APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

MARTIN

[mar-TANH, MART-in, mar-TEEN]

ACADIA

Pierre, son of René Martin and Étiennette Poirier of St.-German de Bourgeuil in the Loire valley of France, born in c1601, married Catherine, daughter of Olivier Vigneau and Renée Courtin, at St.-Germain de Bourgueil in June 1630.  Six years later, having been recruited by agents of the Company of New France, Pierre arrived in Acadia aboard the St.-Jehan with his wife Catherine and sons Étienne, Pierre, fils, and Urbain.  Pierre, père died at Port-Royal in the late 1670s, in his 70s.  He and Catherine had seven children, including four sons, but only two of them married, and only one of them had children of his own.  Their three daughters married into the Morin dit Boucher, Bourg, Pellerin, and Mercier dit Caudebec families.  

Oldest son Étienne, born at St.-Germain de Bourgeuil in June 1631, died probably at Port-Royal in c1636, age 5. 

Pierre, fils, born at St.-Germain de Bourgueil in October 1632, married first to Anne Questnorouest dit Petitous, an Indian, at Port-Royal in c1660.  They had nine children, including fives sons, but only two of them married.  One of their daughters married into the Pellerin family.  Pierre, fils remarried to Jeanne, daughter of Louis Rousselière and Isabelle Parisé and widow of Pierre Godin dit Châtillon, probably at Port-Royal in the late 1680s or early 1690s, but they had no children.  Pierre, fils's older son Pierre III, by his first wife, born at Port-Royal in c1661, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Godin dit Châtillon and Jeanne Rousselière, at Port-Royal in c1686.  They had 17 children, including six sons who married into the Clémenceau, Bertrand, Carret, Michel, and Dubois families.  Four of their daughters married into the Bertaud dit Montaury, Glain dit Cadet, Fortin dit La Fortune, Gourdon, Blouet, Martinez dit Espagnol, and Le Métayer families.  By the early 1730s, Pierre III had taken his family to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where he died at Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of the island in December 1739, in his late 70s.  Pierre, fils's younger son Jean, by his first wife, born at Port-Royal in c1671, married Madeleine, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier, at Port-Royal in c1696.  They settled on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, and had 13 children, including six sons, but only one of them married, into the Paul family during Le Grand Dérangement.  Six of their daughters married into the Vinet, Plessis or Précis, Trunet dit Francoeur, Jehannot, Bourhis, Pineau dit Lejeunesse, and Guilton dit La Roche families.  Jean died at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in September 1732, age 60.  

Urbain, born at St.-Germain de Bourgueil in March 1634, died probably at Port-Royal in c1636, and, with older brother Étienne, was one of the first French children to die in the colony.  

Youngest son Mathieu, born at Port-Royal in c1639, was, by all accounts, "the first Frenchman born in Acadia."  He married a woman in the early 1690s whose name has been lost to history.  Mathieu became a weaver and received a seigneurial grant at Cobeguit, at the northeast end of the Minas Basin, in March 1689 but was not counted there until 1714.  He died probably at Cobeguit before April 1724, in his mid-80s.  He and his wife had no children, so all of the descendants of this branch of the Acadian Martins come from Mathieu's nephews, Pierre III and Jean, who settled on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale, not peninsula Acadia. 

~

Meanwhile, Barnabé Martin, born in France in c1636, probably no kin to Pierre of St.-Germain de Bourgeuil, came to Port-Royal in the 1660s and started another, even larger line of the Martin family in Acadia In c1666, he married Jeanne, daughter of Simon Pelletret of Paris and Perrine Bourg, at Port-Royal They had eight children, including two sons who created families of their own.  One of their sons moved to Île St.-Jean by the 1750s, but the other one remained at Port-Royal.  Four of their daughters married into the Simon dit Le Boucher, Coste, Chênet or Chesnay dit La Garenne, Samson, and Gentil families.  Two of their daughters settled at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, but the others remained at Port-Royal.  Barnabé died at Port-Royal by 1686, probably in his late 40s Jeanne remarried; she died at Port-Royal in January 1706, age 63

Older son René dit Barnabé, born at Port-Royal in March 1671, the year of the first census, married Marie, daughter of André Mignier dit Lagassé and Jacquette Michel and widow of Joseph Gravois, at Port-Royal in c1693.  They had 11 children, including six sons who married into the Comeau, Michel, Cyr, Brun, and Granger families.  Their three daughters married into the Richard, Clémenceau dit Corporon, Tourneur, Breau, and Bourg families.  René died at Port Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in September 1756, age 87

Younger son Étienne, born at Port-Royal in c1678, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Comeau le jeune and Jeanne Bourgeois, at Port-Royal in October 1705.  They had a dozen children, including three sons who married into the Girouard, Lord, Richard, and Maillet families.  Six of their daughters married into the Savoie, Racle, Blanchard, Forest, Richard, Doucet, Gervais, and Lord families.  Étienne died at Annapolis Royal in May 1751, in his early 70s. 

Most, if not all, of the Acadian Martins who emigrated to Louisiana came from this branch of the family.  René dit Barnabé's descendants are especially numerous in the Bayou State.

~

By 1755, Martins from both family lines in Acadia could be found at Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered both branches of this family even farther. ...

Descendants of Barnabé Martin ended up at Champflore, Martinique, in the French West Indies, during the late 1760s. ...

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Martins were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them--10 members of the family, including two sets of brothers--reached New Orleans in February 1765 with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  After attempting to exchange their Canadian card money for Louisiana funds, they followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie along the banks of Bayou Teche:

Marguerite Martin, age 44, came with husband Michel Doucet of Port-Royal, age 43, five children, ages 13 to 1, and orphans Bonaventure Martin, age 12, and Judith-Philippe Martin, age 12, Marguerite's younger siblings.  Judith married fellow Acadian Augustin-Rémi, son of probably Pierre Boudreaux of Pigiguit, at Attakapas in c1777; they settled near Grand Coteau in what became St. Landry Parish, where Judith died in January 1805, in her early 50s.  Meanwhile, Marguerite's succession estate record was filed at what became the Opelousas courthouse in February 1800.  Bonaventure lived at New Orleans, where he married, but returned to the western prairies in his later years. 

Claude Martin of Port-Royal, another of Marguerite's brothers, was a 29-year-old bachelor when he reached the colony. 

Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé, probably from Chignecto, age 32, came with husband René Robichaud of Cobeguit, age 30, and two daughters, ages 8 and 6Marguerite's husband died in the Bayou Teche epidemic of 1765.  She remarried to French surgeon Antoine Borda in October 1767 and settled at what became St. Martinville, where she died in February 1822; the priest who recorded her burial said that she was 104 years old when she died, but she was "only" 89. 

Marguerite dit Barnabé's brother Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, fils, age 31, came with wife Mare-Madeleine Godin dit Bellefontaine of Rivière St.-Jean, age 27, and two children--Hélène, age 4, and newborn Élisabeth. 

Joseph Martin of Chignecto, age 24, was still a bachelor when he came with brother Pierre, age unrecorded, also a bachelor.

That summer and fall, an epidemic struck the Teche valley settlements and killed dozens of Acadians.  No Martin died from the illness, but Marguerite dit Barnabé's husband René Robichaud was one of the victims.  She and her cousins Marguerite, Bonaventure, Judith, Claude, Joseph, and Pierre remained on the prairies, but her brother Ambroise, fils fled with his family to Cabanocé on the river and did not return. 

Descendants of Claude MARTIN (1730-1798; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Claude, elder son of Charles Martin and Jeanne Comeau and brother of Bonaventure, was born at Port-Royal in December 1730.  Claude escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He ended up a prisoner of war in Nova Scotia.  With a brother and two sisters, he came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in February 1765.  He followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where he married Marie, daughter perhaps of fellow Acadian Dominique Babin, in c1769.  At the time of his marriage, Claude served as the syndic for the Attakapas Acadians.  He and Marie settled at La Pointe, on Bayou Teche near present-day Breaux Bridge.  Their daughters married into the Cormier and Mouton families.  Later in life, Claude served as major domo or trustee of the Attakapas church and died probably at La Pointe in July 1798, age 67.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in June 1822, a year and a half before his wife died and decades after his passing.  Four of his five sons created families of their own.  Most, if not all, of the Acadian Martins on the western prairies descend from Claude and three of his sons.

1

Oldest son Jean-André, called André, born at Attakapas in September 1770 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest the following April, married Catherine, also called Gertrude, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvain Sonnier of Opelousas, at Opelousas in June 1795.  They settled at the bridge at La Butte on upper Bayou Vermilion between present-day Breaux Bridge and Lafayette, and at Grand Prairie, a few miles farther down the Vermilion near what is now downtown Lafayette.  "Besides his holdings on the Vermilion," one historian maintains, André "owned land on the Mermentau River within the Calcasieu frontier, where he ran large herds of cattle."  The same source adds:  "André purchased some 1500 acres of land on the Mermentau River from the Attakapas Indians; probably he had been running cattle in that area long before the purchase, using Indians as herders."  André turned 29 in 1799, so if he had been herding cattle on the Mermentau "long before the purchase," he would have done so beginning in his late teens or early 20s.  André and Catherine's son André, fils, also called Valérien-André, was born in January 1798, Valéry le jeune in May 1800 but died "at his parents' [home]" at Grand Prairie, age 7, in August 1807, Charles, also called Charles or Baru Zéphirin, was born in September 1802, and Thomas Drosin in October 1804 but died at age 7 in October 1811.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Dugas families.  André's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in June 1822; he would have been 52 years old that year; a second succession record probably was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in November 1824. 

1a

Valérien André married Marie Cléonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1818.  Their son Adrien was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1819, Valéry le jeune near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1821, and another Valéry le jeune in Lafayette Parish in August 1826.  Valérien André, called André, Esq. by the parish clerk, remarried to Émilie, called Émilite, daughter of fellow Acadian David Guidry and widow of Alexandre Dugas, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1839; André was in his early 40s and Émilie in her late 30s at the time of the wedding.  Their daughter married into the Campbell and Mouton families.  Valérien André, like his father, "was a large landholder, in 1860 operating a 1400-acre sugar plantation on Bayou Vermilion near [present-day] Lafayette with 85 slaves," enough to qualify him as a "great planter."  Valérien André died in Lafayette Parish in May 1867; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Valérien died "at age 71 yrs.," but he was "only" 69; his succession record, calling him André and indentifying his second wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July. 

Valéry le jeune, by his father's first wife, married Lodoiska, 17-year-old daughter of French Creole Joseph Dejean, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1845; Lodoiska's mother was a Guidry.  Their son André le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1850, Joseph Adrien in May 1852, and Adrien le jeune in April 1856.  Their daughters married into the Judice and Mouton families.  Valéry le jeune died in Lafayette Parish in October 1867; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Valérie, as he called him, died "at age 46 to 47 yrs."; if he was the first Valéry le jeune, he would have been 46; the second Valéry le jeune would have been only 41. 

André le jeune, called André D. by the parish clerk, received his emancipation in Lafayette Parish in December 1868, after he turned 18. 

Adrien, by his father's first wife, died in Lafayette Parish in September 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Adrien died "at age 30 yrs.," but he was 33.  He probably did not marry. 

1b

Charles Zéphirin married Marie Caroline, called Caroline, daughter of German Canadian Chevalier Joseph Daigle, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1823; Caroline's mother was a Doucet.  Their son Charles, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1828, Fernesse, Fernes, or Fernest was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 8 months, in June 1831, Martial Thissapherne was born in July 1838, Jules in August 1843, Gabriel in c1847 but died at age 16 in February 1863, and André Mart was born in November 1851.  Their daughters married into the Bienvenu, Boudreaux, Cochrane, and Martin families.  Charles Zéphirin died in Lafayette Parish between October and December 1863; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that "Zephyrin" died "at age 52 yrs.," but he was 61; his succession record, with a will dated 8 September 1853, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1864.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Charles, fils died in Lafayette Parish in February 1848.  He was only 20 years old and probably did not marry. 

Fernes married Hélène Françoise, daughter of Anglo American Robert, also called Herbert, Eastin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1855; Hélène's mother was an Arceneaux.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Charles Herbert was born in July 1856 but died at age 1 in August 1857, Joseph Edmond was born in October 1859, twins Félix and Herbert in August 1861, Edmond Zéphirin in January 1865 but died at age 2 1/2 in December 1867, Paul was born in October 1866 but died the following March, and Horace was born in March 1870.

Martial married Mydia or Nydia, daughter of Robert Taylor, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1860.  Their son Robert Bruce was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1862.  Martial remarried to Eveline or Evelina, daughter of Solomon Harmon, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1866. 

2

Joseph-Marin, called Marin, born at Attakapas in January 1773, married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas, at Attakapas in October 1799.  They settled at La Grand Pointe.  Their son Michel-Aladin, called Aladin, was baptized "at age about 18 mths." in August 1804, Joseph died 24 hours after his birth in August 1804, a second Joseph was born in September 1805 and baptized "at La Pointe at the residence of [his deceased grandfather] Claude Martin" the following January, and Joseph Roséaimé, called Roséaimé, was born in February 1814 but died the following July.  They also had a son named Arvillien, unless he was the second Joseph.  Their daughters married into the Beraud, Guidry, and Riguez families.  One of their daughters attended school at the Grand Coteau academy from November 1826, when she was 9 years old, until May 1830.  Marin died in Lafayette Parish in August 1824; the priest who recorded his burial said that Marin was 43 years old when he died, but he was 51; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1824. 

2a

Arvillien died in Lafayette Parish "from falling off a horse" in August 1822.  The priest who recorded his burial did not bother to give Arvillien's age at the time of his death. 

2b

Michel Aladin married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Potier of Lafayette Parish, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in December 1823.  Their son Césaire was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 17 months, in March 1827, Louis Adolphe, called Adolphe, at age 3 months, 26 days, in September 1827, Michel Fileas or Philias, called Philias and also Joseph, was born in February 1829, Pierre in July 1831, Alexandre Flavius was baptized at age 1 1/2 months in April 1834, Sosthène was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in December 1835 but died at age 7 months the following July, Joseph Numa, called Numa, was born in December 1837, and Jean Baptiste in March 1843.  They also had sons named Balthazar and André Aladin.  Michel Aladin's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in August 1845.  He died in Lafayette Parish in April 1855; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Aladin died "at age 46 yrs.," but he was in his early 50s.  Eight of his sons created families of their own. 

Césaire married Marie Pamela, daughter of French Creole Ursin Patin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1847; Marie's mother was a Guidry.  Their son Louis was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1856, and Paul in March 1862.  Their daughters married into the Albarado and LeBlanc families. 

Adolphe married Marie Erasie, called Erasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Eugène Breaux, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1848.  Their son Michel Aladin le jeune was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1850, and Jean in Lafayette Parish in May 1860.  Adolphe died perhaps in Lafayette Parish in December 1862; he was only 35 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September 1865.  Was his death war-related? 

Philias married Euphémie, daughter of Spanish Creole Joseph Castille, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1850.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Omer was born in November 1851, a son, name unrecorded, died at age 4 months in December 1862, and Émile was born in May 1866. 

Pierre married Fanelie, another daughter of Ursin Patin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1854.  Their son Pierre Aladin was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1861.  Six months after the birth of his son, at age 30, Pierre enlisted in Company F of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Louisiana.  He was promoted to third corporal and accompanied his regiment to Tennessee in the spring of 1862.  He was grievously wounded at the Battle of Shiloh in early April, fell into enemy hands, and was sent to the U.S. general hospital at St. Louis, Missouri, where he died of his wounds on April 19.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August 1865. 

Alexandre married Honorine, another daughter of Hippolyte Eugène Breaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1856.  Their son Adelma was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1859, Alexandre, fils in November 1862, Aloyde in January 1865, and Léo near Breaux Bridge in April 1869. 

Balthazar married Octavie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1859.  Their son Jean Angèl died in Lafayette Parish at age 1 year, 4 months, in May 1860.

Joseph Numa married Marie Caroline, called Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Valsin Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1861.  Their son Joseph Georges, called Georges, was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1863 but died age 8 months in June 1864, Adonis was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in August 1864, Armine, perhaps a son, died "at age 3 wks." in February 1866, Jean Palmyre was born in November 1867, and Louis Aimar in March 1869. 

André Aladin married Azéma, daughter of Pierre Ozémé Constantin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1865; the marriage was record civilly in Lafayette Parish in October 1866. 

3

Michel, born at Attakapas in March 1777, married Marguerite, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Huval of La Pointe, at Attakapas in September 1806; Marguerite's mother was a Doucet.  They settled at La Pointe.  Their son Placide Norval was born in May 1810, and Joseph Portalis in September 1812 but died at age 2 in August 1814.  Their daughters married into the Broussard and Voorhies families.  Michel died in St. Martin Parish in November 1833; the priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was 54 years old when he died, but he was 56; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May 1834.  Neither of his sons created a family.

Placide Norval died "at his father's home at la pointe" in October 1827.  He was only 17 1/2 years old and did not marry.  His family line, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

4

Valéry, born at Attakapas in December 1781, married Céleste or Célestine, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Huval, at Attakapas in August 1805.  They settled at La Pointe.  Their son Valéry, fils was born in November 1805 and baptized "at Lapointe, residence of widow Claude Martin" the following June but died "at his parents' home" at La Pointe, age 2 1/2, in September 1808, Placide was born in September 1807 and baptized "au quartier dit de La Butte (the area called La Butte) at the home of [his uncle] André Martin" the following December, Louis Balthazar, called Balthazar, was born in August 1817, André le jeune, also called André Valsin and Valsin André, in December 1820, and Siméon Valérien, called Valérien le jeune in February 1826.  Their daughter married into the Mouton family.  Valéry died in St. Martin Parish in November 1857; the priest who recorded his burial said that Valéry died "at age 77 yrs.," but he was 75; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following January. 

4a

Placide married Marie Eurasie, called Eurasie, daughter of fellow Acadian François Bernard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1827.  Their son Placide Omer, called Omer, was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1831[sic], Siméon Valéry in January 1832[sic], and Albert Fileas in February 1833.  Their daughter married into the Rousseau family.  Placide died in St. Martin Parish in January 1846; he was only 39 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month. 

Siméon Valéry married Marie Françoise Celina, called Celina, daughter of French Creole Maximilien Derneville DeBlanc, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1849.  Their son Robert was born in St. Martin Parish in March 1853. 

Omer married Élise, daughter of French Creole Alexandre Estilette, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1855.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son William Martin was born in May 1856, René in June 1859, and Georges in April 1861.

Albert Fileas was "emancipated" by a decree issued at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in January 1852; he was just shy of age 19.  Albert married Félicianne, another daughter of Maximilien Derneville DeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1857.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Gabriel Samuel was born in November 1857, Henry Louis in August 1861, Placide Laurent in May 1863, Louis in August 1866, and Charles Marie Oscar in February 1870. 

4b

André Valsin married fellow Acadian Azélie Guidry at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1841.  Their son Agnan Edgard, called Edgard or Edgar, was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1841, Victor in March 1843, Joseph Valsin died at age 11 months in August 1847, and a child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish in January 1848.  André Valsin remarried to Louise, daughter of Robert Cochrane, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1852.  Their son Paul was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1853, Jean Horace in Lafayette Parish in February 1859, Robert in May 1860, a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at birth in September 1862, Joseph Albert was born in July 1866, and Placide Charles in October 1868. 

Victor, by his father's first wife, married Ismène, daughter of fellow Acadian Sosthène Mouton, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1861, and sanctified the marriage at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1866.  Victor remarried to Sidalise, daughter of fellow Acadian Sidney Mouton of Lafayette Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1869; Sidalise was a niece of Victor's first wife.  Victor and Sidalise settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Joseph André was born in December 1870. 

Edgar, by his father's first wife, married cousin Julie, daughter of Charles Zéphirin Martin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1863.  Their son Joseph Claude was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1863. 

4c

Valérien le jeune married Marthe Angelina or Angeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Sosthène Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1852.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Jean Sosthène was born in November 1852, Sidney in April 1856, Auguste in May 1858, Edmond in November 1861, Émile in March 1866, and Paul Alfred in September 1868. 

4d

Louis Balthazar married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvestre LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1853.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Louis Balthazar died near Breaux Bridge in August 1862; he was only 45 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in September.  One wonders if his death was war-related, and if he and his wife had any sons. 

5

Youngest son Dositée, born at Attakapas in April 1784, died at his sister's home at Attakapas in March 1809.  The priest who recorded his burial said that "Dosithée" died "at age 22 yrs.," but he was 24.  He did not marry. 

Descendants of Bonaventure MARTIN (c1753-1817; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Bonaventure, younger son of Charles Martin and Jeanne Comeau and brother of Claude, was born probably at Port-Royal in c1753.  With his family, Bonaventure escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  And with them he ended up a prisoner of war in Nova Scotia.  With an older brother and two of his sisters, he came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue as part of the Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil party in February 1765.  He followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where Spanish officials counted him in the La Manque area in April 1766.  He was still living at Attakapas in May 1777 when he was counted in a general census there.  He owned no slaves, but he had 38 head of cattle and 15 horses, so he had done well in his time on the prairies.  Bonaventure married Louise, also called Marie, daughter of French Creole Antoine Duverne, by the early 1790s, probably at New Orleans, and lived with her at New Orleans.  They did not remain in the city, however, but moved to the western prairies; at least Bonaventure moved there, where he seems to have taken up with fellow Acadian Anne Eléonore, called Eléonore, Comeaux.  His daughter by Eléonore married into the Richard family.  Bonaventure, called "spouse of Marie Duvernet [and] inhabitant at Plaquemine Broule (Brulée[sic])" by the priest who recorded his burial, died "at his home" in December 1817; the priest said that Bonaventure was 75 years old when he died, but he likely was in his mid-60s.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, the following April.  His line of the family survived through a "natural son" who settled in St. Landry Parish. 

1

Oldest son Pierre, by his father's wife, born in December 1793 was baptized at New Orleans in December 1796.  If he did not die young, he may have remained at New Orleans. 

2

Jean-Marie, by his father's wife, died a "very young child" at New Orleans October 1799. 

3

Youngest son Prosper, a "natural son" by Eléonore Comeaux, born probably at Opelousas in c1807, married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian François Richard, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1826; Azélie's brother François, fils was the husband of Prosper's older sister Anne.  Prosper and Azélie's son Prosper, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1830, and Bonaventure le jeune in October 1836.  Their daughters married into the Idalgo and Matt families.  Prosper died "at Plaquemine," St. Landry Parish, in June 1867; the Opelousas priest who recorded the marriage, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Prosper died "at age 60 yrs."; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July. 

Prosper, fils may have married Anglo American Elizabeth Carr.  Their son Thomas Bonaventure was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1861, and Prosper III near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1862.

Descendants of Joseph MARTIN (c1741-1807; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Joseph, son of probably Paul Martin and Marguerite Cyr and brother of Pierre, was born probably at Chignecto in c1741.  He and his brother escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He ended up a prisoner in Nova Scotia and came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap Français, St.-Domingue, with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in February 1765.  He followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where he married fellow Acadian Isabelle Thibodeaux, widow of Charles Pellerin, in c1769.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Doucet, Dugas, Melançon, Moreau, and Savoie families.  Joseph died at his home on Bayou Teche in May 1807; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died "at age 66 yrs."  He and his wife may have had no sons, or at least none who created families of their own.  If so, this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Pierre MARTIN (?-?; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Pierre, son of probably Paul Martin and Marguerite Cyr, and brother of Joseph, born probably at Chignecto, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He ended up a prisoner in Nova Scotia and came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in February 1765.  He followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District and may not have married. 

~

During the late colonial period, Martins from the river crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled on the western prairies:

Marie-Jeanne Martin dit Barnabé, born probably at Chignecto in c1745, sister of François and Paul dit Barnabé of St.-Jacques and half-sister of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils and Joseph dit Barnabé of St.-Jacques and Marguerite dit Barnabé of Attakapas, came to Louisiana by August 1769, when she married fellow Acadian François Savoie, three times a widower, at Attakapas.  She and her husband were at St.-Jacques in January 1777, when Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river there.  In May of that year, however, they also were counted at Attakapas, where they were still living in 1781 and 1785. 

Descendants of Anselme MARTIN (c1750-1780s; Barnabé?)

Anselme, son of Paul Martin and Marie Thibodeau, born in Acadia in c1750, came to Louisiana by February 1774, when he married Marie-Théotiste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Hébert dit Manuel of Cobeguit, at St.-Jacques on the river.  They moved to the Attakapas District by May 1777, when Spanish officials counted them there.  Anselme died by December 1783, when his wife remarried at Attakapas.  His family line may have died with him. 

Valéry, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in July 1775, probably died young. 

~

Other MARTINs on the Western Prairies

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link many Martins in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there.  One suspects that many, if not most, of them were Creole Martins.  One also suspects that some of the Martins who lived on the western prairies during the immediate post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned by "white" Martins or, more likely, took their surname from a progenitor with the given name Martin:

Joseph Martin's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in March 1823.  The clerk who recorded the succession did not mention a wife.  Was Joseph an Acadian? 

Bernard Martin died in Lafayette Parish in June 1830.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Bernard had "no heirs" but did not give his parents' names or his age at the time of his death.  Was Bernard an Acadian? 

Jean Charles, called Charles and Charly, Martin married Acadian Marie Célesie or Célestine Trahan in a civil ceremony in c1833, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1847.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Jean, fils was born in April 1833, Marcillien in March 1846, and Jean Baptiste in June 1849.  Their daughters married into the Lejeune, Lepage, and Mayer families.  Was Jean Charles an Acadian?

Désiré Martin died in St. Martin Parish in June 1844.  He was only 11 years old.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

In December 1846, a succession record for Valérien, Valéry, & Homere Martin was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish.  They probably were descendants of Acadian Valéry Martin of La Pointe. 

Azélie Martin married Pierre Cyrille, called Cyrille, Richard, fils at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1847.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Azélie, like her husband, an Acadian?

Antoine, also called Jean, Martin married French Canadian Delphine LeBlanc, widow of Joseph Leleux, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  Typically, the priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Antoine an Acadian? 

Evaline Edmund Martin died in St. Landry Parish in September 1855, "at age 40 yrs."  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial did not give Evaline's parents' names or mention a spouse.  What was Evaline's gender?

Joseph Martin married Loisa _____.  Their son Joseph, fils was born in c1857 but died in Lafayette Parish at age 13 in September 1869. 

Célesie Martin married Germain Laplace at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1857.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, Martin married Acadian Julien Leger in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1858, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in March 1859.  The parish clerk and the Grand Coteau priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Marcellite an Acadian?

Marguerite, daughter of Arthémise Martin, married Cyprien, fils, son of Acadian Cyprien Leger, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in March 1859.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's father's name. 

Alfred Martin's succession record, containing "very little information," was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in June 1860.  Who was he?

Joseph Sosthène Martin married Bohemian Creole Caroline Touchet probably in St. Landry Parish.  Their son Noël was born near Grand Coteau in December 1860.  They were living near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in 1869. 

Marie A. Martin married Acadian Dosité Blanchard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1861.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

David Martin died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in November 1862.  He was only 13 years old.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not bother to give the parents' names.  One wonders if David's death was war-related. 

Marie Joséphine Martin married Éloi Bauville Dore in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in November 1863.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Élise Martin married Antoine Nezat in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in September 1865.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph Martin married Virginie Segura and settled near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Don Martin married Marie Guilbeau and settled near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Charles Martin's succession record was filed at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in 1866. 

Michael Martin died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in August 1866.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Michael died "at age 1 yr." 

Valérie D. Martin married Marie Athanaise Bossier.  Their son Valérie Bossier was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1866. 

Charles Martin married Sophie Comeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marcillienne Martin, widow of Théoline Leleu, married Jean Élisé Mayard or Maillard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph Martin died in Lafayette Parish in June 1869.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died "at age 23 yrs." 

Joseph Hippolyte Martin died in St. Landry Parish in August 1869.  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Joseph Hyppolite, as he called him, died "at age 18 yrs. & 5 mths."  Did Joseph marry? 

André Martin's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in December 1869.  Which of the many André Martins of that parish was this? 

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

More Acadian Martins--at least six members of the family, including three brothers--reached New Orleans from Halifax in 1765.  They did not go to Bayou Teche with the Broussards and some of their relatives.  They went, instead, to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before:

Anne Martin of Port-Royal, age 45, widow of Pierre Blanchard, came with young cousins François Martin, age 19, and his brother Paul dit Barnabé, age 16.  Anne remarried twice at St.-Jacques, first to fellow Acadian Joseph, son of probably Bonaventure Foret and widower of Isabelle Leger, in June 1775, and then to Jean-Baptiste, son of fellow Acadian Martin Richard and widower of Catherine Cormier, in July 1778.  François and Paul also settled at St.-Jacques. 

Joseph Martin dit Barnabé of Chignecto, age 26, half-brother of François and Paul dit Barnabé, came with wife Marguerite Pitre, age 26.  Their children were born in Louisiana. 

Madeleine Martin, age 37, came with husband Amand Préjean of Chepoudy, age 41, and four children, ages 15 to 5.  Madeleine was pregnant when they reached New Orleans and gave birth to a son in the city.  Madeleine died at Ascension, near St.-Jacques, in December 1772, in her early 40s. 

Marie-Claire Martin, age 31, came with husband Barthélemy Godin dit Bellefontaine of Rivière St.-Jean, age 30.  She remarried to Joseph, fils, son of fellow Acadian Joseph Richard and widow of Agnès Hébert dit Manuel, at nearby Ascension in August 1772.  

Descendants of Joseph MARTIN dit Barnabé (c1739-; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Joseph, younger son of Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, père and his first wife Anne Cyr, born probably at Chignecto in c1739, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married fellow Acadian Marguerite Pitre in Acadia in c1760.  They ended up as prisoners in Nova Scotia soon after their marriage and came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where Spanish officials counted them in April 1766.  They lived near the boundary between St.-Jacques and St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands on the Upper German Coast, and were living in New Orleans in April 1769, when a daughter was baptized there.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at St.-Jacques in 1777.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Joseph died by December 1795, when his wife was listed in an upper Bayou Lafourche census without a husband.  His sons settled on Bayou Lafourche, where they established a third center of Martin family settlement that soon outnumbered their cousins on the river. 

1

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in the late 1760s, married Marie, daughter of French Creole Pierre Charpentier of New Orleans, at St.-Jacques in October 1787.  Their many children were born at St.-Jacques.  During the early antebellum period, they moved to Bayou Lafourche.  One of his sons returned to St. James Parish in the late 1820s, but his other sons remained on the Lafourche. 

2

Michel, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in February 1773, married Marguerite, daughter of German Creole Jacques Grabert of St.-Charles des Allemands, at St.-Jacques in November 1793.  Their many children were born at St.-Jacques.  During the early antebellum period, they moved to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

3

Youngest son Paul le jeune, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in March 1779, may have died young. 

Descendants of François MARTIN (c1746-; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

François, elder son of Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, père and his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne Comeau, half-brother of Joseph and full brother of Paul, was born probably at Chignecto in c1746.  François escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of the St. Lawrence shore.  He ended up a prisoner in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s and came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  He settled with two of his brothers at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Cécile, daughter of Frenchman Julien De Girre of Ginet, France, in February 1781.  His only son moved to the western prairies but did not create a family of his own. 

Joachim, born at St.-Jacques in August 1795, died "at the home of Mr. Godrau in this town of St. Martin" on Bayou Teche in October 1828.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joachim died "at age about 35 years," but he was only 33; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, later that month.  Joachim probably did not marry, so his family line likely died with him. 

Descendants of Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé (c1749-1815; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Paul, younger son of Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, père and his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne Comeau, half-brother of Joseph and full brother of François, was born probably at Chignecto in c1748.  Paul escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of the St. Lawrence shore.  He ended up a prisoner in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s and came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  He settled with two of his brothers at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river, still a bachelor, in 1777.  He married Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of German Creole André Oubre of St.-Charles des Allemands, at St.-Jacques in January 1779.  A daughter was baptized at St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands on the Upper German Coast in January 1783, so they lived near the boundary between St.-Jacques and St.-Jean-Baptiste.  Their daughters married into the Backley, Fontenot, Oubre, Rogers (Anglo, not Acadian), and St. Pierre families.  Paul died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1815; the priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was "age 64" when he died.  His family line, which remained a small one despite his many sons, became one of only two left on the river during the early antebellum period and, except for its blood, may not have survived. 

1

Oldest son Magloire, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in November 1779, married Mélanie Hoemen, probably a German Creole, by 1805.  Their son Paul Magloire was born at St. James in June 1806. 

2

Régis, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in September 1781, may have died young. 

3

Noël, born at St.-Jacques in December 1784, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1815.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Noël was 28 years old when he died, but he was 31.  He probably did not marry. 

4

Maximilien, born at St.-Jacques in May 1790, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1814.  He was only 24 years old and probably did not marry. 

5

Youngest son Symphorien, born at St.-Jacques in January 1792, may have died young. 

~

In the autumn of 1765, Teche valley settlers retreated to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river to escape an epidemic that killed dozens of their fellow Acadians.  Barnabé Martins were among them:

Descendants of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé, fils (c1734-1796; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé)

Ambroise, elder son of Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, père and his first wife Anne Cyr, full brother of Joseph and half-brother of François and Paul, was born probably at Chignecto in c1734.  Ambroise escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of the St. Lawrence shore, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Lincour of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1759.  They ended up as prisoners in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s and came to Louisiana in 1765 with the party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, led by Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil.  They followed the Broussards to the Bayou Teche valley but did not remain there.  Spanish officials counted them at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river in April 1766.  A daughter was baptized at St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands on the Upper German Coast in November 1772, so they lived near the boundary between St.-Jacques and St.-Jean-Baptiste.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at St.-Jacques in 1777.  Their daughters married into the Boucad, Fontenot, and Grabert families.  Ambroise died at St.-Jacques in January 1796; the priest who recorded his burial said that Ambroise died at "age 70 years," but he was closer to 62.  Neither of his two sons seems to have created families of their own, so this family line, except for its blood, probably did not survive in the Bayou State. 

1

Older son Paul-Ambroise, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in February 1775, died in St. Martin Parish in March 1849.  He was 74 years old and probably did not marry.  His last will was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the day after his death.  One wonders when he moved to the western prairies, and why. 

2

Younger son Dominique, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in January 1777, may have died young. 

.

Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Martin, Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils's daughter and wife of Augustin Fontenot, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1815.  She was only 50 years old. 

~

The arrival date of a Martin wife who settled on the river during the 1760s cannot be determined:

Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé, born probably at Chignecto in c1732, not to be confused with her cousin of the same name, married Joseph, son of Pierre Olivier of Port-Royal, probably at Chignecto in c1752.  The British exiled them to South Carolina in 1755, where colonial officials counted them in August 1763.  Later that year, they migrated with dozens of other Acadians from that colony to St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, but they did not remain there.  They first appear in Louisiana records at New Orleans in July 1767 with a son.  They probably remained at New Orleans. 

~

At least one Acadian Martin came to Louisiana from France in 1785 and settled on the river:

Marie-Josèphe Martin of Port-Royal, age 47, widow of Frenchman Louis Courtin, crossed aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  With her were four children, ages 22 to 11.  One of her daughters married a Spaniard aboard the ship.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their vessel to Baton Rouge. 

~

In a reversal of the usual Acadian settlement pattern, a Barnabé Martin left Bayou Lafourche during the antebellum period and returned to the river.  By the late antebellum period, his line was the only one left on the old Acadian Coast: 

Descendants of Michel MARTIN le jeune (1792-1833?; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé, Ambroise dit Barnabé, Joseph dit Barnabé)

Michel le jeune, third son of Joseph Martin dit Barnabé, fils and Marie Charpentier, born at St.-Jacques in August 1792, was living in Lafourche Interior Parish when he married Delise or Elise, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Bourgeois, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in July 1822.  They lived in Lafourche Interior Parish before returning to St. James Parish by the early 1830s.  Michel le jeune may have died near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1833; if so, he would have been only 40 years old that year.  His only son settled near Convent, married French-Creole sisters, and was the only Acadian Martin family that remained on the river. 

Michel Paulin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1823, married Louisa, daughter of French Creole Maximien Roussel, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1844.  They lived near the boundary between St. James and St. John the Baptist parishes, perhaps in the latter parish.  Their son Rodolphe or Randolph was born in July 1846, and John in December1848.  Michel remarried to Célestine, another daughter of Maximien Roussel, at the Convent church in July 1853; they had to secure a dispensation for first degree of affinity in order to marry.  Their son Wanburen, probably Van Buren, was born near Convent in March 1857, Maurice in September1860, Léopold in July 1862, Louis in February 1866, a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at "age a few hours" in November 1867, and Benjamin was born in October 1868.

Randolph "of St. John the Baptiste Parish," by his first wife, married cousin Florestine, daughter of French Creole Elphége Poché, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in March 1869; Florestine's mother was a Bourgeois, so they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

~

Other MARTINs on the River

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link a Martin on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Marten or Martin and Marie Gautro of Québec, married Marie, daughter of Acadian Joseph Richard, at St.-Jacques in March 1791.  Though he would have been called a French Canadian in Louisiana, looking at his mother's name one wonders if Joseph, fils was an Acadian who had found refuge in Canada during Le Grand Dérangement and emigrated to Louisiana to settle near his cousins already there. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

During the early antebellum period, two Barnabé Martin brothers from St. James Parish moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, establishing a third center of family settlement.  In the following decades, their descendants moved down bayou from Assumption into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.  By the middle of the antebellum period, Acadian Martins in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley nearly rivaled in numbers their cousins on the western prairies:

Descendants of Joseph MARTIN dit Barnabé, fils (c1760s-c1815; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé, Ambroise dit Barnabé)

Joseph, fils, eldest son of Joseph Martin dit Barnabé and Marguerite Pitre and brother of Michel, was born probably at St.-Jacques in the late 1760s.  Joseph, fils married Marie, daughter of French Creole Pierre Charpentier of New Orleans, at St.-Jacques in October 1787.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Lepine, Price, Sicard, St. Pierre, and Thibodeaux families.  During the early antebellum period, they moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph's succession inventory was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1815; he would have been in his mid-50s that year.  In a reversal of the usual Acadian settlement pattern, one of his sons returned to the river, but his other sons and his daughters remained on the Lafourche. 

1

Oldest son Joseph-Louis or Louis-Joseph, born at St.-Jacques in April 1789, married Marie Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Charles Theriot of St. James Parish, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1811.  Their son Louis Lessin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1826, Joseph Michel in March 1828, and Aurelien Laurent in December 1834.  Their daughters married into the Araby, Comardelle, Faucheux, Foret, Price, and Rome families.  Joseph may have died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1849; the Thibodaux priest who recorded Joseph Martin's burial said that he died "at age 70 yrs.," but Joseph Louis would have been "only" a few months shy of 60 years old. 

Louis Lessin, called Louis, fils, married Scholastique, called Colastie, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste Babin, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1846.  Their son Louis Amédée was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1847, Auguste Théodule, called Théodule, near Raceland in April 1850, Gustave in September 1853, Félix Morance in September 1859, and Joseph Armand near Raceland in April 1865. 

Théodule married Celina, daughter of French Creole Eugène Pertuit, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1870.

2

Louis, born at St.-Jacques in August 1790, may have died young, unless he was Joseph-Louis/Louis-Joseph.

3

Michel le jeune, born at St.-Jacques in August 1792 and living in Lafourche Interior Parish, married Delise or Elise, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Bourgeois, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in July 1822.  They lived n Lafourche Interior Parish before returning to St. James Parish by the early 1830s.

4

Georges-Saintville, called Saintville, born at St.-Jacques in September 1802, married Marie Héloise, called Héloise and Éloise, 26-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Maurice Blanchard, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1830.  Their son Neuville was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1834, Pierre in February 1837, Justin le jeune in March 1839[sic], Joseph in April 1839[sic], and Paul in February 1843. 

4a

Neuville died near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in February 1856.  He was only 22 years old and did not marry. 

4b

Pierre married Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Narcisse Robichaux, at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1857.

4c

Joseph married Eveline, daughter of French Creole Alexis Autin, fils, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in July 1858; Eveline's mother was a Bergeron.  Their son Joseph Clovis was born near Raceland in April 1862, Ernest Cleopha in July 1866, and Émile Alexis in April 1869. 

4d

Justin le lejeune married Octavie, daughter of French Creole Abraham Bourgeois, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1866.  Their son Joseph Elphége had been born near Raceland in April 1864. 

4e

Paul married Elisa, daughter of Toussaint Damos, Danoe, or Danos, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1870. 

5

Martin died at St. James 10 days after his birth in November 1806. 

6

Youngest son Chrysostôme or Chrejustin, also called Justin, born in St. James Parish in January 1809, married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, 19-year-old daughter of French Creole Jacques Lecompte, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1829; Marie's mother was a Babin.  Their son Henry or Henri Justin, called Justin, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1832, Marcellin Palmire in July 1843, and Joseph Justilien, called Justilien, in January 1846.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Falgout, Folse, Gervais, Lejeune, and Robichaux families. 

6a

Henry Justin married Marie Aglae, called Aglae, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Duplantis, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1855.  Their son Jean Baptiste Henry was born near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in May 1856, Justin Gérard in Terrebonne Parish in April 1858, and Louis Joseph near Montegut in November 1865. 

6b

Justilien married Anastasie, daughter of German Creole Paul Grabert, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1866.  Their son François Justilien was born near Raceland in October 1867. 

Descendants of Michel MARTIN dit Barnabé (1773-?; Barnabé, René dit Barnabé, Ambroise dit Barnabé)

Michel, second son of Joseph Martin dit Barnabé, père and Marguerite Pitre and brother of Joseph, fils, was baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in February 1773.  Michel married Marguerite, daughter of German Creole Jacques Grabert of St.-Charles des Allemands, at St.-Jacques in November 1793.  During the early antebellum period, they, too, moved to Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Arenas, De La Torre, Duplantis, LeBlanc, and Thibodeaux families.  Their older sons settled near Thibodauxville in Lafourche Interior Parish, but their younger sons moved down bayou to Montegut and Chacahoula in Terrebonne Parish. 

1

Oldest son Michel Ambroise, also called Michel, fils, born at St.-Jacques in November 1794, was living in Lafourche Interior Parish when he married Françoise Aspasie or Aspasie Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadian Étienne Boudreaux of Thibodauxville, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1820.  Their son Michel Ambroise, fils was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1820, Pierre Eugène in February 1825, Clerville Fleroial in March 1827, Joachim George, called George, in April 1830, Paul Elphége in February 1836, Amédée Théophile in March 1839, and Ulysse Adrien, called Adrien, in March 1843.  Daughter Désirée Marie "Entered Society 22 July 1850 at Grand Coteau," which means she became a nun.  Their other daughters married into the Kellingsworth or Killingworth and Larkin families.  Michel Ambroise, père's succession inventory record was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in April 1860, and a petition for "appointment of tutor" for two of his children was filed two months later; he would have been 66 years old that year. 

1a

Michel Ambroise, fils, called Michel, Jr., married Hippoline or Pauline, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Thibodeaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1844.  Their son Jacques Édouard, called Édouard, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1846, Joseph Oleus Adrien in October 1848, Pierre François Xavier in December 1852, a child, name, age, and gender unrecorded, perhaps a son, died "during [a] yellow fever epidemic in October 1853, and Villeor Ozema was born in October 1857.  Two of their sons moved to the western prairies after the War Between the States.

Joseph married Marie Erminie, daughter of fellow Acadian Stainville Trahan, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1869. 

Édouard married Louise or Louisa, daughter of French Creole Charles Simon, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1869; Louise's mother was a Leger

1b

Joachim George, called George by the parish clerk, may have married Rosalie Serazine, called Serazine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Lanoux of St. James Parish, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1859.

2

A son, name unrecorded, died at St.-Jacques, age 15 months, in December 1798.

3

Damien, also called Dantin and Dan, born at St.-Jacques in September 1798, married Marie Théoliste or Théotiste Josèphe, daughter of German Creole François Malbrough, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1822; Théotiste's mother was a Duhon.  Their son Émile was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1828, Louis Janvier in September 1830, and Joseph Théodule in September 1837.  Their daughters married into the Domingue, Dubois (French Creole, not Acadian), and Savoie families. 

3a

Émile married Marguerite Pamela, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Foret, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in September 1850.

3b

Joseph married Anaïse or Judise, daughter of German Creole Anatole Matherne, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1864; Anaise's mother was a Savoie.  Their son Joseph Aleban was born near Montegut in October 1865, and Robert Émile in April 1869. 

4

Joachim le jeune, born at St.-Jacques in November 1803, married Euphrosine, called Phroisine, daughter of French Creole Pierre Rousseau, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1834; the marriage was recorded also in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Joachim Evariste, called Evariste, was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in January 1837, and Zenon Marcel in July 1839 but died at age 10 1/2 months in June 1840.  Their daughter married into the Watkins family. 

Evariste married Edolie, Edolide, Edalie, or Edalide, perhaps Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadian C. Jérôme Guidry of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1858.  Their son Joseph Ellis was born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1859, Joseph Florest in January 1864, Joseph Wiltz in February 1866, Joseph Elfried in October 1867, and Joseph Ivans in March 1870. 

5

Jacques, born at St. James in November 1805, married Marie Pauline or Pauline Marie, also called Julienne Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Honoré Breaux, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1831; the marriage also was recorded in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Jacques, fils was born in July 1837, Aimé Théophile in October 1841, Charles Faustin, called Faustin, in February 1844, and Joseph in July 1846.  Their daughters married into the Malbrough family. 

5a

Jacques, fils may have married fellow Acadian Azélie, called Zélie, Boudreaux.  They lived perhaps near the boundary between Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Joseph Théodore was born in February 1861 but died the following November, Raphile, probably Raphaël, O. in August 1862, and Jacques Augustin in November 1869. 

5b

Faustin married Christiana Elisa, daughter of Joseph Dosquet or Dosky, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1865.  They settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Joseph Alfred was born in February 1869.  

5c

Aimé married Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadian Hubert Landry, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in July 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1867.  They settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Théophile Hubert was born in November 1867, and Joseph Nicolas in November 1870. 

5d

Joseph married Cecilia, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcellin Henry, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1867.

6

Youngest son François Maxim, born in St. James Parish in August 1808, married Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Chiasson, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1834; the marriage also was recorded in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Jean Pierre was born in March 1834, Victorin in December 1838, Evariste Justinien or Justilien, called Justilien and perhaps Justin, in June 1841, and Joseph Oscar in October 1842 but died at age 5 in September 1847.  They also had a son named François, fils.  Their daughter married into the Larousse family. 

6a

Victorin died in Lafourche Parish in December 1858.  He was only 20 years old and did not marry. 

6b

François, fils married Anaïse, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1859.  Their son Louis Justilien in Lafourche Parish in January 1863. 

6c

Justilien married Marie, daughter of French Creole Jacques Dhuet, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1863; Marie's mother was a Molaison.  Justilien may have died near Raceland in January 1870; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parent's names or even mention a wife, said that Justin, as he called him, died "at age 28 yrs."; Justilien would have been 29 years old. 

Other MARTINs in the Lafourche/Terrebonne Valley

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link some Martins in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Marie, daughter of Fine or Frice Martin, married Evariste, son of Acadian Étienne Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1843.  One record hints that Marie may have been a Blanchard

Marie Martin married Hermogène, son of Acadian Jean Baptiste Roger and widower of Pauline Adèle Adam, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in July 1856.  The parish clerk, who did not give the couple's parents' names, called Marie's husband Rogers, but he was an Acadian Roger.  Was she also an Acadian?

Joseph Martin married German Creole Eliza Hotard.  Their son Louis Maximilien was born near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in April 1863. 

.

A Martin family that appeared on the Acadian Coast during the early antebellum period seems to have settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Were they Acadian?    

Descendants of Joseph MARTIN (c1798?-1870?; Barnabé?)

Joseph Martin married Acadian Marie Rosalie Daigre.  They settled in Iberville Parish before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Joseph, père may have died in Assumption Parish in December 1870; the Plattenville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Joseph died at "age 74 years." 

Joseph, fils, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1821, may have married Acadian Eulalie Aucoin.  Their son Joseph Léonard, called Léonard, was born in Ascension Parish in Auguste 1846.  Their daughter married into the Himel family at Donaldsonville.

Léonard married Phelonise, daughter of French Creole François Berthelot, first civilly, and then sanctified the marriage at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1870; Phelonise's mother was a LeBlanc.  Their son Joseph Clairville was born near Labadieville in September 1869 but died near Plattenville, age 8 months, in May 1870.   

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Martin is the most common surname in France and can be found in Britain, Spain, Switzerland, Germany, and other European countries.  It is no surprise, then, that most of the Martins of South Louisiana are not Acadians.  Some, from France, Switzerland, even England, could be found in the colony as early as the 1720s.  Spanish Martíns from the Canary Islands, called Isleños, came to Louisiana via Cuba in the late 1770s at the behest of Spanish Governor Bernardo de Gálvez, who created four new communities for them:  Nueva Gálvez or San Bernardo, on Bayou Terre-aux-Boeufs and English Turn below New Orleans in present-day St. Bernard Parish; at Barataria in present-day southern Jefferson Parish; at Galveztown on the right bank of the Amite River in present-day Ascension Parish; and at Valenzuéla on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary of present-day Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Martíns from Spain, especially soldiers, became plentiful in New Orleans by the 1790s.  During the late colonial period, non-Acadian Martins settled also at Natchez (for most of the period a part of Spanish Louisiana), Pointe Coupée, Natchitoches, Opelousas, and on the Acadian Coast:

Guillaume Martin dit Sans Chagrin, probably a Canadian, served as a soldier at Fort Biloxi, then a part of French Louisiana, in 1700, only months after the colony was created. 

Étienne Martin lived at Fort Louis, Mobile, then a part of Louisiana, in 1721.  He may have been the Éstienne Martin, native of Angers, France, who died at Old Biloxi in November 1724; if so, he was only "cir. 40 yr." old. 

Rodoffe or Rodolphe Martin, native of Bern, Switzerland, married Marguerite Bessote, widow of Grégoire Schein, at New Orleans in October 1723.   Rodolphe died at New Orleans in August 1726; he was only "cir. 34 yr." old. 

Gabriel Martin, an infant, died at New Orleans in October 1724.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names.  One wonders if they were Rodolphe Martin and Margueritte Bessote

Antoine Martin "of the Apalache region" married Jeanne ____ "of the Black River" at New Orleans in June 1725. 

Pierre Martin, native of England, died at New Orleans in October 1725.  He was only "cir. 43" years old. 

Françoise Martin, widow of Antoine De La Joye, married attorney Louis, son of Gabriel Morisset de La Chemillere of Cherveux, near Poitiers, France, at New Orleans in February 1729. 

François Martin, native of Laferte-sur-Amance, near Langres, France, died at New Orleans in February 1730. 

Marie, daughter of Sébastien Martin and ____ Demeron of Languedoc, France, and widow of Pierre Lambremon of Natchez, married Étienne, fils, son of Étienne Matee and Jeanne Theriot of Coublanc, near Langres, France, at New Orleans in July 1730. 

René Martin of La Rochelle, France, "master," married Margueritte Couesin.  Their daughter Marie-Magdeleine was baptized at New Orleans in February 1753. 

Joseph Martin, "resident downstream of the river," married Marguerite Fadin or Fary.  Their son Jean-Louis was born at New Orleans in January 1751, and Guillaume at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast in February 1753. 

Francisco Antonio, son of ____ Martín and Antonia De Leon, was born at New Orleans in October 1780. 

Francisca, daughter of Blas Martín and Ana Ortiz of the Canary Islands, married Gaspar, son of Bartolome Ortiz and Antonia San Juan of the Canary Islands, at New Orleans in January 1781. 

Jacques, son of François Martin and Catherine Vincent of Prague, then in Germany, married Françoise-Rosalie, called Rosalie, daughter of Pierre-Dionysius Panquinet, "beadle/verger of this parish," at New Orleans in September 1781.  Their son Jacques III was born at New Orleans in June 1789, Edmond-Célestin in October 1793, Raphaël-Élie in December 1795, Joachim in February 1798, and Louis-Joseph in September 1800.  Their daughter married into the Abadie family at Baton Rouge. 

Antonia, daughter of Baltasar Martín and Rosa Peres of the Canary Islands, married Manuel, son of Pedro Fernandez and Dominga Delamas, at San Bernardo in August 1783. 

Josef Augustin, son of Marcial Martín and Antonia De Leon, married Maria, daughter of José Regla Amada.  Josef Augustin and Maria were Isleños from Pajara or La Oliva, Fuerteventura, who settled at San Bernardo.  Their son Josef Antonio was baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in December 1783, Josef Maria Dorotheo in March 1798 but died the following September, and Rafael Antonio was born at San Bernardo in July 1801. 

Josef Martín, husband of Maria La ____, both Isleños, died at San Bernardo in November 1786.  The priest who recorded his burial did not say how old Josef was when he died. 

Amand, son of Dol Martin and Madeleine Cyr "of Canada," husband of Acadian Madeleine Benoit, died at Attakapas, present-day St. Martin Parish, in November 1787, a few weeks after his marriage.  He was only 30 years old.  Looking at his mother's surname, one wonders if Amand was an Acadian whose family had found refuge in the St. Lawrence valley during Le Grand Dérangement

Bernard, fils, son of Bernard Martin, died at New Orleans in October 1788.  He was only 12 years old. 

William, son of Peter Martin of England, died at New Orleans in October 1788.  He was only 5 years old. 

Antoine, son of Pierre Martin and Marie Seguin of Nantes, France, died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in May 1791.  He was only 26 years old.  The priest who recorded Antoine's burial did not mention a wife. 

Joseph, son of Juan Martín and Gertrudis Galiano of Esche, Valencia, Spain, a soldier in the Third Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at the Royal Military Hospital at New Orleans in October 1791.  He was only 24 years old and a bachelor. 

Juan Antonio Martín, widower of Antonia Martinez Fernandez, died at San Bernardo in February 1792.  He was only 40 years old. 

Bernardo, son of Blas Martín and Bernarda Rivas of Yepes, Toledo, Spain, and a soldier in the Sixth Company of the Second Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at the Royal Military Hospital at New Orleans in April 1792.  He was only 35 years old and still a bachelor. 

Antonio Martín, "native of the [Canary?] islands," died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1792.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Antonio's age at the time of his death or mention a wife. 

Another Antonio, this one son of Juan Martín and Magdalena Vicente of Pamplona, Spain, and a soldier in the Third Company of the First Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1792.  He was only 19 years old and a bachelor. 

_____ Martin, "native of Brittany" and a bachelor, died at New Orleans in September 1792.  He was only 30 years old. 

Juan, son of Guillermo Martín and Maria Hernandez, a  49-year-old convict from Rio Verde, Guadalajara, Mexico, died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1792.  He was a widower. 

Diego, son of Juan Martín and Maria Lopez of Granada, Spain, was a "prisoner from Havana," when he died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in November 1792.  He was 53 years old and a widower. 

Francisco, son of Domingo Martín and Maria Jacinta ____ of San Martin de Moya, Galicia, Spain, and husband in a second marriage to Geneviève Binet of Poitou, France, died at New Orleans in July 1793.  He was only 41 years old. 

Ignacio, son of Guillermo Martín and Maria Concepcion ____ of Santa Ana, Aguala, Spain, was a 39-year-old convict and a widower when he died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1793.

Jean Martin married Catherine Olinde.  Their son, name unrecorded, born in c1793, died at Pointe Coupée, age 4, in November 1797. 

Juan, son of Alexo Martín and Rosalia Fernandes of Odrea, Toledo, Spain, and a soldier in the Sixth Company of the First Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in January 1794.  He was only 33 years old. 

Pedro, son of Gabriel Martín and Jeronima Moreno of Salona, Infantes, Spain, and a soldier in the First Company of the First Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in April 1794.  He was only 46 years old. 

Jean, son of Louis Martin and Catherine Bellon, married Lucie-Josèphe, daughter of Louis Meiller, at Pointe Coupée in May 1794.  Their son Jean, fils was born at Pointe Coupée in December 1795, Paulin was baptized, age unrecorded, in April 1797, Pierre at age 3 months in December 1798, and Louis le jeune at age 1 in May 1801. 

Maria Josefa, daughter of Josef Martín of Granada, Spain, died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in June 1794.  She was only 46 years old and a widow. 

Juan Pedro Martín, a soldier in the Seventh Company of the First Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment, died at the Royal Military Hospital, New Orleans, in July 1794, age unrecorded. 

Pierre, fils, son of Pierre Martin and Marie-Madeleine ____ of France, died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in January 1795.  He was a 64-year-old bachelor. 

Vejy Martin married Jessy Lum at Natchez in April 1795. 

Isabelle Martin married Guillermo Mann at Natchez in September 1795. 

Joseph Martin of New Orleans married Geneva Yarbree of Virginia.  They lived for a time at Castle San Felipe of Plaquemines, downriver from New Orleans.  Their son Jacob was baptized at Castle San Felipe by the chaplain of the Second Battalion of the Louisiana Regiment in December 1797, and Maximilien was born at New Orleans in November 1801. 

François, fils, son of François Martin and Françoise Dubois of New Orleans, died at Charity Hospital in September 1799.  He was only 11 years old. 

André H. Martin, "nat. Bepoudy, dept. of Hautes Pyrenees," France, died at Pointe Coupée in "psssibly[sic] early 1800."  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give his parents' names or mention a wife, said that André H. was "age 39 yrs., 9 mos." when he died. 

Catalina, daughter of Joseph Martín and Maria de Lapo, married Isleño Anthonio, son of Joseph Tilano, near Baton Rouge in June 1802. 

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A French Martin family that began at New Orleans during the colonial period settled in Plaquemines Parish below the city and then on upper Bayou Lafourche, where the family line thrived.  Many of these Creoles married Lafourche valley Acadians: 

Descendants of François MARTIN (c1741-1801)

François, son of Pierre Martin, laborer of St.-Maigrin, Saintonge, France, and Marie Flenet, married Marguerite, daughter of Guillaume Dainesse, Denaisse, Denes, Denesse, or Denet, a cobbler, at New Orleans in November 1762.  Their daughters married into the Anfray, Caballier, and Philibert families.  François died at New Orleans in July 1801; he was "cir. 60 yr." old.  Some of his descendants married Acadians. 

1

Oldest son Pierre, born at New Orleans in December 1764, married Marie-Baptiste, daughter of Jean-Baptiste La France or La Franche, also called D'Argent, at New Orleans probably in the late 1780s.  They settled in Plaquemines Parish.  Their son Jean-Pierre was born at New Orleans in November 1790, François le jeune in July 1795, and Joseph-Joachim in December 1797.  Two of their sons settled on upper Bayou Lafourche during the antebellum period.  One son's line was especially prolific. 

1a

François le jeune married Adèle, daughter of French Creole Dominique Bergeron, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1818; Adèle's mother was a Breaux.  Their son François, fils was born in Assumption Parish in April 1822, Charles le jeune in July 1823, Joseph Aimé Numa in May 1826, and Zenon Treville, called Treville, in November 1826[sic].  They also had sons named Neuville and Osémé.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family. 

François, fils married Eulalie, daughter of French Creole Jean Petit, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1839; Eulalie's mother was a Lambert.  Their son François Zenon was born in Assumption Parish in October 1842, Joseph in August 1846, an unnamed son, baptized soon after his birth, died near Paincourtville in February 1851, François III was born in June 1851[sic], and Charles Jean Ducatair in October 1853.  They also had a son named Martin.  They were living near Attakapas Canal, on the east side of Lake Verret, by the early 1860s.  Their daughter married into the Ousse family. 

François Zenon married Marie Eugènie, daughter of Acadian Eugène Aucoin, at the Attakapas Canal church, Assumption Parish, in May 1862.  Their son William was born near Attakapas Canal in February 1869. 

Joseph married Céleste, daughter of Acadian Urbain Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1865. 

Martin married Marianne, daughter of Louis Borns, at the Attakapas Canal church, Assumption Parish, in October 1869. 

Neuville married Lorenza, daughter of Spanish Creole Joseph Loros Acosta, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1841.  Their unnamed infant, perhaps a son, died near Plattenville 8 days after its birth in January 1842, son François le jeune was born in October 1844, Joseph Sabin Neuville in March 1846, Faustin Numa, called Numa, near Paincourtville in February 1849, Charles Joseph in November 1856, and Joseph Téodore in Ascension Parish in January 1860.  They were living near Attakapas Canal, on the east side of Lake Verret, in Assumption Parish, by the early 1860s.  Their daughter married into the Laland (French Creole or Foreign French, not Acadian) family. 

Numa died near Attakapas Canal, Assumption Parish, in November 1866.  The priest who recorded the burial said Numa died at "age 19 years," but he was only 17.  He likely did not marry. 

Osémé married Octavie, perhaps another daughter of Jean Petit, in the early 1840s.  Their son Osémé Joseph was born near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in July 1846, Osémé Alfred in July 1847, Adam Ducaterre near Paincourtville in April 1849, Joseph Oscar in March 1851, Michel Luthier in May 1853, Jean François in April 1855, Marcel Léonore in April 1861, and Émile Alexis near Attakapas Canal, on the east side of Lake Verret, in January 1865. 

Treville married Jeanette, daughter of Spanish Creole Horter Pares, in a civil ceremony probably in Assumption Parish by the mid-1840s, and sanctified the marriage at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1847.  Their son Zeno was born near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in May 1846, Joseph Léonard in Ascension Parish in September 1850, Cleopha Victorin near Plattenville in February 1853, Lucien Veuillot in January 1855, François le jeune near Attakapas Canal in December 1858, Joseph Melius in April 1861, and Léopold in October 1863.  They also had a son named Treville, fils.  Their daughter married into the Lopez family. 

Treville, fils married Adolphine or Delphine, daughter of Acadian Pierre Séraphin Arcement, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1867.  Their son Paul Elvesce was born near Paincourtville in January 1868. 

1b

Joseph Joachim married Eléonore, daughter of Acadian Servan François Templet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1820.  Their son Joseph Joachim, fils was born near Plattenville in April 1823, Carville in November 1824, and Jean Baptiste in October 1826.  Did the family line survive? 

Carville died in Assumption Parish in September 1854.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that "Clairville," as he called him, died at "age 27 years," but he was 30.  He probably did not marry. 

2

Étienne-François, called François, born at New Orleans in June 1766, married Marie, daughter of Santiago Yabri, perhaps an Isleño, and settled south of the city at San Bernardo.  Their son Louis-Terence was baptized at New Orleans, age 3 1/2, in April 1803, and Louis-Firmin was born probably at San Bernardo in February 1803 and baptized at New Orleans in April.

3

François-Joseph, called Joseph, born at New Orleans in October 1772, married Geneva, daughter of James Smith of Virginia, at New Orleans in December 1796.

4

Charles was born at New Orleans, in August 1775.

5

Sylvestre was born at New Orleans in April 1777. 

6

Youngest son François, fils, born at New Orleans in July 1781, married Isabelle, daughter of James Abreu of Virginia, probably at New Orleans.  Their son Gilbert was born at New Orleans in December 1802.  

.

An Isleño Martín from Galveztown on the Amite River married an Acadian during the late colonial period and settled on Bayou Manchac.  His widow and some of his descendants moved to upper Bayou Teche by the 1830s, while some of his descendants remained in the Baton Rouge area.  Many of them married Acadians: 

Descendants of André MARTÍN (c1774-1814)

André or Andrés, son of Baltasar Martín, sometimes called Martinez, and Rosa Jaco, Jacon, Jacona, Jaconez, or Jacquot of Tenerife in the Canary Islands, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Acadian Paul Landry, at Manchac in May 1794.  They settled north of Bayou Manchac in what became East Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Daigre, Dupuis, Frederick, Lejeune, and Raffray families.  Andrés died probably at Manchac in November 1814; he was only 40 years old.  His widow, three of his daughters, and his two younger sons moved to the western prairies, but two of his daughters and his two older sons remained at Manchac.  Most of his children married Acadians, and his descendants became thoroughly Gallicized during the antebellum period. 

1

Oldest son Armand Zéphirin, born at Manchac in October 1797, married Fleuriana, daughter of Acadian Édouard Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1821. 

2

Joseph, born at Manchac in December 1801, married Jeanne Prosper, widow of ____ Hardy, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1826. 

3

Pierre, born at Manchac in January 1804, died "at his parents' [probably his widowed mother's] home at la grande pointe," St. Martin Parish, in February 1830.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was "age about 23 years" when he died, but he was 26.  He probably did not marry. 

4

Youngest son Lucien, born at Manchac in January 1807, married Marie Elisa, Eliza, or Élizabeth, daughter of Acadian Charles Melançon, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1831.  They settled at Grande Pointe, near present-day Breaux Bridge, close to his widowed mother.  Their son Pierre was born in December 1835, Nicolas in March 1840, and Joseph le jeune in February 1855.  Their daughters married into the Avile and Wiltz families. 

Nicolas may have married Phelonise Savaille or Lavaille in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in March 1866.  They settled near Breaux Bridge. 

~

During the antebellum period, more non-Acadian Martins and Martíns--French and Anglo as well as Hispanic--settled in many South Louisiana communities, complicating considerably the genealogical picture of the family in the region.  One suspects that some of the Martins living in the region during the immediate post-war period were Afro Creoles whose ethnicity was not revealed by area church and civil record keepers: 

Guillaume, son of Jean-François Martin and Jeanne Dubois of Fontain Leveque, Hainault, France, but living at Natchitoches, married Marie Gertrude, daughter of Jose Joachim del Castillo and Marie Françoise, at Opelousas in August 1801.  The priest who recorded the marriage called Marie Gertrude a mestissa or mestiza, that is, of mixed blood.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at Opelousas, age 8 days, in June 1805, and Jean Baptiste was born in February 1808.  Guillaume's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in September 1822. 

Juan Santos, son of Matías Martín and María Magdalena Antos or Santos of Villa de Aquimes, Canary Islands, and Galveztown in what became Ascension Parish, married Antonia, daughter of Joseph Gonzalez of the Canary Islands, at St.-Gabriel in January 1803.  Their son Juan Joseph was born near St. Gabriel in December 1804, and José Cerilio in April 1806. 

Jean Martin, born in c1808, was baptized at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, age 14, in February 1822.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism gave his godparents' names but not the names of his parents!  Were his parents Acadian?

Paul Martin, "a merchant, native of Barcelonnette, Dept. des Basses-Alpes," France, died "at the home of Pierre Broussard at La Grand Pointe" in March 1808.  Paul was only "age 25 yrs., 2 mths." when he died.  His succession record had been filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in February. 

Mary Martin, daughter of Simon Burmy, "a planter," married Joseph Eastolet, "a planter," in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1808. 

Jacques, fils, son of Jacques Martin and Sara Lisles, married Azélie, daughter of French Creole Athanase Darden, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in December 1809; Azélie's mother was a Landry.   Their son Alexandre was born near St. Gabriel in February 1816, and Jules in May 1817. 

Barthélémy, son of Guillaume Martin and Paula Paulet of Narbonne, Languedoc, France, married Rosalie, daughter of Acadian Étienne Landry and widow of ___ Leroux, in St. Bernard Parish in January 1810. 

Ferdinand Martín married Spanish Creole Marie Louise Gonzales.  Their son Joseph was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in January 1811.  Were they Isleños

James Robert, son of Thomas and Nancy Martin, married Mary, daughter of fellow Anglo American John Coleman, and settled on the Vermilion River.  Their son Joseph was born in June 1812, and James Robert, Jr. in February 1823. 

Jean, son of Jean Martin and Lasa Rabley, married Marie, daughter of Jean Baddy, and settled near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, by the early 1810s. 

Jean Chreme, son of Jacques Martin and Marie Rhone, married Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Joseph Granger, and settled on the Vermilion River.  Their son Jean Charles was born in August 1814. 

Antoine Martín, a Spaniard, took up with Acadian Madeleine Granger, wife or widow of Jean Chreme Martin.  Their "natural son" Marcel was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1816, and "natural son" Louis in August 1819.  Marcel married Céleste, also called Sally, Hargrow and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the early 1840s. 

Zacharias or Zacharie, Jr., son of Zacharias or Zacharie Martin and Sarah Teal, Teel, or Thiel of Natchitoches, married fellow Anglo American Rebecca Haye in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1815.  Zacharie, Jr.'s older sisters also settled in St. Landry Parish and married into the Corkran, Francis, and McDaniel families. 

Jacques Étienne Martin, "nat. Mantes," probably Nantes, France, and "res. St. Domingue," which was Haiti, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1820.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give his parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jacques was "age 64" when he died. 

Julien Martin, native of Nantes, France, and husband of Hortense Landry, residing in Assumption Parish, died in St. James Parish in August 1820.  He died at "age about 29 yrs."  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Julien's parents' names. 

John, son of Frederick Martin and Marie Miller, "over 21 yrs. old," married Catherine, daughter of fellow Anglo American Pierre Hartman, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in October 1821.  Their son John Hartman was born probably in St. Mary Parish in March 1824.  They moved to Assumption Parish by the early 1830s. 

Joachin Martín married Marie del Carmine and settled in St. Landry Parish by the early 1820s. 

Joseph Martín married Antonia Mendosa.  Their son Joseph, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1822. 

Félix Joseph, son of Denis François Lazare Martin and Marie Catherine Rochon of Thieallanne, Department of Basses-Alps, France, married Jeanette, daughter of Acadian Joseph Landry.  Their son Félix Michel was born in Ascension Parish in November 1822. 

Jean Baptiste Marius Martin, Félix Joseph's brother, died in Assumption Parish in October 1824.  He was only 25 years old. 

François Xavier Martin, a New Orleans jurist and historian, published his two-volume The History of Louisiana from the Earliest Period in 1827 and 1829. 

Father Auguste Martin, native of Brittany, came to Louisiana during the early antebellum period to serve in the Diocese of New Orleans.  He was pastor of St. James church, St. James Parish, and St. Joseph church, Baton Rouge, chaplain for the Ursuline nuns in New Orleans, and pastor of St. Francis church at Natchitoches in 1850.  In the latter capacity, he also served as Archbishop Blanc's vicar-general in north Louisiana.  Upon the recommendation of the archbishop, Father Martin became the first Bishop of the Diocese of Natchitoches in 1853. 

Joseph Martin married Thérèse Ernande.  Their son Martin was born in Assumption Parish in January 1830. 

Henry Joseph, son of Bil Martin and Sara Maetin, born in c1831, was baptized at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, "age 40 yrs.," in August 1871.  He probably was an Anglo American. 

Jacques Martin married Caroline LeBlanc, probably an Acadian, and settled near Convent, St. James Parish, by the early 1830s.  Was Jacques also an Acadian? 

Emanuel Martin married Marguerite Plasentia and settled in Assumption Parish by the early 1830s.  They may have been Isleños

Joseph Martin married Marie Louise Phowser or Foucher in a civil ceremony probably in Iberville Parish and settled near St. Gabriel by the early 1830s before moving to Ascension Parish.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near St. Gabriel in March 1836, and Norbert in Ascension Parish in June 1840. 

Julie Martin, wife of Isaac Kinneson, died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1832.  She was only 33 years old.  Was she an Anglo American like her husband? 

Edmond H., age 23, son of Hudson Martin and Marianne Hopkins of New Orleans, married Marie Evelina, called Evelina, 19-year-old daughter of fellow Anglo American William Moore, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1833. 

Robert C., son of Peter Martin and Jeanette Bryan of Bertie County, North Carolina, married Mary W., daughter of Whitmell Pugh and Mary Bryan of Bertie County, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1835.  They settled in Assumption Parish.  Their son William Whitmell, born in 1840, became a lawyer.  During the War of 1861, he served as a second lieutenant in Company K of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, as captain of Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, and as major of the 26th Louisiana Infantry.  He was killed in action at Vicksburg, Mississippi (shot in the head by a Yankee sharpshooter), in June 1863; he was only 22 years, 10 months, and 28 days old at the time of his death. 

John or Jean Martin married Céleste Arceneaux, probably an Acadian, in a civil ceremony probably in Ascension Parish in the early 1830s, and sanctified the marriage at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1836.  Their son Jean, fils had been born in Ascension Parish in August 1834.  Was John/Jean also Acadian? 

____ Martin, "Irish, age not given, gardener at Wm. Tailor's, [who] leaves a wife and one child," died in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1837. 

Marie Elizabeth Martin died at Bayou Sarah, West Feliciana Parish, in July 1838.  She was only 18 months old.  The Pointe Coupee priest who recorded the girl's burial did not give her parents' names. 

Richard Martin married Adèle Pipkin and settled near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, by the early 1840s. 

Joseph Eugène, called Eugène, son of Pierre Martin and Étiennette Arnaud of Chambery, Savoy, France, married Virginie Irma, daughter of Jacques Besson, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1841; Virginie's mother was a Dugas.  Their son Jean Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in November 1842, and Joseph Eugène, fils in October 1848. 

Guillaume, son of Guillaume Joseph Martin, died at Bayou Sarah, north of Baton Rouge, in May 1842.  Guillaume, Jr. was only 10 years old. 

Marie Martin, wife of Jean Baptiste Philipeau, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1842, age 72.  Her succession record was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse the following month. 

Eliza Martin married James Dunn in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in December 1842.  Eliza probably was no more Acadian than her new husband. 

Jean Caius or Cayus, also called Jean Louis, son of Joseph Martin and Sophie Coulon, married Marie Amelie, Armelise, or Aurelia, daughter of Urbain Chete or Eshtes, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1844; Marie's mother was a Dantin.  Their son Joseph Adam was born near Raceland in February 1855, and Louis Jean in October 1863. 

Anodin, Audin, or Auruodin Martin married Acadian Marie Léocade Theriot.  Their son Anodin Victor was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1844. 

Carolina Martin married Bevy P. Stinson in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in February 1845.  Was Carolina kin to Eliza? 

Sophie, daughter of Joseph Martin and Marie Jeanne Sophie Foulon, married Samuel McHenry, son of Anglo American William Hart of Indiana, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1845.  Sophie probably was Jean Caius's sister. 

Thomas, son of Guillaume Martin and Élisabeth Morton, married Joséphine, daughter of Claude Sandras, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1846.  Their son William had been born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1846, Joseph was born in February 1848, and Claude Thomas in July 1850. 

Victor Martin's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in December 1847.  Was he kin to Eliza and Carolina of that parish?

Francis Martin died in Ascension Parish in April 1848.  He was only 39 years old.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial did not give Francis's parents' names or mention a wife. 

Jean, fils, son of Jean Martin and Marie Weissen, married Mélanie or Marcella, daughter of Acadian Jean Marie Barrilleaux, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1848.  Their son Téophile Lovinte was born in Ascension Parish in February 1851, and Frédéric near Paincourtville in April 1855. 

Henriette, daughter of Louis Martin and Clémence Morancy, married Lucien, son of French Creole Cyprien Ricard, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1848. 

Sosthène Martin married Marie Hernandez and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1840s. 

Rosa Martin gave birth to son Séverin in Ascension Parish in January 1849.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Bernard, son of Armant Martin and Anne Marche "of France," married Marie Émelia, called Melia, daughter of German Creole Drausin Haydel, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1849.  Their son Bernard Armand was born in Assumption Parish in December 1849.  Bernard may have died in Terrebonne Parish in February 1861; the Houma priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Bernard died "at age 46 yrs."; a "petition for curatorship" in Bernard's name was filed at the Houma courthouse a few days later. 

Céphalide Joacime, daughter of Joseph Martin and Pélagie Pierre Auguste, married Alexandre, Jr., son of Alexandre Moore, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1849. 

Newton J. Martin married Emely Caswell in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1850.  Newton's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in December 1853. 

Pierre Martin married Adèle Collon.  Their son Pierre Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in February 1851. 

Marius Martin married Mary Ann Leane and settled near St. Francisville, West Feliciana Parish, by the early 1850s. 

Jules Martin married Mary Martin.  Their son Arthur Patrick was baptized at the St. Francisville church, West Feliciana Parish, age 1 month, in June 1851. 

Pierre Numa, called Numa, son of Martin Martin and Aimée Dupar, married Henriette, daughter of Anglo American John Conway, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in July 1851.  Their son Joseph Edgard died in Ascension Parish, age 11 months, in February 1852, Jean Loubiesky or Sobieski was born in December 1851 but died in January, and Xavier Cleveland was born in August 1860. 

Hugh, son of James Martin and Mary Ward, married Bridget, daughter of William Perrel, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1852. 

Gentil, son of Francis Martin and Francisse Martin, married Ellen or Helen, daughter of Irishman Patrick Casey or Cassey of New Orleans at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in June 1853.  Gentil's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in December 1865. 

Octavie, daughter of John Martin and Magdaleine Hahan, married Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Dumartre of Guadeloupe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1853. 

Jules Martin married Clarisse Madeleine.  Their son Jules, fils was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in April 1854. 

Jean Baptiste Martin of Montsalvy, Conton, Aurillac, France, died in St. James Parish in September 1854.  He was only 23 years old.  The priest who recorded the Frenchman's burial did not mention a wife. 

Henriette Eléonore Martin, wife or widow of Augustin Frederick Martin, died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in October 1854.  She was 56 years old. 

Louis, son of Martin Martin and Marguerite Émelie, called Émelie, Hotard, married cousin Melisa, daughter of Edward Bossie, in a civil ceremony in April 1854, and sanctified the marriage at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in July 1855; Melisa's mother, also, was a Hotard.  Their son Joseph Edward was born near Plaquemine in early 1854. 

Joséphine, daughter of Martin Martin and Émelie Hotard, married Lucien, son of French Creole Honoré Baudoin, at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1854. 

Louis Martin of Basses Alpes, France, "res. at François Michel[']s, where he worked as a baker," died near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1854.  He was only 34 years old. 

Mathias Martin died "at hospital" in Ascension Parish in March 1855.  He was only 37 years old.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded Mathias's burial did not mention a wife. 

Jacques Louis, son of Jean Charles Martin and Pierrot Marie Josèphe of Bulles, Floreuville, Luxembourg, died "as a result of a gunshot inflicted" probably in Iberville Parish in January 1856.  He was only 44 years old.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded the Luxembourger's burial did not mention a wife. 

Bernard, son of Armand Martin and Anne Morchairs "of France," married Antoinette, daughter of Acadian Ursin Barrilleaux of Assumption Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1856.  They settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Assumption, Lafourche, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Augustin Olvar was born in February 1859, Jean Beauregard in June 1861, and Paulin Oscar in January 1866. 

Alfonse Martin married Filonis Martin and settled in Ascension Parish by the late 1850s. 

Philippe Martin married Émeline West and settled near Chacahoula, Terrebonne Parish, by the late 1850s. 

Jeannette Martin, "a Parisian," married Joseph Schultz "of Germany" at the St. Francisville church, West Feliciana Parish, in September 1858.

Louis Martin married Marguerite Melissa Bossier or Boxier.  Their son Urbain Anacharsis was born near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in December 1858. 

Pierre Louis Martin married Emerante Chauvin, widow of Pierre Thibodaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in June 1860.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Michel, son of Antoine Martin and Marguerite Herschell, married Catherine, daughter of Irishman Darby O'Mealy, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in February 1861. 

Andréson Martin married Marie Victorine.  Their son André was born near Montegut, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1861. 

John G. Martin married "Mrs." Sarah Bryer, widow of ____ Walton, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1863.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joachin Martin married Rosalie or Sophie Quedet or Ladeste and settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, by the early 1860s.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born near Ville Platte in January 1864. 

Joseph, Jr., "native of Mississippi," son of Joseph Martin and Elizabeth Evans, married Femite, daughter of Spanish Creole Perique Sanchez, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1824. 

Evelina Martin, wife of Martin Urso, died in Ascension Parish in September 1863.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names or her age at the time of her death. 

Casimir Martin married Acadian Marie Braud.  Their son Joseph Dixmai was born in Ascension Parish in September 1863. 

Sutter Martin married Francisca Gurlvin at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in September 1863.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Urbin, son of Antoine Martin and Marie Recipion, married Marcelline, daughter of Jean Dufrene, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in March 1864; Marcelline's mother was a Bourgeois

François Martin married Andri Dies.  Their son Henri was born near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, in June 1864. 

Edward Martin died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1864.  He was only 46 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Edward's parents' names or mention a wife.  One wonders if Edward's death was war-related. 

Frank Martin married Marie Bes and settled near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

Casimir, also called Camill, probably Camille, Martin married Charlotte Fernandez and settled in Ascension Parish by the mid-1860s. 

Delia Martin, widow of ____ Fontenot, married Anglo American John W. Scott in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1865.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph Martin died in Assumption Parish in August 1865.  The Plattenville priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or even give Joseph's age at the time of his death, but the priest did record that Joseph was buried "at [the] cemetery at Chapelle at [Attakapas] Canal." 

Alexandre Martin married Isabelle Boit and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the late 1860s. 

Édouard Martin married Félicité Adam and settled near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Bernard Martin married Elizabeth Floyd and settled in St. Landry Parish by the late 1860s. 

Nicolas Martin married Philomène Savage and settled near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Paul Martin married Célestine P. J. B. Roussillon and settled near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Jaspard Lafayette Martin married Eugénie Taylor, widow of E. P. Allen, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in April 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Thomas Martin married Martha Ruffins or Ruffin in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in October 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Elisa Louisiane Martin married William McLalland in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in December 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Eugène Martin married Justine ____.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born in Ascension Parish in January 1867.  Interestingly, the boy's godfather was Casimire, probably Casimir, Martin, so were Eugène and Casimir brothers?  One wonders which Casimir this might have been. 

Casimir Martin married Sara Ann Wilkesson at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in March 1867.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Martilda Martin married Joseph Williams in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in June 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

André Martin's succession record, calling his wife Emily Breaux, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in November 1867. 

Célestine Martin married Preston Clay in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in December 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

James Martin married Amelia E., daughter of H. B. Bryer and Sarah Lee Amos, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the groom's parents' names. 

Joseph Martin died in Ascension Parish in June 1868.  The Donaldsonville priest, who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Joseph died at "age ca. 7 months." 

Eugène Martin died in Ascension Parish in August 1868.  The Donaldsonville priest, who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Eugène died at "age 2 years." 

Colas Martin married Lea Wells in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

John Martin married Hannah Morris in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the groom's parents' names. 

Silvidia Martin married John Sandy Steward or Stewart in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Jean Martin married Joséphine Broussard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

____ Martin, fils married Marguerite Rossette in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, not to mention the groom's given name. 

Joachim Martin married Veroni Chevis a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Mary Jane Martin married William H. Keys in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Pierre Augustin Martin married Elize Martin.  Their son Joseph was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1869. 

Drozin Joachim Martin married Célestine Lavigne in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, not to mention the groom's given name. 

Aristide Martin married Olymphe Theriot.  Their son John was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1869. 

Matilda, also called Maggie, Martin married James Dyer in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marie Martin married Bélisaire Azor in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in December 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Casimire, probably Casimir, Martin married Celine Jones in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in January 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Pierre Martin married Rosa Gardiner in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Jean Baptiste Martin married Irma Lejeune in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Mary Emma, daughter of Jacob Martin and Abby Peck, married John, son of John O'Connor and Mary A. Duffy, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1870. 

Dic Martin married Françoise Desbayons.  Their son Arthelus was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in August 1870. 

Jean Baptiste, son of Marcellin Martin and Estelle Egette, married Amelie, daughter of Philippe McNeil, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1870; Amelie's mother was an Acadian Blanchard

John Martin, "an Irishman," died in Ascension Parish in August 1870.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that John the Irishman died at "age ca. 58 years." 

Julienne Martin married Alphonse Ceret in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in December 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

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A Martin from Glasgow came to the Bayou Teche valley around the time of the Louisiana Purchase and married an Acadian.  His second wife, also, was Acadian.  The Scotsman's descendants became thoroughly Gallicized during the antebellum period: 

Descendants of John MARTIN (c1773-1843)

John, called Jean by his francophone neighbors, son of James Martin and Catherine Hamilton, also called Steel, of Glasgow, Scotland, a Presbyterian living "in this country for 4 yrs.," married Françoise, daughter of Acadian Jean Sonnier of Ascension Parish, at the home of Louis Legnon "at l'isle tocane," St. Martin Parish, in May 1807.  They lived at Île Labbé near Catahoula at the western edge of the Atchafalaya Basin, and at Grand Bois on the lower Teche near New Iberia.  Their daughter married into the Doré family.  According to one church record, John served as "econome de (treasurer for)" planter Jacques Fontenette, so he must have been literate.  John remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Charles Trahan, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1825; John was in his early 50s at the time of the wedding.  Their daughter married into the Ancelet family.  John died in St. Martin Parish in September 1843; he was 70 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse a week after his death.  Most of his many sons died young.  Two of them, however, created families of their own, and one of them married an Acadian. 

1

Oldest son Théodore, called Ordore, from his father's first wife, born in St. Martin Parish in March 1810, married Marie Estelle, daughter of French Creole Antoine Champagne, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1834.  Their son Jean Orestile, Oreste, or Aristide was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1839, and Théores in November 1845.  Their daughter married into the Dauphine family.  Théodore died in St. Martin Parish in July 1854; he was only 44 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month. 

Jean Orestile, called John Aristide by the recording clerk, married Acadian Amelina or Emelina Sonnier in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in July 1860.  Jean Orestile, called Oreste by the recording priest, remarried to Élisabeth, called Elisa, daughter of Philippe McNeil, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1867; Elisa's mother was an Acadian Blanchard.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Oreste's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November 1867; he would have been 28 years old that year. 

2

John Alexandre, by his father's first wife, born at Île Labbé in August 1812, died "at his parent's[sic]" home "at Catahoula," age 14 months, in October 1813. 

3

Rosémond, by his father's first wife, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1815, married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of Acadian Frédéric Blanchard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1841.  Their son Jean Alcée was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1844, Alcide in October 1846 but died at age 5 1/2 in January 1852, and Joseph Rosémond was born February 1854.  Rosémond died in St. Martin Parish in February 1854; he was only 39 years old. 

4

Valéry, by his father's second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in July 1829, died at age 4 in July 1833

5

Louis Alphred, by his father's second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in May 1831, died at age 5 in September 1836. 

6

Jean, fils, by his father's second wife, died in St. Martin Parish, age 1, in July 1833.

7

John St. Clair, called St. Clair, from his father's second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in December 1835, died in St. Martin Parish in August 1843.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that St. Clair died "at age 14 yrs.," but he was only 7. 

8

Youngest son Aurelien Jean, by his father's second wife, born probably in St. Martin Parish in c1837, died at age 10 in October 1847. 

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During the early antebellum period, a Martin from France, who was a surgeon and probably a Foreign Frenchman, married into a prominent French Creole family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche:

Descendants of Joseph Richard MARTIN, fils (c1781-1861)

Joseph Richard, fils, son of Joseph-Richard Martin and Justine Roux of Voiron, Dauphiné, France, a surgeon, born in c1781, married Marguerite Claire, daughter of French Creole Auguste Verret of St. James, at Assumption in October 1805; Marguerite's mother was a Bujole.  They lived at St.-Jacques before returning to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they settled near the boundary of what became Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their daughters married into the Judice and Matherne families.  Dr. Martin died in Assumption Parish in March 1861; he was 80 years old. 

1

Older son Joseph Sabin, a twin, born in Assumption Parish in September 1808, married French Creole Henrietta Susanne or Susanne Henriette Fortier.  Their son Joseph Émile Sabin was born in Assumption Parish in January 1845, and Jean Henry in Ascension Parish in September 1846. 

2

Younger son Numa Jean, called Jean, born in Assumption Parish in February 1812, married cousin Marie Irma, daughter of Acadian Achille Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1841; they had to secure as dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Did they have any children? 

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During the early antebellum period, a Martin from Paris, perhaps a Foreign Frenchman, married an Acadian and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche: 

Descendants of Jean Baptiste Pierre Julien MARTIN (?-)

Jean Baptiste Pierre Julien, son of Pierre Martin and Marie-Geneviève-Françoise Tesseron of Paris, France, living in Ascension Parish, married Rose Florence, daughter of Acadian Jean Baptiste Doucet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1818, and remarried to Céleste, daughter of French Creole Pierre Richau and widow of Louis Dué, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1821.  Jean Baptiste Pierre Julien's only son created a lasting line of the family on lower Bayou Lafourche. 

Marcellin, by his father's first wife, born in Assumption or Lafourche Interior parish in c1819, became a ward of Nicolas Laine by October 1831 and married Rose Anne, daughter of Spanish Creole Joseph Lopes, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1839.  Their twin sons Adam Octave Marcellin, perhaps called Octave, and Marcellin Adam were born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1841.  Marcellin remarried to Estelle, daughter of Dalmars Chete, Eshte, Schete, or Shete, at the Thibodaux church in March 1851.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1851, Victor Arness in January 1854, Joseph Prosper near Lockport in December 1855, Jules Marcel in October 1861, and Marcellin, fils died a day after his birth October 1863. 

Adam Octave Marcellin may have married French Creole Ugène Terrebonne and settled near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, by the early 1860s.  Octave died near Lockport in June 1869; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give a wife's name, said that Octave died "at age 25 yrs.," but he was 27.  Did he father any sons? 

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During the antebellum period, a French-Canadian Martin married an Acadian and settled in Terrebonne Parish:

Descendants of Julien Benjamin MARTIN (c1804-1832)

Julien Benjamin Martin of Montréal, Canada, married 24-year-old Acadian Rosalie Hébert in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in April 1830; the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, though he did say where the groom was from.  Julien Benjamin died probably in Terrebonne Parish in October 1832; he was only 28 years old.  His only son also married an Acadian. 

Jean Baptiste dit La Douceur, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in April 1831, married cousin Marie Caroline, daughter of Acadian Maxilière Hébert, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1854, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1856.

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An Anglo-American Martin family arose in St. Landry Parish during the antebellum period: 

Descendants of Henry J./Henry dit Pitre MARTIN (?-)

Henry J., also called Henry dit Pitre, Martin married Eliza or Eloise Bushnell, perhaps a fellow Anglo American, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1833, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1846.  Their daughter married into the Briley family.  Henry J. died in St. Landry Parish in November 1855; he was only 48 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in March 1856. 

1

Ezra, born probably in St. Landry Parish, married Marie Louise, daughter of French Creole Auguste Soileau, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1867.  They settled at Washington on Bayou Courtableau. 

2

Albert Stewart was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in October 1845.  

3

Conrad Lawrence, born in St. Landry Parish in February 1850, married Elizabeth Savant in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1870. 

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Throughout the antebellum period, dozens of Martins, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, emigrated to New Orleans from France, the Caribbean Basin, Mexico, and Texas.  Most of those who stayed remained in the city, but a few of them settled upriver at Pointe Coupee and on upper Bayou Lafourche: 

Julien, son of Jean Martin and Pérrine Robert of St.-Martin Parish, Nantes, France, married Marie Hortense, daughter of Acadian Jean Raphaël Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1819.

_____ Martin, a 35-year-old physician from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship South Carolina out of Marseille, France, in July 1820. 

M. Martin, a 23-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Orleans out of Marseille in November 1820.  

Jacques Martin, a 44-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Minerve out of Le Havre, France, in June 1821.  One the same ship was Ambroise Martin, age 16, perhaps Jacques's son or a younger brother. 

_____ Martin, a 24-year-old male from France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Phebe out of Marseille in April 1822. 

_____ Martin, a 24-year-old cooper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Nestor out of Nantes in April 1822. 

_____ Martin, a 26-year-old male from France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Roman out of Le Havre in February 1823. 

Louis Martin, a 40-year-old mariner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship 8th of January out of Rio Grande, Texas, in March 1823. 

P. Martin, a 50-year-old mariner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Renown out of Matanzas, Cuba, in February 1824. 

A. Martin, a 30-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Union out of Havana, Cuba, in November 1825. 

Séraphine Martin, a 31-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Camus out of Marseille in November 1825. 

_____ Martin, a 32-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Nestor out of Le Havre in November 1825. 

A. Martin, a 19-year-old scholar from Bordeaux, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Eliza out of Bordeaux in April 1826.  He returned to his home city. 

Louis Martin, a 40-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Venus out of Rio Grande, Texas, in January 1826. 

J. Martin, a 47-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Eclipse out of Rio Grande, Texas, in April 1827. 

Isabella Martin, a 21-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Crescent out of Le Havre in January 1829. 

Dominique Martin, a 29-year-old millwright from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship William out of Bordeaux in November 1829. 

F. Martin, a 35-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Correo out of Tampico, Mexico, in December 1829. 

Louis Martin, a 38-year-old shopkeeper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Sally out of Rio Bravo del Norte, or Rio Grande, Texas, in May 1830. 

Louis Martin, a 22-year-old mariner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Monk out of Tampico in July 1830. 

Burgere Martin, a 26-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Marengo out of Le Havre in March 1832. 

Joseph Martin of Marseilles died in Pointe Coupee Parish in April 1834.  He was 50 years old when he died and left two children.  The priest who recorded his burial did not bother to give Joseph's wife's/widow's name. 

Louis Martin, a 40-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Emperor out of Brazos Santiago, Texas, in April 1835. 

J. Martin, a 26-year-old mechanic from Bordeaux, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Talma out of Bordeaux in November 1835. 

Francis Martin, a 36-year-old actor from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Venezia out of Havana in September 1836. 

Nicolas Martin, a 17-year-old cooper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Macedonia out of Le Havre in November 1836. 

Mr. ____ Martin, a 42-year-old shoemaker from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cecilia out of Nantes, France, in December 1836.  With him was Mrs. _____ Martin, age 36, his wife.  Aboard the same ship were Léonide Martin, age 10, and Jules Martin, age 8, probably their sons. 

Pierre-Mathieu Martin, a 22-year-old baker from Puidonnier, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Suzanne out of Bordeaux in January 1838. 

Mlle. ____ Martin, a 28-year-old milliner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Neptune out of Bordeaux in March 1838.  On the ship also were two Martin children, ages and genders unrecorded, who may have been her younger siblings. 

Paul-B. Martin, a 64-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Marengo out of Le Havre in April 1838. 

Louis Martin, a 37-year-old carpenter from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Girard out of Le Havre in April 1838. 

Nicolas Martin, a 32-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Salem out of Le Havre in May 1838.  Aboard the same ship were Maria Martin, age 32, probably his wife, and Joseph Martin, age 2, and Émilie Martin, age 6 months, probably their children. 

Joseph Martin, a 40-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Carroll out of Havana in August 1838. 

Mary Martin, a 41-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Marengo out of Le Havre in November 1838. 

_____ Martin, a 41-year-old male shopkeeper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Jeune Édouard out of Marseilles in December 1838. 

Françoise Martin, a 26-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Andrew Scott out of Le Havre in December 1838.  Also on the same ship were Guillaume Martin, age 6, and Rossine Martin, age 4, probably her children. 

Jean Martin, a 40-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Saxon out of Le Havre in January 1839.  On the same ship was Guillaume Martin, a 33-year-old mariner from France.  One wonders if the mariner was the Guillaume Joseph Martin who married Françoise LeBret probably at Pleurty, Nantes, France, and whose son Giles, born at Nantes, died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 2, in October 1839.  Their 5-year-old daughter Rose also died in Pointe Coupee that month. 

_____ Martin, a 30-year-old male from France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Anne Louise out of Bordeaux, France, in June 1839. 

Miss ____ Martin, a 14-year-old native of France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Tampa out of Nantes in November 1839. 

François Martin, a 31-year-old "ex-soldier" from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Laurent et Fanny out of Marseilles in December 1839. 

Alex. Martin, a 22-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Charles out of Le Havre in May 1840. 

Nicolas Lorentz Martin, a 20-year-old "proprietor" from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Eulalie out of Bordeaux in July 1840. 

_____ Martin, a 30-year-old mechanic from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Amerika out of Bordeaux in January 1841. 

J. P. Martin, a 24-year-old saddler from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Chateaubriand out of Bordeaux in April 1841. 

Alphonse Martin, an 18-year-old clerk from Paris, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Lyon out of Le Havre in March 1843. 

Eugène Martin, a 36-year-old blacksmith from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oregon out of Le Havre in May 1843.  Also aboard the same ship was Marie Martin, age 45, occupation unrecorded. 

Elisha Martin, a 54-year-old "gentleman" from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Sam Houston out of Galveston in October 1843. 

Élisabeth Martin, a 40-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Talma out of Bordeaux in November 1843. 

Paul Martin, a 35-year-old "property owner" from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vesta out of an unrecorded port in December 1843. 

L. Martin, a 45-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Alabama out of Havana in December 1843. 

Appelina Martin, a 32-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Devonshire out of Le Havre in November 1844. 

Jean N. Martin, a 32-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Magnolia out of Le Havre in April 1845. 

Élisée Martin, a 57-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Tete out of Havana in September 1845.  He was heading to Texas. 

L. Martin, a 30-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Andelle out of Le Havre in December 1845. 

Michel Martin, a 32-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship North Carolina out of Le Havre in December 1845.  He was heading to Missouri. 

_____ Martin, a 25-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Strafford out of Bordeaux in March 1846. 

_____ Martin, a 34-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vesta out of Le Havre in May 1847. 

Conrad Martin, a 39-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Remitance out of Le Havre in May 1848.  Also aboard the same ship was Madalaine Martin, age 30, also listed as a farmer and probably his wife. 

Christophe Martin, a 33-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Hanover out of Le Havre in June 1848.  On the same ship were Marie Martin, age 26, also listed as a farmer, Christophe Martin, age 4, and Barbe Martin, age 1, probably his wife and children. 

_____ Martin, a 19-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Jacques Lafitte out of Le Havre in October 1848. 

_____ Martin, a 48-year-old confectioner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vesta out of Le Havre in November 1848. 

Jules Martin, a 30-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Anna out of Le Havre in November 1848. 

Jean Martin, a 48-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Jacques Lafitte out of Le Havre in April 1849. 

Mrs. Martin, a 25-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Ferrier out of Bordeaux in June 1849. 

Pierre Martin, an 18-year-old clerk from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Titi out of Veracruz, Mexico, in August 1849. 

Victoire Martin, a 39-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oregon out of Le Havre in October 1849.  Aboard the same ship was Alfred Martin, age 7, perhaps her son. 

Paul, Irénée[sic] Martin, a 33-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Spartan out of Bordeaux in December 1849.  Aboard the same ship was Jean Martin, a 23-year-old French laborer, perhaps his brother. 

Carl Martin, a 41-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Buena Vista out of Le Havre in January 1850. 

Victor Martin, a 28-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cesare out of Marseille in June 1850. 

François Martin, a 43-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Caroline & Mary Clark out of Liverpool, England, in November 1850.  Aboard  the same vessel was Sophie Martin, age 35, probably his wife.  They were going to Missouri. 

Ph. Martin, a 22-year-old clerk from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Adler out of Bordeaux in April 1851. 

Peter Martin, a 26-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship New England out of Le Havre in December 1851.  Aboard the same ship was Catharine Martin, a 21-year-old farmer, probably his wife. 

J. P. Martin, a 21-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Medemseh out of Bordeaux in December 1851. 

Dominiq Martin, a 31-year-old farmer from Alsace, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Zanons or Zazons out of Le Havre in December 1851.  He was heading to Texas. 

Peter Martin, a 25-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Edward Everett out of Le Havre in April 1852. 

J. M. Martin, a 20-year-old laborer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oscar out of Bordeaux in November 1852. 

Henri Marten, a 36-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Inza out of Bordeaux in November 1852. 

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Many Martins who lived in South Louisiana were neither French, British, Hispanic, nor Acadian.  They were Afro Creoles who may have been owned by "white" Martins, or, more likely, took their surname from a progenitor with the given name "Martin."  Area church and civil records do not always reveal their ethnicity, but the record keepers often provided tantalizing clues:

A succession record for Antoine G. Martin, free man of color, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1859. 

Paul Martin, a free man of color, married Virginia Segura, a free woman of color, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in January 1860.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son William was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia parish, in February 1864. 

Pauline A. Martin, a free woman of color, married Louis Charlot, a free man of color, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1861.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

"Sister" McKinney Martin married Dyclerd Upstairs in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1864.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph Martin married Souzi ____ at "settled" "at Chenevert's," Pointe Coupee Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

Joseph Martin married Joséphine ____ and settled near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

Martin Martin married Rosalie ____ and settled in Ascension Parish by the mid-1860s. 

John Martin, "freedman," married Azélie Harman, "freedwoman," in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1865.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Martin Martin married Julie ____ and "res[ided] at Mr. Baptiste Lejeune's" in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Their son Augustin was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1866. 

Martin Martin married Léocadie ____ and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the late 1860s. 

Joseph Martin married Augustine ____ and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the late 1860s. 

Martin Martin married Julie ____ and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the late 1860s.  One of their daughters was born "at Théodose Chenevert's" in June 1868.

Émile Martin married Joyele ____ and settled at Washington, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Émile Martin married Joséphine ____ and settled in St. Martin Parish by the late 1860s. 

Paul Martin married Célestine ____ and settled near Bayou Pointe-aux-Loups, now Iota, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Joséphine, "res. at Marcel Samson's," daughter of Joseph Martin and Pauline Lejeune, married Lucien Vincent, "res. at Mrs. Meury Knapps'," son of Vincent Jean Pierre and Amelia Pierre, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee parish, in January 1867. 

Victoria Martin, free woman of color, married Albert Green, free man of color, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in March 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joséphine Martin, daughter of Lucille ____, married Joseph Lessin, son of Clémence ____, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1867.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's fathers' names, unless it was Martin and Lessin. 

A succession record for Moussat Martin, freedman, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in January 1868.  The succession named his wife--Estere Richard, freedwoman. 

Sam Martin married Euphrosine Joe Lemelle, freedwoman, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Can one assume that Sam was a freed person, too? 

Joseph, son of Martin and Annette, "aff. de [affrachi, or freedman, of] St. Denis DeBlanc," married Rosillette, daughter of Febien and Isabelle, "of Pointe Coupee, aff. de Alcide Fuselier," at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1868. 

Lucien Martin married Euphémie ____.  Their son Pierre was born "at Widow Paul Pourciau's," Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1868. 

Travely Martin married Laisa Martin.  Their son Christophe Adam was born near Bayou Pointe-aux-Loups, now Iota, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in February 1869. 

Augustin Martin married Euphrasie Royal.  Their son Pierre died "at Mrs. François Pourciaus's plantation" in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 4 months, in July 1868. 

Jean Louis Martin married Marie ____.  Their son Jean Louis was born "at Clair Cazayou's" in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1868. 

John, son of Joachim Martin and Céleste Donato, homme de couleur libre, or free man of color, married Hyacinthe, daughter of John Jules Thieveste and Célesie Pierre Auguste, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in February 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's ethnicity, but she probably also was a free person of color. 

Clara Martin married Clément Guillaume in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in April 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Edmond, son of Martin Martin and Madeleine ____, married Julie, daughter of Charles Charles and Catherine ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1869. 

Marie or Mary, daughter of Jefferson Martin and Roseline Carrière, married Charles, son of Obit Nicholson and Mary ____, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1869. 

Mary Allain Martin married ____ Antoine in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in October 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Alexandre, son of Martin Martin and Marie Louise ____, married Uranie, daughter of Joseph Joseph and Marie Janot "of P. C. [Pointe Coupee]," at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1869. 

Agnes, daughter of Martin Martin and Catiche ____, married Augustin, son of Mitchell Mitchell and Pouponne ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869. 

Cyprien, son of Martin Martin and Célesie Prudhomme, married Émelie or Émelia, daughter of David Slater and Betsie ____, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1869. 

Fanelie, daughter of Martin Martin and Mildred Egline, married François, son of Jacques dit Jacquot Thierry and Hélène ____, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1869. 

Émile, son of Célestin Martin and Louise Martin, married Joséphine, daughter of Aurelien Johnson and Ane, probably Anne, ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1869.

Welly Martin, son of Léo Louisa Welse, was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in December 1869.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism died not give the father's name nor the mother's parents' names. 

Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Martin and Claire ____,  also called Martin Joseph, married Louise, daughter of Louis Avigne and Marie ____, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Prairies, in January 1870.  The marriage record acknowledged, but did not name, their four children. 

Chalumet Martin "at Baptiste Lejeune's Plantation," Pointe Coupee Parish, married Dorval Jacques, living on the same plantation, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but he did note that the marriage legitimized the couple's children:  Pauline, age about 26; Venue, age about 23; Wel, age about 22; Uranie, age about 18; Joséphine, age about 16; Paulit, age about 13; and Firmin, age about 2. 

Marcellin Martin married Marguerite Jacques or Jaco at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but he did note that the marriage legitimized the couple's children:  Adélaïde, age 10 years; Polieene, age 8; Geneviève, age 6; Martin, age 2; and Marie Arthémise, age 2 months.  Their son Edmond had been born in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1865; looking at the list of children in his parents' marriage record, one wonders if Edmond survived childhood. 

Pierre Martin married Joséphine ____ at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but he did note that the marriage legitimized the couple's children:  Modeste, age 10; and Paul, age 7. 

Roseline Joseph Martin married Norbert Vincent at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but he did note that the marriage legitimized the couple's children:  Adelina, age 5; and Julie, age 2. 

Valsin Martin married Areelie Johnson at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Célestine Jean Baptiste, daughter of Martin Guillaume Martin and Liza ____, married Alfred, son of Daniel Daniel and Fannie ____, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in February 1870. 

Amelia, daughter of Martin Martin and Angélique ____, married Jean, son of Simon Simon and Victoria ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1870. 

Joseph, son of Martin Martin and Françoise ____, married Julia, daughter of Charles Charles and Anne ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1870. 

Silvestre, son of Martin Martin and Modeste ____, married Mercanthe, daughter of Pierre Aglae and Zoe Colas, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1870. 

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A Martin family that appeared in St. Landry Parish during the antebellum period cannot be linked to other Martins in the area.  The marriage of a son hints that these Martins also may have been of African descent:

 Descendants of Antoine Jean Baptiste/Jean Baptiste Guillaume MARTIN (?-)

Antoine Jean Baptiste, also called Jean Baptiste Guillaume, son of Marie Martin, married Domelize, daughter of Eugène Lavigne, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1842.  Marie Martin's daughter Gertrude Guillaume married George, son of French Creole Laurent Malveaux, at the Opelousas church in February 1850; was Gertrude Guillaume a daughter of Antoine?   

Émile married Marie Simien, widow of Jean Baptiste Prevot and free woman of color, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1868; the priest who recorded the church marriage gave the couple's parents' names but said nothing of their ethnicity; the parish clerk who recorded the civil marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but he did note the ethnicity of the bride.  Were Émile and his family also free people of color? 

CONCLUSION

The surname Martin/Martín can be found throughout Europe and the Americas--it is, in fact, the most common surname in France and is exceedingly common in Spain and wherever the Spanish settled.  It should be no surprise, then, that most of the Martins of South Louisiana are not Acadians.  Guillaume Martin dit Sans Chagrin, probably a French Canadian, was a soldier at Fort Biloxi, then a part of Louisiana, in 1700, only a year after the colony was founded.  Martins from France, Switzerland, and even England lived in Louisiana as early as the 1720s.  As many as a dozen Spanish Martíns from the Canary Islands appeared in the late 1770s, when Governor Gálvez brought hundreds of Isleños to Louisiana to increase the colony's population.  Spanish soldiers named Martín were plentiful in New Orleans by the 1790s.  During the antebellum period, more non-Acadian Martins, from the United States, Britain, Spain, and Spanish America, settled in South Louisiana.  They were especially numerous on Bayou Lafourche and the western prairies.  A Martin from Scotland married two Acadians and established a family line among his Acadian namesakes on Bayou Teche.  At least one Isleño Martín, whose mother was an Acadian, settled on upper Bayou Teche during the antebellum period.  Many of the dozens of Foreign-French Martins who came to Louisiana from France, the Caribbean Basin, Mexico, and Texas during the antebellum period remained at New Orleans, but a few chose to settle at Pointe Coupee and on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Many Martins who were free persons of color, or especially freedmen and freedwomen--Afro Creoles either once owned by members of the Martin family or, more likely, whose progenitor bore the given name Martin--appear in South Louisiana church records before and after the War of 1861. 

Two separate lines of Martins were among the first families of Acadia, and descendants of Barnabé Martin of Port-Royal were some of the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana (in fact, all of the Acadian Martin lines established in Louisiana descend from Barnabé, not Pierre, Martin).  Nearly all of them came to the colony from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765.  The first of them--two sets of brothers and a cousin--came with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party that settled on Bayou Teche.  Later that year, more Acadian Martins, all brothers and all cousins of the Teche valley Martins, came to the colony from the prison camps at Halifax and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on what soon became known as the Acadian Coast.  In late 1765 or early 1766, a Martin and his family left the Teche valley and joined his younger brothers at Cabanocé.  By the end of the colonial period, the eastern and western branches of the family were about equal in size.  Nearly all of the western families descend from a single line, that of Claude of Port-Royal, a great-grandson of Barnabé of Port-Royal.  One of the Teche valley Martins, Marguerite dit Barnabé, who was married to a Robichaux when she came to Louisiana in 1765, remarried to an French-born surgeon at St. Martinville and became the maternal grandmother of future Louisiana governor Alexandre Mouton.  During the early antebellum period, Acadian Martins from St. James Parish moved to upper Bayou Lafourche and created a third center of family settlement.  In the following decades, they moved down bayou into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes, as far down as the marshes lining the Gulf of Mexico.  Meanwhile, by the early antebellum period, Acadian Martins virtually disappeared from the river.  In the late 1820s, however, in a reversal of the usual Acadian settlement pattern, a Martin from Bayou Lafourche returned to the old Acadian Coast and settled in St. James Parish; by the War of 1861, this was the only Acadian Martin family still living on the river.  Two Acadian Martin brothers from the Lafourche valley moved to the western prairies after the war. 

On the eve of the War of 1861-65, most Acadian Martins lived west of the Atchafalaya Basin in Lafayette, St. Martin, and St. Landry parishes, and east of the Basin in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  But, with the exception of perhaps Lafayette and St. Martin parishes, the numbers of these Acadian Martins paled in comparison to their non-Acadian namesakes, who lived in nearly every community of South Louisiana.  This complicated the family's genealogical profile considerably wherever they settled near one another.  Not surprisingly, many non-Acadian Martins took Acadian spouses, especially on the prairies and in the Bayou Lafourche valley.  ...

Sources:  Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 4, 7-8, 39, 43, 57-59; Arsenault, Généalogie, 673-85, 1013, 1420-21, 1506, 1566, 2129, 2306, 2370, 2550-53; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 403; Booth, LA Confed. Soldiers, vol. 3(1); Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:364-67, 2:232-33, 3:204-05; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Bunnell, French & Native North American Marriages, 75-77; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155; Hall, 26th LA Infantry, 110; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 316-20; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 19; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 105-07, 180; White, DGFA-1, 1125-40; White, DGFA-1 English, 243-46.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé, fils 01 Feb 1765 Atk, StJ born c1734, probably Chignecto; son of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his first wife Anne CYR; brother of Joseph dit Barnabé, & Marguerite dit Barnabé, half-brother of François, Marie-Jeanne dit Barnabé, & Paul dit Barnabé; at Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, Aug 1752, age 18; married, age 25, Marie-Madeleine dit Bellefontaine, daughter of Jean GODIN dit Bellefontaine dit Lincour & Françoise DUGAS of Rivière St.-Jean, c1759; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, called EnbeRoize, with unnamed wife & 6 unnamed children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 31, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; on list of Acadians who exchanged card money in New Orleans, Apr 1765; moved to Cabanocé fall 1765 probably to escape an epidemic; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Ambrosio BERNARBE, with 1 unnamed woman & 2 slaves in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Ambroise, age 42, with wife Magdelaine age 39, son Paul age 2, daughters Hélainne age 16, Élizabeth age 12, Margueritte age 7, Rozallie age 5, & brother-in-law Jean GAUDIN age 30; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Ambroises, with 8 unnamed whites, 1 black, 15 qts. corn, 12 qts. corn; died [buried] St.-Jacques 14 Jan 1796, age 70[sic]
Anne MARTIN 02 1765? StJ born 7 Mar 1720, baptized 9 Mar 1720, Annapolis Royal; daughter of Étienne MARTIN & Marie-Jeanne COMEAUX; married, age 24, (1)Pierre, fils, son of Pierre BLANCHARD & Anne ROBICHAUX, 13 Jan 1744, Port-Royal; arrived LA 1765, a widow, age 45, with second cousins François MARTIN & Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé; married, age 55, (2)Joseph, son of probably Bonaventure FORET & Claire RIVET, & widower of Isabelle LÉGER, 6 Jun 1775, St.-Jacques; married, age 58, (3)Jean-Baptiste, son of Martin RICHARD & Marguerite BOURG of Chignecto, & widower of Marie-Catherine CORMIER, 23 Jul 1778, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 4 others
Anselme MARTIN 03 17?? StJ, Atk born c1750, Acadia; son of Paul MARTIN & Marie THIBODEAUX; married, age 24, Marie-Théotiste, daughter of Jean-Baptiste HÉBERT dit Manuel & Claire ROBICHAUX of Cobeguit, 14 Feb 1774, St.-Jacques; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 27, head of family number 84, with wife Marie age 23, daughter Valresse [Hélène] age 2, & no economic information; in Attakapas census, 1781, with 3 unnamed individuals, 20 animals, & 10 arpents; died by Dec 1783, when his wife remarried at Attakapas
Bonaventure MARTIN 04 Feb 1765 Atk, NO, Op born c1753, probably Annapolis Royal; son of Charles MARTIN & Jeanne COMEAUX; brother of Claude, Judith-Philippe (likely his twin), & Marguerite; arrived LA Feb 1765, 12, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, La Manque District, called Buenoventura MARTIN, orphan, with 1 man in his household; in Attakapas census, 1769, called Bonnaventure MARTIN, age 17, with family of brother-in-law Michel DOUCET & sister Marguerite; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 10 or 18[sic], with family of brother-in-law Michel DOUCET & sister Marguerite; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 23, head of family number 15, probably a bachelor, with orphan Joseph BABIN age 24, 0 slaves, 38 cattle, 15 horses, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; married Louise, daughter of Antoine DUVERNE and Louise LA PRADE of New Orleans, probably New Orleans; moved to Opelousas District; died "at his home" on Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé, St. Landry Parish, "after having received all the sacraments," 11 Dec 1817, age 75[sic], buried next day "in the parish cemetery"; succession record dated Apr 1818, St. Landry Parish courthouse
Claude MARTIN 05 Feb 1765 Atk born 26 Dec 1730, Annapolis Royal; son of Charles MARTIN & Jeanne COMEAUX; brother of Bonaventure, Judith-Philippe, & Marguerite; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 24, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; on list of Acadians who exchanged card money in New Orleans, Apr 1765; in Attakapas census, 1766, La Manque District, called Claudio MARTIN, with no one else in his household; married, age 39, Marie, daughter of perhaps Dominique BABIN & Marguerite BOUDREAUX of Minas, c1769, probably Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1769, age 32[sic], with unnamed wife [Marie], Marguerite PRINCE age 18, 2 oxen, 5 cows, 3 suckling calves & yearlings, 3 bulls & heifers, 1 horse, 18 pigs; took oath of allegiance to Spanish monarch 9 Dec 1769 & made his mark as Sindic des atacapas; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 35[sic], with unnamed wife [Marie] age 26, 1 unnamed boy [Jean] age 6 mos., Joseph BABIN [brother-in-law?] age 16, Marguerite PRINCE age 18, Joseph PRINCE age 15, 0 slaves, 15 cattle, 5 horses, 12 arpents without title; on Attakapas militia list, Jan 1773; in Attakapas census, 1774, with wife [Marie], 2 unnamed children, 0 slaves, 60 cattle, 9 horses & mules, 30 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 36[sic], head of family number 16, with wife Marie GEBIN age 30, sons André age 7, Martin age 4, Michel age 1, daughter Apoline age 2, 2 slaves, 75 cattle, 14 horses, 50 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1781, with 13 individuals, 130 animals, & 32 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, with 9 free individuals, 4 male slaves, 3 female slaves; "he established a homestead at Pointe de Repose on Bayou Teche"; "major domo" [trustee] of Attakapas church, 1796; died Attakapas 18 Jul 1798, age 60[sic]; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville
Élisabeth/Isabelle MARTIN dit Barnabé 06 Feb 1765 Atk, StJ born c1765, "La hauauve"; daughter of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marie-Madeleine GODIN dit Bellefontaine; sister of Hélène dit Barnabé; arrived LA Feb 1765, an infant, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; moved to Cabanocé fall 1765 probably to escape an epidemic; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 12, with parents, siblings, & uncle Jean GODIN; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married, age 16, Augustin, son of Cadet FONTENOT & Marie-Louise LAGRANGE, 25 Jun 1781, St.-Jacques; died Convent, St. James Parish, 17 Jul 1815, age 50
François MARTIN 07 1765? StJ born c1746, probably Malpèque, Île St.-Jean; son of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne COMEAUX; brother of Marie-Jeanne dit Barnabé, & Paul dit Barnabé, half-brother of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils, Joseph dit Barnabé, & Marguerite dit Barnabé; at Malpèque Aug 1752, age 6; arrived LA 1765, age 19, with brother Paul dit Barnabé & second cousin Anne MARTIN?; married, age 35, Cécile, daughter of Julien DE GIRRE & Hélène DUBOIS of Ginet, France, 26 Feb 1781, St.-Jacques
Hélène MARTIN dit Barnabé 08 Feb 1765 Atk, StJ born c1761, probably Halifax; daughter of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marie-Madeleine GODIN dit Bellefontaine; sister of Élisabeth dit Barnabé; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 4, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; moved to Cabanoce fall 1765 probably to escape epidemic; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 16, with parents, siblings, & uncle Jean GODIN; married, age 17, Morice, son of Jean FONTENOT & Marie-Françoise LAGRANGE of Alabama, 9 Jan 1778, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 1 other
Joseph MARTIN 09 Feb 1765 Atk born c1741, probably Chignecto; son of probably Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marguerite CYR; brother of Marguerite dit Barnabé & Pierre; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 24, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, La Manque District, with no one else in his household; married, age 28, Isabelle THIBODEAUX, widow of Charles PELLERIN, c1769, probably Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1769, age 28, with unnamed wife [Isabelle], no children, 1 oxen, 4 cows, 4 suckling calves or yearlings, 2 bulls or heifers, 2 horses, 2 suckling foals or colts, 6 pigs; took oath of allegiance to Spanish monarch 9 Dec 1769 & made his mark; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 45[sic], with unnamed wife [Isabelle] age 23[sic], unnamed girl [Marie PELLERIN, step-daughter?] age 10, 1 Negro age 10, 20(or 10)[sic] cattle, 7 horses, 12 arpents without title; in Attakapas census, 1774, with unnamed wife [Isabelle], 2 unnamed children, 1 slave, 60 cattle, 10 horses & mules, 50 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 40, head of family number 83, with wife Isabele age 39, daughters Ester age 7 & Pélagie age 5, 2 slaves, 60 cattle, 7 horses, 60 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1781, with 10 unnamed individuals, 100 animals, & 12 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Jh, with 4 unnamed free individuals, 2 male slaves, 3 female slaves; died "at home," St. Martin Parish, age 66, buried 5 May 1807
Joseph MARTIN dit Barnabé 10 1765 StJ, Asp? born c1736, probably Chignecto; son of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his first wife Anne CYR; brother of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils, & Marguerite dit Barnabé, half-brother of François, Marie-Jeanne dit Barnabé, & Paul dit Barnabé; at Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, Aug 1752, age 16; married, age 24, Marguerite PITRE, c1760; on list of Acadians prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1783, with unnamed wife & no children; arrived LA 1765, age 29; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Joseph BERNABE, with 1 woman & 1 girl in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 38[sic], with wife Margueritte age 37, sons Joseph age 12, Michel age 4, daughters Margueritte age 8, Marie age 6, & Pélagie age 2; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 7 whites, 2 slaves, 4 qts. rice, 10 qts. corn; died by Dec 1795, when his wife was listed in the Valenzuéla census without a husband
Judith-Philippe MARTIN 11 Feb 1765 Atk, Op born c1753, probably Annapolis Royal; daughter of Charles MARTIN & Jeanne COMEAUX; sister of Bonaventure (probably her twin), Claude, & Marguerite; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 12, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1769, called Judic MARTIN, age 17, with family of brother-in-law Michel DOUCET & sister Marguerite; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 18, with family of brother-in-law Michel DOUCET & sister Marguerite; married, age 24, Augustin-Rémi, son of perhaps Pierre BOUDREAUX & Anne HÉBERT of Pigiguit, c1777, probably Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 2 others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 3 unnamed others; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, unnamed, with husband & 7 unnamed others; died [buried] Opelousas 29 Jan 1806, age 50[sic]
Madeleine MARTIN 12 1765 StJ, Asc born c1728; daughter of René MARTIN & Marguerite MICHEL; married, age 21, Amand, son of Joseph PRÉJEAN & Marie-Louise COMEAUX of Chepoudy, 21 Jul 1749, Port-Royal; at Restigouche 1759; arrived LA 1765, age 37; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 38, with husband, 3 sons, & 2 daughters; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 41, with husband, 2 sons, & 3 daughters; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, age 48[sic, actually 42], with husband, 2 sons, & 2 daughters; died [buried] Ascension 18 Dec 1772, age 43
Marguerite MARTIN 13 Feb 1765 Atk, Op born c1721, Annapolis Royal; daughter of Charles MARTIN & Jeanne COMEAUX; sister of Bonaventure, Claude, & Judith-Philippe; married, age 28, Michel-Laurent, son of Laurent DOUCET & Marie-Anne PELLERIN, 27 Jan 1749, Annapolis Royal; moved to Miramichi by 1756; on list of Acadians prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 8 children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 44, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, La Manque District, unnamed, but probably the woman in the household of Miguel DOUCET; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, no age given, with husband, 4 sons, & siblings Bonnaventure & Judic MARTIN; in Attakapas census, 1771, unnamed, age 50, with husband, 4 sons, & siblings Judith & Bonaventure MARTIN; in Attakapas census, 1774, unnamed, with husband & 2 children; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 57, with husband, 3 sons, & 1 orphan girl; in Attakapas census, 1781, with husband & 6 others; succession record dated 8 Feb 1800, St. Landry Parish courthouse
Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé 14 Feb 1765 Atk born c1733, probably Chignecto; daughter of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his first wife Anne CYR; sister of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils, & Joseph dit Barnabé, half-sister of François, Marie-Jeanne dit Barnabé, & Paul dit Barnabé; moved from Chignecto to Île St.-Jean with her family, c1742; at Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, Aug 1752, age 19; married, age 21, (1)René ROBICHAUX, son of Jean ROBICHAUX dit Cadet & Anne LÉGER, c1755, probably Île St.-Jean; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 4 unnamed children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 32, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, Apr 1766, La Manque District, called Widow Margarita MARTIN, with 1 unnamed teenage boy & 2 unnamed girls [daughters Geneviève & Madeleine ROBICHAUX] in her household; married, age 34, (2)Antoine, surgeon, son of Jacques-Manuel BORDA & Marie-Barbe BOSSIER, 31 Oct 1767, "at the home of Michel DOUCET," Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, no age given, with husband Antoine BORDAS age 49, daughters Magdeleyne [ROBICHAUX] age 14, Geneviève [ROBICHAUX] age 12, & Marie Mata [BORDA] age 1, Pierre "his Negro" age 30, 2 cows, 2 suckling calves or yearlings, 5 bulls or heifers, 1 horse, 12 pigs; in Attakapas census, 1771, unnamed, age ?4[sic, actually 38], with husband Antoine age 50, [daughter] Madeleine ROBICHO age 15, 3 unnamed girls ages 12 [Geneviève ROBICHAUX], 2 [Marie-Marthe BORDA], & 1 [Scholastique BORDA], 1 unnamed Negro [Pierre] age 30, 18 cattle, 7 horses, 12 arpents without title; in Attakapas census, Oct 1774, unnamed, with husband BORDAT, 6 unnamed children, 1 slave, 19 cattle, 4 horses & mules, 18 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, May 1777, called Marguerite BARNABÉ, age 46[sic], with husband who was head of family number 85, daughters Geneviève ROBICHOT age 18, [Marie-]Marthe BORDA age 8, Colastie BORDA age 7, Modest BORDA, age 5, 1 slave, 24 cattle, 7 horses, 25 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, Apr 1781, called Veuve BORDAS, with 4 unnamed individuals, 30 animals, & 10 arpents; in Attakapas census, Apr 1785, called Widow BORDA, with 3 free unnamed individuals, 0 slaves; died Lafayette Parish, buried "in the parish cemetery at age over 104 years" [actually 89], 12 Feb 1822; maternal grandmother of Governor Alexandre MOUTON; "thought to be the centenarian grandmother referred to by Judge Felix Voorhies in the book, Acadian Reminiscenses"; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville; one of the author's paternal ancestors~~
Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé 15 176? NO born c1732, probably Chignecto; daughter of Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marguerite CYR; sister of Joseph & Pierre; married, age 20, Joseph of Chignecto, son of Pierre OLIVIER & Françoise BONNEVIE of Port-Royal, c1752, probably Chignecto; exiled to SC, 1755, age 23; on list of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called Margte. BERNABE, with husband & 1 son; moved to St.-Domingue, present-day Haiti, probably Nov 1763, age 31?; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, Jul 1767, called Marguerite MARTIN wife of OLIVIER, with son Jean-Bte. [OLIVIER]; settled New Orleans
Marie-Claire MARTIN dit Barnabé 17 1765 StJ, Asc, StJ born c1734, probably Annapolis Royal; daughter of Jean-Baptiste MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marie BRUN; married, age 26, (1)Barthélémy dit Bellefontaine, son of Joseph GODIN dit Beauséjour & Marie-Anne BERGERON, c1760; on list of Acadian prisoners, Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 1 child; arrived LA 1765, age 31; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, called Marie, age 32, with husband & no children; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, age 34, with husband & 2 sons; married, age 38 (2)Joseph, fils, son of Joseph RICHARD & Marie COMEAUX, & widower of Agnès HÉBERT dit Manuel, 24 Aug 1772, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 41, with husband, 1 GODIN son, 2 RICHARD sons, & 4 stepdaughters; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 8 others
Marie-Jeanne MARTIN dit Barnabé 18 176? Atk, StJ born c1744, probably Malpèque, Île St.-Jean; daughter of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne COMEAUX; sister of François & Paul dit Barnabé, half-sister of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils, Joseph dit Barnabé, & Marguerite dit Barnabé; at Malpèque Aug 1752, called Marie, age 8; married, age 25, François, son of Paul SAVOIE & Judith MICHEL of Chepoudy, & widower of Anne AUCOIN, Marie LANDRY, & Anne THIBODEAUX, 22 Aug 1769, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 31[sic], with husband, 1 step-son, 2 sons, & 1 daughter; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 29, with husband & 2 sons; in Attakapas census, 1781, called Veuve SAVOYE, with 7 unnamed individuals, 30 animals, & 10 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Widow SAVOYE, with 9 unnamed free individuals, 1 male slave, 1 female slave
Marie-Josèphe MARTIN 19 Aug 1785 BR born c1738, probably Annapolis Royal; daughter of Michel MARTIN & Madeleine GIROUARD; married, age 23, Louis, surgeon, son of Jean-Baptiste COURTIN & Marie-Anne PELLEREAU of St.-Nicolas de Prête-Vales, Dunois, France, 15 Sep 1761, Cork, Ireland; repatriated to France 1763, age 25; at Morlaix, France, 1764; at Sauzon, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, 1766-79; on list of Acadians at Paimboeuf, France, Sep 1784, called Marie-J. MARTIN, widow COURTIN, with 2 unnamed sons, & 3 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 47, widow, head of family
Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé 20 1765 StJ born c1748, probably Malpèque, Île St.-Jean; son of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne COMEAUX; brother of François & Marie-Jeanne dit Barnabé, half-brother of Ambroise dit Barnabé, fils, Joseph dit Barnabé, & Marguerite dit Barnabé; at Malpèque Aug 1752, age 4; arrived LA 1765, age 17, with brother François & second cousin Anne MARTIN; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Pablo BERNABÉ, with no one else in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 28, with engagé Paul LÉGER age 19; married, age 31, Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of André OUBRE & Marie-Élisabeth BONVILLAIN of St.-Charles des Allemands, 12 Jan 1779, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 2 unnamed whites, 0 slaves, 6 qts. rice, 4 qts. corn; died [buried] Convent 18 Aug 1815, age 64[sic]
Pierre MARTIN 21 Feb 1765 Atk son of probably Paul MARTIN & Marguerite CYR; brother of Joseph & Marguerite dit Barnabé; arrived LA Feb 1765 with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnarbe; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2550, calls him Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé, & says he was born in 1734; BRDR, 2:520 (SJA-4, 5), his death/burial record, calls him Ambrosio MARTIN, "age 70 years & married," but does not give his parents' names.  See also <thecajuns.com/cardmoney.htm>; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

His estimated birth year is taken from the St.-Jacques census of 1777 & Arsenault, not his burial record. 

The spelling for his dit used here is taken from Arsenault & White, not Wall of Names.  

02.  Wall of Names, 22 (pl. 5L), calls her Anne MARTIN, & lists her with cousins François & Paul MARTIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2489; White, DGFA-1, 1138, 1381, says that her parents were Étienne MARTIN & Marie-Jeanne COMEAU; BRDR, 2:293, 520-21 (SJA-1, 54a), the record of her second marriage, calls her Anne MARTIN, "widow of Pierre BLANCHARD," calls her husband Joseph FORET, "widower of Isabelle LEGER," does not give her or his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Jean-Jaque LEGER & François HUBERT; BRDR, 2:521, 622 (SJA-1, 48a), the record of her third marriage, calls her Anne MARTIN, "widow of Joseph FORET," calls her husband Jean-Baptiste RICHARD, "widower of Catherine CORNIER," does not give her or his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph BOURG & Jean LEGER. 

Only White gives her parents' names.  Wall of Names shows her coming to LA with François MARTIN & Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé as if she was their sister.  However, their parents were Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé, her first cousin, & his second wife Madeleine dite Émilene COMEAUX, so the MARTIN boys were her second cousins, not her siblings. 

Why is she not in the Cabanocé census of 1766?  What evidence is there, other than Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé's name on a Cabanocé militia list in Apr 1766, that she came to LA in 1765 from Halifax via St.-Domingue?  She's not even in the Cabanocé census of 1769.  See Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161, 162-70, 173-79.

03.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Anselme MARTIN, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2552; BRDR, 2:370, 521 (SJA-1, 45), his marriage record, calls him Anselme MARTIN "of Acadia," calls his wife Marie-Théotiste HÉBER "of Cobequid in Acadia," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witness to his marriage was ____ VERRET.  See also De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 14. 

When did he reach LA?  From where?  My guess would be in the late 1760s, but he appears in neither the 1766 nor the 1769 censuses at Cabanocé.  See Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161-70, 173-79.  Was he a Barnabé MARTIN like all of the other MARTINs who came to LA?  If not, he would have been the only descendant of Pierre MARTIN to make it to the colony. 

04.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Bonaventure MARTIN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:655 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.163), his death/burial record, calls him Bonaventure MARTIN, "spouse of Marie DUVERNET, inhabitant at Plaquemine Broule (Brulée)," says he "died at his home ... at the age 75 years after having received all the sacraments," that he was buried "in the parish cemetery," but does not give his parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:655 (Opel. Ct.Hse.: Succ. #104), his succession record, calls him Bonaventure MARTIN, but does not gives his parents' names or mention a wife & children.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 21; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 12; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 8; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 125.  

His estimated birth year is calculated from the ages given in the censuses in which he is found, not his burial record. 

The baptismal record of son Pierre, dated 28 Dec 1796, & the burial record of son Jean-Marie, dated 1 Oct 1799, in NOAR, 6:187 (SLC, B14, 19; SLC, F4, 81), give Bonaventure's wife's name, her parents' names, & evidence that he lived in New Orleans during the late colonial period.  Why did he leave the prairies for the city?  And why, & when, did he return to the prairies?

05.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Claude MARTIN, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2551, the LA section, says he was born in c1750, & that his parents were probablement Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his second wife Madeleine dite Emilienne COMEAUX of Beaubassin; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:544 (SM Ch.: v.4, #154), his death/burial record, calls him Claude MARTIN of Acadia, son of Charles [MARTIN] & ____ of Acadia, "m. to Marie BABIN, and 'Major domo' (trustee) of this church," & says he was age 60 when he died.  See also <thecajuns.com/cardmoney.htm>; Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 7-8, 20, 37, 53; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 12.    

His birth date & place are from Arceneaux, D. J., 53. 

Wall of Names lists him separately from the substantial progeny of Ambroise dit Barnabé.  

He made his "ordinary mark" on the 9 Dec 1769 oath of allegiance, which named him as the Sindic des atacapas.  See Arceneaux, D. J., 7-8.  A syndic was a local official, a kind of trustee, who represented the district to higher authority.  The Acadian communities of British NS also had been allowed to choose syndics to represent their fellow habitants before the colonial council in Annapolis Royal.  See Book Two. 

Quote about his homestead is from the brochure that accompanies the Robert Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville.  La Pointe de Repos was near today's Parks, on the east bank of Bayou Teche, between Breaux Bridge & St. Martinville.

06.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Élisabeth MARTIN dit Barnarbe; BRDR, 2:290, 521 (SJA-1, 51a), her marriage record, calls her Isabelle MARTIN, calls her husband Augustin FONTENEAU, says "both parties native of Louisiana," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witness to her marriage was Henrie FONTENEAU; BRDR, 3:604 (SMI-8, 24), her death/burial record, calls her Élizabeth MARTIN, "age 50 yrs., nat. La huauve, spouse Augustin FONTENEAU," but does not give her parents' names. 

Where is "La huauve"?  Judging from her estimated birth year of c1765, she was born either in NS just before her family left that colony for LA, or aboard one of the ships that took her family from NS to New Orleans via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, or in LA soon after they reached the colony.  An older name for Cap-Français was Guárico.  Or is "La huauve" a Spanish corruption of Halifax?  There's the possibility that it means La Have, earlier called La Hève, an old Acadian community on the Atlantic coast of NS near Halifax.  Did Élisabeth's family leave NS from La Hève & not Halifax in late 1764 or early 1765? 

07.  Wall of Names, 22 (pl. 5L), calls him François MARTIN, & lists him with a brother & a cousin; BRDR, 2:232, 521 (SJA-1, 51a), his marriage record, calls him François MARTIN "of Acadia," calls his wife Coecille DE GIRRE "of Ginet," give his & her parents' names, calls his mother Anne COMMO, says his parents were "both decd." at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Josèphe MARTIN & André HOUVE [his younger brother Paul's father-in-law].  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155. 

According to the French official who counted the family at Malpèque in Aug 1752, Ambroise dit Barnabé, père "has been in the country ten years," so François likely was born there. 

Why is he not in the Cabanocé census of 1766?  His older brother Paul was counted with VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, that year.  Why was François not counted in that company, too?  He was old enough then to have served in the militia; he was, in fact, older than Paul.  He's not even in the Cabanocé census of 1769.  What evidence is there, really, that he came to LA from Halifax in 1765?  See Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161, 162-70, 173-79. 

08.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Helaine MARTIN dit Barnarbe; BRDR, 2:291, 521 (SJA-1, 48), her marriage record, calls her Helaine MARTIN "of Acadia," calls her husband Morice FONTENAU "of des Allibamons" & "of Alabama," gives her & his parents' names, says his father was deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Henri FONENEAU, Mathurine BRIGNAC, & Michel LEBLANC. 

09.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Joseph MARTIN, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2551, the LA section, says he was born in 1748; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:492-93 (SM Ch.: v.4, #466), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph MARTIN, "of Bayou Teych, of Acadie," says he died "at home ... at age 66 yrs.," but does not give his parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 7, 20, 37; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 12; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 14.

Why do the ages given in the Attakapas censuses of 1769, 1771, & 1777, as well as his burial record & Arsenault, vary so much?  His estimated birth year used here is based on the ages given in the Attakapas census of 1769 & his burial record, the only ones that agree. 

10.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Joseph MARTIN dit Barnarbe; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2550, says he was born in 1736.  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 14. 

According to genealogists, Joseph dit Barnabé is television personality Ellen Degeneres's direct ancestor thru his son Joseph, fils, born in the late 1760s.  Joseph, fils married French Creole Marie Charpentier of New Orleans at St.-Jacques in Oct 1787.  The couple settled on Bayou Lafourche during the early 1800s.  The author, then, is a cousin of Ellen Degeneres via his paternal ancestors. 

11.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Judith MARTIN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:493 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.82), her death/burial record, calls her Judity MARTIN, "spouse of Rémy BOUDREAU," says she died "at age about 50 yrs.," but does not give her parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 21. 

12.  Wall of Names, 24, calls her Madeleine MARTIN; BRDR, 2:522 (ASC-1, 172c), her death/burial record, calls her Magdalena MARTIN, "age 43 years & wife of Aman PREJEAN," but does not give her parents' names. 

13.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Marguerite MARTIN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:260, her succession record, says her husband was Michel DOUCET & that his brothers were Pierre & Jean.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 21, 37. 

Her succession record seems to be confusing Michel, père, who married Marguerite MARTIN, with their son, Michel, fils.  Michel, père & Marguerite's other sons were ... Jean, Joseph, & Pierre.  I have found no brothers of Michel DOUCET, père who also came to LA.

14.  Wall of Names, 25, calls her Marguerite MARTIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1013, 2550, calls her Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marguerite MARTIN, says she was born in 1733, gives her parents' names, says they were from Beaubassin, that her brothers were Ambroise, born in 1734, Joseph in 1736, Jean-Baptiste dit Barnabé in 1742, & François in 1746, the latter two sons of their father's second wife, Émilienne COMEAU, says that Marguerite was the widow of René ROBICHAUX, & details her second marriage, to Antoine BORDA, chirurgien, venu de France; White, DGFA-1, 1133; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:80, 546 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol. 1, #3), the record of her second marriage, calls her Marguerite MARTIN, "wid. of Rainet (René) ROBICHO," calls her husband Antoine BORDA, "Chirurgien (surgeion)," does not give her or his parents' names, says they were "all inhabitants of this country," that the marriage was "Done at the home of Michel DOUCET," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Claude MOUTON & Antoine ESPAGNIOL; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:651, her death/burial record, says she was 104 when she died.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 23, 37; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155, 160; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 14; <islandregister.com/1752.html>. 

The birth year in Arsenault is probably correct & based on the following deductions:  Her father was born in Sep 1706 & married her mother in c1732, & her age was given at 19 on the 1752 census on Île St.-Jean.  Of the many censuses in LA which she is found, the only one that provided her age was the Attakapas census of 1777, which said she was 46.  This gives her an estimated birth year of c1731, a year before her parents were married.  The age given in her burial record--104--would give her a birth year of c1718, 14 years before her parents were married & when her father was only 12!  So that date cannot be true.  

The 1752 island census notes that her family had been "in the country ten years," which means they left Chignecto in c1742, when she was about 11.  See De La Roque, 2A:155.  Malpèque, also spelled Malpec, is one the northwestern side of Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  Her future husband René ROBICHAUD lived at Bedec, south of & across the island from Malpèque.  René's family, from Cobeguit, had been "in the country 14 months."  See De La Roque, 2A:160

Quote from brochure that accompanies the Robert Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville.  For her role in descendant Félix VOORHIES's famous, but entirely fictional, Acadian Reminiscences, with the True Story of Evangeline (published serially in a New Iberia paper beginning in 1895 & in book form in 1907), see Brasseaux, In Search of Evangeline, especially pp. 20-27. 

I am proud to say that she & her first husband are my paternal ancestors.  Her first husband was a victim of the Teche valley epidemic of 1765. 

15.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Marguerite MARTIN veuve OLIVIER; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1029, calls her Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé.  

Despite being called a widow in Wall of Names, her husband was still very much alive when they reached New Orleans in the late 1760s & seems to have lived for many years afterwards.  

She should not be confused with her double first cousin also named Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé. 

17.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Marie MARTIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2495, her first husband's profile in the LA section, calls her Marie-Claire MARTIN, gives her parents' names, says she was born in 1734 but gives no birthplace, & lists her children by her first husband as Louis GODIN, born in 1767, Barthélemy GODIN in 1769, & Marguerite GODIN in 1771; BRDR, 2:521, 622 (ASC-1, 119), the record of her second marriage, calls her Claire-Maria MARTIN, "widow of Bartolome GODIN," calls her husband Joseph RICHARD, "widower of Anne [HÉBERT dit] MANUEL," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph BAPTISTE & Paul MARTIN.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 12.

Arsenault, 2576, lists her twice with 2 different Joseph RICHARDs.  In one listing, he calls her Claire, in another Marie.  She was the only Marie MARTIN to marry a RICHARD, so this is her. 

18.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Marie Barnabé MARTIN, & lists her singly; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:546, 698 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol. 1, #6), her marriage record, calls her Marie MARTIN, "native of Isle St. Jean in province of Acadie," calls her husband François SAVOY, "wdr. of Anne THIBODEAU," gives her but not his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Pierre BLANCHARD, Pierre BERTRAND, Jean SAVOY, Pierre MICHEL, Ambroise MARTIN, Joseph MARTIN, & Joseph SAULAIS.  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155.

According to the French official who counted the family at Malpèque in Aug 1752, Ambroise dit Barnabé, père "has been in the country ten years," so she likely was born there. 

When did she come to LA?  From where?  Her siblings came to LA from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765, but what evidence is there that she came with them? 

She was her husband's fourth wife!  What were they doing at St.-Jacques in 1777? 

19.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls her Marie MARTIN veuve COURTIN, & lists her with 4 children, Jacques-Marie, Françoise, Mathurine-Olive, & Charlotte-Louise [COURTIN]; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2327, profile of her husband in the Belle-Île-en-Mer section, calls her Marie-Josèphe MARTIN, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says her parents were from Port-Royal, details her marriage, calls her husband Louis COURTIN, says that he was born in 1730, originaire de Saint-Nicolas de Prête-Vales, comté de Dunois, évêché de Blois, that he was a surgeon, that he died in c1780 but gives no place of death, details her family's voyage to LA in 1785, including the names of the children who accompanied her on Le Beaumont, & lists her children as Marie [COURTIN], born 1762 in Ireland, Mathurine-Olive [COURTIN], born 1764 in Morlaix, France, Louis-Auguste [COURTIN], born 1766 in Sauzon, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, Jacques-Marie-Christophe [COURTIN], born 1769, Pascal [COURTIN], born 1772, died Sauzon 1779, Jeanne-Charlotte-Louise [COURTIN], born 1774, & Victorine-Amélie [COURTIN], born 1776; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 32-33, calls her Marie MARTIN, veuve COURTIN, age 47, on the embarkation list, Maria MARTINA, viuda COURTIN, on the debarkation list, & Marie MARTIN, widow COURTIN, on the complete listing, says she was in the 13th Family on the embarkation list with 4 children [Jacques-Marie, journallier, or day laborer, age 16, Francoise, age 22, Mathurine-Olive, age 20, & Charlotte-Louise [COURTIN], age 11] & the 46th Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with 2 children [Santiago Maria & Juana Luisa], &, calling her Marie MARTIN, details the marriage of daughter Mathurine-Olive COURTIN to Jean RAMIREZ of Spain, son of Francois [RAMIREZ] & Bernarde CORRALES, but gives no place of marriage.  See also Voorhies, J. Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 511.  

How did she get to the British Isles?  Via deportation from VA in 1756?  Via deportation from greater Acadia in 1758-59?  Why was this couple in Ireland in the early 1760s when most Acadian exiles were living in port cities in England at the time?  Were other Acadian exiles sent to Cork, Ireland, in the late 1750s & early 1760s?

Her daughter Françoise COURTIN is also found on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with her new husband, Juan GARCIA, whom she evidently married aboard ship since she is called su muger, his wife.  See Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 40-41.  Françoise & Juan are the 47th Family on the debarkation list, which does not give their ages, but the embarkation list, which includes her with her widowed mother's family, says she was 22 when they left France.  See Hébert, D., pp. 32-33.  BRDR, 2:304 (SGA-11, 58, #268), the baptismal record of son Joseph Luis GARCIA, dated 22 Oct 1792, calls her Maria Francisca CORTEN of Baton Rouge, so her full name was probably Marie-Françoise COURTIN.  The baptism was recorded in the St.-Gabriel church, but it probably was performed at the southern edge of the Baton Rouge District, where the couple settled; Baton Rouge did not have its own church until the following year.   

20.  Wall of Names, 22 (pl. 5L), calls him Paul MARTIN dit Barnarbe, & lists him with a brother & a cousin; BRDR, 2:523, 574 (SJA-1, 49), his marriage record, calls him Paul MARTIN "of Acadia," calls his wife Françoise HOUWER "of des Allemands," gives his & her parents' names, says both his parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Henrie HOUWER & Herman BREAU; BRDR, 3:606 (SMI-8, 25), his death/burial record, calls him Paul MARTIN, "age 64, an Acadian," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:155. 

According to the French official who counted the family at Malpèque in Aug 1752, Ambroise dit Barnabé, père "has been in the country ten years," so Paul likely was born there. 

The evidence that he came to LA from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 is his appearance in the Cabanocé militia list of 1766.  Why is his older brother, with whom he supposedly came to the colony, not on that list?  Why are he & his brother not in the Cabanocé census of 1769?  See Bourgeois, pp. 173-79.  What evidence is there that he came to LA with his brother & cousin Anne? 

21.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Pierre MARTIN, & lists him singly.  

What happened to him in LA?

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