet, at Beaubassin in November 1740 and remained at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1764, Anne gave Pierre six children, two sons and four daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1760, they had taken refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where one of their daughter Catherine married into the Bonnevie family in July of that year.  They either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British in the early 1760s and held at Fort Cumerland, formerly Beauséjour, near their home at Chignecto.  After the war with Britain, they followed other Acadians to Île Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where French officials counted them in 1767.  To relieve overcrowding on the island, the French transported them to France later in the year.  Pierre worked as a sailor in the mother country.  Anne died in St.-Nicolas Parish, La Rochelle, in April 1770.  Pierre and his family were still in the coastal city in 1772.  A year later, they went to Poitou with hundreds of other Acadians to settle on land owned by an influential nobleman.  Pierre's daughter Marie died at Archigny, Poitou, in September 1774, age 12 1/2.  Pierre remarried to Marie-Henriette, daughter of Louis Pothier and Cécile Nuirat and widow of Jean-Baptiste Rassicot, at Châtellerault, Poitou, in October 1775.  Marie-Henriette gave him no more children.  In November 1775, Pierre, his new wife, and his two remaining daughters from first wife Anne retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Pierre died at Nantes in July 1781, age 61.  In 1785, Marie-Henriette emigrated to Louisiana with three of her Rassicot children.  None of Pierre's daughters followed their stepmother to the Spanish colony.  One of them, in fact, Catherine, widow of Amand Bonnevie, returned to Île Miquelon in 1784. 

Older son Joseph, by first wife Anne Girouard, born at Chignecto in c1744, followed his family into exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, he married Jeanne Arseneau in c1765, and she gave him a son named Joseph, fils in 1765.  One wonders what happened to them after that date. 

Augustin's second son Michel, born at Chignecto in c1725, married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Germain Girouard and Marie Doucet, probably at Chignecto in c1750 and remained in the area.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1774, Marie-Josèphe gave Michel nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Michel died at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Canada, in February 1789, age 64.  Three of his daughters married into the Buteau, Caron, and Bernard families at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly farther up the Richelieu.  Two of his older sons also created their own families in the Richelieu valley.

Oldest son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1752, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Théotiste, daughter of Pierre Henry and Marguerite Brasseau, at St.-Charles-sur-Richelieu in February 1773.

Michel's second son Michel, fils, born in exile in c1759, married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Brasseau and Geneviève Roy, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in January 1782. 

Augustin's third son Louis, born at Chignecto in c1728, married Marie, daughter of François Hébert and Anne Bourg, probably at Chignecto in c1751 and remained in the area.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1770, Marie gave Louis seven children, two sons and five daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1760, they were at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where one of their daughters was baptized in July of that year.  They either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British in the early 1760s and also were held at Fort Cumerland.  After the war with Britain, they followed other Acadians, including older brother Pierre, to Île Miquelon, where French officials counted them in 1767.  To relieve overcrowding on the island, the French transported them to France later in the year.  French officials counted them at La Rochelle in 1770 and 1772.  By 1773, they had moved to Nantes, where their youngest son was born.  Unlike brother Pierre, Louis survived his time in France.  He, wife Marie, and three of their children, two daughters and a son, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  One wonders what happened to his older sons, Jean and Pontiff, counted with the family at Fort Cumberland in August 1763.  Did they die in exile or Île Miquelon or did they choose to remain in France?  Louis's succession record, probably post-mortem, was filed at what became the Lafourche Parish courthouse in August 1801.  He would have been in his early 70s that year.  His two surviving daughters married into the Arseneaux and Graubert families in Louisiana.  His only surviving son François-Louis married into the Caissie dit Roger and Falgout families, settled on the river and on upper Bayou Lafourche, and created a vigorous line.

Augustin's fourth son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1730 (Arsenault says 1747), married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marie-Josèphe Granger, in c1767 and revalidated the marriage at Caraquet, present-day northeastern New Brunswick (Bona Arsenault says the marriage was revalidated at Pigiguit, now Windsor, Nova Scotia), in August 1768.  According to Arsenault, between 1767 and 1770, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean four children, a son and three daughters.  Nova Scotia officials counted them at Tintamarre, today's Upper Sackville, New Brunswick, in 1763, and at Windsor in 1772.  They moved on to Village des Beaumont, today's Boudreau Village, on the lower Petitcoudiac River in today's southeastern New Brunswick.  Jean died at nearby Memramcook in August 1822, in his early 90s. 

Augustin's fifth son Paul dit Paul-Augustin, born at Chignecto in January 1733, escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He, too, had taken refuge at Restigouche by 1760.  He married Marie dite Manette, daughter of François Bourg and Marie Belliveau, at Restigouche in January 1760.  Between 1760 and 1766, Manette gave Paul two children, a son and a daughter.  Paul, Manette, and their infant son either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British in the early 1760s and also were held at Fort Cumberland.  They, too, chose to go to Île Miquelon and were counted there in 1766.  Paul remarried to Rose, daughter of Pierre Gautrot and Agnès LeBlanc, on the island in August 1767.  Between 1768 and 1777, Rose gave Paul four more children, another son and three more daughters.  The family was counted on the island in 1776, perhaps having returned from France after being sent there in the late 1760s.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British captured the island and deported the Acadians there to France.  French officials counted Paul and his family at St.-Malo later in the year.  Like older brother Pierre, Paul did not survive his sojourn in France.  He died at St.-Servan, a suburb of St.-Malo, in April 1779, age 48.  None of his children followed their kinsmen to Louisiana in 1785.  Paul's widow Rose returned to North America in 1784 and settled on Île St.-Pierre, near Île Miquelon.  Her oldest daughter Appolonie-Rose married into the Girardin family on Île Miquelon in 1788 and died on Île St.-Pierre in July 1848.  Rose's son also survived childhood and created his own family in the Gulf of St. Lawrence region.

Second son Joseph le jeune, by second wife Rose Gautrot, born on Île Miquelon in c1775, followed his family to France in 1778 and his widowed mother back to North America in 1784.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Boudreau and Anne Arsenault, on îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in October 1797.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1798 and 1818, Marguerite gave Joseph seven children, three sons and four daughters.  At least one of their sons created his own family on the islands.

Oldest son Jean-Joseph, born in the islands in c1798, married Pélagie, daughter of François Lapierre and Anne Cormier, in the islands in August 1819.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1820 and 1822, Pélagie gave Jean-Joseph three children, a son and two daughters. 

Augustin's sixth and youngest son Joseph dit Chaculot, born at Chignecto in c1740, escaped the British in 1755, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, probably was held with his family at Fort Cumberland in the early 1760s.  Chaculot married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Michel Bourg and Marguerite-Josèphe Bourgeois, in a civil marriage carried out by Joseph Guegeun in August 1763 perhaps at Fort Cumberland.  Chaculot and Marie-Blanche also chose to go to Île Miquelon, where their marriage was revalidated in June 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1764 and 1767, Marie-Blanche gave Joseph dit Chaculot two children, a daughter and a son.  They did not remain on Île Miquelon.  Nova Scotia officials counted them at Jolicoeur on Rivière Missaguash, today's Jolicure, New Brunswick, not far from their old home at Chignecto, in the late 1760s.  They remained there until 1784, when British authorities removed the Acadians from the Chignecto area and gave their lands to American Loyalists recently expelled from the United States.  Joseph and his family crossed the Mer Rouge, now Northumberland Strait, to St. John, now Prince Edward, Island, and settled at Malpèque on the island's northwest coast, which before 1758 had been an Acadian settlement on what the French called Île St.-Jean.  Joseph dit Chaculot died after September 1812, in his late 60s or early 70s, probably on Prince Edward Island. 

Pierre, l'aîné's sixth and youngest son Jean, born at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie, daughter of François Breau and Marie Comeau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1729 and likely remained there.  In 1755, the family escaped the British at Annapolis Royal and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Sometime in the early 1760s, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British and ended up a prison compound in Nova Scotia.  Jean died either during exile or in prison.  His widow Marie and three of their children, two sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via French St.-Domingue in 1765.  Her daughter survived childhood but did not marry, but both of her Gaudet sons married in the Spanish colony.  One of the lines thrived on what became known as the Acadian Coast, but the other line did not endure. 

Older son Charles, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, followed his famliy into exile.  In 1765, he emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax with his widowed mother and siblings and settled with them at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, where he married cousin Cécile Breau, widow of George Clouâtre, in May 1768.  They remained on the river.  Their three sons married, into the Bergeron, Bourgeois, and Lacroix famliies and created vigorous lines in what became St. James and Ascension parishes. 

Jean's younger son Jérôme, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1740, followed his family into exile and his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1765.  He settled with them at Cabahannocer and married fellow Acadian Marie Doucet there in the 1770s.  They, too, remained on the Acadian Coast and evidently were that rare Acadian couple who had no children of their own. 

Denis's younger son Pierre le jeune, born at Port-Royal in c1654, married Marie, another daughter of Jean Blanchard and Radegone Lambert, at Port-Royal in c1675 and remained there.  Between 1676 and 1698, Marie gave Pierre le jeune 10 children, seven sons and three daughters.  Pierre le jeune died at Annapolis Royal in December 1741, in his late 80s.  Two of his daughters married into the Pellerin and Préjean families.  Six of his seven sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Will Denis, born at Port-Royal in c1676, married Madeleine, daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie and widow of Charles Calvé dit La Forge, at Port-Royal in January 1707 and remained there, but they had no children.  (Madeleine also had given no children to her first husband.)

Pierre le jeune's second son Antoine, born at Port-Royal in c1678, married Marie dite Louise-Marie, daughter of Michel Bourg and Élisabeth Melanson, in c1712 and settled at Tintamarre, Chignecto.  According to Stephen White, between the early 1710s and 1735, Louise-Marie gave Antoine eight children, including three sons and four daughters.  Bona Arsenault gives them another son.  Antoine died probably at Chignecto after October 1740, in his 60s.  His daughters married into the Belliveau, Bourgeois, Richard, and Poirier families.  Two of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles, born at Chignecto at 1718, survived exile and died at Bécancour, Canada, in January 1787, in his late 60s.  He did not marry. 

Antoine's second son Pierre-Antoine, born at Chignecto in November 1722, may not have survived childhood. 

Antoine's third son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in the 1720s, married Madeleine, daughter of Paul Arseneau and Madeleine Hébert, probably at Chignecto in c1752 and likely remained in the area.  He died at Lotbinière, Canada, in April 1800. 

Antoine's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born, according to Arsenault, in c1723, married Madeleine Dugas in c1749 probably at Chignecto.  Arsenault says that between 1750 and 1764, Madeleine gave Joseph five children, four sons and a daughter.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1759, they had found refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where their daughter was baptized in November of that year.  One wonders what happened to them after the British attacked Restigouche in the summer of 1760.  After the war with Britain, they followed other Acadians to Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where French officials counted them in 1765. 

Pierre le jeune's third son Germain, born at Port-Royal in c1680, lived to adulthood but did not marry. 

Pierre le jeune's fourth son Guillaume, born at Port-Royal in c1683, married Marie, daughter of Abraham Boudrot and Cécile Melanson, at Port-Royal in October 1709 and moved on to Chignecto by the 1720s.  Between 1712 and the 1720s, Marie gave Guillaume seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Bona Arsenault gives the couple another son in the early 1730s.  In June 1714, Guillaume, along with younger brother Denis le jeune, cousin Bernard Gaudet, and their families, sailed from Annapolis Royal to Île Royale in a charroi, probably piloted by Guillaume, to look at land there.  They evidently did not care for what they saw on the French-controlled island.  Guillaume died between 1735 and 1741, in his 50s.  His daughters married into the Poirier, Cormier, Bernard, and Deveau families, and one of them moved on to Île St.-Jean.  Two of Guillaume's three sons created their own families. 

Older son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1712, married Anne, daughter of Martin Richard and Marie Cormier, at Beaubassin in February 1735 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1751, Anne gave Charles three children, a son and two daughters.  Their daughter Marguerite married into Doucet family on Île Miquelon in August 1767.  Charles died probably on the island after his daughter's marriage. 

Guillaume's second son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal or Chignecto in c1723, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Gaudet and Marguerite Hébert, at Beaubassin in February 1748 and remained at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean remarried to another couisn, Anne Gaudet, who gave him a daughter in 1768.  Jean and his family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the early 1760s, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British and held at Fort Cumberland, formerly Beauséjour, near their home at Chignecto, until after the war with Britain. 

Guillaume's third and youngest son, name unrecorded, born probably at Chignecto between 1724 and 1726, evidently died young, unless he was the Joseph Gaudet born in c1732 who, Bona Arsenault says, married Anne Richard.  According to Arsenault, between 1760 and 1772, Anne gave Joseph six children, two sons and four daughters.  Arsenault says the family settled at Lande à Decoux, Île Madame, off the southern coast of Cape Breton Island in 1771 and was counted at St.-Pierre on Cape Breton Island the following year. 

Pierre le jeune's fifth son Denis le jeune, born at Port-Royal in November 1685, sailed to Île Royale with older brother Guillaume, a navigator, and cousin Bernard Gaudet and their families in June 1714 to look at land there.  Denis evidently did not care for what they saw on the French-controlled island.  He married Anne, daughter of Toussaint Doucet and Marie Caissie, in c1717 probably at Annapolis Royal.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1728, Anne gave Denis six children, three sons and three daughters.  They resettled at Chignecto.  Denis le jeune died probably at Chignecto between April 1730 and 1731, in his mid-40s.  His daughters married into the Poirier, Nuirat, and Deveau families.  His sons created their own families at Chignecto. 

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1718, married Marie-Marguerite, daughter of François Arseneau and Marguerite Bernard, at Beaubassin in November 1740 and remained in the area.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1741 and 1744, Marie-Marguerite gave Pierre two children, a son and a daughter.

Denis le jeune's second son Joseph, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1723, married cousin Jeanne, daughter of Augustin Gaudet and Agnès Chiasson, at Beaubassin in January 1746.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1747 and 1750, Jeanne gave Joseph two children, a daughter and a son.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755.  Joseph's son created a family of his own after the war with Britain ended.

Only son Joseph, fils, born at Chignecto in c1750, followed his family into exile in 1755 and married Charlotte, daughter of Charles Lavigne and Madeleine Petitpas, on Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland in November 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1774 and 1781, Charlotte gave Joseph, fils three daughters.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British deported them to La Rochelle, France.  Arsenault says Joseph, fils died at La Rochelle before 1784, when his widow returned to Île Miquelon with two of their daughters. 

Denis le jeune's third and youngest son Charles dit Chayé, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1727, married Marguerite, daughter of François Bourg and Catherine Cormier, at Beaubassin in February 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1764, Marguerite gave Charles six children, three sons and three daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They were at Miramichi in 1762; were either captured by, or surrendered to, the British soon afterwards; and were held at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, until the end of the war with Britain.  Nova Scotia officials counted them at Pointe-Beauséjour, Chignecto, in 1764.  They moved on to Île Miquelon by 1765.  One of their daughters, Rosalie, married into the Briand family on the island in February 1770.  Charles and his family remained on the island until 1778, when, during the American Revolution, the British captured the island and deported the Acadians still there to La Rochelle, France.  Charles died at La Rochelle in February 1779, in his early 50s.  His oldest son died there the same month, and his middle son, who became a sailor, died at La Rochelle three years later.  If any of Charles's other children were still in France in 1785, none followed their cousins to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Félix, born at Chignecto in c1748, followed his family into exile in 1755 and to Île Miquelon, where he married Marie-Anne, daughter of François Cormier and Marie Bourgeois of Chignecto, in October 1774.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Anne gave Félix at least one son on the island.  Félix and his family also were deported to La Rochelle in 1778.  Another son was born there in 1778.  Félix died at La Rochelle in February 1779, in his late 20s.  His widow evidently returned to North America with their young sons, but only one of the lines survived. 

Older son Pierre, born on Île Miquelon in c1775 or 1777, followed his parents to La Rochelle in 1778.   His widowed mother returned to North America perhaps in 1784 with other Acadian exiles who did not care to remain in the mother country.  Pierre settled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, where he married Appoline, daughter of Michel Boudreau and Modeste Boudreau, in August 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1802 and 1820, Appoline gave Pierre nine children, three sons and six daughters. 

Félix's younger son Joseph, born probably at La Rochelle, France, in c1778, likely followed his widowed mother back to North America, but he did not remain there.  He died at Le Havre, France, in November 1802, age 24, still a bachelor. 

Charles dit Chayé's second son Pierre, born on Île Miquelon in c1758, followed his family to France, where he worked as a sailor.  He died at La Rochelle in September 1782, age 24.  He probably did not marry. 

Pierre le jeune's sixth son Jean dit Varouël, born at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Abraham Brun and Anne Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in November 1718 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1750, Madeleine gave Jean a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  Jean and his family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge in Canada.  He died at Québec in July 1757, age 67, perhaps a victim of smallpox.  Three of his daughters married into the Arsenault and Bastarache families.  At least one of his sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Varouël, born at Annapolis Royal in c1720, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Bastarache and Marguerite Forest, at Annapolis Royal in February 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1766, Anne gave Jean-Bapiste three children, all daughters.  In 1769, British authorities counted the family at Cap-des-Maringouins, today's Cap Maringouin, southeastern New Brunswick. 

Pierre le jeune's seventh and youngest son Bernard dit Blèche, born at Port-Royal in c1681, married Marguerite, another daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in January 1716.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1717 and 1724, Marguerite gave Bernard four children, three sons and a daughter.  Bernard remarried to Marie, daughter of Claude Doucet and Marie Comeau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1724.  According to Arsenault, between 1725 and 1739, Marie gave Bernard eight more children, four sons and four daughters--11 children in all by both wives.  Bernard died probably at Annapolis Royal after January 1747, in his 50s. His oldest daughter by first wife Marguerite married into the Brun and Caron families.  Four of his sons by both wives created their own families.

Second son Germain, by first wife Marguerite Pellerin, born at Annapolis Royal in c1719, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Bastarache and Angélique Richard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1747 and 1752, Marguerite gave Germain four children, three sons and a daughter.  Germain remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Marie Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in November 1753.  According to Arsenault, in 1754 and 1755, this second Marguerite gave Germain three more children, twin sons and a daughter.  The British deported the family to New York in 1755.  Colonial officials counted Germain, his wife, and six children still in the colony in 1763.  When the British allowed them to leave, the family chose to go not only to Canada, where they settled at Yamachiche, below Trois-Rivières, in c1767, but also to the French Antilles.  Germain's daughter Marie, by first wife Marguerite, was a merchant on the French-controlled island of Martinique in July 1782 when she married into the Framery family at Le Mouillage on the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, at least one of Germain's sons created his own family in Canada. 

Third son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Marguerite Bastarache, born at Annapolis Royal in c1752, followed his family to New York and Canada.  He married Marie-Louise, daughter of Joseph Rocheleau and Marie Rivard, at Yamachiche in November 1785. 

Bernard dit Blèche's third son Amand-Grégoire, by first wife Marguerite Pellerin, born at Annapolis Royal in c1724, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Bourg and Louise Robichaud, at Annapolis Royal in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1751 and 1753, Marie gave Amand-Grégoire three children, a son and twin daughters.

Bernard dit Blèche's fourth son Joseph-Bernard, by second wife Marie Doucet, born at Annapolis Royal in c1726, married Cécile, another daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Marie Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in January 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, Cécile gave Joseph-Bernard a daughter in 1749. 

Bernard dit Blèche's fifth son Charles-Alexandre, by second wife Marie Doucet, born at Annapolis Royal in c1728, married Nathalie, daughter of Prudent Robichaud, fils and Françoise Bourgeois, in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1766 and 1768, Nathalie gave Charles-Alexandre two sons.  The family was counted at St.-Sulpice, Canada, in 1767 and further down at Pointe-aux-Trembles, near Montréal, in 1770. 

Jean's younger son Jean, fils, by second wife Nicole Colleson, born at Port-Royal in c1653, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Rose Bayon, at Port-Royal in c1672.  In 1673 and 1674, Françoise gave him a daughter and a son.  Their daughter married into the Doiron family.  Jean, fils remarried to Jeanne Henry at Port-Royal in c1680.  She gave him three more children, all daughters, two of whom married into the Lejeune dit Briard and Benoit families.  Jean, fils remarried again--his third marriage--to Jeanne Lejeune dit Briard, widow of François Joseph, at Port-Royal in c1694.  She gave him no more children.  Despite his many marriages, Jean, fils's line of the family was substantially smaller than that of older half-brother Denis.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean, fils resettled at Pigiguit. 

Only son Jean III, by first wife François Comeau, born at Port-Royal in c1675, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Jean Bourg and Marguerite Martin, at Port-Royal in c1697.  Between 1698 and 1702, Élisabeth gave Jean III three children, two sons and a daughter.  By 1701, Jean III and his family were living on Rivière-Kenescout at Minas, where he died after 1707, in his 50s.  By 1714, his widow had moved the family to nearby Pigiguit.  Both of their sons created their own families, but only one of the lines may have survived. 

Older son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in May 1728.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1729 and 1750, Marie-Madeleine gave Pierre ten children, seven sons and three daughters.  They moved to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  Pierre died on the island in August 1752, in his mid-50s.  A few days after his death, a French official counted Marie-Madeleine and nine of their children, six sons and three daughters, on the north side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  The official described Pierre's widow as "poor."  One of her daughters married into the Boudrot family on the island in October 1755, was deported to Cherbourg, France, in 1758, and remained in the mother country in 1785 when some of her cousins emigrated to Louisiana.  One, perhaps two, of Pierre's sons married on Île St.-Jean before the deportation.  At least one of them also was deported to Cherbourg in 1758. 

Third son Dominique, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1733, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Denis Boudrot and Agnès Vincent, in October 1755; Marie-Josèphe was a sister of Dominique's sister Dorothée's husband Alexandre.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Dominique a daughter in 1757.  The British deported them to Cherbourg, France, in 1758-59.  Twin sons Dominique, fils and Prosper were baptized at Très Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, in late November 1759 but died the following day.  Two daughters were born at Cherbourg in c1761 and March 1763, but the yonunger one did not survive childhood.  Dominique took his family to Le Havre by 1765, when another son was born there.  Two more daughters were born at La Havre in 1768 and 1771.  In 1785, Dominique, if he was still alive, chose to remain in France.  His daughters married into the La Perrelle, Robert, and Hertevent families at Le Havre.  His surviving son also created his own family there.

Second son Jean-Charles, born at Le Havre in c1765, was a 32-year-old sailor when he married Marie-Rose, 49-year-old daughter of Guillaume-Antoine L'Hurier and Anne-Geneviève LeVerdier, at Le Havre in March 1797. 

Charles, who Bona Arsenault insists was one of Pierre's sons, born, Arsenault says, in c1734, married Marie-Rose Bastarache at Port-La-Joye on Île St.-Jean in c1755.  Arsenault says Marie-Rose gave Charles a daughter in 1756.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Pierre's son François, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1737, followed his family to Île Ste.-Jean and Cherbourg, France, where he died in December 1759, age 22.  He evidently did not marry. 

Jean III's younger son Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in c1702, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jérôme Darois and Marie Gareau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1727 and resettled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1749, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean-Baptiste seven children, two sons and five daughters.  They, too, moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, wife Marie-Josèphe, and six of their children, two sons and four daughters, at Anse-du-Nord-Est on the south shore of the island.  The official noted that Jean-Baptiste was "always ill, and poor."  Two of his daughters married into the Thibodeau and Brousse families on the island before 1758.  The British deported Jean-Baptiste and his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Not all of them survived the terrible crossing.  Jean-Baptiste died at Hôtel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in November 1759, in his late 50s, perhaps from the rigors of the crossing.  Daughter Marie-Blanche, widow of Breton tailor Louis-Julien Brousse, remarried into the Boullot family at St.-Malo.  Marie-Blanche's younger brother Joseph-Ignace emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 but did not marry.  Sister Marie-Josèphe married into the Comeau family at Yamachiche, Canada, in February 1766, so she must have eluded the British in 1758. 

Older son Joseph-Ignace, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1743, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  In October 1761, he embarked on the ship La Duchesse de Grammont probably as a privateer, was captured by the British and held as a prisoner of war in England until the spring of 1763.  Back in France, he settled at St.-Servan, a suburb of St.-Malo, working probably as a sailor.  Still a bachelor in his early 40s, he emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, and followed the majority of his fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  He does not seem to have married in the Spanish colony, so his father's line of the family, except for its blood, likely died with him. 

Jean-Bapitste's younger son Paul-Marie, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1749, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  He died at the hospital at St.-Malo in November 1758, age 11, probably from the rigors of the crossing.338

Gautrot

François Gautrot, a late 1630s arrival, married twice.  The Acadian branch of his line comes from his second wife.  François's first wife Marie, her family name unrecorded, who he married in France, gave him two children, a daughter who married into the Potet and Dupuis families and who settled in Acadia, and a son, Charles, who did not remain in the colony.  François's second wife Edmée or Aimée Lejeune gave him nine more children, five sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Thériot, Labat dit Le Marquis, Girouard, and Lanoue families.  Three of their sons married and, like their sisters, settled in Acadia.  François's descendants settled in Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement), Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, Cobeguit, and in the French Maritimes.  At least 48 of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, and especially from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Charles l'aîné, who favored the family name Gottreau, left Acadia after he came of age and married Françoise, daughter of Martin Cousin and Marie Hubert of St.-Nicolas-des-Champs, Paris, at Québec in October 1665.  They settled at nearby Charlesbourg, where Françoise gave Charles six children, including three sons and two daughters.  Only one of their daughters married, into the Brousseau and Valade families at Charlesbourg.  Two of their three sons reached adulthood, but neither married.  They both died at Charlesbourg in their early 20s, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive. 

François's second son Jean survived childhood but never married.

François's third son François, fils married Marie, also called Sébastienne, daughter of Vincent Brun and Renée Breau, at Port-Royal in c1677 and remained there.  Marie dite Sébastienne gave François, fils only one child, a son, before François, fils died at Port-Royal by 1683, in his mid-20s. 

François III married Louise, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Marie Gaudet, at Port-Royal in 1708 and settled at Cobeguit.  Louise gave François III nine children, seven sons and two daughters.  Both of their daughters survived childhood, but only one married, into the Bourg family.  Six of their sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Pierre married Agnès, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1731, remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Thériot and Marie Bourg and widow of ___ Landry and Pierre Melanson, in c1752, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

François III's second son Charles dit Maringouin (Mosquito) married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1737 and may have  remained there. 

François III's third son probably died an infant. 

François III's fourth son Honoré, born at Cobeguit in c1716, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Robichaud and Claire LeBlanc, in c1745 probably at Cobeguit.  Although Honoré became an appeaser to British rule after the construction of Halifax, he escaped to Île St.-Jean with other habitants from Cobeguit perhaps in the summer of 1755.  He remarried to Jeanne, daughter of Jean Lebert and Jeanne Breau, at Plouër, near St.-Malo, France, in January 1761 while in exile. 

François III's fifth son Alexandre married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas, probably at Cobeguit in c1744 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in c1751. 

François III's sixth son Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Marguerite Bourg, probably at Cobeguit in c1749, moved on to Île St.-Jean after 1752, remarried to Anne, daughter of Germain Pitre and Marie-Josèphe Girouard and widow of Louis Bourg, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in November 1764 while in exile, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

François III's seventh and youngest son François IV married Marie, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at Grand-Pré in July 1748, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of Jean Daigre and Marie-Anne Breau, in c1754. 

François, père's fourth son Claude married Marie, daughter of Bonaventure Thériot and Jeanne Boudrot, probably at Port-Royal in c1684, and moved to Minas by the early 1690s.  Marie gave Claude 13 children, three sons and 10 daughters.  Nine of their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Hébert, Brun, Landry, Babin, Daigre, Benoit, Breau, and Richard families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Two of Claude's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean married Anne, daughter of Jacques à René LeBlanc and Catherine Landry, at Grand-Pré in January 1719 and died there in November 1747, age 50.   

Claude's second son Charles married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Jacques à René LeBlanc and Catherine Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1725 and remained.   

Claude's third and youngest son Joseph may not have survived childhood. 

François, père's fifth son Charles le jeune married Françoise, daughter of René Rimbault and Anne-Marie ____ at Port-Royal in c1684, moved on to Minas, and settled on Rivière Gaspereau, where Charles died between April 1723 and October 1725.  Françoise gave Charles 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Célestin, Breau, Daigre, and Hébert families.  All of Charles's sons created families of their own.   

Oldest son François le jeune married Marie, daughter of Michel Vincent and Marie-Josèphe Richard, at Grand-Pré in October 1709, and remained there.  Marie gave François le jeune 11 children, four sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Cyr, Barrieau, Thibodeau, Bouard, Boudrot, and Aucoin families.  All of their sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean married Élisabeth, daughter of Louis Cyr and Marie-Josèphe Michel, probably at Minas in c1735 and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

François le jeune's second son François, fils married in c1746 probably at Minas a woman whose name had been lost to history, and remarried to Anne, daughter of François Naquin and Angélique Blanchard, in c1752, perhaps in the French Maritimes. 

François le jeune's third son Charles le jeune married Marie Boudrot probably in the French Maritimes in c1755, remarried to Anne, daughter of Claude Bourg and Judith Guérin and widow of Charles Melanson, at St.-Charles de Bellechasse, below Québec, in November 1758 during exile, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jean Ringuet and Marie-Geneviève Duchesne, at Baie-St.-Paul, below Québec, in June 1764. 

François le jeune's fourth and youngest son Pierre-Mathurin married Anne-Rosalie, daughter of Jean Daigre and Marie-Anne Breau, probably in the French Maritimes in c1755.   

Charles le jeune's second son Charles, fils married Madeleine, daughter of Guillaume Blanchard and Huguette Gougeon, at Annapolis Royal in May 1712 and settled at Minas.  Madeleine gave Charles, fils eight children, four sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Landry, and Dupuis families.  Only two of Charles, fils's sons created families of their own. 

His oldest son, name unrecorded, probably died in infancy. 

Charles, fils's second son Joseph also died young. 

Charles, fils's third son Charles III married Marie, daughter of Charles Dupuis and Élisabeth LeBlanc, in c1755 perhaps at Minas. 

Charles, fils's fourth and youngest son Alexis married Marguerite-Louise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and Anne-Marie Gentil and widow of Pierre Deveau, at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in January 1761 while in exile.  

Charles le jeune's third son Claude married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Landry and Catherine Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in August 1713 and remained.  Marguerite gave Claude a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  Only two of their daughters married, into the Richard dit Sapague (Sapin) dit Turpin and Clémenceau (Clémenson) dit Corporon families.  Six of Claude's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Claude, fils married Geneviève-Salomé, daughter of Antoine Hébert and Jeanne Corporon, at Annapolis in February 1737 and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Claude, père's second son Benoît dit Bénoni married Marie-Josèphe Labauve in c1745 perhaps at Minas and died by 1754. 

Claude, père's third son Jean married Euphrosine, daughter of Louis Labauve and Anne LaVache, probably at Minas in c1740. 

Claude, père's fourth son Charles married in c1750, probably at Minas, a woman whose name has been lost to history. 

Claude, père's fifth son Alexis married in c1749, probably at Minas, a woman whose name has been lost to history. 

Claude, père's sixth son Joseph married in c1752, probably at Minas, a woman whose name has been lost to history. 

Claude, père's seventh and youngest son Pierre did not survive childhood.   

Charles le jeune's fourth son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre-Alain Bugeaud and Élisabeth Melanson, in c1716 probably at Minas and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, in c1747, perhaps at Minas.   

Charles le jeune's fifth and youngest son Jean married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, at Grand-Pré in October 1725.  Jean died there between 1745 and 1749. 

François, père's sixth and youngest son Germain probably died young.340

Thériot

Jean Thériot and his wife Perrine Rau, late 1630s arrivals, created a large and influential family in the colony.  Perrine gave Jean seven children, five sons and two daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Thibodeau and Guilbeau families.  Jean and Perrine's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis, Minas, Cobeguit, Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes.  They were especially numerous at Minas, which they helped pioneer.  At least 43 of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, and especially from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Claude l'aîné married Marie, daughter of François Gautrot and and his second wife Edmée Lejeune, at Port-Royal in c1661 and remained.  Claude died at Annapolis Royal in September 1725, in his late 80s.  Claude's line of the Thériot family became the largest.  Marie gave him 14 children, five sons and nine daughters.  Eight of their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Landry, Babin, Gaudet, Belliveau dit Blondin, Robichaud dit Niganne, Blanchard, and Richard dit Beaupré families.  Three of Claude's sons created families of their own.   

Oldest son Germain le jeune married Anne, daughter of Michel Richard and Madeleine Blanchard, at Port-Royal in c1686, and settled at Minas.  Anne gave Germain 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Melanson, LeBlanc, and Blanchard families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Five of their seven sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Claude le jeune married Marguerite, daughter of François Cormier and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Port-Royal in c1710, and settled at Minas.  Marguerite gave Claude le jeune 11 children, including three sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Surette, Benoit, Bourg, Trahan, and Doucet families, and one of the emigrated to Louisiana.  All three of their sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Paul married Anne, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Marie-Josèphe Blou, at Grand-Pré in c1739. 

Claude le jeune's second son Joseph married Agnès, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Catherine LeBlanc, in c1746, and may have settled at Chignecto. 

Claude le jeune's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Germain Girouard and Jeanne Barrieau, at Beaubassin in June 1745, and likely remained there. 

Germain le jeune's second son Jean married Madeleine, daughter of Michel Bourg and Élisabeth Melanson, at Beaubassin in October 1712, and settled at Minas, where Jean died in December 1751.  Madeleine gave him 11 children, six sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Granger, Doucet dit Jean Prudent, Cormier, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Three of their sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Bourgeois and Marie-Françoise Cormier, probably at Minas in c1749. 

Jean's second son Pierre probably did not survive childhood. 

Jean's third son Joseph married Madeleine, another daughter of Pierre Bourgeois and Marie-Françoise Cormier, in c1758 while in exile and emigrated to Louisiana. 

Jean's fourth and fifth sons Charles and Alexis did not survive childhood. 

Jean's sixth and youngest son Hilarion-Charles married Marie, daughter of Jean Belliveau and Madeleine Gaudet, in c1761 while in exile. 

Germain le jeune's third son Jacques married Marie, also called Marguerite, daughter of René LeBlanc and Anne Bourgeois, at Grand-Pré in October 1713, and remained there.  Marie/Marguerite gave Jacques five children, three sons and two daughters.  Their daughter married into the Landry and Babin families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Jacques remarried to Marie, daughter of Prudent Robichaud and Henriette Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in June 1726 and settled at Minas.  Marie gave him four more children, three sons and a daughter.  Their daughter and youngest son did not marry.  Three of his six sons by both wives created their own families. 

His oldest son, by first wife Marie LeBlanc, died in childhood, as did his second son Jean-Baptiste. 

Jacques's third son Étienne, by first wife Marie LeBlanc, married Hélène, daughter of Abraham Landry and Isabelle Blanchard, probably at Minas in c1747, remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Marie LeBlanc and widow of Joseph Robichaud and Charles Boudrot, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in February 1770 while in exile, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite Vallois, widow of Pierre Dubois and Olivier Dubois, at Chantenay, near Nantes, France, in November 1780, and died the following year. 

Jacques's fourth son Jean-Jacques, by second wife Marie Robichaud, married in c1749 probably at Minas a woman whose name has been lost to history, remarried to Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Richard and Catherine-Josèphe Gautrot, probably in England in c1762 while in exile, and emigrated to Louisiana from France. 

Jacques's fifth son Olivier, by second wife Marie Robichaud, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Anne Landry, probably at Minas in c1754, and remarried to cousin Madeleine, daughter of Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry and widow of Simon Comeau, at St.-Servan, France, in July 1765. 

Jacques's sixth and youngest son Pierre, by second wife Marie Robichaud, probably did not survive childhood. 

Germain le jeune's fourth son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Melanson and Marguerite Dugas, probably at Minas in c1720 and they likely remained there. 

Germain le jeune's seventh and youngest son Germain, fils married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Catherine Hébert, at Grand-Pré in November 1734.  Germain, fils died there in July 1737, in his mid-20s.   

Claude l'aîné's second son Jean married Jeanne, daughter of René Landry and Marie Bernard, at Port-Royal in c1691 but settled at Minas.  Jeanne gave Jean 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Bourg, Babin, and Trahan families.  Three of Jean's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son François died at Grand-Pré, age 16, in January 1710, before he could marry. 

Jean's second son Jean, fils married Marie, daughter of Olivier Daigre and Jeanne Blanchard, at Annapolis Royal in October 1722 but likely settled at Minas.  

Jean, père's third son Charles married Françoise, daughter of Antoine Landry and Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in November 1727 and remained there. 

Jean, père's fourth and youngest son Germain married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, at Grand-Pré in c1729 probably at Minas and remained there.   

Claude l'aîné's third son Claude, fils married Agnès, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Marie Gaudet, in c1703 probably at Minas.  Agnès gave Claude, fils 11 children, six sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Landry, LeBlanc, Daigre, Richard, and Trahan families.  Five of Claude, fils's sons created families of his own.  He died on Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas, in October 1752, in his mid-70s. 

His oldest son, name unrecorded, died probably as an infant. 

Claude, fils's second son Jean-Baptiste dit Janis married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Landry and Marguerite Forest, probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in May 1734 and remained there. 

Claude, fils's third son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Antoine Dupuis and Marie-Josèphe Dugas, at Rivière-aux-Canards in October 1738 and remained there. 

Claude, fils's fourth son Cyprien married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Landry and Marie Melanson, at Rivière-aux-Canards in June 1741 and remained there. 

Claude, fils's fifth son Charles married Élisabeth, daughter of Jean Trahan and Marie Hébert, at Rivière-aux-Canards, in March or May 1758 and remained there. 

Claude, fils's sixth and youngest son Simon-Joseph married Françoise, daughter of Olivier Daigre and Françoise Granger, at Rivière-aux-Canards in May 1748.  Simon-Joseph died there in October 1752, in his mid-20s.   

Claude l'aîné's fourth son Pierre died in Boston in 1711, having accompanied Annapolis Royal priest Father Durand to the New English city after an incident on the haute rivière; Pierre was only 17 years old at the time of his death.  His brother Joseph, Claude l'aîné and Marie's fifth and youngest son, also accompanied the priest to Boston and died there in 1711, age 15.  The records do not say why these boys went with the priest to Boston. 

Jean's second son Jean, fils married at Port-Royal in c1671 a woman whose name had been lost to history.  Wherever they may have settled, the names and fate of their children, if they had any, have been lost to history.

Jean's third son Bonaventure dit Venture married Jeanne, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Michelle Aucoin, at Port-Royal in c1666 and settled there.  Jeanne gave Venture four children, all daughters.  Three of them married into the Gautrot, Landry, and Granger families.

Jean's fourth son Germain married Andrée, daughter of Vincent Brun and Renée Breau, at Port-Royal in c1668 and moved on to Minas.  Andrée gave Germain three children, two sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Aucoin family.  Both of Germain's sons created families of their own.   

Older son Germain, fils married Anne, daughter of François Pellerin and Andrée Martin, probably at Minas in c1690, where they remained until moving on to the French Maritimes.  Germain, fils died at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in August 1750, in his early 80s.  Anne gave him 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Doiron, LeBlanc, Henry dit Le Neveu, Benoit, Boisseau, and Vigneron families, and one of them settled at Louisbourg, Île Royale.  All of Germain, fils's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Charles married Angélique, daughter of Charles Doiron and Françoise Gaudet, at Grand-Pré in October 1718 and settled there until they moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Germain, fils's second son Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of Jérôme Guérin and Isabelle Aucoin, in c1724 probably at Minas before moving on to the French Maritimes. 

Germain, fils's third son Claude married Marie, another daughter of .Jérôme Guérin and Isabelle Aucoin, in c1726 probably at Minas. 

Germain, fils's fourth son François married Françoise, yet another daughter of Jérôme Guérin and Isabelle Aucoin, in c1729, probably at Minas before moving on to the French Maritimes. 

Germain, fils's fifth and youngest son Germain III married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Benoit and Marie-Anne Breau, probably at Minas in c1732 and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Germain, père's younger son Pierre married Marie, daughter of Martin Bourg and Marie Potet, at Minas in c1698 and settled there and at Cobeguit.  Marie gave Pierre 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Their daughters married into the Arsement, Pitre, Boudrot, Landry, Melanson, Gautrot, and Girouard families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Only one of Pierre's sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Joseph married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marie Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in October 1725 and settled there.  He was recorded as having taken the oath of allegiance to the British crown in April 1730, before moving on to the French Maritimes. 

Pierre's second son François survived childhood but did not marry.  Evidently he and brothers Joseph and Pierre, fils are recorded as having taken the oath of allegiance to the British crown in April 1730. 

Pierre's third son Pierre, fils was born at Cobeguit but may have settled at Minas, where he was recorded as having taken the oath of allegiance with his older brothers in April 1730.  He did not marry. 

Pierre's fourth and youngest son, unnamed, probably died in infancy.

Jean's fifth and youngest son Pierre married Cécile, daughter of René Landry and Marie Bernard, at Port-Royal in c1678 and pioneered the Minas settlement on Rivière St.-Antoine, later called Rivière-des-Habitants, soon after their marriage.  Jean served as a judge at Minas, where he and Cécile became that rare Acadian couple who had no children.341

Boudrot

Michel Boudrot, the long-time colonial judge at Port-Royal, a late 1630s arrival, and his wife Michelle Aucoin created one of the largest and most influential families in the colony.  Between 1642 and 1666, Michelle gave Michel 11 children, seven sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Robichaud, Thériot, Bourg, Babineau, and Poirier families.  Michel and Michelle's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, Pigiguit, Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes, on Île Royale as well as Île St.-Jean.  At least 103 of the judge's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, Île St.-Pierre in 1788, and especially from France in 1785.  However, a substantial number of them could be found in Canada, greater Acadia, France, and the French Antilles after Le Grand Dérangement.  

Oldest son Charles, born at Port-Royal in c1646, married Renée, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, at Port-Royal in c1672.  Between 1673 and 1683, Renée gave Charles eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Charles remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie, probably at Port-Royal in c1686 and settled at Minas and Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  Between 1688 and 1707, Marie gave Charles a dozen more children, seven sons and five daughters.  Charles, who fathered 20 children by his two wives, died at Ste.-Famille after 1714, in his late 60s.  Six of his daughters from both wives married into the Trahan, Babin, Thibodeau, Bugeaud, and Girouard families.  Eight of his 12 sons from both wives created their own families. 

His oldest son, by first wife Renée Bourg, born at Port-Royal in c1673, name unrecorded, probably died young.  

Charles's second son Charles, fils, by first wife Renée Bourg, born at Port-Royal in c1674, married Marie, daughter of Étienne Rivet and Marie Comeau, in c1700 probably at Rivière-de-l'Ascension, Minas, where they settled.  In c1714, Marie gave Charles, fils one child, a son, whose name has been lost to history and who likely died young, so this line of the family did not survive.  

Charles, père's third son René, by first wife Renée Bourg, born at Port-Royal in c1678, married in c1701, according to Stephen White, a woman whose name has been lost to history.  Bona Arsenault insists René's wife was Agnès, sans doute daughter of Pierre Vincent and Anne Gaudet of Port-Royal, and that René married her in c1712.  They settled at Rivière-de-l'Ascension the Minas Basin.  According to White, René fathered a single child, a daughter named Élisabeth or Isabelle, born in c1701, who married into the Pitre family in c1724.  Arsenault calls René's daughter Madeleine, says she was born in c1724 and that she married into the Boisseau family in c1748.  René died at Minas in June 1748, age 69.  Except for its blood, this line of the family died with him, though one wonders what became of his daughter after 1755. 

Charles, père's fourth son Claude, a twin, by first wife Renée Bourg, born at Port-Royal in c1683, probably died young. 

Charles, père's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, Claude's twin, by first wife Renée Bourg,  married Cécile, another daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie, probably at Port-Royal in c1702 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  Between 1703 and 1721, Cécile gave Jean-Baptiste nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Louise, daughter of Louis Saulnier and Louise Bastineau dit Peltier, in c1722 and settled at Minas.  Between 1723 and 1742, Louise gave Jean-Baptiste seven more children, three sons and four daughters--16 children in all.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, Louise, and three of their unmarried children at La Traverse on the island's south shore.  The British deported Jean and his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Jean, age 56 at the time, did not survive the crossing, nor did wife Louise.  His daughters by both wives married into the Trahan, Hébert, Davoux, Landry, Roussin, and Pineau or Pinaud families in greater Acadia and France.  Seven of his nine sons created families of their own at Minas, Pigiguit, and in the French Maritimes. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, also called Jean, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born probably at Minas in the early 1700s, married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Brassaud and Gabrielle Forest, at Grand-Pré in October 1729 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1740, Catherine gave Jean-Baptiste, fils three children, all daughters.  According to Stephen White, Jean-Baptiste, fils died probably at Ste.-Famille by 1752, age unrecorded.  Arsenault, however, insists that Jean-Baptiste, fils took his family to Île St.-Jean, escaped the British in 1758, and found refuge at Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Arsenault says that Jean-Baptiste, fils's daughters married into the Denis, Brun, and Landry families at Port-La-Joye and Restigouche.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France notes that Marguerite, born in c1741, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Catherine Brasseau, married into the Pitre family at LaGouesnière near St.-Malo in November 1759, became a widow in 1782, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 with six of her Pitre chldren.  She settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche and did not remarry.  So the blood of Jean's family line survived in greater Acadia and in the Bayou State. 

Jean's second son Pierre, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born probably at Minas in c1708, married Anne, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, at Grand-Pré in February 1732 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1748, at Minas and Ste.-Famille, Anne gave Pierre eight children, four sons and four daughters, including a set of twins.  Other sources hint that she gave him two more sons, in 1737 and in the early 1750s.  Pierre died before 1752.  At least two of his sons created their own families in France and Louisiana.

Older son Pierre, fils, baptized at Grand-Pré in October 1737, evidently moved to the French Maritimes after his father died and was deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  In February 1759, he received permission to move on to Rochefort to find work, but he was unsuccessful.  He returned to St.-Malo in October and "settled" at nearby Trigavou.  He married cousin Françoise, daughter of François Daigre and Marie Boudrot of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, at Trigavou in November 1763.  Between 1764 and 1771, Françoise gave Pierre, fils four children, a son and three daughters.  Pierre, fils took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s.  Having eschewed the intrigues of his fellow Acadians against their benefactor the Marquis de Pérusse, when 900 of the Acadians in Poitou retreated to Nantes in late 1775, Pierre, fils and Françoise were among the 300 Acadians who chose to remain.  Between 1773 and 1780, at Châtellerault and Bonneuil-Matours, she gave him four more children, three sons and a daugher, but the two older children, a son and a daughter, died young.  No member of the family emigrated to Louisiana, so they likely remained in Poitou.  One wonders if Pierre, fils's surviving sons--Isaac, born in October 1764; Benjamin, baptized in October 1777; and Paul, baptized in January 1780--as well as his daughters--Marie-Josephe, born in October 1766; and Françoise-Mathurine in April 1769--created their own families in France. 

Pierre, père's younger son Augustin-Rémi, born at Minas or Pigiguit before 1752, evidently was deported to Pennsylvania or Maryland in 1755 perhaps with his widowed mother and older siblings.  If so, his mother died in one of those colonies.  In July 1763, Maryland officials found an orphan named Rémis Budro living at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac with the family of Acadian Jean-Charles Bro.  Rémi followed the Breaus to Louisiana in 1767-68 and went with them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez on the Mississippi above Baton Rouge, where, again called Rémi, he was described soon after his arrival as a 13-year-old orphan.  One suspects, however, that Rémi's actual age was closer to 16 or 17.  The following year, Spanish Governor-General O'Reilly released the Acadians from the isolated settlement.  None of them remained.  Rémi, perhaps after following the Breaus to one of the Acadian settlements downriver, chose to go to the Attakapas District, where, after 1781, he was consistently called Augustin by the census takers.  He married Judith-Philippe, daughter of Charles Martin and Jeanne Comeau of Annapolis Royal, probably at Attakapas in c1777.  As a 12-year-old orphan, she had come to Attakapas with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in the spring of 1765.  She gave Rémi all of his children.  Called Augustin-Rémi by the recording priest, he remarried to cousin Madeleine, daughter of Olivier Benoit and his first wife Susanne Boudreaux and widow of Amand Martin and André Favron, at Opelousas, north of Attakapas, in July 1815.  He died in St. Landry Parish in June 1830.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial called him Rémi and noted that he died at age 85, which would have given him a birth year of c1745.  Rémi's daughters, all by first wife Judith, married into the Boone and Prejean families.  Three of his four sons, also by his first wife, married into the Ritter, Caruthers, and Lacase families and settled near Grand Coteau. 

Jean's third son Honoré l'aîné, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born at Pigiguit in December 1708, likely died young. 

Jean's fourth son Benjamin, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born probably at Pigiguit in the early 1710s, married Cécile, daughter of Jean Melanson and Marguerite Dugas and widow of Claude Richard, in c1754, perhaps at Minas.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  Cécile gave Benjamin at least one child, a daughter, in c1755.  He and Cécile evidently died in Maryland before July 1763, when colonial officials counted daughter Marie, now an 8-year-old orphan, living with the family of François Hébert at Fredericktown/Georgetown on the colony's Eastern Shore.  Marie followed relatives to Louisiana in 1767 and settled at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  She married cousin Amand, son of Paul Hébert and Marguerite-Josèphe Melançon, probably at San Gabriel in September 1776, so the blood of this family survived.  Amand also had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767 and probably had known Marie from childhood.  Two of their grandsons became prominent men in Louisiana affairs:  Paul Octave Hébert served as governor of Louisiana in the early 1850s, and Paul Octave and his first cousin Louis Hébert rose to the rank of brigadier general during the War of 1861-65.  Marie died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1847, a widow in her early 90s. 

Jean's fifth son Antoine, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born probably at Pigiguit in c1717, married Brigitte, daughter of Jean-Michel Apart and Élisabeth Hébert, at Grand-Pré in July 1747 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, in c1748 Brigitte gave Antoine a son, Jean-Baptiste le jeune.  In August 1752, a French official counted Antoine, Brigitte, son Jean-Baptiste, and Brigitte's infirm brother Alexis Apart near Antoine's father and his brother Zacharie at La Traverse on the island's south shore.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  In February 1759, soon after the family reached the port, son Jean-Baptiste died in a St.-Malo hospital, age 11.  Between 1760 and 1772, at Trigavou near St.-Malo, Brigitte gave Antoine eight more children, five sons and three daughters, one of whom, a daughter, did not survive childhood.  Antoine took his family to Poitou and retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in December 1775.  He died at St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, France, in April 1776, age 58.  Brigitte did not remarry.  She took five of her unmarried children, three sons and two daughters, to Spanish Louisiana in 1785.  Her married son also went there.  One of her daughters married into the Rassicot family in Louisiana.  Three of her sons created their own families in France and Louisiana.  Only one of the lines survived in the Bayou State, but it did so magnificently. 

Second son François-Xavier, born at Trigavou, France, in March 1760, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Dugas and his second wife Marguerite Cyr of Boulogne-sur-Mer, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in May 1785.  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled at Manchac on the river south of Baton Rouge.  François-Xavier remarried to Marie-Françoise, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Anne Hébert, at nearby San Gabriel in May 1787 and died at San Gabriel in February 1798, age 27.  His daughters married into the Acoste, Tircuit, and Trosclair famiies.  Only one of François-Xavier's four sons married, into the Edelmer family at St. Gabriel, but the line does not seem to have survived. 

Antoine's third son Charles-Michel, born at Trigavou in October 1761, followed his famliy to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He settled on upper Bayou Lafourche near his siblings, but he did not marry.

Antoine's fourth son Joseph, born at Trigavou in February 1765, followed his famliy to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He married Marie-Jeanne Langlinais, a native of France, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in February 1791.  One wonders if he fathered any children. 

Antoine's fifth son Étienne, born at Trigavou in December 1766, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He married Victoire-Andrée, daughter of Alexandre Gautrot and Marguerite Hébert, at Ascension in January 1788 and settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughter married into the Martin and Stephen families.  Nine of Étienne's 10 sons married into the Toups, Pontiff, Lefevre, Thibodeaux, Barbier, Brunet, and Broussard families and created on Bayou Lafourche one of the largest Boudreaux families lines in the Bayou State.  

Antoine's sixth and youngest son Jean-Pierre, born at Trigavou in December 1772, may have followed his family to Poitou and Nantes.  Though he would have been only 12 years old when his widowed mother and five older siblings left Paimboeuf for New Orleans in late August 1785, he not accompany them to the Spanish colony, so he may have died in France. 

Jean's sixth son Zacharie, by first wife Cécile Corporon, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1721, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Daigre and Françoise Doucet, in c1748 perhaps at Ste.-Famille and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  Between 1749 and 1758, Marguerite gave Zacharie five children, three sons and two daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Zacharie, Marguerite, two of their children, and orphan Marguerite Boudrot next to his parents at La Traverse on the island's south shore.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Zacharie and Marguerite survived the voyage aboard one of the Five Ships, but all of their children died at sea!  They settled at Trigavou near St.-Malo and created another family.  Between 1760 and 1770, at Trigavou, Marguerite gave Zacherie six more children, five sons and a daughter--11 children in all--but two of the younger sons and the daughter did not survive childhood.  Zacharie took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s and in October 1775 retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  At age 61, Zacharie remarried to Frenchwoman Marguerite Vallois, widow of Pierre and Olivier Dubois and Étienne Thériot, at Chantenay near Nantes in September 1782.  She gave him no more children.  Zacharie took his second wife, his youngest son, and a stepson to Louisiana in 1785 aboard L'Amitié and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  All three of his remaining sons married into the Landry, Gautrot, and Ferguson created families in France and Louisiana.  His oldest son's line of the family was especially vigorous. 

Jean's seventh son, another Jean-Baptiste, fils, by second wife Louise Saulnier, born at Minas in August 1723, married Lucie, daughter of Jean Trahan and Marie Girouard, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in October 1752.  Between 1754 and 1755, Lucie gave Jean-Baptiste, fils three children, a daughter and two sons.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  All three of their children died at sea.  They lived for a time at La Martin on the Rue des Fougeurs in St.-Malo before moving to La Rochelle in February 1759. 

Jean's eighth son Honoré le jeune, by second wife Louise Saulnier, born at Minas in March 1728, married Élisabeth, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas, in c1753 probably in the French Maritimes and settled there.  In c1754 and c1758, Élisabeth gave Honoré two children, a son and a daughter.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Both of the children died ag sea.  Honoré, age 29, and Élisabeth, age 24, died in a hospital at St.-Malo in March 1759, probably from the rigors of the crossing, so the deportation to France wiped out the entire family. 

Jean's ninth and youngest son Mathurin, by second wife Louise Saulnier, born probably at Minas in c1742, probably died young. 

Charles, père's sixth son Jérôme, by second wife Marie Corporon, born probably at Minas in c1688, evidently died young.  

Charles, père's seventh son Denis, by second wife Marie Corporon, born probably at Minas in c1690, married Agnès, daughter of Michel Vincent and Marie-Josèphe Richard, at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1709 and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Between 1710 and 1731, Agnès gave Denis 10 children, six sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Denis died at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in February 1754, in his mid-60s.  His daughters married into the Richard, Boisseau, Hébert dit Manuel, Livois, and Gaudet families. 

Oldest son Charles le jeune, born probably at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1710, married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Thériot and Marie Bourg, in c1735 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1745, Cécile gave Charles three children, two sons and a daughter.  A French official counted Charles, Cécile, and their three children at Anse-à-Pinnet on the island's south shore in August 1752.  The British deported them to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in 1758.  Charles remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Marie LeBlanc and widow of Joseph Robichaud, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in August 1762, but they returned to Boulogne,where Marie-Madeleine gave him another son in 1764.  In May 1766, Charles took his family to St.-Malo aboard the ship Le Hazard.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan.  Charles died at the Hôtel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in November 1766, age 55.  His youngest son was born posthumously at St.-Servan in May 1767.  Marie-Madeleine remained at St.-Servan until 1769, when she moved to neary Pleudihen.  She remarried to widower Étienne Térriot at St.-Servan in February 1770 and became the stepmother of Étienne's son Olivier, the cobbler of Nantes who, 15 years later, would help coax hundreds of his fellow Acadians in France to go to Louisiana.  Two of Charles's children--a daughter by his first wife who had married into the Richard family at Nantes, and his youngest son, who he never knew--emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  One wonders what happened to Charles's older sons Charles-Olivier and François from his first wife who, as teenagers, had been counted with their parents on Île St.-Jean in 1752. 

Charles le jeune's fourth and youngest son Joseph by second wife Marie-Madeleine, born posthumously at St.-Servan, France, in May 1767, followed his widowed mother to Nantes, Louisiana, and the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  He married Élisabeth- or Isabelle-Apolline, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Marguerite Duhon of Pigiguit and Belle-Île-en-Mer, at Attakapas in November 1792.  They settled on Bayou Vermilion.  Joseph died in Lafayette Parish in December 1838, age 71.  His daughters married into the Landry and Simon families.  His three sons married into the Labauve and Simon families and created vigorous lines on the prairies. 

Denis's second son Olivier, born probably at Ste.-Famille in June 1712, married Henriette, daughter of Jérôme Guérin and Isabelle Aucoin, in c1740 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1742 and 1749, Henriette gave Olivier five children, two sons and three daughters.  A French official counted Olivier, Henriette, and their five children at Anse-à-Pinnet in August 1752.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  By then, the couple had seven children, four sons and three daughters.  All but one of their children died at sea or from the rigors of the crossing.  Henriette died at St.-Malo in March 1759, age 45, two months after reaching the port.  Olivier remarried to Anne, daughter of Charles Dugas and Anne-Marie Benoit, at St.-Énogat near St.-Malo in May 1762.  Between 1763 and 1767, at nearby Trigavou, Anne gave Olivier three more children, two sons and a daughter--10 children in all for him.  They also lived at Ploubalay and Langrolay, other suburbs of St.-Malo, between 1759 and 1772.  Olivier's daughter Madeleine-Josèphe by first wife Henriette married into the Guillot family at Trigavou.  Olivier, Anne, and their two youngest children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Older daughter Madeleine-Josèphe and her family had gone to the Spanish colony on an earlier ship.  Olivier died by January 1788, when his wife was listed in a Bayou Lafourche census as a widow.  Daughter Marie married into the Brunet family in the Spanish colony, and his son Jean-Baptiste married into the Pitre family and settled on Bayou Lafourche. 

Denis's third son Jean, born probably at Ste.-Famille in c1714, married Marguerite, daughter of August Comeau and Jeanne Levron, at Annapolis Royal in February 1738.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1747, Marguerite gave Jean six children, four sons and two daughters.  They settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  Jean drowned in the river there in 1747, age 33.  Marguerite remained at Pigiguit.  The British deported most of the family to Massachusetts in 1755.  After the war with Britain ended, members of the family chose to emigrate to Canada, where Jean's daughters married into the Létourneau and Cailla families at Trois-Rivières and Baie-du-Fèvre across Lac St.-Pierre from Trois-Rivières.  One of Jean's sons, however, did not go to Massachusetts or to Canada. 

Second son Félix le jeune, born at L'Assomption in c1742, was deported to Virginia in 1755 and then sent on to England the following year.  The British held him with other Acadian exiles at Falmouth until 1763, when he and other Acadians in England were repatriated to France.  He landed at Morlaix in Brittany and married Anne-Gertrude, called Annette, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Thériot and Marie-Josèphe Landry of Rivière-aux-Canards, at St.-Martin des Champs, Morlaix, in July 1764.  Anne gave Félix le jeune a son, Simon-Bruno, at Morlaix, in May 1765.  That November, they followed Anne's family to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany and settled at Kerxo, Sauzon.  Anne gave Félix a daughter there in August 1767.  The family left the island in the late 1760s or early 1770s and moved on to Quimper in southwestern Brittany, where Félix served as "commis des Fermes du Roi" at l'Aberlidut in the Parish of Poasponder.  Anne gave Félix another daughter at Quimper in November 1773 and another son there in May 1777.  Félix remarried to Frenchwoman Marie Lagatu at Quimper in the late 1770s or early 1780s.  She gave him two more daughters at Quimper in 1783 and 1792, so when hundreds of his countrymen, including one of his paternal uncles and several first cousins, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, Félix and his family remained in France.  Rising through the ranks of the Breton bureaucracy, he served as a customs officer at Douanes, near Quimper, during the early years of the French Revolution.  

Denis's fourth son Anselme, born probably at Ste.-Famille in c1719, married Geneviève Girouard in c1744.  Between 1745 and 1758, Geneviève gave Anselme six children, four sons and two daughters.  Anselme took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted him, Geneviève, and three of their children at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Anselme and five of his children died during the crossing; Anselme died at age 39.  His oldest daughter died in a St.-Malo hospital in late November 1758, age 10, soon after reaching the port.  Geneviève, left alone by the death of her husband and all of her children, died probably in the same hospital in late December, age 38, so the North Atlantic crossing wiped out the entire family. 

Denis's fifth son Félix, born probably at Ste.-Famille in c1723, married Jeanne, daughter of François Boisseau and Marie-Anne Saulnier, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in September 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, in c1754 Jeanne gave Félix a daughter, Élisabeth.  The family either returned to peninsula Acadia after 1755 or escaped the British roundup on the island in 1758.  Félix died at Québec in December 1757, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that fall and winter.  His family remained in Canada.  Daughter Élisabeth married into the Richard family at Cap-Santé on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Trois-Rivières, so the blood of this family survived.  

Denis's sixth and youngest son Alexandre, born probably at Ste.-Famille in the 1720s, married Anastasie-Dorothée, daughter of Pierre Gaudet and Marie-Madeleine Pitre, at Port-La-Joye in October 1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, in c1757, Anastasie gave Alexandre a son, Pierre.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758. 

Charles, père's eighth son Paul, by second wife Marie Corporon, born, according to Stephen White, in c1692, evidently died young.  According to Bona Arsenault, however, Charles's son Paul, born in c1703, married Marie-Josèphe Doiron in c1731.  Arsenault says that, between 1732 and 1748, Marie-Josèphe gave Paul six children, two sons and four daughters, and that the oldest daughter, Marie-Josèphe, married into the Closquinet family at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in January 1751.  Arsenault evidently confused this Paul with the younger Paul dit Petit Paul, son of Charles's younger brother Claude. 

Charles, père's ninth son Pierre, by second wife Marie Corporon, born probably at Minas in the c1693, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Anne Doucet, at Grand-Pré in November 1714 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  Between the mid-1710s and 1733, Madeleine gave Pierre six children, two sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Doiron, Thibodeau, Landry, and Clouâtre families, and three of them emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland and France.  Pierre's two sons created families of their own but did not go to Louisiana. 

Older son Basile, born probably at Ste.-Famille in June 1718, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Marie Doiron, in c1745 perhaps at Pigiguit and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.   Between 1746 and 1758, Marguerite gave Basile eight children, four sons and four daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Basile, Marguerite, and their three oldest children in the household of a Sr. Emard at Havre-St.-Pierre on the island's north coast.  The British deported Basile and his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758 aboard the transport Supply.  Three of their children died at sea.  Between 1760 and 1764, at Pleudihen near St.-Malo, Marguerite gave Basile three more children, a son and two daughters.  One of his older daughters married into the Moyse family in France and remained there.  Two of his sons created their own families in France and also remained. 

Oldest son Pierre-Paul, born probably at Pigiguit in c1746, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, where he worked as a seaman.  He married Marie, daughter of Jean Moyse and Marie Blanchard, at nearby St.-Suliac in January 1765.  Between 1766 and 1771, at La Chapelle de Mordreux, today's Mordreuc, Marie gave Pierre-Paul four children, three daughters and a son.  Pierre-Paul took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s, and Marie gave him another son there in 1774.  In early 1776, they retreated with 900 other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Between 1777 and 1783, Marie gave Pierre-Paul three more children, a son and two daughters, and buried the son who had been born in Poitou.  They did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785.

Basile's fifth and youngest son Jean-Cyprien, born at Mordreux, near Pleudihen, in August 1761, was living with his parents there into the early 1770s.  While a resident of St.-Donatien Parish, Nantes, on the other side of Brittany, he married Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Broussard and Madeleine Landry and widow of Joseph Melanson, at Pleudihen in November 1784.  They remained there.  In August 1785, Élisabeth gave Jean-Cyprien twins, a daughter and a son, at La Coquenais, near Pleudihen.  They did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785. 

Pierre's younger son Augustin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1731, moved to the French Maritimes, was deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758, and married Osite dite Dosithée, daughter of Jean Landry and Madeleine Melanson and widow of Jean Broussard, at Pleudihen in August 1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1773, Osite gave Augustin five daughters, and that the family was counted at St.-Malo in c1762 and 1772.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., in his study of the Acadians in France, says that between 1761 and 1773, Osite gave Augustin eight children, a son and seven daughters, all but two of the daughters dying in childhood.  Osite died at La Coquenais, near Pleuidhen, in September 1779, age 48.  Augustin remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at nearby St.-Servan in January 1781.  Madeleine gave him another daughter at La Coquenais in 1782.  Arsenault, who says nothing of Augustin's remarriage, implies that he emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but Louisiana records says otherwise:  the two Augustin Boudrots who did go to the Spanish colony did so in the 1760s from Halifax or Maryland, when Augustin à Pierre was living in France. 

Charles, père's tenth son Antoine, by second wife Marie Corporon, born probably at Minas in c1694, married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Brassaud and Gabrielle Forest, in c1719 probably at Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1739, Cécile gave Antoine eight children, six sons and two daughters.  The family moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Two years later, in August 1752, a French official counted Antoine, Cécile, five of their younger children, and an orphaned nephew at Grande-Anse on the south shore of the island.  Some members of the family escaped the British in 1758, but Antoine, Cécile, and two of their sons, one married, the other still a bachelor, did not.  The British deported to St.-Malo, France, which they reached aboard the transport Supply in March 1759.  Antoine died at nearby St.-Servan in March 1768, age 75.  Cécile died there in February 1761, age 75.  At least four of their sons created their own families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  A nephew, likely a grand nephew, the identity of whose parents is difficult to determine, also created a family of his own and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Second son Charles, born probably at Pigiguit in c1724, married Marie-Josèphe DoucetAccording to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1770, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles nine children, five sons and four daughters.  The family moved to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles, Marie-Josèphe, and three of their daughters at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the island's interior.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted at Ste.-Foy near Québec in 1759 and Repentigny near Montréal in 1768.  One of their sons created his own family.

Fifth and youngest son Charles, fils, born probably at Repentigny in c1770, married Marie, daughter of Amable Jetté and Marie-Anne Mauriceau, at Repentigny in November 1791. 

Antoine's third son Antoine, fils, born probably at Pigiguit in c1725, married Marie LeBlancAccording to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1772, Marie gave Antoine, fils six children, two sons and four daughters.  They moved to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area in 1755, escaped the British that year, and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in the interior south of Québec in 1758, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on Rivière Richelieu east of Montréal in 1761, and at St.-Philippe-de-Lapierre across from Montréal in 1774.  Two of Antoine, fils's daughters married into the Brault and Boudrot families at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie and nearby L'Acadie.  One of his two sons created his own family.

Older son Firmin, born in c1752, followed his family the trois-rivières and Canada and married Marie, daughter of Alexis Brault and Marguerite Barriault, at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie in February 1776. 

Antoine, père's fourth son Victor, born probably at Pigiguit in c1728, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Madeleine Doiron, at Port-La-Joye on the island in January 1752.  A French official counted them with a 17-year-old Boudrot orphan at Grande-Anse on his father's homestead on the south shore of the island in August of that year.  Between 1752 and 1758, on the island, Catherine gave Victor three children, a son and two daughters.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Their second daughter died at sea.  They settled at St.-Suliac, a suburb of St.-Malo, where Victor worked as a carpenter.  Between 1760 and 1770, at St.-Suliac, Catherine gave Victor six more children, three sons and three daughters.  Two of them died as infants. Catherine died at Hôtel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in April 1772, age 40.  Victor remarried to Geneviève, daughter of Charles Richard and Catherine Gautrot of Grand-Pré and widow of Simon dit Pierre Pitre, at nearby St.-Servan in August 1773.  Perhaps because he was a carpenter and not a farmer, Victor did not follow dozens of his fellow Acadians to Poitou.  Between 1774 and 1785, at St.-Servan, Geneviève gave him five more children, three sons and two daughters--14 children in all.  Two of them died as infants.  Victor's oldest daughter by first wife Catherine married into the LeLorre family in France.  One wonders if second son Pierre, born at St.-Suliac in August 1764, was still alive in 1785.  That summer, from St.-Malo, Victor took his family--wife Geneviève, six of his unmarried children by both wives, a son-in-law, and a stepdaughter--to Louisiana.  From New Orleans, they followed their fellow passengers aboard La Ville d'Archangel to Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  Victor died there in his late 50s by September 1787, when his wife remarried.  Victor's three younger daughters by both wives married into the Calegan, Silvi or Silvy, Clément, and Navarre families at Baton Rouge and on Bayou Lafourche.  The older son by his first wife who had come with him to Louisiana did not marry, but the younger son by second wife Geneviève married into the LeBlanc family and settled on the upper Lafourche.  Three years after Victor took his family to Louisiana and a year or so after his death, his fourth son Jean-Baptiste appeared in the colony, one of the few to go there directly from greater Acadia, in this case from Île St.-Pierre off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  This son also married, into the LeBlanc and Benoit families, and settled on the Lafourche. 

Antoine, père's fifth son Prudent, born probably at Pigiguit in c1734, followed his parents aboard the Supply to St.-Malo in 1758 and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marie Landry of Grand-Pré, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in October 1763.  In 1765 and 1767, at St.-Servan, Marie-Josèphe gave Prudent two children, daughter Marguerite and son Jean-Baptiste.  Prudent died at St.-Servan in February 1782, age 47.  One wonders what happened to his family after his death.  Did he take his family to Poitou in the early 1770s and return to the St.-Malo suburbs?  Was his son the Jean-Baptiste Boudrot who married Anastasie Benoit in c1775?  The couple had a son, Jean, at Cenan, Poitou, in May 1776.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana. 

Antoine, père's nephew--likely a grand nephew--Ignace, born in c1748, was counted with Antoine Boudrot's family at Grande-Anse, Île St.-Jean, in August 1752.  The French official making the survey noted that Ignace was "their nephew, orphan, without father and mother."  Ignace followed his relatives to France in 1758 aboard the transport Supply and settled with them at St.-Servan, where, like his first cousin Victor, he worked as a carpenter.  In January 1772, Ignace, now 24, received permission to work at Morlaix, on the northwest coast of Brittany.  Later that month, he was working in the Royal Artillery Corps, one wonders in what capacity.  At age 32, Igance married Frenchwoman Anne Pierson in c1780.  In 1781 and 1783, Anne gave Ignace two sons.  They were counted in St.-Nicolas Parish, Nantes, in 1783.  Their second son was baptized there in September, and their first son died there in October, age 2.  They then moved on to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Britanny, where they were counted in September 1784.  Ignace followed his cousin Victor to Louisiana in 1785 aboard a later ship and also settled at Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  Anne gave him another son in the Spanish colony, but the son probably died young.  Only one of Ignace's sons, Charles born at Nantes in September 1783, seems to have survived childhood, but there is no evidence in Louisiana records that he created his own family.  Ignace's line of the family, then, probably did not endure. 

Charles, père's eleventh son François, by second wife Marie Corporon, born probably at Minas in the 1690s, married Angélique, daughter of Abraham Doiron and Anne Babin, in c1720 probably at Pigiguit and settled on the L'Assomption side of the river.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1737, Angélique gave François seven children, five sons and two daughters.  The family was deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, and held at Bristol.  François's daughters married into the Vincent and Thériot families at Pigiguit and in England.  All five of his sons, including one with a serious handicap, created their own families.

Oldest son Alexandre, born probably at L'Assomption in c1723, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Vincent and Marie Richard, probably at Pigiguit in c1753.  In c1754, Madeleine gave Alexandre a son, Jean-Baptiste.  The British deported them to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and held them at Bristol, where Alexandre died soon after their arrival, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian exiles there.  Madeleine remarried to a Breau widower at Bristol in c1760.  Madeleine was again a widow in May 1763, when she and her two sons, Jean-Baptiste Boudrot, who would have been age 9 at the time, and Joseph Breau, fils, only a few years old, were repatriated to France aboard the ship La Dorothée.  Marguerite and her sons settled at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo.  She remarried again--her third marriage--to a Dugas widower at nearby St.-Servan in January 1764.  Her Boudrot son created his own family.

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Pigiguit in c1754, lived with his mother and stepfather at St.-Suliac until 1772 and then followed them to Poitou.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of Joseph Trahan and Anne Thériot, at St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, in October 1774.  Marie-Modeste gave Jean-Baptiste a son at Châtellerault in 1775, but the boy died nine days after his birth.  In December, Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Modeste retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to Nantes, where she gave him four more children, two sons and two daughters, but the younger son did not survive childhood.  In 1785, Jean-Baptiste, Marie-Modeste, and their three remaining children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana aboard the first of the Seven Ships from France.  They settled at Manchac near Baton Rouge, where Jean-Baptiste remarried to Anne-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Henry and his first wife Marie-Madeleine Pitre of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, and widow of Théodore Thériot, in February 1786, not long after his arrival, so Marie-Modeste may have died soon after reaching New Orleans.  Anne-Josèphe evidently gave Jean-Baptiste no more children.  He took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1790s and died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June or July 1832, age 78.  His two daughters, both from first wife Marie-Modeste, married into the Aucoin, Dubois, and Henry families in the Spanish colony.  His surviving son Jean-Constant married into the Henry family and settled on the upper Lafourche.

François's second son Germain, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1724, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Trahan and Charlotte Comeau, probably at L'Assomption in c1745.  The British deported them to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and held them at Bristol.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite and died at Bristol in 1757 "avec tous ses enfants," but he does not say how many children they had.  Albert J. Robichaux, in his study of the Acadians in France, says Marguerite died at Bristol in August 1756 but mentions no children.  One wonders if she was a victim of smallpox.  Germain remarried to Anne, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry and widow of Charles-Honoré LeBlanc, at Bristol in c1758.  Between 1759 and 1768, Anne gave Germain four more children, a son and three daughters, in England and France.  They were repatriated to France in May 1763, reached St.-Malo aboard the ship La Dorothée, and settled at nearby Plouër until March 1773, when they joined other Acadian exiles on the British-controlled Isle of Guernsey off the west coast of Brittany.  Returning surreptitiously to North America, they engaged in the fisheries in the Gulf of St. Lawrence with other refugees.  Arsenault says Anne gave Germain two more children, a son and a daughter, in c1775 and c1778 probably in greater Acadia.  Arsenault also hints that, by October 1792, Germain had become a pioneer settler at Chéticamp on the west coast of Cape Breton Island, present-day Nova Scotia. 

Youngest son Joseph, born in c1775, married cousin Anne, daughter of Paul Chiasson and Louise Boudrot, at Chéticamp in c1810. 

François's third son Félix, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in April 1729, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois, at L'Assomption in May 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1764, Marie-Josèphe gave Félix two children, a daughter and a son, at Pigiguit and in France.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, held them at Bristol, and in 1763 repatriated them to France, where Félix worked as a carpenter.  The family was counted at St.-Mathieu-de-Morlaix, Brittany, in 1764, where they had come in, and at Boudrun, Sauzon, Belle-Île-en-Mer, in 1767, where they had gone in November 1765.  Marie-Josèphe died at Sauzon in 1773, and Félix remarried to Madeleine Hébert, perhaps widow of Pierre Blanchard.  His daughter Félicité by first wife Marie-Josèphe married into the Lejeune family at Nantes, France, in November 1782.  His son by his first wife also created a family of his own in France.  Félix took his second wife but no children to Louisiana in 1785.  His married daughter Félicité crossed with her husband on the same transport, Le St.-Rémi, and his son Joseph-Simon crossed on the last of the Seven Ships with his wife.  At age 58, Félix remarried again--his third marriage--to Luce-Perpétué, daughter of François Bourg and Marie-Madeleine Hébert and widow of Pierre Hébert, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in August 1787.  She gave him no more children.  Félix died by November 1789, age 60, when his wife remarried at Lafourche.   His married daughter and her husband proved to be that rare Acadian couple who would have no children.  However, his son only Joseph-Simon by first wife Marie-Josèphe married into the Brossier family in France and created a substantial family line in Louisiana.

François's fourth son Amand, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1730, became blind at the age of 12.  The British deported him to Virginia in 1755, sent him on to England in 1756, and he was repatriated to France in May 1763.  He arrived at St.-Malo aboard the ship La Dorothée with younger brother Jean-Charles and his family and lived with them at Plouër, near St.-Malo.  In spite of his infirmity, at age 39, Amand married Marie, daughter of Guillaume Couillard and Marie Hesry of Plouër in April 1769.  Between 1770 and 1776, Marie gave Amand four children, all sons, two of whom died young.  One wonders how he supported his family.  He remarried to Marie-Perrine, daughter of Charles Nogues and François Raimond of La Fresnais, near St.-Malo, at Plouër in February 1777.  Marie-Perrine gave Amand another son in 1777, but the boy died nine days after his birth.  Amand, wife Marie-Perrine, and five children, three sons and two daughters, sailed to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel in late 1785.  From New Orleans, they either followed their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge or went directly to upper Bayou Lafourche.  One of his daughters from second wife Marie-Perrine married into the Aucoin family on Bayou Lafourche.  All three of his surviving sons from both of his wives married, into the Boudreaux, Thibodeaux, and Billardin families, on the upper Lafourche, but two of the lines did not endure. 

François's fifth and youngest son Jean-Charles, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in 1733, was deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, and held with his family at Bristol.  He married Agnès, daughter of Jean Trahan and Charlotte Comeau, at Bristol in 1758.  In England, in 1760 and 1761, Agnès gave Jean-Charles two children, a son and a daughter.  They were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763 aboard the ship La Dorothée.  Jean-Charles worked as a wood polisher and wigmaker in France.  Between 1765 and 1772, at Plouër, Agnès gave him four more children, two sons and two daughters.  Jean-Charles took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s and, with dozens of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians, retreated to Nantes in December 1775.  Agnès gave Jean-Charles another daughter at Nantes in February 1776 but died there the following June, age 34, perhaps from the rigors of childbirth.  He remarried to Marguerite-Victoire, daughter of Charles Guédry and his first wife Adélaïde-Madeleine Hébert of Île Royale, in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in August 1780.  Between 1781 and 1785, Marguerite-Victoire gave Jean-Charles three more children, two sons and a daughter, at Nantes, but the daughter did not survive childhood.  Jean-Charles also buried two of his sons at Nantes--third son Pierre, age 9, in August 1777; and oldest son Jean-Charles, age 23, in June 1783--both from his first wife Agnès.  His oldest daughter Marie, born in England, married into the Havard family at Nantes.  In 1785, Jean-Charles, Marguerite-Victoire, and four of his younger unmarried children, two sons and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana on the same ships as his married daughter Marie, who was pregnant on the voyage and accompanied by her brother Joseph-Marie.   Marguerite-Victoire gave Jean-Charles another daughter on Bayou Lafourche.  One of their daughters married into the Heusé family in Louisiana, and his oldest daughter Marie may have remarried into the Forgeron family there as well.  All three of Jean-Charles's surviving sons married into the Darois, Duhon, and Henry families in the Spanish colony, and two of them created substantial lines. 

Charles, père's twelfth and youngest son Joseph, by second wife Marie Corporon, born at Ste.-Famillie, Pigiguit, in 1700, married Anne, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Marguerite Richard, in c1723 probably at Ste.-Famille and also lived at Grand-Pré.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1724 and 1745, Anne gave Joseph 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  The British deported members of the family to Pennsylvania in 1755.  Four of Joseph's daugthers married into the Trahan, Gautrot, and LeBlanc families at Minas and in Pennsylvania.  Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in c1724, went to Pennsylvania with younger sisters Claire and Catherine but may not have married.  Only one of Joseph, père's sons seems to have created his own family. 

Second son Pierre, born in c1735, evidently moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752 and was deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  He "settled" at nearby St.-Énogat and married cousin Anne, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Judith Belliveau and widow of Jacques-René Haché dit Gallant, there in November 1763.  Anne gave Pierre a son in October 1765, on the eve of their going to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  Between 1767 and 1771, Anne gave Pierre three more children, at least one son and one daughter, on the island.  The family, including four children from Anne's first marriage, did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785 but remained on Belle-Île.  Pierre died at Bangor in c1791.  Members of the family, including two married children, Joseph and Anne-Marie-Michelle, moved on to Lorient on the mainland of Brittany, where they were counted in 1792 during the French Revolution.  Others remained on Belle-Île-en-Mer.  Anne died at Le Palais on Belle-Île in 1804.  The name of daughter Anne-Marie-Michelle's husband has been lost to history.  Both of Pierre's sons created their own families.

Older son Joseph-Ian, born at St.-Énogat in October 1765, married on Belle-Île-en-Mer a woman whose name has been lost to history.  After his father's death, they moved to Lorient, Brittany, where they were counted in 1792.

Pierre's younger son Jean-Marie, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1771, remained on the island with his widowed mother after 1792 and married cousin Marie-Augustine, daughter of Étienne Clavey and Élizabeth Granger, at Bangor in 1801.  Jean-Marie died at Antoureau near Le Palais in 1816, age 45. 

Michel's second son Jean, born at Port-Royal in c1655, married Marguerite, daughter Jacques Bourgeois and Jeanne Trahan, at Port-Royal in c1676 and settled at Minas, where Marguerite gave him only one child, a daughter named Marie-Anne, who married into the Arseneau family, so the blood of this family line survived.  Jean died at either Minas or Chignecto by November 1679, when his wife remarried at Chignecto. 

Michel's third son Abraham, born at Port-Royal in c1657, married Cécile, daughter of Charles Melanson and Marie Dugas, at Port-Royal in c1686.  He worked as a pilot and merchant at the colonial capital, trading extensively with New Englanders.  In early 1693, during King William's War, Acadian Commander Villebon sent Abraham to Boston to obtain information from the New Englanders, so Abraham must have been fluent in English.  His mission was successful.  Cécile gave him six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  Abraham died at Port-Royal in c1701, in his early 40s.  His daughters married into the Gaudet, Mius d'Entremont, and Bourg families.  All three of his sons married Landry sisters. 

Oldest son Charles dit Charlot, born at Port-Royal in c1687, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot, at Port-Royal in February 1707 and moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale in the mid-1710s, where he worked as a navigator and boat builder.  Between 1707 and 1724, Marie-Josèphe gave Charlot eight children, three sons and five daughters, at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Port-Toulouse.  Charlot died at Port-Toulouse in c1726, in his late 30s.  Two of his daughters married into the Richard and Bourg families at Port-Toulouse.  One of them--Anne, widow of Charles Bourg, and six of her children--emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65.  All three of Charlot's sons created their own families in the French Maritimes. 

Oldest son Charles, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1714, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Fougère and Marie Bourg, at Port-Toulouse in c1740 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1747, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles, fils three children, a son and two daughters.  Charles, fils died before October 1760 either on the island or in exile.  One of his daughters married into the Clergé family and settled at Chezzetcook, near Halifax, Nova Scotia, in the late 1760s. 

Charlot's second son Joseph, born at Port-Toulouse in c1717, a navigator like his father, married Marie-Rosalie, called Rosalie or Rose, daughter of Charles Arseneau and Cécile Breau of Malpèque at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in May 1743 and likely remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1774, Rose gave Joseph nine children, four sons and five daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Joseph, Rose, and six of their children at Malpèque on the island's northwest coast, next to Rose's parents and younger siblings.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After escaping the British again at Restigouche, they settled at Carleton in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province.  Two of Joseph's daugthers married into the LeBlanc family at Carleton.  Two of his four sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably on Île St.-Jean in c1744, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Madeleine Girouard, in c1760 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1777 and 1786, Marguerite gave Joseph, fils five children, two sons and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Joseph, père's fourth son François, born perhaps in Gaspésie in c1764, married Charlotte, daughter of Charles Bernard and Élisabeth LeBlanc, at Carleton in May 1787.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1788 and 1818, Charlotte gave François a dozen children, six sons and six daughters, at Carleton. 

Charlot's third and youngest son Pierre, born at Port-Toulouse in c1722, according to Stephen White, married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vécot and Marie Chiasson, in c1749.  Bona Arsenault says the Pierre who married Cécile Vécot was sans doute a son of Charlot's youngest brother François dit Manne and that between 1749 and 1760, Cécile gave Pierre six children, four sons and two daughters.  A French official counted Pierre, Cécile, and two of their children--Marie-Josèphe, age 19 months; and Félix, age 2 months--at Tracadie on the north shore of Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  Both White and Arsenault agree that Pierre, whoever his father may have been, remarried to Madeleine Bourg, though Arsenault calls her Marie-Madeleine.  Arsenault says the remarriage was in c1762, but White says it was in c1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  Neither Arsenault nor White reveal the fate of Pierre and his family when the British struck in 1758.  One wonders if Pierre's son Félix by first wife Cécile was still alive then.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., in his study of the Acadians in France, notes that second wife Madeleine gave Pierre two sons, Jean and Louis, and that Jean was "born about 1759 in the Parish of Saint-Pierre of Chiboutou[sic] in Acadie," which may have been Chebouctou, the original name for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Arsenault gives the couple a daughter, Céleste, in c1760.  Arsenault says Pierre and his family were counted on Île Miquelon in c1765.  White says Pierre à Charlot was on the island in 1767 and died in Très-Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, in September 1771, in his late 40s.  Arsenault places Pierre à François in France in c1772 but says nothing of his death.  Pulling this and other data together, the likely scenario for the family is this:  They escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean in 1758 but were captured soon afterwards and held at Halifax until the war with Britain ended in 1763.  Pierre's oldest son Félix may not have survived imprisonment.  From Halifax, probably in 1764, Pierre and his famliy--Madeleine, daughter Marie-Josèphe, and sons Jean and Louis--followed other Acadian refugees to Île Miquelon to work in the fishery there.  While living on the island, Madeleine gave Pierre another daughter, Célestine-Sibilias, in c1765, though Arsenault insists daughter Céleste, as he calls her, was born in c1760.  Later in the decade, overcrowding on the island compelled Pierre and other Acadians to try their luck in France.  Pierre died at Cherbourg in 1771.  In early 1773, Madeleine, still at Cherbourg, took her children to Poitou, where Pierre's daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Delaune family.  In October 1775, Madeleine, her three Boudrot children, and stepdaughter Marie-Josèphe and her family retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Marie-Josèphe and her husband, with her half-sister Célestine, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, and Célestine married into the Guidry and Augeron families there.  According to Robichaux, both of Pierre's remaining sons by second wife Madeleine created their own families in France, but neither of the sons went to Louisiana.  Arsenault would have us believe that two of Pierre's sons by first wife Cécile--Félix, born in c1752 (the one counted with Pierre and his first wife at Tracadie); and Jean, born in c1757--went to Louisiana in 1785 and married into the Hébert and LeBlanc families on Bayou Lafourche, but Louisiana records say otherwise:  none of the Félix and Jean Boudrots who went to the Spanish colony had a father named Pierre. 

Oldest son Félix, by first wife Cécile Vécot, born at Tracadie, Île St.-Jean, in c1752, may have died on Île St.-Jean before 1758 or in Nova Scotia, on Île Miquelon, or in France during exile. 

Pierre's second son Jean, by second wife Madeleine Bourg, born perhaps at Halifax in c1759, followed his parents to Île Miquelon and Cherbourg and his widowerd mother to Poitou and Nantes, where he married Anne-Léonore, daughter of Jean Granger and Madeleine Melanson of Grand-Pré, in St.-Pierre-de-Réze Parish, Nantes, in November 1785.  They did not go to Louisiana.  

Pierre's third and youngest son Louis, by second wife Madeleine Bourg, born perhaps at Halifax in c1760, followed his parents to Île Miquelon and Cherbourg and his widowed mother to Poitou and Nantes, where he worked as a seaman.  He married Perpétué, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Dugas and Marguerite Benoit, in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in November 1777.  In 1779 and 1780, at Nantes, Perpétué gave Louis two children, a son and a daughter.  The daughter, Marie-Adélaïde, was listed as an orphan in a census at Nantes in September 1784.  She emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 with her maternal grandfather Jean-Baptiste Dugas aboard the same ship on which two of her paternal aunts crossed.  She married into the Carret and Blanchard families on upper Bayou Lafourche.  The rest of her family, if they were alive, remained in France. 

Abraham's second son Michel dit Miquetau, born at Port-Royal in c1689, like his older brother a navigator and boat builder, married Anne, another daughter of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714.  They followed his older brother to Port-Toulouse.  Between 1714 and 1725, Anne gave Miquetau seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Miqutau remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Broussard and Marguerite Bourg, at Port-Toulouse in c1727.  She evidently gave him no more children.  He died between November 1732 and May 1733, in his early 40s.  One of his daughters married into the Pothier family on Île St.-Jean.  According to Bona Arsenault, another daughter married into the Richard family.  All four of Miquetau's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Michel dit Miquetau, fils, born in c1717, married Anne dite Jeanne, daughter of Jean Fougère and Marie Bourg, in c1749 in the French Maritimes and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1753, Jeanne gave Miquetau, fils three children, a son and two daughters.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758. 

Miquetau, père's second son Joseph dit Castor, born on Île Royale in c1721, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Chiasson and Marie-Josèphe Arseneau, in c1749 on one of the Maritime islands.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1770, Marguerite gave Castor a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  They settled at Étang-des-Berges on the north coast of Île St.-Jean, where a French official counted with them with a 2-year-old daughter in August 1752.  Arsenault says Joseph dit Castor and his family were still living on Île St.-Jean in 1761, so they evidently had escaped the British roundup on the island in 1758.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they moved on to Chédabouctou on the upper Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, where they were counted in 1764.  That same year, they moved on to Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, but they did not remain there.  They joined other Acadians on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Joseph dit Castor died there in August 1808, in his late 80s.  Five of his six sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Michel le jeune, born in c1758, married cousin Modeste Boudreau probably in the Madeleines in c1782.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1783 and 1802, Modeste gave Michel seven children, five sons and two daughters.  Four of their five sons created their own families.

Oldest son Charles, born probably in the Madeleines in c1785, married Marie, daughter of Jean Richard and Charlotte Vigneau, probably in the Madeleines in September 1810.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1811 and 1822, Marie gave Charles eight children, five sons and three daughters. 

Michel le jeune's second son Placide, born probably in the Madeleines in c1792, married Victoire, daughter of Louis Terrieau and Anastasie Cormier, probably in the Madeleines in October 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1815 and 1821, Victoire gave Placide four daughters. 

Michel le jeune's third son Joseph le jeune, born probably in the Madeleines in c1794, married Hélène, daughter of Mélème Cyr and Marguerite Briand, probably in the Madeleines in August 1814, and remarried to Margaret, daughter of Morgan Doyle and Anne Power, probably in the Madeleines in July 1819. 

Michel le jeune's fourth son Michel-Firmin, called Firmin, born probably in the Madeleines in c1796, married Pélagie, daughter of Hyppolite Cormier and Anne Gaudet, probably in the Madeleines in September 1820.  According to Bona Arsenault, Pélagie gave Firmin a daughter in 1821. 

Joseph dit Castor's third son François, born in c1762, married cousin Marie Boudrot probably in the Madeleines in c1782.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1782 and 1793, Marie gave François six children, three sons and three daughters.  Their sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Lazare, born probably in the Madeleines in c1788, married Rose, daughter of Jacques Vigneau and Anastasie Cyr, probably in the Madeleines in November 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1811 and 1821, Rose gave Lazare five children, two sons and three daughters. 

François's second son Joseph le jeune, born probably in the Madeleines in c1790, married Anne, daughter of Jean Terriot and Anne Richard, probably in the Madeleines in September 1810.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Joseph  three children, two sons and a daughter.

François's third and youngest son Joachim, born probably in the Madeleines in c1793, married Mélanie, daughter of Hyppolite Cormier and Anne Gaudet, probably in the Madeleines in August 1817.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1818 and 1820, Mélanie gave Joachim two daughters. 

Joseph dit Castor's fourth son Firmin, born in c1763, married another cousin Marie Boudrot probably in the Madeleines in c1786.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1787 and 1788, Marie gave Firmin two sons, one of whom created his own family. 

Younger son Joseph le jeune, born probably in the Madeleines in c1788, married Marguerite Landry probably in the Madeleines in c1796.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1796 and 1801, Marguerite gave Joseph three children, two sons and a daughter. 

Joseph dit Castor's fifth son Jean, born in c1768, married Victoria Terriot probably in the Madeleines in c1791.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1810, Victoria Jean 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Two of their sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean-Léandre, called Léandre, born probably in the Madeleines in c1792, married cousin Julienne, daughter of Antoine Arsenault and Louise Boudrot, probably in the Madeleines in October 1816.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1818 and 1820, Julienne gave Léandre two sons. 

Jean's second son Damas, born probably in the Madeleines in c1793, married cousin Marie, daughter of Marie, another daughter of Antoine Arsenault and Louise Boudrot, in October 1822.

Joseph dit Castor's sixth and youngest son Joseph, fils, born in c1770, married Marie, daughter of Paul Gaudet and Marie Gautrot, probably in the Madeleines in October 1794.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1795 and 1814, Marie gave Joseph, fils nine children, two sons and seven daughters. 

Miquetau, père's third son Jean dit Miquetau, born at Port-Toulouse in c1723, married Françoise, daughter of Abraham Arseneau and Jeanne Gaudet, at Beaubassin in February 1746 but returned to Port-Toulouse in 1750 to engage in the wood-carrying trade to Louisbourg.  In February 1752, a French official counted Jean, Françoise, and three of their children at Port-Toulouse.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1747 and 1771, Françoise gave Jean a dozen children, at least five sons and six daughters.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  One of their daughters was baptized at Restigouche in July 1760.  One wonders if the British captured them that summer and held them as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they moved on to Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  The British may have deported them to La Rochelle, France, in 1778 during the American Revolution.  If so, they refused to remain in the mother country.  They returned to North America and settled at Cascapédia, today's New Richmond, in Gaspésie, present-day Québec Province.  Jean dit Miquetau died at Cascapédia in August 1798, age 75.  Four of his daughters married into the Poirier, Bourgeois, Cyr, and Caissie families on Miquelon, at La Rochelle, and in Gaspésie.  Two of his sons created their own families. 

Second son Jean, fils, born at Port-Toulouse in c1750, married Louise, daughter of Paul Cyr and Marie-Josèphe Richard, on Île Miquelon in May 1774.  He died on the island before 1776, so his family line probably died with him. 

Jean dit Miquetau's fourth son Joseph, born in c1768, settled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

Miquetau, père's fourth and youngest son Charles dit Madousse, born at Port-Toulouse in c1724, married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Fougère, at Port-Toulouse in c1754 and likely remained there.  One wonder what happened to them after 1758. 

Abraham's third and youngest son François dit Manne, born at Port-Royal in c1692, married Jeanne, yet another daughter of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in January 1717 and moved on to the French Maritimes in the 1720s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1717 and 1744, Jeanne gave François 15 children, five sons and 10 daughters, including a set of twins.  François and his growing family were counted at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on Île St.-Jean in 1727 and at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale in 1739.  Five of François's daugthers married into the Haché dit Gallant, Arsenault, and Doucet families.  At least one of François dit Manne's sons created his own family.

Oldest son Pierre, twin of his brother Basile, born at Annapolis Royal in c1722, according to Bona Arsenault, followed his family to the French Maritimes and married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vécot and Marie Chiasson of Île St.-Jean, probably on the island in c1748.  However, according to genealogist Stephen White, it was Pierre, third and youngest son of Charles dit Charlot, François dit Manne's oldest brother, who married Cécile Vécot.  According to Arsenault, between 1749 and 1752, Cécile gave François dit Manne's Pierre three children, a daughter and two sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Pierre, Cécile, and two of their children, the daughter and the younger son, at Tracadie on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  Both White and Arsenault agree that the Pierre who married Cécile Vécot remarried to Marie-Madeleine or Madeleine Bourg.  Arsenault says they married in c1762, but White says it was in c1758.  Arsenault says, in 1759 and 1760, during exile, that Marie-Madeleine gave Pierre three more children, two sons and a daughter.  Both genealogists agree that Pierre and his family settled on Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where, Arsenault says, they were counted in c1765.  White says Pierre à Charlot and second wife Madeleine Bourg were counted on Île Miquelon in 1767 and that he died at Cherbourg, France, in September 1771, in his late 40s.  Arsenault places Pierre in France in c1772 but says nothing of his death there. 

Michel's fourth son Michel, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1659, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Thomas Cormier and Marie-Madeleine Girouard, probably at Chignecto in c1690.  Between 1691 and the early 1700s, Marie gave Michel, fils seven children, four sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  Michel, fils died at Chignecto between 1707 and February 1714, in his late 40 or early 50s.  His daughters married into the Lambert, LeBlanc, and Chiasson families. 

Oldest son Michel-Joseph, born at Port-Royal in c1693, married Anne, daughter of Jean Caissie and Anne Bourgeois, at Beaubassin in February 1718 and died there the following May, evidently before he could father any children. 

Michel, fils's second son Anselme, born in 1700 or 1701 probably at Port-Royal, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Gaudet and Marguerite Blou, in c1725 probably at Chignecto and likely settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1747, Marguerite gave Anselme seven children, five sons and two daughters.  Anselme died probably at Chignecto before February 1765.  Four of his five sons created their own families.

Oldest son François, born probably at Chignecto in c1728, married Marie, daughter of Michel Bourgeois and Marguerite Girouard, at Beaubassin in February 1748.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Anselme's second son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1739, escaped the British in 1755, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, and escaped the British again at Restigouche in the summer of 1760.  He married cousin Jeanne-Marie, daughter of Jacques Haché dit Gallant and Marie-Josèphe dite Josette Boudrot of Île St.-Jean, at Restigouche in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1780, Jeanne-Marie gave Joseph five children, four sons and a daughter.  After the war with Britain ended, they settled at nearby Miscou, where they were counted in 1778, and were among the pioneers settlers at Petit-Rocher, present-day New Brunswick, on the south shore of the Baie des Chaleurs west of Miscou. 

Anselme's fourth son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in c1743, escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge in Canada.  He married Marie-Ursule, daughter of Étienne Allaire and Josèphe Arniel-Lusignan, at St.-Ours on lower Rivière Richelieu in February 1765. 

Anselme's fifth and youngest son Étienne, born probably at Chignecto in c1747, also found refuge in Canada.  He married cousin Marie, daughter of Pierre Boudreau and Marie Richard, at St.-Philippe-de-Leprairie, in the interior south of Montréal, in June 1771.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1772 and 1774, Marie gave Étienne two sons at St.-Philippe, where the family remained. 

Michel, fils's third son Claude le jeune, born in c1703, moved to the French Maritimes in the early 1720s and married Marie-Judith, called Judith, daughter of Jean Belliveau and Cécile Melanson of Chignecto, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1724.  They moved on to the north shore of Île St.-Jean in 1732 and were still there in 1743.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1743, Judith gave Claude le jeune nine children, three sons and six daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Claude le jeune, Judith, and six of their children at Tracadie on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  They may have escaped the British in 1758, found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British in the early 1760s, held as prisoners at Fort Cumberland, formerly French Fort Beauséjour, in Nova Scotia, until 1764, and chose to go to Île Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coat of Newfoundland.  Claude le jeune died before October 1765, when his family was counted on Miquelon.  His widow Judith died on the island in December 1774.  His daughters married into the Haché dit Gallant, Boudrot, Arseneau, Chiasson, Cyr, and Hébert families on Île St.-Jean, in France, and on Île Miquelon.  All three of his sons created their own families.  None emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son André-Claude dit Le Petit Claude, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in September 1732, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Osselet or Ozelet and Jeanne Moyse of Tatamagouche, in c1760 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1771, Madeleine gave Petit Claude four children, all daughters.  They were at Fort Cumberland in 1764 and followed his family to Île Miquelon, where they were counted in 1765, 1776, and 1778.  The British captured the island during the American Revolution and deported them and dozens of other island Acadians to La Rochelle, France, in 1778.  Wife Madeleine died in St.-Nicolas Parish, La Rochelle, in June 1779.  Daughter Marie married into the Vigneau family in St.-Jean's Parish, La Rochelle, in January 1783.  Petit Claude took two of his daughters, Anne and Geneviève, back to Île Miquelon in 1784.  One wonders if daughter Marie and her husband went with them.  Louisiana records show that they did not emigrate to Louisiana from France. 

Claude le jeune's second son Michel, born probably at Tracadie, Île St.-Jean, in c1733, married Angélique, daughter of Claude Poirier and Marguerite Cyr, at Pointe-Beauséjour, Chignecto, in December 1764, followed his family to Île Miquelon after the British released them, and sanctified their marriage on the island in October 1765.  Perhaps to escape overcrowding on the island, they moved to France in 1766 and settled at Nantes, where Angélique died soon after their arrival.  Later in the decade, Michel joined other Acadians on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  He was counted at Runello, in the forest near Bangor, in 1768.  He remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Charles Granger and Françoise LeBlanc, at Bangor on the island in January 1769.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1779, Marie-Anne gave Michel four children, a son and three daughters.  The family was counted at Coquet on the island in 1773.  They did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785.  They were counted at Kernest on the island in 1791, in the early years of the French Revolution.  Michel died probably on the island in 1811, in his late 70s.  Two of his daughters married into the Granger and Labado families on Belle-Île in 1795 and 1801. 

Claude le jeune's third and youngest son Pierre dit Chaculot, born probably at Tracadie, Île St.-Jean, in c1743, followed his family into exile, into imprisonment in Nova Scotia, and to freedom on Île Miquelon.  Still a bachelor, he, too, was deported by the British to La Rochelle in 1778.  Like older brother Petit Claude, he refused to remain in the mother country.  He returned to Île Miquelon in 1783, but he did not remain there either.  He moved on to the ïles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and married Rose Gautreau, widow of Paul Gaudet, in July 1799. 

Michel, fils's fourth and youngest son Paul, born in early 1700s, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Isabelle Landry, in c1731 perhaps at Chignecto, where they may have remained.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1747, Marie gave Paul seven children, five sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Doucet family.  One wonders what happened to Paul and Marie after 1755. 

Michel's fifth son Olivier, born at Port-Royal in c1661, married Isabelle, daughter of Claude Petitpas and Catherine Bugaret, in c1686 probably at Port-Royal and remained there.  In c1687, Isabelle gave Olivier a son, Jean-Baptiste, who survived childhood but probably did not marry, so this line of the family likely died with him. 

Michel's sixth son Claude, born at Port-Royal in c1663, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot, perhaps at Port-Royal in c1682 and moved to Minas, where they settled on Rivière-des-Habitants.  Between 1683 and 1698, Anne-Marie gave Claude eight children, three sons and five daughters.  Claude remarried to Catherine, daughter of Jean Meunier and Marguerite Housseau, in c1700 perhaps at Minas.  From the early 1700s to 1725, Catherine gave Claude 13 more children, six sons and seven daughters.  Claude remarried again--his third marriage--to Madeleine, daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie and widow of Bernard Doucet dit Laverdure and François Leclerc dit Laverdure, at Annapolis Royal in August 1735.  She gave him no more children.  Claude, who fathered 21 children by his first two wives, died at Minas in March 1740, in his late 70s.  His daughters by both wives married into the Hébert, Aucoin, LeBlanc, Daigre, and Doiron families, including three sets of brothers.  All eight of his sons by his first two wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Claude, fils, by first wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born at Port-Royal in c1683, married Catherine, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Anne Doucet and the sister of three of his sister's husbands, probably at Minas in c1706 and settled on Rivière-des-Habitants.  Between 1708 and 1734, Catherine gave Claude, fils 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Dugas, Thériot, Landry, LeBlanc, and Clouâtre families, and one of them, Élisabeth, wife of Étienne LeBlanc, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  Five of Claude, fils's six sons created their own families in Nova Scotia and Canada. 

Oldest son Claude III, born at Minas in December 1708, married Judith, daughter of Claude Landry and Madeleine Doucet, at Grand-Pré in December 1747 in his late 30s and likely settled there.  The British deported them to Massachusetts in 1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1757 and 1760, Judith gave Claude III three children, a son and two daughters.  After the war with Britain, the family settled on Baie Ste.-Marie on the western coast of British Nova Scotia with other Acadian exiles.  One of Claude III's daughters married into the Thibault family. 

Claude, fils's second son Joseph, born at Minas in December 1718, married Hélène, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Comeau, at Grand-Pré in September 1743 and likely settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1745 and 1747, Hélène gave Joseph two daughters.  Stephen White says Joseph died before April 1769.  One wonders what happened to Joseph's daughters. 

Claude, fils's third son Pierre, born at Minas in November 1723, married Marie, daughter of Germain Richard and Marguerite Daigre, in c1749 probably at Minas and likely remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1751 and 1754, Marie gave Pierre two children, a daughter and a son.  Arsenault says Pierre died in c1754, but genealogist Stephen White says he died between February 1765 and October 1766.  Arsenault says members of the family settled at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie, Canada, in 1771.  Pierre's daughter married a Boudrot cousin at St.-Philippe. 

Claude, fils's fourth son Jean, born at Minas in June 1725, never married.  According to Bona Arsenault, he settled at St.-Philippe-de-La-Prairie, Canada, in June 1771, probably with older brother Pierre.  He died at L'Acadie, today's St.-Jean-sur-Richelieu, east of Montréal, in May 1796, age 70. 

Claude, fils's fifth son Olivier, born probably at Minas in c1730, married Ludivine Landry probably at Minas in c1754, and remarried to Euphémie-Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Breau and Marie-Blanche Boudrot, in c1779 perhaps at Memramcook, present-day southeastern New Brunswick, where he died after October 1786

Claude, fils's sixth and youngest son Charles, born at Minas in June 1734, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, in c1753 probably at Minas, and remarried to Marie-Louise, daughter of Canadians Laurent Perrault and Louis Boileau, at St.-Luc above Québec in November 1802, in his late 60s.  

Claude, père's second son Michel le jeune, by first wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born in c1685, married Cécile, daughter of Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine Hébert, in c1708 probably at Minas and also settled on Rivière-des-Habitants.  Between 1709 and 1728, Cécile gave Michel le jeune 11 children, seven sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  At age 47, Michel le jeune remarried to Anne, daughter of Jean Préjean and Andrée Savoie and widow of François Pitre dit Nordest at Annapolis Royal in April 1732.  She gave him no more children.  His daughters married into the Daigre, Préjean, Pellerin, and Dupuis families. 

Oldest son François dit Lami, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born at Minas in August 1710, married Marguerite, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, in c1731 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1754, Marguerite gave Lami nine children, three sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Arsenault insists that the British deported the family to New York in 1755.  According to Stephen White, François dit Lami died at Québec in late November 1757, age 47, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees there that fall and winter.  One thing is certain--he did not go to New York.  Arsenault says Marguerite remarried at Nicolet across from Trois-Rivières, Canada, in January 1768.   One suspects that she and her Boudrot children had been in Canada all along.  Five of François's daughters married into the Vallée, Ricard, Desfossés, Provencher dit Villebrun, and Beaulaurier families at Nicolet and Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pérade between Québec and Trois-Rivières.  All three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles, born probably at Minas in c1735, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, in c1756 during exile, though Arsenault also says Charles, fils, sixth and youngest son of Michel le jeune's older brother Charles, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Clouâtre, in c1753.  Arsenault insists that between 1757 and 1770, Madeleine gave this Charles seven children, four sons and three daughters, that they settled at Trois-Rivières in 1767 and at L'Acadie on Rivière Richelieu southeast of Montréal in 1768.  Arsenault says two of their daughters married into the Labrecque and Cyr families at L'Acadie, and that three of Charles's four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Mathurin, born in exile in c1757, married Marie, daughter of Michel Lanoue and Madeleine Brun, at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie in the interior southeast of Montréal in July 1780.

Charles's third son Joseph, born in c1764, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Lanoue and Marie-Josèphe Brun, at St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie in January 1784. 

Charles's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born in c1766, married Marguerite, daughter of François Boissonneau and Josephte Lefebvre, at nearby L'Acadie in February 1803. 

François dit Lami's second son Athanase, born probably at Minas in c1736, married Félicité, daughter of Charles Orillon and Anne Richard of Annapolis Royal, in c1760 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1771, Félicité gave Athanase six children, two sons and four daughters.  They were counted at Deschambault between Québec and Trois-Rivières in 1761, Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pérade farther upriver in 1763, Nicolet in 1765, nearby Baie-du-Fèbvre in 1771, Nicolet again in 1778, and moved on to Petit-Rocher on the south shore of the Baie des Chaleurs near today's Bathurst in northeastern New Brunwick.

François dit Lami's third and youngest son Osias, born probably at Minas in c1743, married Marie-Anne, another daughter of Charles Orillon and Anne Richard, at Nicolet in November 1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1766 and 1789, Marie-Anne gave Osias eight children, four sons and four daughters, at Nicolet.  His daughters married into the Poirier, Simonneau, Bourg, and Villate dit Beausoleil families at Nicolet.  All four of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son François, born probably at Nicolet in c1768, married Élizabeth, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Foucault-Lemire and Angélique Loisseau, at Nicolet in June 1793.

Osias's second son Joseph, born probably at Nicolet in c1770, married Marguerite, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Foucault-Lemire and Angélique Loisseau, at Nicolet in August 1796. 

Osias's third son Louis, born probably at Nicolet in c1776, married Marie Deshaies at Nicolet in July 1800.

Osias's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Nicolet in c1780, married Marguerite Bourg at Nicolet in January 1801. 

Michel le jeune's second son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born probably at Minas in c1715, married Agnès, another daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, in c1738 probably at Minas and settled at Rivière-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1745, Agnès gave Jean-Baptiste three children, two sons and two daughters.  The family evidently escaped the British in 1755.  While in exile or after Le Grand Dérangement, Jean-Baptiste took his family to Baie-St.-Paul on the lower St. Lawrence.  One of his daughters married into the Guérin family at St.-Joachim above Baie-St.-Paul.  One of his two sons created his own family.

Second son François, born probably at Minas in c1744, married Marie-Sophie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Martel and Marie-Clotilde Desbiens, at Baie-St.-Paul in July 1769. 

Michel le jeune's third son Michel, fils, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born probably at Minas in c1716, married, according to Stephen White, Claire, daughter of Jean Comeau le jeune and Catherine Babin, in c1742 probably at Minas.  Between 1742 and 1748, Claire gave Michel, fils at least three children, two sons and a daughter.  The family was deported to Virginia in 1755 and sent on to England in 1756.  Michel, fils and Claire died there.  In late May 1763, as part of the repatriation of the Acadians in England to France, sons Joseph and Michel and daugther Marguerite took the ship Dorothée to St.-Malo settled at nearby St.-Servan.  One wonders what became of Marguerite.  Only one of Michel, fils's two sons seems to have created his own family. 

Older son Joseph, born at Minas in c1742 or 1744, followed his parents to Virginia and England and his siblings to St.-Malo.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Richard dit Sapin and Cécile Gautrot, at St.-Servan in June 1763, soon after their arrival from England, so they may have known one another in England and perhaps at Minas.  Between 1764 and 1773, at St.-Servan and nearby Plouër, Marguerite gave Joseph seven children, at least four sons and two daughters, only three of whom, the oldest daughter and two sons, survived childhood.  Joseph took his family to Poitou in 1773.  Marguerite gave him another daughter there in 1774.  In November 1775, they retreated with 900 other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Between 1776 and 1782, Marguerite gave Joseph four more children at Chantenay near Nantes, two sons and two daughers, but only one of the sons and one of the daughters survived childhood.  They also buried their daughter who had been born in Poitou.  In 1785, Joseph, Marguerite, and their remaining four children, two sons and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  Marguerite was pregnant on the voyage, and another son was born to them probably at New Orleans.  They moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph's daughters married into the Crochet and Dagbert families in Louisiana.  Two of his three sons married into the LeBlanc, Bertrand, and Dugas families, and two of them created substantial lines on the Lafourche. 

Michel, fils's younger son Michel III, born at Minas in c1748, followed his family to Virginia and England and his siblings to St.-Malo aboard La Dorothée.  In March 1767, now age 18, he "went to England," which means he likely joined other Acadian exiles in the British-controlled Channel Islands who were making their way back to North America.  One wonders what happened to him there. 

Michel le jeune's fourth son René, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born at Minas in 1717, married Judith, yet another daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, in c1745 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in c1753 Judith gave René a son, Pierre.  Stephen White says René died between 1756 and 1757.  Arsenault says René died in c1758 and that Judith remarried at St.-Joachim below Québec in November 1760, during exile.  René's son created his own family.

Only son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1753, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Tremblay and Marie-Josèphe Dufour, on Île-aux-Coudres in the lower St. Lawrence in July 1774. 

Michel le jeune's fifth son Pierre, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born at Minas in December 1720, married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Dupuis and Marie-Josèphe Dugas, in c1750 probably at Minas.  Stephen White says Pierre died before August 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, Pierre, son of Michel le jeune, first married Marie, daughter of Joseph Préjean and Marie-Louise Comeau of Chepoudy in c1743; she gave him a son, Augustin, in c1745; and then he remarried to Marguerite Dupuis in c1750.  Arsenault says Pierre died in either Maryland or Connecticut in c1760; that his son Augustin accompanied his maternal uncle, Amand Préjean, to Louisiana; and that Pierre's second wife Marguerite was counted in Connecticut in 1763 with five unnamed children.  Louisiana records show no Augustin, son of Pierre Boudrot and Marie Dupuis, in Louisiana.  One wonders what were the names of Pierre's other children. 

Michel le jeune's sixth son Honoré, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born at Minas in January 1724, married in c1753 a woman whose name has been lost to history.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Michel le jeune's seventh and youngest son Olivier, by first wife Cécile LeBlanc, born at Minas in May 1728, married, according to Stephen White, Anne-Marie, another daughter of Antoine Dupuis and Marie-Josèphe Dugas, in c1752 probably at Minas.  They escaped the British in 1755, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, eluded another round up at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs in the summer of 1760, and either were captured by, or surrendered to, the British soon afterwards.  Olivier and his family of six were counted at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, in August 1762.  In 1764-65, now a widower, Olivier emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, with his 12-year-old son Simon and settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans on what became known as the Acadian Coast.  At age 39, Olivier remarried to Anne, daughter of Pierre Gaudet and Marie Belliveau and widow of Michel Dupuis, at Cabahannocer in October 1767.  She gave him no more children.  According to Bona Arsenault, Oliver, son of Michel, married Ludivine Landry before going to Louisiana, which seems to be confusing this Olivier with Olivier, son of Claude, fils, who did not go to Louisiana.  Records in the Spanish colony tend to support White's version.  Olivier died at Cabahannocer in November 1782, age 54.  His only surviving son Simon married into the Dupuis family and created a substantial family line on the prairies.

Claude, père's third son Joseph, by first wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born in c1687, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Comeau le jeune and Catherine Babin, at Grand-Pré in July 1712 and settled on Rivière-des-Habitants and Rivière-aux-Canards.  Between 1714 and the 1730s, at Minas, Françoise gave Joseph 14 children, seven sons and seven daughters, including a set of twins.  Members of the family was deported from Village des Comeau at Minas to Virginia in 1755 and sent on to England in 1756.  Joseph died in England before the repatriation of May 1763.  Wife Françoise accompanied her twin sons to St.-Malo aboard the ship La Dorothée late that May and died at Hotel-Dieu, St.-Malo, the following July, in her early 70s.  Three of their daughters married into the Saulnier and Dupuis families.  Four of Joseph's seven sons created their own families, but only one, if any, of their lines survived. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Minas in the 1710s, married in c1749 a woman whose name had been lost to history.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Joseph, père's second son Antoine, born probably at Minas in the 1720s, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Anne Thériot, in c1750.  They evidently eluded the British in 1755 and, either during exile or after Le Grand Dérangement, found refuge in Canada.  One wonders if Marie-Josèphe gave him any children, or if any of the ones she may have given him survived the rigors of exile.  Antoine, perhaps in his 70s, remarried to Françoise, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Françoise Landry and widow of Louis-Sylvain Dupuis, at L'Acadie in the interior east of Montréal in September 1801. 

Joseph, père's third son Jean-Baptiste, a twin, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1732, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France.  He, his widowed mother, his twin brother, and his brother's wife, arrived at St.-Malo from England aboard the ship Dorothée in late May 1763.  After his mother's death at St.-Malo, he settled at St.-Servan and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Daigre and Marguerite Granger, at nearby Plouër in March 1764.  Between 1764 and 1773, at Plouër and St.-Servan, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean-Baptiste five children, two sons and three daughters, three of whom, a son and two daughters, died in childhood.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s, and Marie-Josèphe gave him another son there in May 1775.  The following March, they followed other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where, between 1777 and 1782, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean-Baptiste four more sons, all of whom died in childhood.  They also buried the son who had been born to them in Poitou, leaving only two children, daughter Marie-Rose and son Jean-François, of the 10 they had been given.  Jean-Baptiste died in St.-Nicolas Parish, Nantes, in November 1783, age 51.  His two remaining children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 with their widowed mother, who remarried to a Thériot widower soon after their arrival.  Marie-Josèphe died on upper Bayou Lafourche by June 1790, when her second husband remarried again; she would have been in her mid- or late 40s at the time of her passing.  Daughter Marie-Rose married into the Bourg family in the Spanish colony and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but her father's line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Only surviving son Jean-François, born at St.-Servan, France, in September 1773, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and his sister and widowed mother to Louisiana.  He lived with his mother and stepfather on upper Bayou Lafourche and remained there after he came of age.  In January 1798, at age 24, he was living alone on his six-arpent lot fronting the bayou.  He never married. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Pierre, his brother Jean-Baptiste's twin, married Marie Thériot in c1755 probably at Minas on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  They were deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, repatriated to France in the spring of 1763, and went to St.-Malo with his widowed mother and twin brother.  Pierre, likely a widower now, followed his older brother Joseph to Poitou and died at Châtellerault there in February 1776, age 44.  His family line evidently died with him. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Abraham, born probably at Minas , as well as his sixth and seventh sons, their names lost to history, evidently died young. 

Claude, père's fourth son Étienne, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born at Minas in November 1725, married Marie-Claire, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Catherine Thériot of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Grand-Pré in November 1725 and likely remained at Minas.  From 1730 to 1742, Marie-Claire gave Étienne at least three sons at Minas.  The British evidently deported the family to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and Étienne, and perhaps Marie-Claire as well, died there before May 1763, when the the Acadians in England were repatriated to France.  Three of their sons, still bachelors, arrived at St.-Malo aboard the ship Dorothée in May 1763.  Two of these sons created their own families in France. 

Oldest son Marin, born at Minas in c1732, followed his family to Virginia and England and his younger brothers Charles and Étienne, fils to St.-Malo aboard La Dorothée.  He settled at nearby Pleudihen and married Pélagie, daughter of Pierre Barrieau and Véronique Girouard, there in May 1765.  Between 1767 and 1772, at Pleudihen, Pélagie gave Marin four children, three sons and a daughter, but their daughter died an infant.  Marin took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s.  Pélagie gave him another son there, and they buried two others.  In December 1775, Marin, Pélagie, and their remaining sons retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Pélagie gave Marin four more children at Nantes, two sons and two daughters, but only the youngest daughter survived.  They also buried the son who had been born in Poitou.  Marin, Pélagie, and their remaining two children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Marin died at Ascension on the river above New Orleans in October 1786, age 54.  His daughter Marie-Anne married into the Pitre family in the Spanish colony.  Hs only surviving son Étienne le jeune married into the Doiron family and created an impressive family line on Bayou Lafourche. 

Étienne's second son Charles, born at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Virginia and England and his brothers Marin and Étienne, fils to St.-Malo aboard La Dorothée.  Charles lived at nearby Pleudihen from 1763 to 1767 and moved on to Nantes, on the other side of Brittany, where he died in July 1767, age 30, before he could marry. 

Étienne's third and youngest son Étienne, fils, born at Minas in c1742, followed his family to Virginia and England and his brothers Marin and Charles to St.-Malo, where Étienne, fils worked as a seaman and a joiner.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Susanne Comeau, at Pleudihen in May 1764.  Between 1765 and 1771, at Pleudihen, Marguerite gave Étienne, fils four children, two sons and two daughters.  They went to Poitou in the early 1770s, and Marguerite gave him another son there in 1774.  They retreated to Nantes with other Poitou Acadians in December 1775, and Marguerite gave Étienne, fils four more children there, two sons and two daughters--nine children in all--but the older daughter died in childhood, and they buried their son who had been born in Poitou.  In 1785, Étienne and Marguerite, along with their seven children, emigrated to Louisiana and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Étienne, fils died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1825, age 84.  Two of his three daughters married into the Ayo, LeBlanc, and Boudreaux families on Bayou Lafourche.  All four of his sons married, into the Pitre, Barrieau, Hébert, and Caissie dit Roger families, and created their own families in the Spanish colony, but not all of the lines endured.  Two of the lines that did endure were substantial one. 

Claude, père's fifth son Paul dit Petit Paul, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born at Minas in October 1707, married Madeleine-Josèphe, called Josette, daughter of Charles Doiron and Françoise Gaudet, in c1730 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault (who says the Paul Boudrot who married Madeleine-Josèphe Doiron was a son of Charles, not Claude), between 1732 and 1748, Marie-Josèphe gave Paul six children, two sons and four daughters.  According to genealogist Albert J. Robichaux, Jr. in his study of the Acadians in France, between 1735 and 1754, Marie-Madeleine gave Paul seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Petit Paul took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Arsenault says oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe, born in c1732, who Robichaux does not mention, married into the Closquinet family at Port-La-Joye in January 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted Petit Paul, Madeleine-Josèphe, and five of their children--Marguerite; Françoise; Jean-Charles, called Charles; Anne; and Basile--at Rivières-des-Blonds in the island's interior near younger brother Pierre.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Petit Paul, age 51, and two of his youngest children--Basile, age 10; and Mathurin--did not survive the crossing.  Widow Marie-Madeleine died in a St.-Malo hospital in late November 1758, age 54, soon after reaching the port.  Youngest son Joseph died probably in the same hospital in late December, age 4.  Daughters Marguerite, Françoise-Marie, and Anne married into the Hébert, Landry, Closquient, Dugas, Haché dit Gallant, and Daigre families in France and Louisiana, and all three of them emigrated to the Spanish colony in 1785.  Petit Paul's only remaining son created his own family in France and Cayenne.

Oldest son Jean-Charles, called Charles, born at Minas in c1740, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, France.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Haché dit Gallant and Cécile Lavergne, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, in November 1763.  The following April, he, Marie-Josèphe, and other Acadian exiles took the ship Le Fort to French Guiane on the northern coast of South America.  Marie-Josèphe did not survive the venture, and she evidently gave Charles no children there.  At age 35 (the recording priest said 38), Charles remarried to Marie-Marguerite, daughter of François-Robert Du Mesnil and Thérèse Le Botte and widow of Sr. Regnauldin, at St. Joseph de Sinnamary, Guiane, in February 1775.  One wonders what became of him after his remarriage. 

Claude, père's sixth son François, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born at Minas in July 1709, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Marie Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in October 1730 and evidently moved on to Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1747, Anne-Marie gave François six children, four sons and two daughters.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and held them there with dozens of other Acadians until the French repatritated them to France in 1763.  François died probably in England before May 1763.  One wonders if wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau also died there.  A married son and three of their unmarried children--Anselme, age 25; François, fils, age 22; and Anne, age 16--took the ship L'Ambition from England to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763.  Daughter Anne married into the LeBlanc in France and emigrated to Louisiana.  At least three of François's sons created their own families at Minas and in France, but none of them emigrated to Louisiana.  A grandson, however, may have gone there.

Oldest son Jean-Zacharie, born probably at Minas in c1730, married Marguerite Hébert probably at Minas in c1754.  Either there or in exile, Marguerite gave Jean-Zacherie a son, Joseph, in c1755.  They, too, were deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in the spring of 1756, and held there until May 1763, when they took the ship L'Ambition to St.-Malo.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan, where Marguerite died in July 1764, age 26.  Jean-Zacharie died at St.-Servan in April 1765, age 35. 

Only son Joseph, born at either Minas or aboard ship in c1755, followed his family to Virginia in 1755, to England in the spring of 1756, and to France in May 1763.  After the death of his father in April 1765, Joseph, now age 10, went to live with Joseph Célestin dit Bellemère, husband of Marguerite Boudrot.  Joseph's stay with the family was brief.  Joseph Bellemère died at St.-Servan in August 1767, age 39, and Marguerite Boudrot followed her husband to the grave the following month, at age 30, leaving behind three young children.  Joseph was still only 12.  One wonders if he was the Joseph Boudrot who married Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of Germain Semer and Marie Trahan of Grand-Pré and Le Havre, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in May 1785.  If so, he emigrated to Louisiana later that year, though not on the same ship as his wife; between 1786 and 1790, she gave him three sons in the Spanish colony; and he died by August 1796, in his early 40s, when his wife remarried at Attakapas.  If this was him, two of his three sons, both born at Attakapas, married into the Savoie and Broussard families and created lasting lines on the prairies.   

François's third son François-Anselme, called Anselme, born probably at Minas in c1738, took the ship L'Ambition to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763.  He married Ursule, daughter of Jean Daigle and Anne Breau, at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, in January 1764.  They lived at Pleudihen in 1763-65 and at nearby St.-Servan from 1765 to 1772.  Between 1764 and 1768, at Pleudihen and St.-Servan, Ursule gave Anselme four children, three sons and a daughter.  One wonders what happened to the family after 1772.  They did not go to Louisiana in 1785. 

François's fourth and youngest son Joseph-François, called François, fils, born probably at Minas in c1742, followed his older brothers to St.-Malo aboard L'Ambition in May 1763.  François, fils married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Landry and Marie Comeau, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in 1765.  He worked as a sailor.  Marguerite died at St.-Servan in January 1767, age 26, perhaps from the rigors of childbirth.  François, fils remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of Pierre Barrieau and Véronique Giroir, at nearby Pleudihen in April 1768.  Between 1769 and 1773, at St.-Servan, Euphrosine gave François, fils four sons, the oldest of whom did not survive childhood.  François, fils took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s, and Euphrosine gave him another son there in 1775.  In November of that year, François, fils, Euphrosine, and their four sons retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to Nantes, where the couple buried two more of their sons in 1777 and 1780.  François, fils also died there before June 1784, when Euphrosine remarried to widower Charles Broussard at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay.  In 1785, she and her older remaining Boudrot son followed her second husband and his five sons to Louisiana.  Euphrosine's son created his own family in the Spanish colony.  One wonders if Jean-Louis, her younger remaining Boudrot son, who would have been only age 12 in 1785, died at Nantes or Chantenay before the family sailed to Louisiana. 

Third son Paul-Marie, born at St.-Servan, France, in October 1771, followed his parents to Poitou and Nantes and his mother and stepfather to Louisiana.  He settled with them at Manchac on the Mississippi above New Orleans before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Élisabeth- or Isabelle-Modeste, daughter of Charles Pitre and Anne Henry of St.-Malo, at Assumption in September 1794.  He died a widower in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1846, age 75.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Naquin, and Thibodeaux families.  The older of his two sons married a Boudreaux cousin and created a vigorous line on Bayou Lafourche. 

Claude, père's seventh son Jean dit Lami, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born probably at Minas in c1710, married Agathe, another daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Marie Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in October 1731 and evidently settled at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1748, Agathe gave Lami seven children, three sons and four daughters, but other records give them a fourth son.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  One of their sons may have married there in c1758.  A daughter married into the Daigre family at Southampton in c1761.  Jean dit Lami and Agathe may not have survived the ordeal in England.  When the family and hundreds of other Acadians being held in England were repatriated to France in May 1763, four of Jean dit Lami and Agathe's unmarried children--Charles, Joseph, Amand, and Anastasie--went to St.-Malo, but their parents were not with them.  Married son Jean-Baptiste and his family, as well as married daughter Marie-Flavie and her family, may have gone from England to St.-Malo on another vessel.  Only one of Jean dit Lami's sons seems to have created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Minas in c1735 or 1736, may have been the Jean-Baptiste Boudrot who married Anastasie, daughter of Jacques dit Jacob Célestin dit Bellemère and Marie Landry of Minas, at Southampton, England, in c1758.  After the Acadians in England were repatriated to France, Jean-Baptiste and his family reached St.-Malo aboard the ship L'Ambition in May 1763 and settled at nearby St.-Servan.  Between 1759 and 1772, in England and France, Anastasie gave Jean-Baptiste six children, four sons and two daughters, but both of their daughters and their youngest son died young.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to Poitou in 1773.  When most of the Poitou Acadians retreated to Nantes in late 1775 and early 1776, Jean-Baptiste and his family remained in Poitou.  In 1774 and 1779, in Poitou, Anastaise gave Jean-Baptiste two more daughters, but the younger one died young.  Their oldest son married a local girl in Poitou in June 1778.  Jean-Baptiste may have died there in the early 1780s, or he may have taken his family to Nantes soon after the birth of his youngest daughter and died in the port city by August 1784, when Anastasie remarried to a Comeau widower.  One wonders what happened to Jean-Baptiste and Anastasie's remaining daughter.  Two of their remaining three sons married in France and Louisiana, but only one of the lines endured.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in England in October 1759, followed his family to St.-Malo and Poitou.  He married Marguerite, daughter of François Bedel dit Picard and Jeanne ____ of Targé, Poitou, at Targé in June 1778.  In 1779 and 1783, in Poitou, Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste, fils two children, a daughter and a son, but the daughter died young.  They moved on to Nantes by September 1784.  Another son was born at Chantenay near Nantes in February 1785.  Later that year, Jean-Baptiste, fils, Marguerite, and their two young sons followed his mother, stepfather, and younger brothers to Louisiana.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, and Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste, fils more children,  including four sons, in the Spanish colony.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in August 1799, age 39.  His daughters married into the Lis and Williamson families.  Hs two older sons died young; they may not have survived the crossing from France.  Two of his four sons born in Louisiana married into the Michel and Boudreaux families and created vigorous lines on bayous Lafourche and Terrebonne. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Joseph-Marie, born at St.-Servan, France, in March 1766, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes, became a sailor, and followed his mother, stepfather, and brothers to Louisiana in 1785.  He married Anne-Isabelle, daughter of Joachim-Hyacinthe Trahan and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Duhon, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in February 1786, soon after his arrival, and followed his family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anne-Isabelle gave Joseph-Marie only one son, who probably died young, so the family line died with him.

Jean-Baptiste, père's third and youngest son Charles, born at St.-Servan, France, in January 1769, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and also became a sailor.  He followed his mother, stepfather, and brothers to Louisiana in 1785, settled on upper Bayou Lafourche with them, but he did not marry. 

Jean dit Lami's second son Charles, born probably at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Virginia and England and three of his younger siblings to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée in May 1763.  He lived at nearby Pleudihen and at St.-Malo, perhaps with his siblings.  Charles, perhaps a sailor, and still a bachelor, died at sea in September 1770, age 32. 

Jean dit Lami's third son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1742, followed his family to Virginia and England and three of his siblings to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée in May 1763.  He lived at St.-Malo from 1763 to 1770.  In May 1770, he was reported aboard the ship L'Heureux in Guinea and died at "la Coste," perhaps in Guinea, in January 1771, age 29. 

Jean dit Lami's fourth and youngest son Amand, born probably at Minas in c1748, followed his family to Virginia and England and three of his older siblings to St.-Malo, France, aboard La Dorothée in May 1763.  Amand, and perhaps his siblings, lived at nearby Pleudihen and St.-Malo from 1763 to 1771.  One wonders what happened to Amand after 1771. 

Claude, père's eighth son Pierre, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born probably at Minas in c1712, married Marie, daughter of Louis Doiron and Marguerite Barrieau, Grand-Pré in August 1733 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1752, Marie gave Pierre 10 children, two sons and eight daughters, though they may have had a third son named Augustin.  In August 1752, a French official counted Pierre, Marie, and nine of their children at Rivière-des-Blonds in the island's interior near his older brother Petit Paul.  Pierre remarried to Madeleine, daughter of François Gautrot and Marie Vincent, at Port-La-Joye on the island in November 1753.  The family was deported to France in 1758.  Pierre died at Cherbourg in June 1759, age 47, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  According to Bona Arsenault, Pierre's daughter Anastasie from his second wife Madeleine (though he says Anastasie was born in c1744) married into the Vigneau family on Île Miquelon in June 1771, so Pierre's widow may have taken her family there from France in the 1760s. 

Third son Augustin, by first wife Marie Doiron, born at Minas or Pigiguit probably in the 1740s, may have become separated from his family before they moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750, or perhaps he went there with them but returned to the Minas Basin before August 1752.  He first appears in Louisiana records in January 1771 when he married Osite, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry and widow of Alexandre Melanson, at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Osite had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766, a widow with six of her Melanson children.  Augustin died by January 1777, when his wife was listed in a Cabahannocer census with four of her Melanson children but no husband.  Stephen White calls the Augustin who married Osite Hébert at Cabahannocer Augustin-Rémi Boudrot, the name of a young Acadian who came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768.  Records in the Spanish colony, however, make it evident that the Augustin, son of Pierre Boudrot and Marie Doiron, who married the 40-year-old widow on the river, was not the Augustin-Rémi who, after leaving Spanish Fort San Luìs de Natchez on the river above Baton Rouge, settled on the western prairies.  Louisiana records reveal that the Augustin who remained on the river likely died in the 1770s not long after his marriage, while Augustin-Rémi, who was age 13 when he came to the colony from Maryland, lived to a ripe old age. 

Claude, père's ninth and youngest son Charles, by second wife Catherine Meunier, born at Minas in October 1725, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Doucet and Marie Doiron, in c1747, and moved on to Île St.-Jean with his older brothers in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles, Marie-Josèphe, and their three daughters at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the island's interior.  Charles died before August 1781. 

Michel's seventh and youngest son François, born at Port-Royal in c1666, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Belliveau and Jeanne Bourg, in c1692 probably at Port-Royal.  Between 1694 and 1715, Madeleine gave François nine children, six sons and three daughters.  François died at Port-Royal in September 1733, in his late 60s.  His daughters married into the LeBlanc, Michel, and Dugas families.  Only three of his six sons created their own families.  A grandson emigrated to Louisiana in 1765. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Port-Royal in c1694, evidently died young.  

François's second son Joseph, born at Port-Royal in c1697, moved on to the French Maritimes and married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marie-Madeleine Landry, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1722.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1738, Marguerite gave Joseph five children, four sons and a daughter.  Joseph died at Port-Toulouse before 1752.  In August of that year, a French official counted Marguerite with their three youngest children at La Briquerie near Port-Toulouse.  Joseph's daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  All four of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1722, married Judith, daughter of Jean Fourgère and his first wife Marie Bourg, in c1751 probably at Port-Toulouse, where he worked as a coaster.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1771, Judith gave Joseph, fils six children, a son and five daughters.  They, too, were counted at La Briquerie in August 1752 with their infant daughter.  After Le Grand Dérangement, they returned to Cape Breton Island, formerly Île Royale, and settled at Petit-de-Grat on the southeast coast of Île Madame, Nova Scotia. 

Joseph, père's second son Pierre, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1727, married cousin Marie-Josèphe, called Josette, Dugas in c1752 and remained on Île Royale.  They, too, were counted near his widowed mother at La Briquerie in August 1752.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758. 

Joseph, père's third son Louis, called Louison, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1733, was counted with his widowed mother at La Briquerie in August 1752.  He married Barbe, daughter of Jean Fougère and his second wife Madeleine Belliveau, probably on Île Royale in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1770, Barbe gave Louis four children, three sons and a daughter.  They, too, returned to Cape Breton Island, formerly Île Royale, after the Great Upheaval and settled at Petit-de-Grat. 

Joseph, père's fourth and youngest son Charles, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1738, was counted with his widowed mother at La Briquerie in August 1752.  He marrried Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Chiasson and Marie Arseneau of Chigecto, probably at Port-Toulouse in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1756 and 1772, Madeleine gave Charles five children, four sons and a dauthter.  Arsenault says they were counted on Île St.-Jean in 1762, so one wonders if they had escaped the British round up there in 1758.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they moved on Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where they were counted in 1764, 1765, and 1767, but they did not remain there.  They resettled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, where they were counted in 1772.  Charles died in the Madeleines in September 1810, in his early 70s.  All four of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Louis, born in c1756, married Louise Dugas probably in the Madeleines in c1785.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1785 and 1809, Louise gave Louis 11 children, three sons and eight daughters.  Three of their daughters married Boudrot first cousins.  At least one of Louis's sons created his own family.

Oldest son Louis-Jean-Marie, born probably in the Madeleines in c1793, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Vigneau and Anastasie Cyr, probably in the Madeleines in October 1816.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1817 and 1822, Marie gave Louis three children, a son and two daughters.   

Charles's second son Firmin, born in c1763, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Bourg and Madeleine Cyr, probably in the Madeleines in February 1795.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1796 Anne gave Firmin two sons, both of whom created their own families.

Older son Joseph le jeune, born probably in the Madeleines in c1796, married Batilde, daughter of Jean Vignot and Marie Terriot, probably in the Madeleines in September 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Batilde gave Joseph a son in 1820. 

Firmin's younger son Jean, born probably in the Madeleines in c1796, married Esther, another daughter of Jean Vignot and Marie Terriot, probably in the Madeleines in November 1819.  According to Bona Arsenault, Esther gave Jean a daughter in 1821.   

Charles's third son Joseph le jeune, born probably on Île Miquelon in c1765, married cousin Élisabeth Boudrot probably in the Madeleines.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1787 and 1796, Élisabeth gave Joseph eight children, five sons and eight daughters.  All five of their sons created their own families.

Oldest son Benoit, born probably in the Madeleines in c1787, married first cousin Geneviève, daughter of his uncle Louis Boudrot and aunt Louise Dugas, probably in the Madeleines in September 1803.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1807 and 1822, Geneviève gave Benoit six children, three sons and three daughters.

Joseph le jeune's second son Placide, born probably in the Madeleines in c1788, married Céleste, daughter of Étienne Vignot and Louise Cyr, probably in the Madeleines in September 1808.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1811 and 1816, Céleste gave Placide three sons.

Joseph le jeune's third son Joseph, fils, born probably in the Madeleines in c1789, married Marguerite, daughter of Amant Chiasson and Marguerite Doucet, probably in the Madeleines in November 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1811 and 1821, Marguerite gave Joseph, fils five sons. 

Joseph le jeune's fourth son Charles le jeune, born probably in the Madeleines in c1793, married first cousin Sophie, another daughter of his uncle Louis Boudrot and aunt Louise Dugas, probably in the Madeleines in August 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, Sophie gave Charles two daughters in 1816 and 1819.

Joseph le jeune's fifth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably in the Madeleines in c1796, married first cousin Élizabeth, yet another daughter of his uncle Louis Boudrot and aunt Louise Dugas, probably in the Madeleines in September 1817.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1821 Élizabeth gave Jean-Baptiste a son. 

Charles's fourth and youngest son Thomas, born in c1772, married Marie Landry probably in the Madeleines in c1795.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1802 and 1804, Marie gave Thomas two children, a son and a daughter. 

François's third son François, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1701, may have died young. 

François's fourth son Michel, born at Port-Royal in July 1706, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Marie Thériot, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1725.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1740, Anne-Marie gave Michel four children, three sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Dupuis family.  All three of Michel's sons created their own families.  Two of them in fact married sisters of their sister's husband.  One of them emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1728, married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Dupuis and Marie-Josèphe Dugas of Grand-Pré, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1750.  The British deported them to New York in late autumn of 1755.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Michel's second son Michel, fils, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1729, married Anne-Marie, another daughter of Antoine Dupuis and Marie-Josèphe Dugas, in c1758 perhaps on Île Royale on the eve of the island's dérangment.  According to Bona Arsenault, Michel, fils emigrated to Louisiana, but records there say otherwise. 

Michel's third and youngest son Jean, born perhaps at Annapolis Royal in c1740, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau and Madeleine Michel, in the late 1750s during exile.  A son evidently was born to them at Halifax in c1762, though a Louisiana church record hints that the son was born at Boston, Massachusetts.  British officials counted Jean and his wife at Halifax in August 1763, but, oddly, they had no children with them.  Jean, Marguerite, and a son followed the Broussards from Halifax to Louisiana in 1764-65.  Jean's name can found on a list of Acadians who exchanged Canadian card money in New Orleans that April.  He and Marguerite accompanied the Broussards to Bayou Teche that spring.  Marguerite gave Jean no more children in Louisiana.  He died at Attakapas by c1768, when his wife remarried there; he would have been in his late 20s.  His only son Jean-Charles dit Donat married into the Comeau family and created a vigorous family line on the western prairies. 

François's fifth son Charles, born at Port-Royal in March 1709, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine and Marguerite Landry, at Annapolis Royal in November 1734 and likely settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1754, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, including a set of twins.  They escaped the British in 1755 and made their way to Canada, where they were counted at Québec in 1758.  Charles died at Dechambault on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Trois-Rivières in March 1778, age 68.  One of his daughters, Nathalie, married into the de Fleury family at Deschambault.  According to Bona Arsenault, at least one of his sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Isaïe, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1746, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Eustache Bélisle and Marie Rolet, at Deschambault in January 1773. 

François's sixth and youngest son Pierre dit Grand Pierre, born at Annapolis Royal in June 1712, married Madeleine, daughter of Ambroise Melanson and Françoise Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in January 1735.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1749, Madeleine gave Grand Pierre six children, all sons.  Grand Pierre remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marguerite Granger, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, one of Grand Pierre's sons by his first wife created his own family.

Third son Basile, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1739, evidentyl moved on to the French Maritimes and was deported to France in 1758.  He married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Mius d'Entremont and Marguerite Landry of Pobomcoup, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in May 1764 and died there, age 32, in September 1771.356

Bourg

Antoine Bourg, a late 1630s arrival, and his wife Antoinette Landry created one of the largest and most influential families in Acadia.  Between 1643 and 1667, Antoinette gave Antoine 11 children, five sons and six daughters, all of whom married.  Antoine died at Port-Royal between October 1687 and 1693, in his late 70s or early 80s.  His daughters married into the Breau, Belliveau, Boudrot, Brun, Comeau dit L'Esturgeon, and Allain families.  All five of Antoine's sons created vigorous lines.  His and Antoinette's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, Minas, Cobeguit, Rivière St.-Jean, and in the French Maritimes, and their youngest son and a grandson became important colonial officials.  At least 116 of Antoine's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, and France in 1785.  Ninety-five of them came on six of the Seven Ships from France.  Only the Héberts and the Trahans outnumbered the Bourgs in the Seven Ships expedition.  However, a substantial number of Antoine's descendants could be found in Canada, greater Acadia, France, and the French Antilles after Le Grand Dérangement.  

Oldest son François, born at Port-Royal in c1643, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Michelle Aucoin, at Port-Royal in c1665 and remained there.  Between 1666 and 1684, Marguerite gave François seven children, three sons and four daughters.  François died at Port-Royal in c1684, in his early 40s, and his wife remarried to a Babineau Three of François's daughters married into the Richard, Maissonat dit Baptiste, LeBlanc, and Melanson families.  Two of his three sons created their own families.  The younger married son became an important colonial official.  

Oldest son Michel dit Michaud, born at Port-Royal in May 1666, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Charles Melanson and Marie Dugas, at Port-Royal in c1689 and settled at Chignecto.  Between 1690 and the early 1700s, at Port-Royal and Chignecto, Élisabeth gave Michaud 11 children, six sons and five daughters.  Michaud died probably at Chignecto between 1714 and November 1721, in his early 50s.  His five daughters married into the Cyr, Vigneau dit Maurice, Gaudet, Bourgeois, Thériot, and Hébert families.  Four of Michaud's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Michel, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1692, married Marie, daughter of Alexis Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in October 1713 and remained at Chignecto.  From the 1714 to 1737, Marie gave Michel, fils 11 children, six sons and five daughters, all of whom married.  Michel, fils died probably at Chignecto between February 1746 and August 1754, in his late 50s or early 60s.  His daughters married into the Poirier, Bourgeois, Richard, Leprince, Bergeron, and Vigneau families. 

Oldest son Michel dit Michaud le jeune, born at Chignecto in May 1719, married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard, at Beaubassin in January 1741 and settled there.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1742 and 1759, at Chignecto, Marguerite-Josèphe gave Michaud le jeune six children, two sons and four daughters.  In 1767, the family was counted on Île Miquelon off the south coast of Newfoundland before moving to Pigiguit in Nova Scotia.  According to Stephen White, Michaud le jeune, at age 61, remarried to Anne, daughter of Jacques Léger and Anne Amireau and widow of Louis Allain, in c1780 perhaps in Nova Scotia.  One suspects she gave him no more children.  Michel dit Michaud le jeune died at Cumberland, Nova Scotia, in November 1790, age 71.  Two of his daughters married into the Gautrot and Gaudet families.  One wonders if any of his sons created their own families. 

Michel, fils's second son Pierre dit Canique, born probably at Chignecto in c1722, married Anne dite Nanette, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie-Anne Cyr, at Beaubassin in February 1746.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1747 Nanette gave Canique a daughter.  According to Stephen White, Pierre remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Vigneau and Marguerite Arseneau, probably at Chignecto in c1750.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755.  White says Pierre remarried again--his third marriage--to Anne Richard, widow of Bénoni Granger, in c1756 while in exile.  Arsenault records this as Pierre's second marriage and says it occurred in c1750, perhaps a typo.  According to Arsenault, between 1757 and 1771, Marie-Anne, as he calls her, gave Pierre eight more children, six sons and two daughters, including a pair of twins--nine children in all.  The family was counted at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières in 1765 and at St.-Charles-sur-Richelieu in the interior east of Montréal in c1771.  Pierre dit Canique died at St.-Charles-sur-Richelieu in June 1790, age 68.  One of his daughters by third wife Anne married into the Hogue family at St.-Charles.  Two of his six sons by third wife Anne created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born in exile in c1757, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie-Louise, daughter of Jean Archambault and Marie-Charlotte Bousquet, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly upriver from St.-Charles on the Richelieu in November 1785. 

Pierre dit Canique's second son Basile, born in exile in c1758, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jacques Denis dit Lafrance and Marie-Françoise Fournier, at Lavaltrie on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal in June 1778. 

Michel, fils's third son Antoine-Bénoni, called Bénoni, born, according to Stephen White, in c1724 probably at Chignecto, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot, probably at Chignecto in c1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Bénoni a son, Joeph, in c1756 during exile.  Bénoni remarried to Félicité, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Anne LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Leprince, at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence in November 1760 while still in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1766, Félicité gave Bénoni three more children, a son and two daughters.  They were counted on Rivière St.-Jean in 1763 but returned to Canada.  They were counted at Bécancour again in 1765.  Bénoni died at St.-Grégoire de Nicolet downriver from Bécancour in December 1813, age 89.  One of his daughters, Rosalie, by second wife Félicité married into the Prince family probably at Bécancour; Rosalie's son Jean-Charles Prince (1804-60) became the first bishop of the diocese of St.-Hyacinthe, Canada, in 1852.  Bénoni's son by first wife Marie-Josèphe created his own family.

Older son Joseph, born in exile in c1756, followed his family to Canada, Rivière St.-Jean, and back to Canada, where he married Marie-Anne, daughter of Antoine Desilets and Françoise LeBlanc, at Bécancour in January 1785. 

Michel, fils's fourth son Jacques dit Canique, born at Chignecto in May 1732, married Marguerite, another daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie-Anne Cyr, at Chignecto in August 1754.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1755 and 1768, Marguerite gave Jacques six children, two sons and four daughters.  They were counted at Québec in 1758 and remained in Canada.  Jacques dit Canique died at St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu in January 1789, age 56.  Two of his daughters married into the Lafrenaye-Leclerc and Painchaud families at St.-Ours.  One wonders if any of Jacques dit Canique's sons created their own families. 

Michel, fils's fifth son Jean dit Jeannotte, born at Chignecto in October 1734, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Arseneau and Anne Bourgeois, in c1760 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1765, Marie-Madeleine gave Jeannote four children, two sons and two daughters.  They may have eluded the British in 1755 but were captured later.  British officials counted them at Halifax in 1763.  After the war finally ended, they joined other Acadian refugees on Île Miquelon off the south coast of Newfoundland, where they were counted in 1766.  Perhaps to escape overcrowding on the island, they moved on to Cocagne on the lower Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they were counted in c1770.   Jeannotte died near Cocagne, New Brunswick, in January 1811, age 76.  One of Jeannotte's daughters married into the Hébert and Bourgeois dit Vielland families probably at Cocagne.  One of his sons created his own family there.

Younger son Fabien, born at either Halifax or on Île Miquelon in c1764, followed his family to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and married Anne, daughter of Michel Richard dit Laplate and Marguerite Babineau, in c1785. 

Michel, fils's sixth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1737, married Marie, daughter of Michel Bergeron dit d'Amboise, in the early 1760s in Canada during exile.  Joseph died at Nicolet across from Trois-Rivières in June 1797, age 60. 

Michaud l'aîné's second son François, born at Port-Royal or Chignecto in c1698, married Catherine, daughter of François Cormier and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in November 1721.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1724, at Chignecto, Catherine gave François three children, a son and two daughters.  François remarried to Marie, daughter of Antoine Belliveau dit Blondin and Marie Thériot, probably at Chignecto in c1730, and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1746, at Chignecto, Marie gave François nine more children, six sons and three daughters--a dozen children in all.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted at Québec in 1758.  François died at Bécancour across from Trois-Rivières in January 1771, in his early 70s.  His five daughters by both wives married into the Gaudet, Blanchard, and Bergeron families.  Six of his seven sons by both wives created their own families.

Oldest son François, fils by first wife Catherine, born at Chignecto in c1723, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie, daughter of Honoré Prince and Élisabeth Forest and widow of Jean Bourgeois, at Bécancour in February 1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave François, fils a son, Michel, in 1768.  François, fils remarried to Madeleine, another daughter of Antoine Belliveau and Marie Thériot, at Nicolet below Bécancour in August 1783.  François, fils died at St.-Grégoire near Nicolet in May 1808, age 85.  His only son created his own family.

Michel, born at Bécancour in c1768, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Brassard and Marie-Antoinette Pinard, at Nicolet in November 1791. 

François, père's second son Pierre, the oldest by second wife Marie, born at Chignecto in c1733, his family to Canada, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Anne LeBlanc of Annapolis Royal and widow of Joseph Dupuis, at Bécancour in February 1775.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1776 and 1786, Marguerite gave Pierre five children, three sons and two daughters.  Pierre died at St.-Grégoire in September 1807, age 74.  One of Pierre's daughters married into the Belliveau family at St.-Grégoire.  Two of his three sons also created their own families in the area.

Oldest son Simon le jeune, born at Bécancour in c1776, married Rosalie, daughter of Charles Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at nearby Nicolet in June 1802.

Pierre's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Bécancour in c1779, married Louise, daughter of Jean Bruneau and Anne Babin, at St.-Grégoire in October 1802. 

François, père's third son Simon, born at Chignecto in c1735, followed his family to Canada, where he married Rosalie, daughter of Charles Gaudet and Marie Cormier, at Bécancour in February 1762 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1779, Rosalie gave Simon nine children, six sons and three daughters, including a set of twins.  Simon died at Nicolet downriver from Bécancour in June 1799, age 64.  One of his daughters married into the Bourgoies family at Nicolet.  Three of his six sons created their own families.

Oldest son François-Simon, born at Bécancour in c1763, married Marie-Anne Comtois in c1785.

Simon's second son Charles, born at Bécancour in c1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Richard, at Nicolet in 1799, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Belliveau and Marie LeBlanc, at nearby St.-Grégoire in October 1803. 

Simon's sixth and youngest son Vital, born probably at Bécancour in c1777, married Marie, daughter of Antoine Rivard and Marie Beaudry, at St.-Grégoire in February 1804. 

François, père's fourth son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1737, followed his family to Canada, where, at age 26, he married 17-year-old Marie Bergeron in c1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1786, Marie gave Joseph a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters, including a set of twins.  Joseph died at Nicolet in June 1797, age 60.  Three of his daughters married into the Desilets, Richard, and Bergeron families.  Six of his eight sons created their own families. 

Second son Joseph, fils, born in Canada in c1764, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Prince and Marie Thibodeau, at Nicolet in November 1790. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Grégoire, born in Canada in c1768, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Prince and Madeleine Forest, at Nicolet in February 1797. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Michel, born in Canada in c1770, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter Jean-Baptiste Doucet and Marie Richard, at Trois-Rivières in February 1800. 

Joseph, père's sixth son Pierre, born in Canada in c1776, married Louise, daughter of Louis Doucet and Marguerite Belliveau, at at St.-Grégoire in July 1806. 

Joseph, père's seventh son David, born in Canada in c1778, married Madeleine, daughter of Honoré Hébert and Madeleine Leprince, at St.-Grégoire in January 1806. 

Joseph, père's eighth and youngest son François, born in Canada in c1786, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Perpétué Landry, at St.-Grégoire in February 1803. 

François, père's fifth son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1742, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Poirier and Marguerite Cyr, at Québec in August 1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1768, Marguerite gave Jean three children, two sons and a daughter.  Jean died at St.-Denis on Rivière Richelieu east of Montréal in May 1770, age 28.  One of his sons created his own families.

Younger son Joseph le jeune, born in Canada in c1766, married Marie-Madeleine Lauzière at Nicolet across from Trois-Rivières in August 1805. 

François, père's seventh and youngest son Raphaël, born at Chignecto in c1746, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie, daughter Jean Poirier and Madeleine Forest, at Bécancour in November 1771.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1795, Marie gave Raphaël 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Raphaël helped establish the settlement of Godefroy near Bécancour.  One of his daughters married into the Hébert family at nearby Nicolet.  His three oldest sons created their own families.

Oldest son Raphaël, fils, born at Bécancour in c1772, married Marie, daughter of Louis Desilets and Catherine Frigon, at Trois-Rivières in August 1802.

Raphaël, père's second son Pierre-Noël, born at Bécancour in c1775, married Marie Brassard in c1798. 

Raphaël, père's third son François le jeune, born at Bécancour in c1783, married Marguerite, daughter of David Belliveau and Marie Gaudet, at St.-Grégoire in January 1809. 

Michaud l'aîné's third son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Cécile, another daughter of François Cormier and Marguerite LeBlanc, probably at Chignecto in c1722 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1741, at Chignecto, Cécile gave Pierre four children, a daughter and three sons.  One wonders what happened to the family in 1755.  Pierre's daughter married into the Poirier family.  Two of his three sons created their own families, one of them on one of the Newfoundland islands.

Older son Pierre-Paul, born at Chignecto in c1738, followed his family into exile and married Madeleine, daughter of Paul Sire or Cyr and Marie-Josèphe Richard, on Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland in January 1764.  They were counted on the island on 1767 and 1776.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1775, Madeleine gave Pierre six children, four sons and two daughters.  After the British captured the island in 1778, they deported Pierre and his family to La Rochelle, France, where he died in 1779, age 41.  His widow and children--Arsenault does not name them--returned to North America and settled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Three of her four sons created their on families on the islands.

Second son Joseph, born on Île Miquelon in c1767, followed his family to France and back to North America and married Madeleine Haché probably in the Madeleines in c1792.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1793 and 1808, Madeleine gave Joseph eight children, five sons and three daughters.  At least one of their sons created his own family.

Second son Joseph-Constant, born probably in the Madeleines in c1796, married Julie, daughter of Joseph Gaudet and Marguerite Boudrot, probably in the Madeleines in September 1820.  According to Bona Arsenault, Julie gave Joseph-Constant a daughter in 1822.

Pierre-Paul's third son Mèlem, born on Île Miquelon in c1773, followed his family to France and back to North American and married Brigitte, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Louise Arsenault, probably in the Madeleines in October 1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1799 and 1815, Brigitte gave Mèlem six children, three sons and three daughters.

Pierre-Paul's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born on Île Miquelon in c1775, followed his family to France and back to North America and married Angélique, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Angélique Boudrot, probably in the Madeleines in July 1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1801 and 1811, Angélique gave Pierre five children, a son and four daughters. 

Pierre's younger son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1740, followed his family into exile and married Jeanne Chiasson in c1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1764 and 1766, Jeanne gave Jean two children, a son and a daughter.  They were counted on Île Miquelon in 1764 and 1766. 

Michaud l'aîné's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, probably at Chignecto in c1733 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1748, Marie gave Jean-Baptiste three children, a son and two daughters.  They were counted at Aulac west of Rivière Missaguash in 1754.  One wonders what happened to them the following year.  One of their daughters married into the Thibodeau family from Chepoudy after Le Grand Dérangement

Michaud l'aîné's fifth son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in the late 1700s or early 1710s, married Anne, daughter of Alexis Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, probably at Chignecto in c1733 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1746, at Chignecto, Anne gave Joseph six children, four sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Bourgeois family on Île St.-Jean and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  Two of Joseph's four sons created their own families and remained in greater Acadia. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born at Chignecto in c1733, followed his family into exile and married Catherine, daughter of Ambroise Comeau and Marguerite Cormier of Chepoudy, in c1760 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1783, Catherine gave Joseph, fils 10 children, five sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  They settled at Bonaventure in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province.  His daughters married into the Landry, Robichaud, Arsenault, Guignard, and Bourdages families at Bonaventure.  Two of his five sons created their own families.

Oldest son Joseph III, born probably at Bonaventure in c1776, married Jeanne-Rebecca, daughter of Pierre Loubert and Euphrosine Landry, at Bonaventure in January 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1800 and 1823, Jeanne gave Joseph III a dozen children, nine sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Lavache, Poirier, and Gauthier families at Bonaventure.  Three of Joseph III's sons created their own families there. 

Fourth son Joseph IV, born at Bonaventure in c1806, married Rose, daughter of Alexandre Bernard and Élizabeth Arsenault, at Bonventure in 1834.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1837 and 1847, Rose gave Joseph IV five children, two sons and three daughters.

Joseph III's eighth son Hubert, born at Bonaventure in c1816, married Rose, daughter of Alain Bujold and Geneviève Cayouette, at Bonaventure in August 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1857, Rose gave Hubert eight children, five sons and three daughters.

Joseph III's ninth and youngest son Pierre, born at Bonaventure in c1819, married Monique, daughter of Hilarion Albert and Marie Landry of Grande-Anse, New Brunswick, at Bonaventure in May 1849.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1849 and 1859, Monique gave Pierre six children, five sons and a daughter. 

Joseph, fils's third son Jean-Urbain, born probably at Bonaventure in c1779, married Julienne, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in January 1802.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1803 and 1807, Julienne gave Jean-Urbain three children, two sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Bujold family at Bonaventure, and both of their sons created their own families there.

Older son Pierre-Joseph, born at Bonaventure in c1803, married Louise, daughter of Jean Goulet and Appoline Comeau of Maria, at Bonaventure in September 1831.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1834 and 1849, Louise gave Pierre-Joseph eight children, five sons and three daughters. 

Jean-Urbain's younger son Jean-Ubald, born at Bonaventure in c1805, married Lucille, daughter of Jean-Marie Bernard and Lutine Babin and widow of Joseph Cayouette, at Bonaventure in October 1833.

Joseph, père's fourth and youngest son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1746, followed his family into exile and married Marie, daughter of Pierre Surette and Catherine Breau of Minas, in c1765.  The marriage was blessed at Halifax in June 1769.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1765 and 1766, Marie gave Jean two daughters.  They settled on Rivière St.-Jean, present-day New Brunswick, in 1770. 

Michaud l'aîné's sixth and youngest son Alexandre, born probably at Chignecto in the late 1700s or early 1710s, evidently did not survive childhood.   

François's second son Alexandre dit Bellehumeur, born at Port-Royal in c1671, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marguerite Mius d'Entremont, at Port-Royal in c1694 but settled at Minas, where Alexandre served as a delegate to the colonial Council and as a judge and notary.  Between 1695 and 1722, at Minas, Marguerite gave Bellehumeur 15 children, seven sons and eight daughters.  He died during exile at Richibouctou on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1760, age 89.  His daughters married into the LeBlanc dit Le Maigre, Babin, Doucet, Godin dit Lincour and dit Châtillon dit Préville, and Landry families; one of the younger ones emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766.  Five of Bellehumeur's eight sons created their own families; his youngest son emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765. 

Oldest son Pierre, born at Minas in the early 1700s, may not have survived childhood. 

Bellehumeur's second son Alexandre, fils, born at Minas in October 1709, married Marie, daughter of René Hébert and Marie Boudrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1755, Marie gave Alexandre, fils seven children, five sons and two daughters.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge in Canada.  Arsenault says Alexandre, fils was a flour vendor at St.-François-du-Sud near Montmagny below Québec in 1768.  He died at St.-François-du-Sud in June 1770, age 60.  One of his daughters married into the Dumas family at Montmagny.  Four of his five sons created their own families there.

Alexandre, fils's second son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Minas in c1747, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie-Félicité, daughter of Jean Morin and Félicité Lemieux, at Montmagny in January 1776. 

Alexandre, fils's third son François, born probably at Minas in c1749, followed his family to Canada, where he Marie-Louise, daughter of Charles Doyon and Marie-Louise Rancourt, at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce on Rivière Chaudière in the interior south of Québec City in November 1775, and remarried to Marie-Louise Dion at Ste.-Marie-de-Beauce farther downriver in February 1794. 

Alexandre, fils's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Minas in c1750, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Antoine Morin and Marguerite Daviau, at Montmagny in October 1770. 

Alexandre, fils's fifth and youngest son Paul, born at either Minas or in exile in 1755, followed his family to Canada, where he married Marguerite Bernard at Montmagny in September 1787. 

Bellehumeur's third son Paul, born at Minas in c1715, married Judith, daughter of Guillaume Hébert and Marie-Josèphe Dupuis, at Grand-Pré in February 1740 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1747, Judith gave Paul four children, two sons and two daughters.  The British deported them to Pennsylvania in 1755.  They were still there in June 1763.  Paul died probably in Pennsylvania before November 1771. 

Bellehumeur's fourth son Michel, born at Minas in c1717, married Jeanne, also called Anne, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Anne Dugas, probably at Minas in c1743 and settled at Village des Aucoin at Rivière-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1754, at Minas, Jeanne gave Michel seven children, three sons and four daughters.  The British deported them to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  Jeanne died there, and Michel remarried to Brigitte, daughter of René Martin and Marie Mignier and widow of Séraphin Breau, in England in January 1759.  They were repatriated to France aboard La Dorothée in May 1763 with other Acadians in England and settled at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo.  They were counted at nearby St.-Servan in 1766 but did not remain in France.  In 1771, one of their married daughters returned to North America, followed by a son in 1772 via one of the British-controlled Channel Islands off the western coast of Brittany.  The rest of the family followed in 1774.  Back in North America, they helped establish the Acadian settlement at Carleton in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where their oldest son was serving as a missionary.  According to Stephen White, Michel died soon after the family reached the warm water bay.  His daughters from both wives married into the Gravois, Bourg, LeBlanc, Richard, and Arsenault families in France and Gaspésie, and one of them, Marie-Madeleine by first wife Jeanne, emigrated to Louisiana from Île St.-Pierre in 1788.  One of Michel's three sons became a priest in France and served as a missionary in Gaspésie, and another of Michels's son created his own family in Gaspésie. 

Oldest son Joseph-Mathurin, called Mathurin, born at Minas in c1744, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France.  In 1767, at age 23, he went to Paris with stepbrother Jean-Baptiste Breau to study for the priesthood with Father du Saint-Esprit.  Mathurin and Jean-Baptiste were sent to Canada in 1772 to serve as a missionaries on the Baie des Chaleurs, where their family joined them two years later.  Mathurin remained at his post on Chaleur Bay until 1795 and died at St.-Laurent near Montréal in August 1797, age 53. 

Michel's second son Charles, born at Minas in c1750, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France.  In March 1772, with the purpose of returning to North America, he slipped away to the British-controlled Isle of Jersey off the western coast of Brittany, and his family followed two years later.  Charles married Théotiste, daughter of Jean Savoie and Anne Landry of Miramichi, at Carleton on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province, in June 1778, where his older brother was serving as a missionary.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1792, Théotiste gave Charles five children, two sons and three daughters.  His three daughters married into the Bernard, Degrâce, LeBlanc, and Caissie families at Carleton.  His two sons created their own families in Gaspésie.

Older son Édouard-Jean-Michel, born at Carleton in c1781, married Henriette, daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carleton in November 1810.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 181 and 1813, Henriette gave Édouard two children, both daughters.  He remarried Félicité, daughter of Pierre Audet and Louise Arsenault, at Carleton in January 1817.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1818 and 1821, Félicité gave Édouard three more daughters.

Charles's younger son Constant-Amand, born at Carleton in c1792, married Clarisse, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Françoise Dugas, at Carleton in November 1810, on the same day his older brother Édouard married his first wife.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1813 and 1826, Clarisse gave Constant eight children, two sons and six daughters. 

Michel's third and youngest son Pierre, born at Minas in c1752, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France.  Did he also accompany them to North America in the 1770s, or did he remain in the mother country? 

Bellehumeur's fifth son Bénoni, born at Minas in November 1718, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Anne Thériot, at Grand-Pré in January 1745 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1745 and 1747, Françoise gave Bénoni two children, a daughter and a son.  The British deported them to Pennsylvania in 1755.  They were still there in June 1763.  Bénoni died probably in Pennsylvania before November 1771. 

Bellehumeur's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, born at Minas in October 1720, may not have survived childhood. 

Bellehumeur's seventh and youngest son Joseph, born at Minas in May 1722, married Marie Landry probably at Minas in c1744 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1748, Marie gave Joseph three children, two sons and a daughter, but other records hint that she gave him at least six children.  The British deported them to Pennsylvania in 1755.  They were still there in June 1763, when colonial officials counted Joseph wife Marie and six children.  Perhaps soon after the counting they slipped away and returned to Nova Scotia.  Joseph, Marie, and five of their children, four sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  Joseph died before July of that year, when his wife remarried a Savoie widower in New Orleans, so Joseph may not have survived the voyage.  Marie took her children to Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans and died by October 1766, when her second husband remarried at New Orleans.  Joseph's daughter Marguerite married into the Cormier family at Cabahannocer and followed her husband to the Attakapas District, where, still in her 20s, she died by January 1779, when her husband remarried.  Two, perhaps three, of Joseph's four sons created their own families on the river and the prairies. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born at Minas in December 1745, followed his family to Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, and Louisiana, settled with them at Cabahannocer, and may have married fellow Acadian Marie Dugas at New Orleans in c1768.  One wonders if he fathered any children. 

Joseph's second son Pierre, born at Minas in c1750, followed his family to Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, and Louisiana, settled with them at Cabahannocer, and married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Cormier, père and Madeleine Richard of Chignecto and sister of his sister Marguerite's husband, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in January 1772.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1771[sic] and 1778, Anastasie gave Pierre six children, a son and six daughters, but Louisiana records give them two more sons in 1781 and 1788.  Their daughters married into the Guidry and LeBoeuf families.  Two of Pierre's three sons married into the Oubre and Belmere families on the river, but only one of the lines survived. 

Joseph's third son Jean, born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in c1759, followed his famliy to Nova Scotia and Louisiana and settled with them at Cabahannocer on the river, but he did not remain there.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Richard and Marguerite Dugas, at Opelousas west of the Atchafalaya Basin in March 1784.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1810, Marguerite gave Jean 13 children, six sons and seven dauthters, but Louisiana records give them seven sons.  Jean died at his home at La Prairie Basse du Grand Coteau at the southern edge of St. Landry Parish in January 1814, age 55.  His daughters married into the Babineaux, Beard, Benoit, Breaux, Caruthers, and Royer families on the prairies.  Five of his seven sons married into the Mayhe, Léger, Desormeaux, Savoie, and Richard families, but not all of the lines survived. 

Joseph's fourth and youngest son Charles, born during exile in c1762, followed his parents to Louisiana and settled with them at Cabahannocer, where, at age 15, he was counted with brother Pierre in January 1777.  He then disappears from the historical record.  He probably did not marry. 

François's third and youngest son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1683, survived childhood but did not marry. 

Antoine's second son Jean, born at Port-Royal in c1646, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Martin and Catherine Vigneau, at Port-Royal in 1667.  Between 1668 and 1690, Marguerite gave Jean nine children, two sons and seven daughters.  Jean died at Port-Royal between 1693 and 1698, in late 40s or early 50s.  Six of their daughters married into the Thibodeau, Naquin dit L'Étoile, Dubois, Robichaud dit Cadet, Gaudet, Turpin dit La Giroflée, Triel dit Triquel dit Patron, and Guérin dit Laforge families.  Both of Jean's sons created families of their own at Minas and Cobeguit.

Older son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1684, married Marie-Catherine, daughter of Nicolas Barrieau and Martine Hébert, probably at Port-Royal in c1706 and settled at Minas.  Between 1707 and 1717, at Minas, Marie-Catherine gave Jean, fils six children, four sons and two daughters, all of whom married.  Jean, fils remarried to Françoise, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Marie Gaudet, probably at Minas in c1719.  Between 1720 and 1732, at Minas, Françoise gave Jean, fils six more children, two sons and four daughters.  Jean, fils took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean, fils, Françoise, four of their unmarried children at Rivière-de-l'Ouest on the south side of the island near son Charles and his family.  Jean, fils died on the island in February 1757, age 74.  His daughters by both wives married into the Dugas, Breau, LeBlanc, Doiron, Pitre, and Landry families at Cobeguit and on Île St.-Jean.  Five of his six sons from both wives created their own families, most of them devastated by the deportation of 1758.

Oldest son Jean III (who Bona Arsenault attributes to Jean's first cousin Michel dit Michaud), by first wife Marie-Catherine Barrieau, born at Minas in c1707, married Marie, daughter of Marc Pitre and Jeanne Brun and widow of Charles Lapierre, in c1733 probably at Minas and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Arsenault, between 1735 and 1748, Marie gave Jean III five children, three sons and two daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean III, Marie, and their five children at Rivière-des-Blonds on the south shore of the island near his brothers Alexandre and François.  The British deported Jean III and his family to France in 1758.  Wife Marie died at sea.  Oldest daughter Marguerite died in a St.-Malo hospital in March 1756, age 26, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  Jean III died at Village aux Génilles, Pleudihen, near St.-Malo in April, age 52, probably from the rigors of deportation.  His remaining daughter, Marie, married into the Henry family in France.  All three of his sons created their own families in the mother country. 

Oldest son Jean IV, born probably at Minas in c1735, followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  He married Marie Aucoin in c1758 on the eve of the island's dérangement.  They survived the deportation to St.-Malo and settled at nearby Pleudihen.  Between 1760 and 1764, Marie gave Jean IV three children, a son and two daughters, but the younger daughter died young.  Jean IV remarried to Anne-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Daigre and Marie Breau, at Pleudihen in May 1767.  Between 1768 and 1785, at Pleudihen, Anne-Josèphe gave Jean IV 13 more children, four sons and nine daughters, four of whom, a son and three daughters, died young.  Jean IV did not take his family to Poitou in the early 1770s nor to Nantes later in the decade.  In 1785, only a few weeks after their youngest daughter was born, Jean IV, Anne-Josèphe, and eight of their children, three sons and five daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  His oldest children from first wife Marie--Joseph-Firmin and Rose-Perrine, who would have been ages 25 and 24 in 1785--and a daughter from his second wife--Anne-Jeanne, only age 10 in 1785--either died in France or chose to remain in the mother country (one suspects that the 10-year-old was dead by then).  From New Orleans, Jean IV and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  Anne-Josphe gave him no more children in Louisiana.  Their three youngest children, two sons and a daughter, evidently died at Bayou des Écores.  When the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Jean IV took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Four of his daughters, all from second wife Anne-Josèphe, married into the Comeaux, Albert, Aucoin, and Henry families on the river and on the upper Lafourche.  Only one of his sons married, into the Comeau family, but his family line did not survive. 

Jean III's second son François, born probably at Minas in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne Aucoin in c1758 on the eve of the island's dérangement.  They survived the deportation to St.-Malo and settled at Pleudihen.  Between 1760 and 1774, Anne gave François seven children, a son and six daughters, but the son and three of youngest daughters did not survive childhood.  François, evidently a sailor, died at age 36 "on le Roche de L'isle Aigot" in March 1775 and was buried at Pleudihen.  His two older daughters married into the Daigre family in France.  None of them, nor their mother Anne, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Jean III's third son Charles, born probably at Minas in c1746, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, France, where he worked as a seaman.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Thibodeau and Susanne Comeau, at Pleudihen in January 1768.  Between 1769 and 1771, at Pleudihen, Anne gave Charles three children, a son and two daughters, but the daughters died young.  Charles took his family to Poitou in 1773, and Anne gave him two more children there, a daughter and a son, but they lost this daughter as well.  Charles, Anne, and their two sons retreated to the port city of Nantes with dozens of other Poitou Acadians in November 1775.  She gave him two more sons there in 1776 and 1779, but both of them died in childhood.  Charles died at Nantes by December 1781, when Anne remarried in Ste.-Croix Parish to a Frenchman from Rennes, Brittany.  She and her second husband remained in France in 1785.  Her younger Bourg son, Alexis, born at Châtellerault in July 1774, evidently remained with her.  Her older Bourg son, however, emigrated to the Spanish colony.

Oldest son Pierre-Jean, born at La Villeger, Pleudihen, France, in August 1770, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes.  Still in his teens, he was the only member of his immediate family to go to Louisiana, likely aboard one of the Seven Ships in 1785.  He first appears in Louisiana records on upper Bayou Lafourche in January 1791.  He worked as an engagé, or hired hand, with several families into the late 1790s and married Madeleine-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre-Olivier Pitre and Rosalie Hébert of Nantes, at Assumption on the upper bayou in June 1798.  Their daughter married into the Guillot family.  Seven of Pierre-Jean's eight sons married into the Roger, Thibodeaux, Boudreaux, Hernandez, Guillot, LeBlanc, and Lopez families, and most of the lines survived in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley. 

Jean, fils's second son Alexandre, by first wife Marie-Catherine Barrieau, born at Minas in January 1709, married Ursule, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1735 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Between 1736 and 1757, Ursule gave Alexandre eight children, three sons and five daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Alexandre, Ursule, and six of their chldren at Rivière-des-Blonds near his brothers Jean and François.  Alexandre died during the deportation to St.-Malo, France, in 1758, age 49.  Four of his younger children also died at sea; only two of his daughters survived the crossing with wife Ursule.  She settled with her daughters at St.-Énogat near St.-Malo and remarried to a Melanson widower there in April 1761; she gave him no more children.  Two of Alexandre's daughters married into the Doiron and Henry families in France, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Only one of Alexandre's three sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1736, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Margerite Aucoin in c1758 on the eve of the island's dérangement.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, soon after their marriage, and they settled at St.-Énogat near his widowed mother.  Between 1760 and 1777, at St.-Énogat, Marguerite gave Joseph 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, but three of them died young.  Joseph did not take his family to Poitou or Nantes, nor did he and his family emigrate to Louisiana.  He may have been the Joseph Bourg, an aging fisherman, counted at Pleurtuit near St.-Énogat in 1793 during the French Revolution.  One wonders how many of his remaining children--Joseph, fils, born in May 1760; Jean-Christophe, born in December 1761; Hélène-Germain in March 1765; Marguerite-Josèphe in August 1767; Anne-Françoise in May 1769; Isabelle-Laurence in August 1773; and Charles-Simon in July 1777--created their own families in the mother country.   

Jean, fils's third son Joseph (who Bona Arsenault attributes to Jean's cousin Pierre à Martin), by first wife Marie-Catherine Barrieau, born at Minas in c1711, married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Dugas and Claire Bourg, probably at Minas in c1735 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1752, Françoise gave Joseph eight children, four sons and four daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Joseph, Françoise, and their eight children on the north side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the interior of the island.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Henry and Marie Hébert, at Port-La-Joye in July 1754.  According to Bona Arsenault, who does not mention Joseph's first marriage, Marie gave Joseph another son on the island in c1756.  The British deported them to France in 1758.  Joseph died in Très-Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, France, in December 1758, age 47, probably from the rigors of deportation.  One of Joseph's younger daughters married into the Longuépée family in France and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  His oldest son emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, so he may not have accompanied his family to France. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by first wife Françoise Dugas, born probably at Minas in c1735, was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  He may have returned to British Nova Scotia sometime between then and 1755, escaped the British roundup in 1755, and joined other Acadian refugees on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, or he may have left Île St.-Jean between 1755 and 1758 and gone from the island directly to the shore.  It is also possible, but not likely, that he followed his family to France in 1758 but managed to return to North America soon after his arrival.  He married Anne-Marguerite or Marguerite-Anne Léger in the late 1750s or early 1760s while in exile, either was captured by, or surrendered to the British, and ended up in a Nova Scotia prison camp with hundreds of other Acadians.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1761 and 1763, Anne-Marguerite gave Joseph three children, twin daughters and a son.  In 1765, now a widower with two young children (one of his twin daughters having died by then), he followed other Acadian refugees to Louisiana and settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  He remarried to fellow Acadian Marie LeBlanc, widow of Joseph Richard, at Cabahannocer in March 1767.  Arsenault says that between 1766[sic] and 1771, Marie gave Joseph four more children, two sons and two daughters.  Louisiana records show that in May 1771, Marie gave Joseph a set of twins, a son and a daughter.  She may have died giving birth to them.  Joseph remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles La Croix dit Durel and Judith Chiasson of Île St.-Jean and widow of Joseph Préjean, at Ascension on the river above Cabahannocer in June 1772.  They remained at Cabahannocer, also called St.-Jacques.  Arsenault says Marguerite gave Joseph another daughter in 1774.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in January 1812, in his late 70s.  His daughters by his three wives married into the Vesiers, Torbert, Gravois, Causin, and Verret families.  Two of his sons by his first two wives--the older one born in Nova Scotia, the younger one the twin born at Cabahanncoer--married into the Blanchard and Mire families and created lasting lines on the river.  The younger son's line was especially vigorous. 

Jean, fils's fourth son François l'aîné, by first wife Marie-Catherine Barrieau, born at Minas in c1717, married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, at Grand-Pré in November 1739, settled at Cobeguit, and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  Between 1740 and 1754, at Cobeguit and on Île St.-Jean, Marie-Josèphe gave François seven children, three sons and four daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted François, Marie-Josèphe (he called her Marguerite), and five of their children at Rivière-des-Blonds near his brothers Jean and Alexandre.  Marie-Josèphe died on the island soon after 1754.  The British deported François and his children to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  François, age 41, died during the crossing, as did his three youngest children, a son and two daughters.  Another daughter died in a St.-Malo hospital in March 1759.  His only remaining daughter, Françoise, married into the Henry family in France.  His two older sons also created their own families there and emigrated to Louisiana, but neither of the lines seems to have survived there. 

Older son Charles le jeune, born at Cobeguit in c1740, followed his family to Île St-Jean and his widowed father to St.-Malo, France.  He settled at St.-Énogat and married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Françoise Thériot, at nearby Pleurtuit in February 1767, and remained at St.-Énogat.  In 1773, they did not go to Poitou with most of the other Acadians in the St.-Malo, nor did they move on to Nantes in 1775-76 when most of the Poitou Acadians resettled there.  They did emigrate to Louisiana in 1785 and followed most of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  In the early 1790s, when most of the Acadians at Bayou des Écores abandoned the settlement, Charles and Marguerite resettled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where they evidently spent their final days.  They evidently were that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

François l'aîné's younger son Jean le jeune, born probably at Cobeguit in c1743, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and his widowed father to St.-Malo, France.  He settled at St.-Servan.  In March 1760, he signed on for corsair duty aboard La Biche, was captured by the Royal Navy, and held in an English prison-of-war camp until the end of the war.  In May 1763, he was repatriated to France with other Acadians in England and returned to St.-Malo.  He joined his older brother at St.-Énogat and married Marie, daughter of Ambroise Dupuis and Anne Aucoin of Minas, at Plouër in February 1768.  Between 1769 and 1772, at St.-Énogat, Marie gave Jean le jeune four children, a son and three daughters, but the son and one of the daughters died young.  Jean le jeune took Marie and their two daughters to Poitou in the early 1770s.  In 1774, Marie gave him another daughter there, but the baby died in September 1775.  Three months later, Jean le jeune, Marie, and their two remaining daughters retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where Marie gave Jean le jeune another daughter in October 1776.  They were back at St.-Énogat, probably by ship, in August 1778.  From then until 1785, at St.-Énogat, Marie gave Jean le jeune four more children, three sons and a daughter, but the daughter and one of the sons evidently died young.  Jean le jeune, Marie, and their five remaining children, two sons and three daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  When the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Jean le jeune and his family were among the minority of them who remained.  Sons Yves-Jean and Jean-Baptiste-Simon-Louis, ages 6 and 1 in 1785, may not have survived childhood or even the crossing from France; Louisiana records reveal no marriages for them.  Nor do any of their three daughters--Marguerite-Marie, Isabelle-Gertrude, and Marie, ages 16, 12, and 8 in 1785--appear in Louisiana marriage records.  Isabelle-Germaine may have resettled on upper Bayou Lafourche and lived to a ripe old age. 

Jean, fils's fifth Charles, by second wife Françoise Aucoin, born at Minas in c1720, married Madeleine-Marguerite Blanchard perhaps at Minas in c1746 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1747 and 1755, Madeleine-Marguerite gave Charles five children, two sons and three daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles, Madeleine, and three of their children at Rivière-de-l'Ouest near his father.  They evidently left the island before the British roundup of 1758.  Charles died at Québec in December 1757, age 37, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that fall and winter. 

Jean, fils's sixth and youngest son François le jeune, by his second Françoise Aucoin, born at Minas in c1732, survived childhood but did not marry.    

Jean, père's younger son Louis (who Bona Arsenault calls François-Louis and attributes to Jean's younger brother Martin), born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Cécile, daughter of François Michel and Marguerite Meunier, in c1721 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  According to Arsenault, between 1722 and 1744, Cécile gave Louis eight children, four sons and four daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Louis, Cécile, and seven of their children at Rivière-aux-Crapauds on the south shore of the island near his married son Jean-Baptiste.  Louis died in 1758 during the crossing to France, in his late 50s.  Cécile did not remarry in France.  After burying three of her sons there, she died at St.-Martin de Chantenay, near Nantes, in August 1781, age 86.  Two of her daughters married into the Guillot, Metra, and Hamon families in France.  All four of her sons created their own families on Île St.-Jean and in France.  None of them were still living when hundreds of their fellow Acadians emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, but Cécile's married daughters, as well as her youngest son's widow and three of her sons, did go to the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Eustache, born in Nova Scotia in c1722, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Daigre and Marie Boudrot, at Port-La-Joye on the island in October 1752, two months after a French official had counted him with his parents and siblings at Rivière-aux-Crapauds.  Between 1752 and 1757, Marguerite gave Eustache three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Eustache, age 36, and all of his children died during the crossing.  Eustache, in fact, died in the English port of Plymouth when their ship took refuge there before moving on to St.-Malo.  Marguerite, alone now, survived the crossing.  In April 1759, three months after reaching St.-Malo, she secured permission to move on to Cherbourg in Normandy.  In November 1763, at Le Havre, where she evidently resettled, Marguerite remarried to a Lavergne from Chignecto. 

Louis's second son Jean-Baptiste, born in Nova Scotia in c1723, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of Thomas Doiron and Anne Girouard, at Port-La-Joye in January 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1752 and 1753, Françoise gave Jean-Baptiste two children, a son and a daughter.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, Françoise, and their 7-month-old son at Rivière-aux-Crapauds on the south shore of the island near his parents and siblings.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Louis's third son Louis, fils, born in Nova Scotia in c1731, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne, daughter of Germain Pitre, in c1758 on the eve of the island's dérangement.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Louis, fils died at the hospital in St.-Malo in March 1759, age 28, from the rigors of the crossing, before he could father any children.  Anne remarried to a Gautrot widower at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in November 1764, gave him more children, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Louis, père's fourth and youngest son Charles, born in Nova Scotia in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, France, where he married Madeleine Blanchard in c1759 soon after reaching the port.  Between 1760 and 1773, Madeleine gave Charles seven children, three sons and four daughters, four of whom, three daughters and a son, died young.  Charles took his family, likely including his mother Cécile, to Poitou in 1773.  Madeleine gave him another son there in 1776, but the boy died less than a week after his birth.  In early 1776, Charles, Madeleine, and their three remaining children, probably with his mother Cécile in tow, retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Madeleine gave Charles another son there in 1777.  Charles died at Nantes before September 1784, in his 40s.  Oldest son Lucien married probably at Nantes in the early 1780s.  In 1785, Madeleine, who never remarried, took her two unmarried sons to Louisiana.  Her married son also took his family there.  The younger sons created their own families in the Spanish colony.  One wonders if Charles and Madeleine's oldest daughter Cécile-Jean[sic], born at Pleudihen in April 1760, survived childhood, and, if so, did she marry in France; she did not go with her family to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Lucien, born at Pleudihen, France, in October 1763, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and became a carpenter.  He married Marie-Élisabeth or -Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Marguerite Duhon of Rivière-aux-Canards, probably at Nantes in the early 1780s.  They followed his widowed mother and two younger brothers to Louisiana in 1785, but they did not follow them and the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Instead, they followed Marie-Élisabeth's family to the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin and settled on upper Bayou Vermilion.  Marie-Élisabeth was pregnant on the voyage and gave birth to their first child, a son, at Attakpas in April 1786.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1803, Marie-Isabelle gave Lucien six children, three sons and three daughters.  Lucien died in Lafayette Parish in September 1841, age 77.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Duhon, and Montet families.  All three of his sons married, into the Duhon, Landry, and Parr families, and established lasting lines on the western praires. 

Charles's third son Jean-Charles, called Charles, born at Pleudihen in July 1773, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother and younger brother to Louisiana.  He lived with his mother and younger brother on upper Bayou Lafourche until 1798, when he followed her to the Attakapas District, where his older brother had settled in 1785.  Charles, at age 34, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Jean Trahan and Madeleine Hébert of Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, at Attakapas in October 1798, on the same day and at the same place where his younger brother Joseph married Marie-Louise's sister.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1802 and 1803, Marie-Louise gave Charles two daughters.  He died "of dropsy" in Lafayette Parish in January 1824, age 50.  One of his daughters married into the Frederick family.  Having had no sons, this family line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou States.

Charles's fifth and youngest son Joseph-Florent, the second with the name, baptized at St.-Martin de Chantenay, near Nantes, in October 1777, followed his widowed mother and older brother to Louisiana.  He lived with his mother and older brother on upper Bayou Lafourche until 1798, when he followed her to the Attakapas District, where his oldest brother had settled in 1785.  At age 21, Joseph married Jeanne-Félicité, called Félicité, another daughter of Jean Trahan and Madeleine Hébert, at Attakapas in October 1798, on the same day and at the same place where his older brother Charles married Félicité's sister.  According to Bona Arsenault, from 1799 to 1810, Félicité gave Joseph four children, two sons and two daughters, but Louisiana records give them a third son.  Joseph died in Lafayette Parish in March 1840, age 62.  His daughters married into the Desormeaux and Mire families.  Two of his three sons married into the Thibeaux and Landry families and established vigorous lines on the prairies.

Antoine's third son Bernard, born at Port-Royal in c1648, married Françoise, daughter of Vincent Brun and Renée Breau, at Port-Royal in c1670 and remained there.  Between 1671 and 1692, Françoise gave Bernard 13 children, two sons and 11 daughters.  Bernard died at Port-Royal.  Nine of his daughtesr married into the Daigre, Dugas, Guilbeau, Melanson, Babineau dit Deslauriers, and Granger families.  Only one of his two sons created his own family, but the line was a vigorous one. 

Older son René, born at Port-Royal in c1676, survived childhood but did not marry. 

Bernard's younger son Abraham le jeune, born at Port-Royal in c1685, married Marie, daughter of Claude Dugas and Françoise Bourgeois, at Port-Royal in November 1709 and remained there.  Between 1712 and 1735, Françoise gave Abraham le jeune 11 children, seven sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Abraham le jeune died at Annapolis Royal in April 1751, age 66.  His daughters married into the Comeau, Babineau dit Deslauriers, Pellerin, and Amireau families.  

Oldest son François, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1712, married Madeleine, daughter of Alexandre Comeau and Marguerite Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in November 1735.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1750, at Annapolis Royal, Madeleine gave François seven children, four sons and three daughters.  According to Stephen White, François died at Annapolis Royal in April 1751, age 39, on the same day and at the same place where his father died.  According to Arsenault, at least one of François's sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in c1736, escaped the British in 1755 and married Marie Girouard in c1759 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Joseph a daughter at Restigouche in September 1760, soon after the British attacked the French stronghold.  Joseph likely was one of the Joseph Bourgs counted with a thousand other Acadians at Restigouche in late October 1760.  One wonders what happened to him and family after 1760. 

Abraham le jeune's second son Claude, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1716, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieu, at Annapolis Royal in January 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1754, at Annapolis Royal, Marie-Josèphe gave Claude three children, all sons.  Claude died in exile before 1760, in his 40s, while being held in the prison at Halifax.  One wonders what happened to his sons. 

Abraham le jeune's third son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1718, married Marguerite-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Charles Blanchard and Madeleine Girouard, Annapolis Royal in January 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1746 and 1758, at Annapolis Royal, Petitcoudiac, and in exile, Madeleine gave Joseph five children, all daughters.  According to Stephen White, Joseph died between 1754 and 1757, but Arsenault contends that Joseph à Abraham settled at Batiscan on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Troise-Rivières in c1766 after Le Grand Dérangement.  According to Arsenault, four of Joseph's daughters married into the Caissie, Thifault, and Lemnay families at Batiscan. 

Abraham le jeune's fourth son Honoré, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1720, married Madeleine, daughter of François Amireau and Madeleine Lord of Pobomcoup, at Annapolis Royal in February 1749 and settled there.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Abraham le jeune's fifth son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1726, married Cécile, daughter of René Doucet and Marie Broussard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, Cécile gave Charles a daughter in 1753.  Arsenault says the British deported Charles and his family to Massachusetts in 1755, but Charles was counted in Connecticut in 1763.  Cécile and their daughter, whose name, Arsenault says, has been lost to history, died either at Annapolis Royal or in New England during exile.  Charles remarried to Anne, daughter of Joseph Richard and Anne Bastarache, in Connecticut in February 1764 and sanctified the marriage at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, today's Chambly, east of Montréal, in October 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1779, in New England and Canada, Anne gave Charles nine more children, seven sons and two daughters.  According to Bona Arsenault, at least four of Charles's sons, all by second wife Anne, created their own families.

Second son Jean-Joseph, born perhaps in Connecticut in c1766, followed his parents to Canada and married Louise, daughter of Pierre Dumas and Charlotte-Perrine Boutin, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in September 1793. 

Charles's fourth son Joseph, born probably at Chambly in c1772, married Marguerite, daughter of Nicolas Arcan and Marguerite Frenet, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in July 1799. 

Charles's fifth son Pierre, born probably at Chambly in c1773, married Marie-Émery, daughter of Marie-Ours Coderre and Josephte Casavant, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in October 1794. 

Charles's sixth son Alexis-Amable, born probably at Chambly in c1774, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Renaud and Marguerite Audet-Lapointe, in September 1797. 

Abraham le jeune's sixth son Pierre, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1731, married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Pierre Daunay and Marie-Josèphe Denoyon, at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Canada, in February 1772. 

Abraham le jeune's seventh and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1735, likely escaped the British in 1755 but may have been captured by them in the early 1760s.  After the war with Britain ended in 1763, he moved to Île St.-Pierre, one of the French-controlled islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where he married Jeanne, daughter of Claude Chaillou and Marthe Bastrate and widow of Nicolas Cuomel, in October 1763.  In 1764 and 1767, she gave him a son and a daughter on Île St.-Pierre and on nearby Île Miquelon.  Sometime in 1767, Jean-Baptiste took his family to La Rochelle, France, to escape overcrowding on the Newfoundland islands.  In 1769 and 1771, Jeanne gave Jean-Baptiste two more sons in France.  In the early 1770s, he took his family to Poitou to participate in the settlement venture there.  Sadly, son Jean, age 10, died at Monthoiron, near Châtellerault, in July 1774, but Jeanne gave Jean-Baptiste another son at Monthoiron in June 1775.  In March 1776, Jean-Bapiste, Jeanne, and their four remaining children retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Jean-Baptiste died at the Hôtel-Dieu there in August 1777, age 42.  Jeanne, still unmarried, emigrated with her four remaining children to Louisiana in 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Jeanne died before December 1795, when her children were counted in a Lafourche valley census without her.  Daughter Marie-Geneviève married into the Moulard family at New Orleans soon after they reached the Spanish colony and followed her family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  All three of Jeanne's remaining Bourg sons reached adulthood in Louisiana, but only two of them created their own families there.

Second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at La Rochelle, France, in c1769, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He married François-Hélène, daughter of François Blanchard and Hélène-Judith Giroir and widow of Jean-Charltes Gautrot, at Ascension on the Missisippi above New Orleans in February 1793 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died in Assumption Parish in April 1831, age 62.  Two of his eight sons married Moulard and Bourg cousins on the river and on Bayou Lafourche, and the lines likely survived. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's third son André, born in France in c1771, followed his famliy to Poitou and Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He was counted with her on upper Bayou Lafourche in  January 1791, age 19, but then disappears from the historical record.  He probably did not marry.

Jean-Baptiste, père's fourth and youngest son Charles, born at Monthoiron, Poitou, France, in June 1775, followed his family to Nantes and his widowed mother to Louisiana.  He married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Joseph Dupuis and his second wife Marie Landry of Minas, at Assumption in February 1797; Élisabeth also had been born in Poitou.  Charles died in Assumption Parish in November 1828, age 54.  Two of his five sons married into the Thériot and Dupuis on the upper bayou, and the lines likely survived. 

Antoine's fourth son Martin, born at Port-Royal in c1650, married Marie, daughter of ___ Potet and Marie Gautrot, at Port-Royal in c1674 and settled at Cobguit in the early 1700s.  Between 1676 and the early 1700s, Marie gave Martin 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Martin died at Cobeguit.  His daughters married into the Thériot and Aucoin families.  Five of his seven sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Abraham le jeune, born at Port-Royal in c1678, married Anne, daughter of Claude Dugas and Françoise Bourgeois, probably at Port-Royal in c1704 and settled at upper Cobeguit, where he served as a delegate to the colonial Council.  Between 1707 and 1710, Anne gave him three children, a son and two daughters.  Abraham le jeune remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Thériot and Jeanne Landry, probably at Cobeguit in 1711.  Between 1712 and the early 1730s, at Cobeguit, Marie gave Abraham le jeune six more children, four sons and two daughters.  His daughters by both wives married into the Robichaud, Hébert, and Dugas families.  Four of his five sons by both wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Anne Dugas, born at Cobeguit in October 1707, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Gautrot and Louise Aucoin, probably at Cobeguit in c1735, though Bona Arsenault insists that Pierre à Abraham married Marie Landry in c1728.  According to Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre a daughter in c1730 who married into the Vécot family on Île St.-Jean.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, between 1737 and 1747, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre four children, two sons and two daughers.  Stephen White says Pierre died before 23 January 1759, which implies that his entire family had moved on to the French Maritimes and was deported to France in 1758.  Robichaux agrees:  Pierre, age 51, died at sea during the crossing.  Younger daughter Marguerite-Josèphe, age 12, died at St.-Malo in early February 1759, soon after reaching the port, and older son Ambroise, age 19, died at St.-Malo in March, most likely from the rigors of the crossing.  Marie-Josèphe took her two remaining children to nearby Pleslin.  She did not remarry.  Daughter Françoise-Josèphe emigrated to Louisiana with her younger brother, lived to a ripe old age, and never married, but her brother did. 

Second son Jean-Pierre le jeune, also called Pierre, fils, born probably at Cobeguit in c1743, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St-Malo and settled with his widowed mother and older sister at Pleslin.  In 1768, at age 25, he began studying for the priesthood under the notorious Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre but ended his studies in 1772 after the abbé died.  Jean-Pierre le jeune evidently returned to Pleslin to live with his mother and sister.  He worked as a foreman.  In 1785, now age 42, he emigrated to Louisiana with his older sister and an umarried cousin, Élisabeth, daughter of Claude Bourg.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  At age 46, in June 1789, Jean-Pierre le jeune married Marguerite, 46-year old daughter of Michel Richard and Françoise Thériot, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer on the river, but they settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Despite her age, Marguerite gave Jean-Pierre a son, Jean-Pierre, fils, who died in May 1806, age unrecorded, but he could not have been more than 15 or 16.  This line of the family died with him. 

Abraham le jeune's second son, name unrecorded, from second wife Marie Thériot, born at Cobeguit in the early 1710s, died an infant. 

Abraham le jeune's third son Jean-Pierre, by second wife Marie Thériot, born at Cobeguit in the late 1710s, married Élisabeth, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Marguerite Landry, probably at Cobeguit in c1742.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, Marie-Josèphe, age 9, and Théodore, age 12, orphan children of Jean Bourg and Isabelle Hébert, were deported to St.-Malo, France, probably from Île St.-Jean in 1758 with the family of François Bourg and survived the crossing.  Stephen White says Jean-Pierre à Abraham died before 23 January 1759, so the childrens' parents evidently did not survive the crossing.  Robichaux says Marie-Josèphe lived with her brother at Pleslin near St.-Malo until she died there in December 1762, age 13.  Her brother, on the other hand, survived childhood and created his own family.

Théodore, born probably at Cobeguit in c1746, accompanied his family to Île St.-Jean and his younger sister to St.-Malo in 1758 and settled at nearby Pleslin.  He married Anne, daughter of Joseph Granger and Marguerite Gautrot and widow of Pierre Bonnière, at nearby St.-Coulomb in June 1764 and settled there.  Between 1765 and 1770, Anne gave Théodore four children, a son and three daughters, but the youngest daughter died young.  Théodore, Anne, and their three remaining children did not go to Poitou or to Nantes with other St.-Malo-area Acadians, but they did emigrate to Louisiana in 1785.  From New Orleans, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anne gave Théodore no more children in the Spanish colony.  Their daughters married into the Simoneaux and Daunis families on the bayou.  Théodore's only son married into the LeBlanc family and settled on the bayou.  

Jean à Abraham le jeune, Bona Arsenault insists, married Marie-Anne Térriot in c1735 and that she gave him two sons in c1741 and 1742.  Arsenault says both of Jean's sons by Marie-Anne created their own families during and after Le Grand Dérangement

Older son François, born probably at Cobeguit in c1741, married Isabelle, daughter of Jean Broussard and Anne LeBlanc, at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1771 and 1772, Isabelle gave François two children, a son and a daughter. 

Jean's younger son Jean, fils, born probably at Cobeguit in c1742, married Marie Hébert in c1762 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1769, Marie gave Jean, fils three children, all sons.  Jean, fils remarried to Anne, daughter of Louis Belliveau and Louise Haché of Annapolis Royal, in c1770.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Jean, fils a daughter in 1773.  Arsenault gives no clue as to Jean, fils's comings and goings during and after Le Grand Dérangement

Abraham le jeune's fourth son Alexandre, by second wife Marie Thériot, born at Cobeguit in c1719, married Marguerite-Josèphe Hébert probably at Cobeguit in c1747 and moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  Between 1747 and 1754, at Cobeguit and in the Maritimes, Marguerite-Josèphe gave Alexandre four children, all daughters.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  The two younger daughters died at sea.  Alexandre, Marguerite, and their remaining daughters settled at St.-Suliac near St.-Malo, and Marguerite gave him no more children there.  Alexandre took his family to Poitou in 1773 and died at Senillé near Châtellerault in October 1774, age 55.  Marguerite-Josèphe and her two Bourg daughters retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where her younger daughter Marguerite married into the Aucoin family, bore a son, and soon became a widow, too.  Older daughter Marie-Rose died in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in February 1782, age 33.  Marguerite-Josèphe, her widowed daughter, and grandson Firmin Aucoin emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  The daughter remarried into the Garidel family in the Spanish colony, but her mother never remarried. 

Abraham, le jeune's fifth and youngest son Joseph, by second wife Marie Thériot, born at Cobeguit in c1733, married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of Paul Dugas and Anne-Marie Boudrot, probably on Île St.-Jean in c1758 on the eve of the island's dérangement.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, soon after their marriage, and Marguerite died at sea.  She gave him no children.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Granger and Anne Richard and widow of Alain Bugeaud of Grand-Pré, at Pleurtuit near St.-Malo in June 1760.  They settled at nearby St.-Coulomb before moving to St.-Servan.  Between 1761 and 1770, Marie-Madeleine gave Joseph six children, four sons and two daughters, but the oldest son died in childhood.  Joseph took his family to Poitou in the early 1770s.  In March 1776, they retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where their oldest surviving son married.  In 1785, Joseph, Marie-Madeleine, and four of their unmarried children, two sons and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  Their married son and his family also went there on the same vessel.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marie-Madeleine, age 54 when they reached New Orleans, gave Joseph no more children in the Spanish colony.  Ther older daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Bujole family on the river.  Their younger daughter Élisabeth-Blanche lived to a ripe old age but never married.  Three of Joseph's sons married into the Dugas, Bujole, Landry, Boudrot, and Hébert families in France and in the Spanish colony, and two of them created substantial lines on Bayou Lafourche.

Martin's second son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1682, married Marguerite, daughter of Martin Blanchard and Marguerite Guilbeau, in c1706 and also settled at Cobeguit, where he died.  According to Stephen White, between 1708 and the mid-1710s, Marguerite gave Pierre five children, all sons, three of whom married.  Bona Arsenault insists that Marguerite gave Pierre another son named Joseph in c1711 (White attributes him to Pierre's cousin Jean, fils) and a daughter named Anne in c1722 who married two Blanchard cousins.  Pierre died at Cobeguit before Le Grand Dérangment

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Cobeguit in July 1708, if he survived childhood may not have married. 

Pierre, père's second son François, born at Cobeguit in c1709 (Bona Arsenault says c1717), married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Marguerite Landry, in c1735 probably at Cobeguit.  Arsenault says Marguerite gave François a daughter in 1738.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France shows that Marguerite gave him two sons as well in c1741 and c1744.  Their daughter Marguerite- (Arsenault calls her Madeleine-)Josèphe married into the Robichaud family probably at Cobeguit.  François remarried to Émilie, also called Émilienne, daughter of Philippe Thibodeau and Isabelle Vincent and widow of Pierre Doiron, in c1746 probably at Cobeguit and moved on to Île St.-Jean perhaps in 1755 to avoid the British roundup in Nova Scotia.  Between 1748 and 1756, at Cobeguit and on the island, Émilie gave François four more children, a son and three daughters.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Wife Émilie and all four of their children either died at sea or in a St.-Malo hospital soon after the family reached the port.  François, age 50, died in the hospital at St.-Malo in February 1759, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  Only François's older children from his first marriage survived the crossing, but all of his Robichaux grandchildren also died at sea.  Both of his remaining sons created their own families in France, and his daughter Marguerite-Josèphe and son-in-law Alexandre Robichaux had many more children there. 

Older son Athanase, born probably at Cobeguit in c1741, followed his father and stepmother to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo and settled at nearby St.-Énogat, where he worked as a sailor and navigator.  He married cousin Luce or Louise, daughter of Joseph Breau and Ursule Bourg, at nearby St.-Suliac in February 1768.  In 1769 and 1773, Luce gave Athanase three sons, but two of them died young.  He took his family to Poitou in 1773, and Luce gave him another son there in 1775.  In December of that year, Luce and her sons followed dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Athanase was not with them.  He likely had become so frustrated with providing a living for his family in Poitou that he returned to sea.  When his third son died in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in June 1776, age 3, one wonders if Athanase was back with his family to mourn the loss of another child.  In 1779 and 1785, at Nantes, Luce gave him two more children, another son and a daughter.  They, too, did not survive childhood.  Athanase, Luce, and their remaining son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  The death of their daughter, Marie-Rose, in late June 1785, in fact, forced the family to take a later ship to the Spanish colony.  When they reached Louisiana, they followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Athanase died by January 1788, when his wife was listed in a Lafourche valley census as a widow.  She had given him no more children there.  Only one of their two sons married, into the Melanson family, and settled on the upper Lafourche.

François's younger son Joseph, born at Cobeguit in c1744, followed his father and stepmother to Île St.-Jean and his older married sister and her family to St.-Malo.  He settled near them and his older brother at St.-Énogat and married cousin Anne, daughter of Joseph Melanson and Anne Bourg, at St.-Énogat in January 1767.  Between 1768 and 1779, Anne gave Joseph ten children, three sons and seven daughters, but six of them, all of the sons and three of the daughters, died young.  Joseph did not take his family to Poitou or Nantes, nor did he and his family emigrate to Louisiana.  One wonders how many of his remaining children--Marguerite-Théodose, born in November 1768; Jeanne-Perrine in August 1772; Josèphe-Marguerite in September 1773; and Anne in January 1775--married in the mother country. 

Pierre, père's third son, his name unrecorded, born at Cobeguit in the early 1710s, died probably as an infant. 

Pierre, père's fourth son Jean, born at Cobeguit in c1713, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Benoit and Marie-Anne Breau, in c1740 probably at Cobeguit and moved on to Île Royale in the late 1740s or early 1750s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1756, at Cobeguit and in the French Maritimes, Françoise gave Jean six children, two sons and four daughters.  In late March 1752, a French official counted Jean, Françoise, and their six children at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse in the interior of the island near his first cousin Pierre à Ambroise.  The British deported Jean and his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  One of their daughters died at sea.  Jean, age 46, Françoise, age 35, and youngest son Théodore, age 7, died at St.-Suliac near St.-Malo in June 1759, three months after reaching the port.  Six of Jean and Françoise's children survived the crossing, but two of the younger sons, Joseph and Jean-Baptiste, ages 8 and 6 in 1758, may have died in France, dates unrecorded.  Jean's three remaining daughters married into the Hébert and Gautrot families at St.-Suliac and Nantes.  The youngest, Marie, died at Nantes in November 1780, and her older sisters, Luce-Perpétué and Gertrude, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, where Luce-Perpétué remarried into the Mazerolle family.  Jean's oldest son created his own family in France and also emigrated to the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Marin, also called Martin, born at Cobeguit in c1741, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo.  He lived with his parents and younger siblings at St.-Suliac, remained there after his parents died, and married Marie-Osite, called Osite, daughter of Olivier Daigre and Angélique Doiron of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, at nearby Plouër in January 1763.  Between 1764 and 1781, at Plouër, Marie-Osite gave Marin nine children, five sons and four daughters, all of whom, amazingly, survived the rigors of childhood in a refugee community.  Marin did not take his family to Poitou or Nantes, but he did take them to Louisiana in 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  Marie-Osite gave him had no more children in the Spanish colony.  Like most of their fellow Acadians at Bayou des Écores, they did not remain.  In 1794, after a series of hurricanes caused extensive flooding along the bayou, most of Marin's family followed other Acadians to upper Bayou Lafourche; one of the daughters and her husband, as well as a son and his wife, remained at Baton Rouge.  Marin died at either Bayou des Écores or on the upper Lafourche by December 1795, when Marie-Osite was counted in a Lafourche valley census without a husband.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Dupuis, Felteman, and Landry families at Bayou des Écores, Baton Rouge, and on Bayou Lafourche.  All five of Marin's sons married, into the Aucoin, Blanchard, Bertrand, and Breau families, and settled on the river and Bayou Lafourche.

Pierre, père's fifth and youngest son Claude, born probably at Cobeguit in the 1710s, married Anne, daughter of Joseph Henry and Christine Pitre, in c1751 (Bona Arsenault says c1755) probably at Cobeguit.  Arsenault says Anne gave Claude a son, Jean-Michel, in c1757.  If Stephen White's marriage date is followed here, and it is, they may also had a daughter, Élisabeth/Isabelle, at Cobeguit in c1752.  Claude, Anne, and their daughter may have escaped the British roundup in the Minas Basin in the summer of 1755 and sought refuge, along with the entire population of Cobeguit, on Île St.-Jean.  If Claude and Anne were still alive, the British likely deported them to France in 1758 but not to St.-Malo.  Their infant son may not have survived the crossing, but daughter Isabelle, who would have been age 6 in 1758, certainly did.  If she was an orphan when she reached the mother country, she probably lived with relatives until she came of age.  In her early 30s, still unmarried, perhaps motivated by a widower she had met in Nantes, she emigrated to Louisiana with two older Bourg cousins.  She married François, son of Jean Friou and Antoinette Pru of Paimboeuf, France, and widower of Susanne Robichaux, at New Orleans in September 1785 soon after they reached the Spanish colony aboard the same vessel.  She settled with her husband and teenage stepson on upper Bayou Lafourche, where she gave François more children, including at least two more sons.  Isabelle died in Assumption Parish in December 1819.  The priest who recorded her burial said she was age 76 at the time of her death, but he likely meant to write 67.  If she was the daughter of Claude Bourg and Anne Henry of Cobeguit, the blood of that family line, at least, survived in the Bayou State. 

Martin's third son Ambroise, born at Port-Royal in c1686, married Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marie Blanchard, in c1714 probably at Annapolis Royal and may have remained there.  After 1717, Élisabeth gave Ambroise five children, three sons and two daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Daigre, and Pitre dit Marc families. 

Oldest son Ambroise, fils, born in the mid- or late 1710s, married Anne, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Dugas, in c1745 probably at Cobeguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Ambroise, fils a son, Ambroise III, in c1757. 

Ambroise, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born in c1717, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Hébert and Marguerite Dugas, in c1751 at either Cobeguit or in the French Maritimes.  According to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine (he calls her Marguerite) gave Pierre a daughter in c1756.  In late March 1752, a French official counted Pierre le jeune, Madeleine, and their infant child, as yet unnamed, at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse in the interior of the island near his first cousin Jean à Pierre.  Pierre le jeune and his family perished aboard the British transport Duke William, which sank in a North Atlantic storm in December 1758 on its way to St.-Malo, France. 

Ambroise, père's third and youngest son Joseph married Julie Arseneau in c1769.  One wonders where. 

Martin's fourth son François, born at Port-Royal in c1688, married Madeleine, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, at Grand-Pré in 1717 and remained there.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, as well as Stephen White's work and Louisiana records, reveal that François and Madeleine had, between 1721 and 1744, at least seven children, four sons and three daughers, that the family moved on probably to Île St.-Jean after 1752, and that François and Madeleine's children, at least, were deported to France in 1758.  All three of their daughters married:  Anne into the Blanchard family either at Minas or on Île St.-Jean and the Dugas family in France; Françoise into the Naquin family on Île St.-Jean and the Guillot family in France; and Luce-Perpétué into the Hébert family in France and the Boudrot and Gautrot families in Louisiana.  Daughter Anne also emigrated to the Spanish colony.  Three of François's four sons created their own families, but only one of the lines survived, in Louisiana.

Oldest son Michel, born, Albert Robichaux insists, "on Isle St. Jean" in c1721, but it likely was at Minas late in the decade, married Cécile, daughter of François Moyse dit Latreille, fils and Marie Brun, probably at Minas in c1749 and followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  Between 1751 and 1758, Cécile gave Michel four children, two sons and two daughters.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  All four of their children died at sea, and Michel died in St.-Malo in March 1759, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  Cécile, now alone, settled at nearby St.-Suliac, where she remarried to a Dugas widower in June 1768.  She gave him no more children, at least who appeared in French records, and died in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in December 1776, age 52. 

François's second son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1730, followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  He was still singe when the British deported him to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  He traveled on a different ship from most of the rest of the family--they on one of the so-called Five Ships, he, younger sister Françoise and her family on Supply. He reunited with his family at St.-Suliac after he reached St.-Malo in March 1759.  He married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jacques Naquin and Jeanne Melanson, sister of his sister Françoise's first husband Joseph, at St.-Suliac in January 1761.  Between 1763 and 1772, Anne-Marie gave Pierre six children, two sons and four daughters, but all but one of the daughters and the younger son did not survive childhood; the oldest daughter, in fact, died of smallpox at age 10.  They lived for a time in La Rochelle, where Anne-Marie gave him another daughter in c1774.  Pierre and his family then joined the settlement venture in Poitou, but, like most of the Acadians who had gone there, they did not remain.  They retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in March 1776.  In 1779 and 1781, Anne-Marie gave Pierre two more children, a daughter and a son, but both of them died young.  They also buried their 16-year-old daughter Marguerite in St.-Nicolas Parish in October 1784.  Pierre, Anne-Marie, and their remaining three children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Pierre died by January 1788, when his wife was listed in a Lafourche valley census as a widow; one wonders if he even survived the crossing to Louisiana.  Anne-Marie did not remarry.  She died in Assumption Parish in September 1822, in her mid-80s.  Older daughter Jeanne remained a spinster and died in Assumption Parish in February 1839, age 73.  Younger daughter Georgine-Victoire married into the Daigle family on Bayou Lafourche.  Anne-Marie and Pierre's surviving son married into the Livois family in the Spanish colony and settled on the Lafourche. 

François's third son Anselme, born probably at Minas in c1736, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, France.  Less than a week after his arrival, he died in the hospital at St.-Malo in February 1759, age 33, probably from the rigors of the crossing. 

François's fourth and youngest son Alain, born probably at Minas in c1741, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and St.-Malo, France.  He settled with his family at St.-Suliac, where he worked as a day laborer.  In 1761, now age 20, he signed up for corsair service aboard the ship Le Tigre and was promptly captured by the British.  He remained in an English prison from March of that year until the end of the war two years later.  After his return to St.-Malo in June 1763, he lived with younger sister Luce-Perpétué at St.-Sulaic.  He married cousin Anne-Marie, daughter of Joseph Comeau and Marguerite Hébert, at St.-Suliac in January 1764.  From 1764 to 1773, Anne-Marie gave Alain seven children, three sons and four daughters, but only three of them, a son and both daughters, survived childhood.  Alain took his family to Poitou in 1773, and Anne-Marie gave him another son there.  In 1775 or 1776, they followed hundreds of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they appear on a church record in July 1776.  Between 1776 and 1783, in St.-Similien and St.-Nicolas parishes, Anne-Marie gave Alain five more children, all of them sons.  All but one of them died young.  They also buried 12-year-old Marguerite-Tarsile in St. Nicolas Parish in August 1782, and their son who been born in Poitou also died at Nantes.  When Alain and Anne-Marie emigrated Louisiana in 1785, only three of their 13 children followed them there.  Daughter Marie-Geneviève married into the Dugas family in the Spanish colony.  Youngest son Louis-Alexis, called Alexis, age 2, appears on the embarkation but not the debarkation record of Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, so the boy evidently died at sea.  Alain died in Assumption Parish in October 1827, age 86.  Only the blood of this long-suffering family survived in the Bayou State. 

Martin's fifth son Charles, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Cécile, another daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marie Blanchard, probably at Minas in c1720 and moved to Cobeguit by the 1730s.  From the early 1720s to the late 1730s, at Minas and Cobeguit, Cécile gave Charles at least four children, two sons and two daughters.  Older daughter Cécile married into the Breau family in the early 1740s.  According to Stephen White, Charles died before 1750, likely at Cobeguit.  Daughter Cécile and her family moved on to Île Royale, where a French official counted them at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse in the interior of the island in March 1752.  In the summer of 1755, the entire population of Cobeguit escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia by fleeing to Île St.-Jean.  Charles's widow Cécile, if she was still alive, and her three younger children may have been among the ones who fled.  Her younger daughter Marguerite-Josèphe married into the Henry family on Île St.-Jean in May 1756.  Her older son married there a year later.  The British deported members of the family to France in 1758.  Cécile likely had died by then.  Her children sailed aboard different vessels and landed in Cherbourg as well as St.-Malo.  Older daughter Cécile died at St.-Malo in November 1758, one of the many passengers who died from the rigors of crossing aboard the transport Duke William.  Charles and Cécile's three younger children survived their sojourn in France and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Older son Ambroise le jeune, born perhaps at Cobeguit in c1732 (Bona Arsenault says c1736), followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Pitre and Isabelle Guérin at Port-La-Joye on the island in June 1757.  The British deported them to Cherbourg, France, in 1758.  Anne-Josèphe gave Ambroise a daughter in Très-Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, in December 1759.  Five days after their daughter was born, Anne-Josèphe died, evidently from the rigors of giving her birth.  Ambroise remarried to Marie-Modeste, daughter of Jacques Molaison and Cécile Melanson of Pobomcoup, at Très-Ste.-Trinité in July 1763.  They lived for a time at Le Havre before moving on to St.-Malo in January 1773.  Between 1764 and 1783, at Le Havre, Cherbourg, and Pleurtuit, near St.-Malo, Marie-Modeste gave Ambroise 11 more children, three sons and eight daughters.  Only two of them died young.  When hundreds of other Acadian in the St.-Malo area went to Poitou in the early 1770s, Ambroise and Marie-Modeste remained at Pleurtuit.  When most of the Poitou Acadians retreated to Nantes in late 1775 and early 1776, Ambroise and his family did not join them there.  Ambroise and Marie-Modeste did, however, emigrate to Louisiana in 1785, taking nine of their children with them; only two of their children were sons.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to a new Acadian settlement at Bayou des Écores on the Mississippi north of Baton Rouge.  Marie-Modeste gave Ambroise another daughter there in March 1786, so she must have been pregnant on the voyage from St.-Malo, but the couple also buried their younger son Ambroise, fils and daughter Modeste at the bayou settlement.  Ambroise died at Bayou des Écores by July 1790, when Marie-Modeste remarried to 24-year-old Joseph-Constans Granger there; she was age 40 at the time of her remarriage.  Ambroise would have been in his mid- or late 50s at the time of his death.  Four of his seven remaining daughters, all by second wife Marie-Modeste, married into the Bernard du Montier, Blanchard, Seguin, and Thibodeaux families at Bayou des Écores or Baton Rouge.  His only remaining son married into the LeBlanc family and, like his sisters, was among the few Acadians at Bayou des Écores who did not resettle on the lower river or on upper Bayou Lafourche.  He went, instead, to what became West Baton Rouge Parish.

Charles's younger son François-Xavier, born at Cobeguit in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, was deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758, and settled at nearby Pleurtuit.  In May 1760, Françoix-Xavier signed up for corsair duty aboard Le Jason, was captured by the Royal Navy, and was held in an English prisoner-of-war camp.  In May 1763, he was repatriated to France with other Acadians in England and returned to Pleurtuit, where he married Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Anne Thériot, in September 1763.  Between 1764 and 1780, at Pleurtuit, Élisabeth gave François-Xavier at least nine children, six sons and three daughters, but two of the sons died as infants at nearby Crehen.  François-Xavier did not take his family to Poitou in the early 1770s, nor did he and Élisabeth join other Acadians in Nantes when the Poitou venture failed in 1775.  They remained at Pleurtuit, where François-Xavier remarried to Marguerite-Pélagie, daughter of Pierre Henry and Marie-Madeleine Pitre, in July 1781.  In 1783 and 1785, Marguerite gave François-Xavier two more children, a son and a daughter.  François-Xavier, Marguerite, and seven of their children--four sons and three daughters--emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  One of their older sons, François-Xavier or Augustin-Xavier, who would have been age 17 in 1785, either had died by then or chose to remain in the mother country.  François-Xavier and his family followed his older brother Ambroise to Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  Marguerite gave François-Xavier more children there, including another son, but the couple also buried their year-old daughter, Anne-Victoire, who had been born only weeks before they left St.-Malo.  François-Xavier either died at Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, or, when most of the Acadians abandoned the bayou settlement, he led his family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Colonne, and Fremin families on the upper Lafourche.  Four of his sons by both wives, all born in France, married into the Schmitt or Smith, Canade, Rentrop, and Berthelot families and settled on the bayou.

Martin's sixth and seventh sons, their names unrecorded, born probably at Port-Royal in the early 1700s, evidently died in infancy.  

Antoine's fifth and youngest son Abraham, born at Port-Royal in c1662, married Marie dite Sébastienne, daughter of Vincent Brun and Renée Breau and widow of François Gautrot, fils, at Port-Royal in c1683.  Between 1684 and 1697, Marie dite Sébastienne gave Abraham eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Abraham served as a delegate to the Nova Scotia Council at Annapolis Royal from 1720 until 1726, when he asked to be relieved of his duties "because of lameness and infirmity."  In September 1727, he and two other Acadian delegates ran afoul of Lieutenant-Governor Lawrence Armstrong, who accused them of encouraging their fellow Acadians to refuse to take an unqualified oath of allegiance to the new King Geogre II.  Armstrong threw the younger delegates into the Fort Anne dungeon but allowed Abraham, "'in consideration of his great age'"--he was 65--"'to leave the province as soon as possible, but without his goods.'"  Abraham likely remained.  He died probably at Annapolis Royal after April 1736, when his wife's burial record called her his wife, not his widow.  He would have turned 74 that year.  His daughters married into the Broussard and Fougère families.  Five of his six sons created their own families at Minas, Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in c1684, survived childhood but did not marry.   

Abraham's second son Claude, born at Port-Royal in c1688, married Judith, daughter of Jérôme Guérin and Isabelle Aucoin of Cobeguit, at Grand-Pré in 1717.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1741, at Annapolis Royal, Judith gave Claude a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Babineau dit Deslauriers, Melanson, Gautrot, and Michel families, and another may have married into the Naquin family and emigrated to Louisiana from France.  At least two of Claude's sons created their own families.

Second son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in c1726, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Doucet and Françoise Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in February 1750.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Claude's third son Claude, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1728, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Guilbeau and Madeleine Forest, at Annapolis Royal in November 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1772, at Annapolis Royal, in exile, and in Canada, Marie gave Claude, fils seven children, two sons and five daughters.  They escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge in Canada, where they were counted at St.-Joachim below Québec City in 1760 and 1765, at St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu east of Montréal in 1767, and at St.-Denis farther up the Rivière Richelieu in 1770.  Two of their daughters married into the Carpentier and Leclave families at St.-Denis.  One of Claude, fils's two sons created his own family. 

Younger son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at St.-Denis in c1772, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Pierre Liré and Marie-Louise Phaneuf, at St.-Denis in April 1773 [Arsenault probably meant 1793], and remarried to Élizabeth, daughter of François Gareau-Saintonge and Élizabeth Dufault, at St.-Ours in January 1804. 

Abraham's third son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1689, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of François Broussard and Catherine Richard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714.  Between 1715 and 1718, Élisabeth gave Pierre three children, all daughters, two of whom married into the Guérin and Doucet families.  Élisabeth died at Annapolis Royal in December 1718, and Pierre moved on to the French Maritimes, motivated, perhaps, by what happened to his father in 1727.  Pierre remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot and widow of Charles dit Charlot Boudrot, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1727.  In 1729, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre another daughter at Port-Toulouse.  She remained in the French Maritimes and married into the Vécot family on Île St.-Jean.  Pierre died probably at Port-Toulouse before 1734.    

Abraham's fourth son Michel, born at Port-Royal in c1693, became a carpenter.  He married Anne, daughter of Abraham Boudrot and Cécile Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in April 1720.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1739, Anne gave Michel eight children, five sons and three daughters.  In the late 1720s, motivated, perhaps, by the fate of his father, Michel took his family to Tracadie on the north shore of Île St.-Jean, where they were counted in 1734.  In August 1752, a French official counted Michel, Anne, and seven of their children at Tracadie near brother Charles.  Michel died before 1761 perhaps while in exile.  Two of his daughters married into the Doucet and Hébert families, one of them on Île Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland in 1766.   At least one of Michel's sons created his own family.

Son Michel, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1722, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne Belliveau there.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Michel, fils a son, Pierre, in 1741.  Oddly, when a French official counted Michel, fils's famliy at Tracadie in August 1752, Michel, fils, age 30, was listed with them, but the official said nothing of his wife or son. 

Abraham's fifth son Charles, born at Port-Royal in c1695, followed his older brothers to the French Maritimes.  He married Anne, daughter of Charles dit Charlot Boudrot and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1726, and moved to Tracadie on the north shore of Île St.-Jean, where he and his family were counted in 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1750, Anne gave Charles 10 children, six sons and four daughters, on the islands, but other records show them with 11 children.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles, Anne, and 11 of their children, six sons and five daughters, at Tracadie near his brother Michel.  Three of their older sons married on the island between 1752 and 1755.  Charles and his family escaped the British in 1758, sought refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, and escaped the British again, at Restigouche, in the summer of 1760.  That October, Charles, called le vieux, the elder, was counted at Restigcouhe with a family of 13--among the 1,003 Acadians remaining.  After October 1760, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, the redcoats and held in a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia.  In August 1763, Charles, Anne, and their 11 children were counted with other Acadian refugees on Georges Island,  Halifax.  Charles must have died soon after.  In 1764-65, Anne, now a widow, and six of her children, two sons and four daughters, followed the Broussards from Halifax to Louisiana and settled on Bayou Teche.  Her daughters married into the Thibodeaux, Pitre, Guilbeau, Sonnier, Savoie, and Landry families at Attakapas and Opelousas (daughter Gertrude's marriage to Amand Thibodeaux at New Orleans in February 1765 was, in fact, the earliest recorded Acadian marriage in Louisiana).  Both of Anne's sons who accompanied her to Louisiana created their own families in the Opelousas District, but only one of the lines endured.  Anne was still alive in 1771, when a Spanish census taker found her with daughter Gertrude in Attakapas.  Anne would have turned 62 that year. 

Oldest son Charles, fils, born in the French Maritimes in c1727, followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  He married Angélique, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vécot and Marie Chiasson of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Tracadie, in November 1753, and remarried to Marguerite Landry in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1756 and 1757, Marguerite gave Charles, fils two children, a son and a daughter.  Evidently the British deported Charles, fils and his family to France in 1758.  A Catherine, daughter of Charles Bourg and Marguerite Landry married into the Bertrand family at Cherbourg in February 1764.  Catherine, her husband, and their seven children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Charles's second son Sylvain, born in the French Maritimes in c1728, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Madeleine Landry in c1752.  One wonders where they were on the island that August.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1754 and 1757, Madeleine gave Sylvain two children, a son and a daughter.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758.

Charles's fourth son Claude, born in the French Maritimes in c1732, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne Henry in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Claude a son, Jean-Michel, in 1757.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758. 

Charles's seventh son L'ange, born at Tracadie in c1748, followed his family into exile and imprisonment and his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana.  He married Anne-Marie, called Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeaux and Françoise Sonnier, probably at Opelousas in c1776.  Marie gave L'ange two daughters but no sons.  He died at Opelousas in June 1788, age 40.  Except perhaps for its blood, his line of the family died with him. 

Charles's eighth and youngest son Joseph, born at Tracadie in c1750, followed his family into exile and imprisonment and his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana.  He married Susanne, another daughter of Pierre Thibodeaux and Françoise Sonnier, probably at Opelousas in c1780.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1782 and 1809, at Opelousas, Susanne gave Joseph 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Figurant and Lavergne families and perhaps into the Rous family as well.  Four of Joseph's six sons married into the ____, Hébert, Guidry, and Lavergne families, and another took up with a mulatresse libre and fathered a "natural" son by her.  Two, perhaps three, of the family lines survived. 

Abraham's sixth and youngest son Joseph, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Louise, daughter of Alexandre Robichaud and Anne Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in November 1733.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1724 and 1744, at Annapolis Royal, Louise gave Joseph nine children, two sons and seven daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Savoie and Gaudet families.  At least one of Joseph's sons created his own family.

Older son Joseph, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1738, was deported to Massachusetts in 1755.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Amireau and Marguerite Lord of Pobomcoup, at Boston, and the marriage was validated at L'Assomption on the upper St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivières and Montréal in 1767.339

Bourgeois

Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois, founder of the Chignecto settlement, who arrived in 1641, and his wife Jeanne Trahan created one of the most influential families in the colony.  Jeanne gave Jacob 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Cyr, Girouard, Boudrot, Mirande dit Tavarre, Maissonat dit Baptiste, Dugas, LeBlanc, and Comeau dit Des Loups-Marins families.  Daughter Marguerite's third husband Pierre Maissonat dit Baptiste, a widower from Bergerac, France, was a notorious privateer who fought the English during King William's and Queen Anne's wars.  All three of Jacques dit Jacob's sons married, but family lines came only from the two older ones.  His and Jeanne's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes.  At least 20 of his descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and the French Antilles in the late 1760s and 1770s.  But the majority of Jacques dit Jacob's progeny could be found in Canada and greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Charles, born at Port-Royal in c1646, married Anne, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Doucet, in c1668 at Port-Royal and may have followed his father to Chignecto in the early 1670s.  Between 1670 and 1678, Anne gave Charles four children, two sons and two daughters.  Charles died between 1677 and 1679, in his early 30s.  One of his daughters married into the Caissie family.  Both of his sons created their own families.  His older son's line was especially vigorous.  Many of the Acadian Bourgeoiss who emigrated to Louisiana came from the younger son's branch of the family.   

Older son Charles, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1673, married Marie, daughter of Guillaume Blanchard and Huguette Gougeon, at Port-Royal in c1692 and settled at Chignecto.  Between 1693 and 1713, Marie gave Charles, fils 10 children, six sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Nuirat, Héon, Poirier, and Sire or Cyr families.  All six of Charles, fils's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles III, born at Chignecto in c1695, married Madeleine, daughter of Alexis Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in February 1718.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1719 and 1737, Madeleine gave Charles III six children, five sons and a daughter.  Charles III remarried to Marie dite Louise-Marie, daughter of Michel dit Michaud Bourg and Élisabeth Melanson and widow of Antoine Gaudet, at Beaubassin in July 1741.  She may not have given him anymore children.  Charles III died at Chignecto by October 1754.  His daughter married into the Carret family.  One of his sons was deported to South Carolina in 1755, but most of them escaped the British that year.  All five of them created families of their own.

Oldest son Charles IV, born at Chignecto in c1719, married Anne, daughter of Michel Poirier and Françoise Arseneau, at Beaubassin in February 1743.  They settled at Aulac west of Rivière Missaguash.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1751, Anne gave Charles four children, two sons and two daughters.  Charles remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean of Annapolis Royal and widow of Charles Simon dit Boucher and Charles Girouard, probably at Chignecto in c1752.  She gave him at least three more children, two sons and a daughter, born at Chignecto and in exile.  The British deported Charles, Marie, and their children to South Carolina in 1755.  In August 1763, colonial officials counted Charles, Marie, three of his children from first wife Anne (only son Jean, who would have been age 18, was missing) and three children from Marie's second marriage to Charles Girouard.   

Charles III's second son Michel le jeune, born at Chignecto in c1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Martin Richard and Marie Cormier, in c1750 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1768, Marguerite gave Michel seven children, five sons and two daughters.  Other sources note that their oldest son was born in c1750, soon after their marriage.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted at Québec in 1757 and settled at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on Rivière Richelieu east of Montréal.  Their daughters married into the Guertin and Cottard families.  Three of Michel le jeune's five sons created their own families.

Oldest son Félix, born at Chignecto in c1750, followed his family to Canada and married Marie, daughter of Jean Chiasson and Marguerite-Anne Bernard, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in January 1777.  Félix died at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu in November 1812, in his early 60s. 

Michel le jeune's second son David, born at Chignecto in c1754, followed his family to Canada and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Cormier and Marie-Madeleine Bernard, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in January 1780.  David died at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu in January 1808, in his mid-50s.

Michel le jeune's fifth son Michel, fils, born at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Canada, in September 1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Quay dit Dragon and Marguerite Cartier, at St.-Dénis-sur-Richelieu in January 1792, and remarried to Marie-Louise, daughter of Joseph Goguet and Monique Goulet, at St.-Hyacinthe-les-Maskoutains in March 1810. 

Michel le jeune's sixth and youngest son Joseph, born in Canada in c1768, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Jacques Girouard and Marie-Françoise Gaudet, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in January 1792, and remarried to Marie-Desanges, daughter of Jacques Gauvin and Marie Paquet, at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu in August 1814. 

Charles III's third son Pierre, born at Chigencto in c1723, married Marie, another daughter of Martin Richard and Marie Cormier, at Beaubassin in February 1746.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre a daughter in c1748.  They, too, escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Pierre remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Bernard and Cécile Gaudet and widow of Jean Mignault, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in February 1763.  Pierre's daughter by first wife Marie married into the Migneau family at Chambly. 

Charles III's fourth son Claude, born at Chignecto in c1734, may also have escaped the British in 1755 but was captured by them a few years later and held as a prisoner in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain ended, he chose to settle on Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  He married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vigneau and Anne Poirier, on the island in January 1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1782, Marie gave Claude eight children, four sons and four daughters.  French authorities evidently coaxed them into leaving the island in 1767 to relief overcrowding.  They were counted at La Rochelle, France, in 1768, but they returned to Île Miquelon sometime in the 1770s.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British captured the Newfoundland islands and deported the inhabitants to La Rochelle.  Claude and his family were still living at the French port in 1782, but, again, they did not remain there.  Claude took his family back to Île Miquelon in 1784, but this time they moved on to Canada.  They settled at Nicolet on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, where Claude died in October 1801, in his late 60s.  Three of his daughters married into the Richard, Bergeron, and Benoit families at Nicolet.  Three of his four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably on Île Miquelon in c1766, followed his family to France and Canada and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Marguerite Thibodeau, at Nicolet in October 1797.

Claude's third son Jacques, born probably at La Rochelle, France, in c1777, followed his family to Canada and married cousin Éléonore Vigneau probably at Nicolet in March 1813, and remarried to Madeleine Bourque in February 1816. 

Claude's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at La Rochelle in c1779, followed his famliy to Canada and married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Bergeron and Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, at St.-Grégoire near Nicolet in July 1807. 

Charles III's fifth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Chignecto in c1737, evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  He married Marie-Élisabeth, daughter of Honoré Prince and Isabelle Forest, at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières in February 1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1765, Marie-Élisabeth gave Jean-Baptiste three children, two sons and a daughter.  Jean-Baptiste died in c1765, perhaps at Bécancour.  One of his sons created his own family.

Younger son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Bécancour in c1765, married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Richard and Françoise Cormier, at Bécancour in October 1789, remarried to Monique, daughter of Simon Bourg and Rosalie Gaudet, at nearby Nicolet in January 1796, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Françoise, daughter of Pierre Rouillard and Thérèse Lemire, at Nicolet in May 1801. 

Charles, fils's second son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1699, married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Catherine LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in August 1722 and settled at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1725 and 1747, Marie gave Pierre seven children, five sons and two daughters.  Pierre was counted at Aulac west of Rivière Missaguash in 1754.  One wonders if he was a widower by then.  At least one of his married sons moved on to Île St.-Jean either before or after 1755.  In the fall of that year, the British deported Pierre to South Carolina.  The following spring, the governor of that colony allowed Acadians sent there to return to greater Acadia if they could acquire their own boats.  Pierre's younger brother Michel led a group of 78 refugees north; Pierre was among them.  In August, the British intercepted them at Long Island, New York, and promptly dispersed them to various communities in the lower part of the colony.  Colonial officials sent Pierre to North Castle, Westchester County, on the lower Hudson, where he was counted without a wife or children in late August 1756.  He died during exile probably in New York.  His daughters married into the Babin, Thériot, and Berteau families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  All of his five sons created their own families, and two of them emigrated to Louisiana in 1765. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Chignecto in c1733, either escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on Île St.-Jean or went to the island between 1752 and 1755.  He married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter Joseph Bourg and Anne Cormier of Chignecto, at Port-La-Joye on the island in February 1757.  They evidently escaped the British on the island in 1758, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, fell into British hands a few years later, and were held as prisoners in Nova Scotia until the end of the war with Britain.  Jean-Baptiste, Madeleine, and their two sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in 1765.  Madeleine was pregnant on the voyage and gave birth to a third son at New Orleans soon after the family reached the colony.  They settled at Cabahannocer/St.-Jacques on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Osite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Melançon and Madeleine LeBlanc and widow of Jean-Pierre LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques in February 1776.  In his early 70s, Jean-Baptiste remarried again--his third marriage--to Rosalie LeBlanc, widow of cousin Paul Bourgeois, fils, at St.-Jacques in January 1804.  Jean-Baptiste died in St. James Parish in March 1816, in his early 80s.  Five of his six sons, all by first wife Madeleine, two born in greater Acadia, the others in Louisiana, married into the Sonnier, LeBlanc, Arceneaux, and Godin families and created vigorous lines on the river. 

Pierre's second son Michel, born at Chignecto in c1734, married Marie Le____.   They escaped the British in 1755, took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, fell into British hands a few years later, and were held as prisoners in Nova Scotia until the end of the war with Britain.  Probably a childless widower now, Michel emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and followed older brother Jean-Baptiste and his family to Cabahannocer/St.-Jacques.  Michel remarried to Rose-Osite, called Osite, Gautrot of Grand-Pré, widow of Olivier Forest, at New Orleans in May 1767.  They settled at St.-Jacques.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1769 and 1775, Osite gave Michel four children, two sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Duhon and Michel families.  Their older son married  into the Thibodeaux family and created a lasting line on the river. 

Pierre's third son Claude, born at Chignecto in c1736, escaped the British in 1755 and married Anne Bourg in c1761 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1762 and 1765, Anne gave Claude two children, a daughter and a son.  They were counted on Rivière St.-Jean in 1768. 

Pierre's fourth son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1738, escaped the British in 1755 and married Madeleine Hébert in c1762 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine gave Jean a daughter, Marie-Anne, in 1763.  Jean died in c1765.  Evidently his line of the family died with him.  Madeleine remarried to a Comeau, who took her to Pigiguit, present-day Windsor, Nova Scotia, by 1768.  They did not remain there.  Jean's daughter Marie-Anne was baptized on Rivière St.-Jean in July 1768, age 5. 

Pierre's fifth and youngest son Joseph, born at Chignect in c1741, evidently escaped the British in 1755 and married Félicité, daughter of Pierre Belliveau and Jeanne Gaudet of Annapolis Royal, in c1764.  The marriage was rehabilitated at Pigiguit, now Windsor, Nova Scotia, in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1765 and 1766, Félicité gave Joseph two children, a daughter and a son, but they had many more children, especially sons, during the following years.  Joseph died at Memramcook, present-day southeastern New Brunswick, in November 1833, in his early 90s.  According to Bona Arsenault, six of his sons settled in the Memramcook area. 

Charles, fils's third son Honoré, born at Chignecto in c1702, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Michel Richard and Agnès Bourgeois, at Annapolis Royal in July 1726.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1745, Marie gave Honoré six children, three sons and three daughters.  Perhaps as a widower, Honoré moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Pichard and Claudine Deron and widow of Henri L'Hôtellier, on the island before August 1752.  That month, a French official counted him, Marie-Madeleine, and two of his children from his first marriage on the south side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Honoré and his family, along with dozens of other Acadian exiles, perished that December aboard the British transport Violet which sank in a North Atlantic storm.  Marie, one of Honoré's oldest daughter, married into the Girouard and LeBlanc