APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LOUVIÈRE/DAMOUR

[LOO-vee-air, dah-MORE]

ACADIA

Mathieu, son of Louis d'Amours, a conseiller du Roy, and Élisabeth Tessier of St.-Paul de Paris, was born in the French capital in c1618.  His family, a noble one, was well connected.  In October 1651, at age 33, Mathieu, still single, arrived at Québec with the new Canadian governor, Lauzon.  Less than a year later, in April 1752 at Québec, Mathieu married Marie, daughter of Nicolas Marsolet de Saint-Aignan, a prominent Canadian.  In September 1663, at age 45, Mathieu became one of the seven founding members of the Conseil sourverain de Québec.  In November 1672, he obtained the seigneury of Matane.  He lived to a ripe old age, dying at Québec in October 1695, age 77.  

Mathieu and Marie had 15 children, including nine sons, all born at Québec, seven of whom created families of their own.  At least five of Mathieu's sons also married into prominent Canadian families and received seigneuries like their father:

Oldest son Nicolas, born in April 1653, lived for only 10 days.

Louis, born in May 1655, received the seigneurie of Jemseg on Rivière St.-Jean, present-day New Brunswick, in 1683.  In September 1684, he received another grant of land from two prominent Canadians, this time on the Rivière Richibouctou in what is now eastern New Brunswick.  His name and titles were now Louis d'Amours, sieur de Chaffours et de Jemseg.  In October 1686, he married Marguerite, daughter of Simon Guyon, at Québec.  She bore him three children, including a son, Louis, fils, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1698.  Meanwhile, in the winter of 1696-97, during the final months of King William's War, Louis and his younger brother, Bernard, served as officers in Pierre Lemoyne, sieur d'Iberville's successful expedition against English settlements in Newfoundland.  Louis and Marguerite's second daughter, Charlotte, married Bernard-Anselme d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, the half-breed son of Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, the seigneur of Pentagöuet, in October 1707.  Older daughter Marie-Josèphe married privateer Louis-Pierre Morpain in August 1709.  Louis, père remarried to Anne, daughter of Acadian Jean Comeau l'ainé, at Port-Royal in January 1708, but she gave him no more children.  Louis d'Amours de Chaffours et de Jemseg died at Port-Royal in May 1708, in his early 50s, only a few months into his second marriage.

Mathieu, fils, born in March 1657, received a grant of land on Rivière St.-Jean between Jemseg and Nashouat in September 1684.  He thus became Mathieu d'Amours, sieur de Freneuse.  In October 1786 at Québec he married Louise Guyon, sister of brother Louis's wife Marguerite and widow of Charles Thibault.  Mathieu, fils and Louise had five children, all of them sons, three of whom married into the Léger de La Grange, d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, and Coutard families.  Mathieu, fils died at the end of October 1696, probably from the effects of exposure during the defense of Fort St.-Joseph at Nashouat; he was only 39 years old.  According to Mathieu, fils's biographer, the dead hero's widow "moved to Port-Royal ... when the governor, Monbeton[sic] de Brouillan, established his headquarters there.  There seems little doubt that during the years she was at Port-Royal she was on intimate terms both with the governor and with Sieur [Simon-Pierre] Denys de Bonaventure, a prominent naval captain [and Brouillan's second in command].  This caused her to be one of the most talked about persons in New France."  Evidently her notoriety did not hurt her standing among the New French elite.  "In 1708 she was sent to Quebec and there received in high social circles.  Three years later, she reappeared at Port-Royal, now in English control, having crossed the Bay of Fundy in a birch-bark canoe in mid-winter with only an Indian and her youngest son to help.  She was given permission to settle there.  Soon afterwards a force of English soldiers was ambushed and that same evening Mme Damours was taken to safety by a French force, adding weight to the suspicion that she had only returned to Port-Royal to serve the French cause." 

René, born in August 1660, received a grant on Rivière St.-Jean on the same day his older brother Mathieu received a similar concession.  The younger brother then became René d'Amours, sieur de Clignancour.  In October 1689, at Québec, he married Charlotte-Françoise, daughter of Charles Le Gardeur.  René and Charlotte-Françoise had seven children, including three sons, one of whom married into the Guyon dit Despres family.  The date of René d'Amours de Chignancour's death is unknown.

Charles, born in March 1662, married Marie-Anne, daughter of François Genaple, at Québec in January 1688.  By the late 1690s he was living on a seigneurie on Rivière St.-Jean, where his three older brothers had concessions.  This gave him the title of sieur de Louvières.  Marie-Anne gave him four children, including two sons who married into the Rouer de Villeray, Morel de La Durantaye, and Renoyer families, all prominent in Canada.  His two sons also called themselves de Louvières.  In 1697, Charles remarried to Anne-Marie, daughter of Acadian Pierre Thibodeau, pioneer of the settlement at Chepoudy.  Anne-Marie gave him 10 more children, including four sons who married into the Catalogne, Tonty, Couillard dit Despres, Pelletier, Boulogne, and Richaume families; two of Charles's sons by this second marriage also called themselves de Louvières.  One of them, Pierre de Louvières, born at Ste.-Foy, near Québec, in February 1712, became a cadet in the troupes de la marine and was stationed at Illinois, part of upper Louisiana, in c1736, where he married the daughter of a senior officer in c1743.  He settled at Prairie-du-Rocher, Illinois, died there in May 1768, age 56, and was buried in the church there.  Charles, meanwhile, drowned in 1716 at age 54, probably at Québec.  Most of Charles's children from both marriages were born at Québec and Ste.-Foy, so he probably did not reside for very long on his seigneurie at Rivière St.-Jean.  

Joseph-Nicolas, born in May 1664, never married and died at Quebec in November 1690, only 27 years old. 

Claude-Louis, born in January 1666, died at three months old. 

Bernard, born in December 1667, also received a seigneurie and became Bernard D'Amours, sieur de Plaine or Des Plaines.  He married first to Jeanne, daughter of former Acadian governor Alexandre Le Borgne de Belisle, at Port-Royal in September 1697, after he had served as an officer with his older brother, Louis, in Iberville's successful expedition against English settlements in Newfoundland.  Jeanne gave Bernard five children, including four sons, but only one of them married, twice, into the Boucher de Montbrun and Coulon de Villiers families.  In November 1716 at St.-Thomas de Montmagny, Bernard remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Jacques Couillard dit Despres.  She gave Bernard 10 more children, including two sons who married into the Vallerand, Joncas, and Belanger families.

Youngest son Philippe, born in February 1680, married first to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Mesnage, at Québec in February 1722.  In March 1728, at Beauport, he remarried to Marie-Anne-Louise, daughter of Ignace Juchereau.  He died in February 1747, age 67.

According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, the Louvières of Louisiana are descended from Mathieu d'Amours, sieur de Matane's third son, Mathieu, fils, sieur de Freneuse, whose second son, Louis de Chauffours, born either in Québec or on Rivière St.-Jean in c1689, married Ursuline, daughter of Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, in c1715, probably at Port-Royal.  Ursuline's father was the famous capitaine de sauvages and Abenaki chief who terrorized New England during the late 1600s.  Ursuline's mother was Mathilde, daughter of an Abenaki chief, so Ursuline was what the French called a métis.  Ursuline's brother, Bernard-Anselme, also was a hero of the struggle against the English, leading Abenaki warriors against the hated enemy in two colonial wars.  One of Louis and Ursuline's sons, Jean-Baptiste, evidently used the honorific de Louvière like his cousins.  Jean-Baptiste d'Amours dit de Louvière married Geneviève, daughter of Acadian Michel Bergeron dit de Nantes of Port-Royal and his second wife Marie Dugas, sometime in the late 1740s.  Jean-Baptiste and Geneviève settled on Rivière St.-Jean near present-day Fredericton, New Brunswick.  All of the Acadian Louvières of Louisiana descend from three of their sons.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

In late 1764 and early 1765, dozens of Acadians from Halifax migrated to Louisiana, arriving in several expeditions in 1765.  Jean-Baptiste d'Amour dit de Louvière of Rivière St.-Jean was not among them.  He died either before his family could get away from Halifax or on the long voyage through St.-Domingue to the lower Mississippi Valley.  His widow, Geneviève Bergeron, age 35, continued on to Louisiana with six of their children--Charles, age 15, Jean-Baptiste, age 10, Anastasie, age 8, François, age 6, Isidore, age 2, and infant Susanne.  Geneviève took her children to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  Charles and Jean-Baptiste remained on the river, but François, Isidore, and Anastasie moved elsewhere. 

Descendants of Charles LOUVIÈRE (c1750-; Mathieu, père, Mathieu, fils, Louis)

Charles, oldest son of Jean-Baptiste d'Amour dit de Louvière and Geneviève Bergeron, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1750, followed his family into exile in Massachusetts in the late 1750s and on to the prison camp at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He came to Louisiana via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Anne-Élisabeth or Anne-Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Melançon of Port-Royal, in the early 1770s.  Their daughters married into the Clouâtre, Godin, and Rouillier families.  One of his sons settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but his other married son remained in what became St. James Parish. 

1

Oldest son Jean Louis, called Louis, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in July 1776, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Melançon of Lafourche, at St. Jacques in September 1804.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche by the early 1810s and created another center of family settlement. 

2

David, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in November 1781, probably died young. 

3

Jean-Baptiste le jeune, called Baptiste, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1782, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcel LeBlanc, at St. Jacques in June 1804.  Their son Désiré was born in Ascension Parish in January 1809 but died near Convent, St. James Parish, at age 3 1/2 in September 1811, Jean Baptiste Vasseur, called Vasseur, was born in St. James Parish in September 1814, Evariste near Convent in August 1816, Jean Marcellin, called Marcellin or Marcellus in August 1820 but died at age 11 in August 1831, and Louis Victorin was born in July 1824.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Champic, Dugas, Melançon, and Ramirez families.  Jean Baptiste died near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1824; he was only 42 years old.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 3 slaves--a male and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 20 to 14--on Widow J. Bte Louvieres's farm next to Vasseur Louvières in the parish's Eastern District; these probably were the slaves of Baptiste's widow, Marguerite LeBlanc.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 3 slaves--all females, all black, ages 30, 4 and 2--on Widow J. B. Louviere's farm next to Vavasseur Louvière in the parish's East Bank 4th District.   

3a

Evariste married cousin Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1837.  Their son Jean Baptiste Aristide, called Aristide, was born near Convent in November 1839, Evariste, fils in Ascension Parish in January 1845, Joseph Ernest, called Ernest, in January 1846 but died near Convent at age 9 in September 1855, Laurent died in Ascension Parish at age 18 months in April 1852, and François Thibeaux was born in May 1855.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, Brooks, and Guidry families.  Evariste remarried to cousin Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcellin LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1856, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Séverin Duhon and widow of Bertrand Lanigrasses, at the Convent church in October 1865; Evariste was 49 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Joseph Villère was born near Convent in July 1866, and Joseph Sidney in November 1868 but died at age 9 months in September 1869.

Aristide, by his father's first wife, married cousin Olive, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Gaudin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1860; they had to secure a dispensation for second and third degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  During the War of 1861, Aristide served in Company E of the St. James Regiment Militia and may have served in the Pelican Artillery, also called the 5th Battery Louisiana Light Artillery, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  If he was the A. Louviers who served in the battery, he was captured during operations along lower Bayou Teche in April 1863.  Soon after his capture, the Federals sent him to New Orleans to be exchanged, and there his Confederate service record ends. 

3b

Jean Baptiste Vasseur married Eméranthe, called Mirande, daughter of German Creole George Laudenbach, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in December 1838; Eméranthe's mother was a Lanoux.  Their son Victor was born near Convent in October 1839, Donat Marcellus, called Marcellus, in July 1841, Joseph Amédée in July 1843, Désiré Joseph or Joseph Désiré in January 1846 but died at age 18 months in October 1847, and Auguste was born in November 1852.  They also had a son named Douradon or Douradou.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, all black, ranging in age from 22 to 4--on Vasseur Louvières's farm next to Widow J. Bte. Louvières in the parish's Eastern District.  In June 1860, the federal census taker counted 8 slaves--1 males and 7 females, all black, ages 31 to 2, living in 4 houses--on Vavasseur Louvière's farm next to Widow J. B. Louvière in the parish's East Bank Fourth District. 

Joseph Amédée married Adélaïde Olivia, called Olivia, daughter of fellow Acadian Adolphe Poirier, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1862.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son Joseph Justilien had been born in December 1861, Amédée Joseph was born in March 1863 but died at age 2 in August 1865, and Joseph Thuriaf was born in January 1867.  During the War of 1861, beginning in the summer of 1863, Amédée served in Company D of the 14th Regiment Confederate States Cavalry and in Company A of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, units raised in Ascension Parish that fought in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. 

Victor married Oliva, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Gaudin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1862.  Their son Joseph Victorin was born near Convent in September 1866, a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died "a few days old" in December 1868, and François Ulrie was born in January 1870. 

During the War of 1861, Douradon served in the Pelican Artillery, also called the 5th Battery Louisiana Light Artillery, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  Douradon married cousin Claire, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Gravois, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Arthur was born near Convent in October 1867, and Joseph Dumas in April 1870. 

Marcellus married Marie Ophelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Trasimond Lanoux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1870. 

4

Youngest son Daniel died at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in June 1795. 

Jean-Baptiste LOUVIÈRE, fils (c1754-?; Mathieu, père, Mathieu, fils, Louis)

Jean-Baptiste, fils, second son of Jean-Baptiste d'Amour dit de Louvière and Geneviève Bergeron, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1754, followed his family into exile in Massachusetts in the late 1750s and on to the prison camp at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He came to Louisiana via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  In August 1777, Spanish officials counted him at nearby Ascension, where he was working as an engagé, or hired hand, in a French surgeon's household on the right, or west, bank of the river.  Jean-Baptiste, fils may not have married. 

~

Other LOUVIÈREs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Louvière on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Magloire Louvière died in Ascension Parish in October 1870.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Magloire died at "age 8 years." 

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

In the late 1770s, the two younger sons and the older daughter of Geneviève Bergeron, widow of Jean-Baptiste D'Amour dit de Louvière, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District and established a western branch of the family: 

Anastasie Louvière, wife of French Canadian Pierre LeBlanc, died at her home at Fausse Pointe, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1815.  The priest who recorded her burial said that Anastasie was 68 years old when she died, but she was closer to 58. 

Descendants of François LOUVIÈRE (c1759-1808; Mathieu, père, Mathieu, fils, Louis)

François, third son of Jean-Baptiste D'Amour dit de Louvière and Geneviève Bergeron, born at Boston, Massachusetts, in c1759 during Le Grand Dérangement, followed his family to the prison camp at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He came to Louisiana via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  In the late 1770s, he and younger brother Isidore moved to the Attakapas District, where François married Marie-Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Thibodeaux, in c1780.  They settled at Fausse Pointe on Bayou Teche.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Bonin, Broussard, Comeaux, and Prince families.  François remarried to Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Bourgeois and widow of Pierre Arceneaux, at Attakapas in November 1799.  She, too, had been born in Boston during Le Grand Dérangement.  Their daughter married into the Robichaux family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  François died suddenly at his home at Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in August 1808; he was only 48 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following month.  His sons and grandsons settled in St. Martin, St. Mary, and Iberia parishes. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, by his father's first wife, born probably at Attakapas in c1777 and baptized there, age unrecorded, in June 1784, died at age 7 in December 1784. 

2

Benjamin, by his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in June 1781, married Louise, called Lise, daughter of French Creole Paul Bonin of Mobile, at Attakapas in July 1804.  They settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son Benjamin, fils was born probably at Fausse Pointe in September 1806 but died at age 9 in July 1815, a son, name unrecorded, died 7 days after his birth in September 1808, François le jeune was born in February 1810, Joseph Benjamin in February 1812, Louis Béloni in May 1816 but died "at his father's house" at age 5 in June 1821, Paulin was born in September 1818, another son, name unrecorded, died at age 6 months in June 1821, another son, name unrecorded, died at birth in March 1822, Jean-Baptiste le jeune, also called Vileor, was baptized at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, age unrecorded, in September 1823, Germain, also called Delaunay or Delauney, was born in September 1824, and yet another son, name unrecorded, died "at his parents' home" shortly after his birth in December 1826.  Their daughter married into the Dugas family.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a 40-year-old black female--on Benjamin Louviere's farm at Fausse Pointe.  Benjamin died in St. Martin Parish in October 1859; the priest who recorded his burial said that Benjamin died "at age 84 yrs.," but he was "only" 78; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November.  Despite the untimely death of six of his sons, five of Benjamin's sons created families of their own and settled in St. Martin Parish. 

2a

Joseph married first cousin Louise Emitilia, perhaps also called Marguerite, daughter of his uncle François Xavier Louvière, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1845; Joseph was 33 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Hippolyte was born in August 1851, François le jeune, perhaps their son, in November 1853, and Édouard, perhaps also their son, in March 1862. 

2b

François le jeune died in St. Martin Parish in January 1846.  He was only 35 years old and does not seem to have married.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in April 1847. 

2c

Jean Baptiste le jeune married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul David, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1846.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in July 1847, St. Cyr in November 1850, Ulgère in November 1853, Anatole in February 1859, Charles Aubeal in December 1864, and Léonce in September 1866.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a 16-year-old black male--on J. B. Louvièr's farm; one wonders if this was him or a cousin. 

2d

Germain/Delauney married Marie Laure or Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian François Trahan, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July 1847.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Did they have any sons?  Germain, called Delauney by the recording clerk, remarried to Ordalie David, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in March 1868; Germain would have been 44 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Joseph Terreole was born near New Iberia in February 1870. 

2e

Paulin married Marie Aurelia, daughter of Pierre Auguste Molbert, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1860; Paulin was 42 years old at the time of the wedding, so one wonders if this was his first marriage.  Paulin died in St. Martin Parish in July 1867; he was only 48 years old.  Did he father any sons? 

3

Frédéric, by his father's first wife, baptized at Attakapas, age 7 months, in May 1783, married Pélagie, daughter of French Creole Jean-Louis Bonin of Mobile, at Attakapas in April 1802.  They settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son Frédéric, fils was born probably at Fausse Pointe in January 1806, Sylvère, perhaps also called Sylvain, in June 1807, Donat Evan, called Evan, in March 1812 but died at age 4 1/2 in October 1816, Moïse was born in April 1815, a son, name and age unrecorded, died in August 1817, and Dolze, born in c1817, died at age 3 in December 1820.  Their daughters married into the Bonin, Broussard, Derouen, Larrive or Larive, and Louvière families.  Frédéric, père died in St. Martin Parish in January 1831; he was only 48 years old. 

3a

Frédéric, fils married Doralise Marie or Marie Doralise, daughter of Eugène Borel of St. Mary Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1826.  Their son Frédéric III was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1829, Séverin in February 1834, Adrien in March 1837, and Jean Melicourt in June 1840.  Their daughters married into the Doty, Landry, and Moore families.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted 6 slaves--4 males and 2 females, 3 blacks & 3 mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 6--on Frédérick Louvier's farm. 

Adrien married cousin Caroline or Coralie, daughter of French Creole Norbert Bonin, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1854.  Their son Joseph Celicourt was born in July 1856, and Adam Félix in December 1857.  Adrien remarried to Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Émilien Landry and widow of Pierre Dugas, at the New Iberia church in February 1866.  They settled near New Iberia. 

Jean Melicourt married Marie Alice, daughter of fellow Acadian Onésime LeBlanc, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1861.

Frédéric III died near New Iberia in June 1861.  He was only 31 years old and does not seem to have married. 

3b

Sylvère married Marcellienne or Marcellite, daughter of French Creole Joseph Derouen, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1828; Marcellienne's mother was a Prejean.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Joseph Alcide, called Alcide, was born in November 1838, Jean Baptiste Ferjus, called Ferjus, in February 1843 but died at age 2 1/2 in October 1845, Joseph died 15 days after his birth in June 1849, and Sylvestre was born in July 1850.  They also had a son named Octave.  Their daughters married into the Bonin, Broussard, and Rachan or Rachon families.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 7 slaves--2 males and 5 females, all black, ranging in age from 25 years to 4 months--on Silvere Louvière's farm next to Xavier Louvière at Fausse Pointe.  Sylvère remarried to cousin Marie Virginie, called Virginie, daughter of French Creole Bélisaire Bonin, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1852; Marie's mother was a Bourgeois.  Their son Bélisaire was born in December 1853, Sylvestre Dupré in February 1855, Homere in August 1858, Filias Léonce in January 1860, Moïse le jeune in June 1863, Alexandre Brunair in September 1865, and Jean Vores near Patoutville, now Lydia, in September 1868.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted 6 slaves--2 males and 4 females, perhaps all black, ages 38 to 5--on Sylvestre Louviere's farm in the parish's Western District; this probably was Sylvère. 

Alcide, by his father's first wife, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis LeBlanc, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in February 1860.  Their son Despon Beauregard was born in January 1862, Philemon in May 1863, and Anatole in July 1864.  During the War of 1861, Alcide, a resident of St. Mary Parish, served in Company C of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Natchitoches Parish, which fought in Louisiana; his first cousin Moïse Louvière, fils, also served in that company.  Alcide died near New Iberia in December 1865; the priest who recorded his burial said that Alcide died "at age 25 yrs.," but he was 27; his succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in April 1866.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Octave, by his father's first wife, married Marie Alzire, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcellin Broussard, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1866; the marriage was recorded also in St. Mary Parish.  They settled near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish.  Their son Joseph Alcide, who received his emancipation in January 1888, was born in January 1868. 

3c

Moïse married Gertrude Adeline, called Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Leclair Hébert, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in August 1839.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Stanislas was born in August 1840 but died at age 3 in September 1843, Moïse, fils was born in February 1845, twins Frédéric le jeune and Jean in January 1851, Denis in October 1857, and Aristide Clovis in January 1867.  They also had an older son named Ducléon.  Their daughters married into the Bonin and Larive families.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted a single slave--a 17-year-old black female--on Moïse Louvièr's farm. 

During the War of 1861, Moïse, fils, a resident of St. Mary Parish, served in Company C of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry with his first cousin Alcide Louvière

Ducléon married Philomène, daughter of fellow Acadian Onésime LeBlanc, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1865.  They settled near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish.  Their son Stanislas was born in August 1866, and Frédéric Prevot in September 1869. 

4

François-Xavier, called Xavier, from his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in February 1788, married Arthémise, also called Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Nicolas Hébert of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1814.  They settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son François Hermogène was born in February 1817, Jean Baptiste Théogène, called Théogène, in December 1820, Louis Tertule in June 1825, Pierre Galispi or Olypsi in October 1833, and Joseph Aladin in February 1838.  Their daughters married into the Bonin, Hébert, Louvière, Mallet, and Oubre families.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 6 slaves--4 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 25 to 1--on Xavier Louvière's farm next to Silvere Louvière at Fausse Point.  François Xavier died in St. Martin Parish in February 1863; the St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that François Xavier died "at age 82 yrs.," but he was "only" 75; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in October 1865. 

4a

François Hermogène married Marie Célestine, daughter of French Creole Come DeBlanc, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July 1844; Marie's mother was a Landry.  Their son Joseph des Paliere died in St. Martin Parish, age unrecorded, in February 1847.  Did the family line survive? 

4b

Jean Baptiste Théogène married first cousin Marguerite Anaïse, daughter of his uncle Frédéric Louvière, père, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in March 1845.  They settled near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish.  Their son Joseph was born in June 1851, and Alexandre Adam in May 1864.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a 16-year-old black male--on J. B. Louvier's farm; one wonders if this was him or a cousin.  Marguerite Anaïs, called Mrs. Théogène Louviere, died near New Iberia in July 1865; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that she died "at age 40 yrs."; her succession record, calling her husband Théogène, was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in October 1866.  Jean Baptiste Théogène remarried to Marie Olive, called Olive, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis LeBlanc, at the New Iberia church in November 1866; Jean Baptiste Théogène was 45 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Magloire was born near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish, in October 1869. 

4c

Louis Tertule died in St. Martin Parish in March 1848.  He was only 22 years old and probably did not marry.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following November. 

4d

Pierre Olypsi married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Frédéric LeBlanc, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in April 1854.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Alex, perhaps also called Alexis, was born in April 1855 but may have died at age 11 in July 1866, and Louis Zerthur was born in January 1859.  During the War of 1861, Olypsi, as he was called in Confederate records, served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He survived the war. 

4e

Joseph Aladin married Henriette Eléonore, daughter of Henry Ransonnet, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July 1865.

5

A son, by his father's first wife, name and age unrecorded, died at Attakapas in November 1796. 

6

Youngest son Émilien, by his father's second wife, born at Attakapas on Good Friday, 1801, died young. 

Descendants of Isidore LOUVIÈRE (c1763-?; Mathieu, père, Mathieu, fils, Louis)

Isidore, fourth and youngest son of Jean-Baptiste D'Amour dit de Louvière and Geneviève Bergeron, born at Boston in c1763 during Le Grand Dérangement, was taken to the prison camp at Halifax soon after his birth.  He came to Louisiana via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans.  In the late 1770s, he and older brother François moved to the Attakapas District, where Isidore married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadian Firmin Landry, in November 1787.  They also settled at Fausse Pointe on Bayou Teche.  Their daughters married into the Granger and Steven families.  Isidore remarried to Marie, daughter of French Creole Simon Picard of St.-Charles des Allemands and widow of Jacques Touchet, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1812; Isidore was 49 years old at the time of the wedding.  They settled on the lower Vermilion River.  Their daughter married into the Abshire family.  Isidore's sons and grandsons settled in St. Martin, St. Mary, St. Landry, Lafayette, and Iberia parishes. 

1

Oldest son Julien, by his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in c1788, married Éloise or Héloise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Granger of Prairie Sorel, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1816.  They settled at Côte Gelée.  Their son Julien, fils was born in March 1820, Joseph le jeune in July 1821 but died "at this father's house" at age 4 in July 1825, and David Clairville, called Clairville, was born in August 1829.  Their daughters married into the Lalande, Leger, Lormand, Mire, and Trahan families.  Julien, père died probably at his home at Côte Gelée in January 1848; he was 60 years old. 

1a

Julien, fils married cousin Marie Zépheline, Zéphiline, or Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadian François Hébert, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1839; Marie's mother, also, was a Granger.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1841.  Their daughter married into the Leger family. 

Joseph le jeune married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Leger and widow of Gerasin Broussard, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1866. 

1b

Clairville, age 19, was assigned "a tutor," as per his father's post-mortem succession record, in May 1848.  He married fellow Acadian Marguerite Zoë Mire in c1849 and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish.  Their son Damase was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1855, Jules near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in November 1858, and Placide in July 1861.  Their daughter married into the Lormand family. 

2

Louis, by his father's first wife, baptized at Attakapas, age 2, in April 1795, married Marie Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Vital Landry of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1818.  Did they have any children?  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted 5 slaves--all females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 6--on Louis Louviere's farm.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 7 slaves--1 males and 6 females, all mulattoes except for 1 black, ages 22 years to 6 months--on Louis Louvièr's farm. 

3

Joseph, by his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in August 1798, married Delphine Séraphine, also called Adèle, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Broussard of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1821.  They settled at Côte Gelée and at Île aux Cannes.  Their son Joseph, fils was born probably at Côte Gelée in April 1822, Édouard in November 1824, a son, name unrecorded, died "at his parents' home" at La Petite Ance, age 2 months, in November 1829, Théodule was born in November 1832, Paulin in June 1835 but died at age 10 months in April 1836, Jean Osémé, called Osémé, was born near New Iberia in May 1839, and Clet or Clayton in September 1843.  Their daughters married into the Borel, Delhomme, Hébert, Landry, Maillard or Mayer, Savoie, and Sonnier families.  Joseph's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in August 1852; he would have been 54 years old that year; it evidently was not a post-mortem succession.  Joseph may have died near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in July 1870; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Joseph died "at age 76 yrs."; this Joseph would have been "only" a month shy of 72, but who else could it have been? 

3a

Édouard married cousin Marie Elina, Helena, or Héloise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Granger, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1844; Marie's mother was a Louvière.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1845, Éloi in August 1851, and Félix in August 1858. 

Joseph le jeune married Alexandrine, daughter of fellow Acadian Eusèbe Hébert, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in September 1867.  Their son Édouard was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1868, and Eusèbe in August 1870. 

3b

Joseph, fils married Victoire Sidalise, daughter of fellow Acadian François Prince, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in July 1847 or 1848.

3c

Jean Osémé married French Canadian Marie Azélie, Zelie, or Azelina Lantier, also called Duhon, probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1850s.  Their son Jean, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1866, and Joseph Olepse in December 1868.  During the War of 1861, Osémé served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

3d

During the War of 1861, Clayton served with older brother Osémé in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry.  After the war, Clayton settled at Rayne in present-day Acadia Parish. 

4

Rosémond, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques on the river in December 1801, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Breaux and widow of Joseph Lalande, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1825.  Their son Osémé was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 5 months, in August 1826 but died a few weeks later, and Théodule was born in St. Martin Parish in July 1827.  They also had a son named Joseph Théodule, unless he was Théodule.  Rosémond remarried to Charlotte Lormand or Normand and settled in Lafayette Parish.  Their daughter married into the Leleux family.  Rosémond remarried again--his third marriage--to Amelina, daughter of French Creole Balthasar Delahoussaye and widow of Jean Louis Picard, at the St. Martinville church in February 1866; Rosémond "of Manchac," as the recording priest noted, was 65 years old at the time of the wedding. 

Théodule, by his father's first wife, married fellow Acadian Julie Landry probably in St. Martin Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Édouard Zartur was born near New Iberia in May 1855, Joseph le jeune in Lafayette Parish in February 1857, and Paulin in May 1864.  A daughter was born to them in April 1866 and died a week after her birth.  Théodule died in Lafayette Parish in January 1867; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Théodule died "at age 31 yrs.," but he would have been 40; his succession record, calling his wife Julie Landry, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse two weeks after his death, so he likely married only once. 

Joseph Théodule, by his father's first wife, called a widower by the recording priest (but he may have been referring to the groom's father), married Célestine, daughter of French Creole Gilbert Amy, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1864; Célestine's mother was a Landry

5

Youngest son Joachim, by his father's second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in October 1815, may have died young. 

Other LOUVIÈREs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Louvières in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Octave Joseph Louvière died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, five days after his birth in August 1841.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

Joseph Louvière died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1844.  He was only 12 years old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

Arthémise Damoine Louvière married Henri Hargroder at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  Neither the priest nor the parish clerk who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 4 slaves--2 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 6--on Arthémise Louvière's farm; she probably was a widow by then.  Arthémise, called Phémise, remarried to Aurere Badeau in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1862.  Again, the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Vileor Louvière married Vores Cory in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in January 1860.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a year-old black female--on Dumastrait Louvièr's farm. 

Gustave Louvière died near New Iberia in March or April 1861.  He was only 8 months old.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give the boy's parents' names. 

Ellen Louvière married Anglo American William F. Leming in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in October 1861.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Volrien, perhaps Valérien, Louvière married Rosalie Landry and settled near Patoutville, now Lydia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Olepsy, son or daughter of Joseph Louvière, died in Lafayette Parish in July 1866.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give the mother's name, said that Olepsy died "at age 22 yrs." 

Célestine Louvière married Michel Leleu at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in May 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph, son of Julien Louvière and Marie Louise Shichneider, probably Schexneider, married Cora, daughter of Louis Boutte, at the Patoutville, now Lydia, church, Iberia Parish, in July 1869. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Twenty years after the first of the family came to Louisiana, a cousin of the D'Amour dit de Louvières came to the colony from France in 1785:

Marie-Rose D'Amour, age 24, crossed aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were second husband Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Thibodeau, age 20, and their infant son.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marie Rose died by November 1804, when her husband remarried at Assumption. 

~

A Louvière from St. James Parish moved to upper Bayou Lafourche during the early antebellum period and created a third center of family settlement there.  His descendants settled as far down the valley as the coastal marshes of Terrebonne Parish: 

Descendants of Jean-Louis LOUVIÈRE (c1776-1847; Mathieu, père, Mathieu, fils, Louis, Jean-Baptiste)

Jean-Louis, called Louis, eldest son of Charles Louvière and Anne-Isabelle Melançon, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in July 1776, married cousin Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Melançon of Lafourche, at St. Jacques in September 1804.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche in the late 1800s or early 1810s.  Their daughters married into the Auger, Gautreaux, Labiche, and Pontiff families.  Jean Louis died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Louis was 66 years old when he died, but he was closer to 70.   His sons and grandsons settled in Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes. 

1

Oldest son Onésime, born at St. James in June 1805, married ____ Allain.  Onésime died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1849; he was only 45 years old.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

2

Pierre Evariste, called Evariste and Varice, born in Assumption Parish in December 1811, married Nicolette dite Colette, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon LeBlanc, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1837.  Their son Pierre, fils died in Lafourche Interior Parish at age 1 month in January 1838, Henri Valéry was born in January 1846, Evariste Léon in March 1848, and Ludger Armogène in January 1852.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Domingue, and LeBlanc families. 

Henri married America, daughter of Anglo American William Whitney, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1870; America's mother was a Gautreaux

3

Benjamin, born in Assumption Parish in May 1817, may have died young. 

4

Jean Baptiste Désiré, also called Pierre Hermogène and Aimé Hermogène, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1822, married Emeranthe, called Meranthe, daughter of fellow Acadian Mathurin Daigle of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1846; the marriage also was recorded in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Henry Dubrick was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1846, and Osémé Alphonse in January 1851.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron and Lirette families.  Hermogène died in February or March 1853; he was only 30 years old; a petition for his succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in April. 

Henry married Euphrasie, daughter of Émile Fanguy, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1869.  Their son James Frederick was born in Terrebonne Parish in September 1870. 

5

Jean Louis, fils died in Lafourche Interior Parish 10 days after his birth in September 1824. 

6

Achille, perhaps his youngest son, born probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in c1828, married fellow Acadian Angeline Aurelienne, called Aurelienne, Richard at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1859.  Their son Jean Baptiste Félicien was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1860.  During the War of 1861-65, Achille served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia.  He was captured at the Battle of Labadieville in October 1862 and paroled at Thibodaux soon afterwards.  Achille died in Lafourche Parish in August 1865; the Thibodaux priest who recorded the burial said that Achille died "at age 37 yrs." 

Other LOUVIÈREs in the Lafourche/Terrebonne Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Louvières in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Norbert Louvière married Uranie Barrios.  Their son Alphonse was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1842. 

Marie Louvière's son Joseph Théophile died in Lafourche Interior Parish at age 9 months in February 1850.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Madeleine Louvière, wife of Paul Galabert, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1850.  She was only 48 years old. 

.

A Louvière family that moved from the river to Bayou Lafourche cannot be linked to other members of the family in those areas: 

Descendants of Pierre LOUVIÈRE (?; Mathieu, père?)

Pierre Louvière married Thérèse Grégoire.  On 22 August 1814, the notorious smuggler, Jean Laffite, issued a passport to "Pierre Louvier" at Barataria.  Was this the Pierre married to Thérèse Grégoire?  Was he Acadian?

Horter or Orthaire, born at St.-Jacques in February 1807, married Delphine Theriot.  Their son Jean Altenor Alcide was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1835. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Non-Acadians with a similar-sounding surname lived in colonial Louisiana as early as the 1740s:

Pierre Loubière of St.-Germain-en-Laye, France, was serving as a soldier at Natchez Post when he died in September 1749.  He probably had no family. 

Thérèse Loubière of Fort Chartres, Illinois, was the widow of Louis-Joseph-Auguste Deverger when she died at New Orleans, age 38, in February 1792. 

Charles Louvièr, husband of Jeanne Bosonier, died at St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands on the Upper German Coast in February 1800.  He was only 45 years old.  The priest who recorded Charles's burial did not give his parents' names or mention where he came from. 

~

Louvières who cannot be linked to Jean-Baptiste D'Amours dit de Louvière and his sons, and an Italian who used the dit d'Amour, settled in South Louisiana during the antebellum period:

Denis, son of Michel Louvière and Marie Joséphine Louvière, born in c1776, married Marie Anne, daughter of German Creole Paul Toups and widow of Antoine Frederick, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1817, and remarried to Acadian Marie Henriette Landry.  Denis moved to the western prairies and died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in December 1846; the priest who recorded his burial said that Denis died "at age 70 yrs.."  His wife, called Mme. Denyse Louvière, died "at Gros Chevreuil," perhaps Prairie Grand Chevrueil, east of present-day Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, "at age 74 yrs." in November 1860.  Was Denis a French Canadian who was a cousin of the Louisiana Louvières? 

Laurent Noveri dit Charles d'Amour married Anne Nicolas Longrin.  Their son Laurent was born in Assumption Parish in May 1819. 

François Louvière "of Montreal, Canada," married Julie Ellender in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in February 1824.  Was François a kinsman of Denis? 

CONCLUSION

The D'Amours, a family of French nobles from Canada, settled early in Acadia, but not in any of the Acadian communities along the Bay of Fundy.  They settled, instead, on seigneuries granted to them during the early 1680s along Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick.  In the 1740s, a grandson of one of the Rivière St.-Jean seigneurs, Jean-Baptiste D'Amour dit de Louvière, married into the Bergeron dit Nantes family on the river.  During Le Grand Dérangement, Jean-Baptiste and his growing family were held at Boston and Halifax, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  Sadly, Jean-Baptiste D'Amour dit de Louvière did not accompany his family to the Mississippi colony; he died either in Nova Scotia or on the long voyage from Halifax to New Orleans in 1764 or 1765.  His widow took their children to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  Her two older sons remained there, but in the late 1770s her two younger sons and a daughter settled on the western prairies, creating a second center of family settlement.  Meanwhile, a female cousin who called herself Damour came to Louisiana from France in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  A Louvière from St. James Parish created a third center of family settlement on upper Bayou Lafourche during the early antebellum period.  By the end of the period, his descendants had settled as far down the valley as Terrebonne Parish.  Throughout the antebellum period, however, the western branch of the family, concentrated in St. Martin, Lafayette, and St. Mary parishes, equaled in numbers the two eastern branches combined. 

A few non-Acadian Louvières settled in South Louisiana during the late colonial and early antebellum periods, but none of them created large families.

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, members of the family in all three centers of settlement participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy--a decided contrast to their socioeconomic status back in greater Acadia.  Vasseur Louvière held eight slaves on his east bank St. James Parish farm in 1860.  A hand full of his cousins in St. Martin and St. Mary parishes owned no more than seven slaves in 1850 and 1860.  Most, including all of the Louvières in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes, owned no slaves at all, at least none who appear on the federal slaves schedules of 1850 and 1860.   

Nearly two dozen Louvières served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861.  Confederate records reveal no deaths in service among them, though one of them--Alcide Louvière of St. Mary Parish, a young husband and father who served in Company C of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry--died in December 1865, age 27.  One wonders if his death was war-related. ...

Interestingly, when Louisiana priests recorded their baptisms, marriages, and burials, the descendants of Jean-Baptiste D'Amours dit de Louvière used the surname Louvière and sometimes De Louvière but not D'Amours.  The family's name in Louisiana also is spelled Leviere, Loievier, Loubiere, Louvier, Louvieres, Louvierre, Lubiere, Luvier, Luviere.  The members of the family who did use the original surname preferred the spelling Damour, not D'Amours.  This fairly large Acadian family should not be confused with the much smaller Larrive or Larive family, created by a Foreign Frenchman on lower Bayou Teche during the antebellum period; interestingly, the progenitor of the Larive family in South Louisiana, Joseph "de Savoie en Pedmont," France, married a Louvière

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, St. James, St. Mary, & St. Martin parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, St. James, St. Landry, St. Mary, & St. Martin parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1626-32, 2469-70; BRDR, vols. 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Crouse, Lemoyne d'Iberville, chap. 6; Dartez, Genealogy, <wdartez.com>; Davis, W. C., The Pirates Lafitte, 548n9; Faragher, A Great & Noble Scheme, 113; F. Grenier, "DAMOUR (D'AMOURS) de Chauffours, Mathieu," in DCB, 1:245, & online, source of quotation; Griffiths, From Migrant to Acadian, 220; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; George MacBeath, "DAMOURS (D'AMOURS) de Freneuse, Mathieu," in DCB, 1:245-46, & online; NOAR, vols. 5, 7; White, DFGA-1, 453-66; White, DGFA-1 English, 100-01. 

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anastasie LOUVIÈRE/DAMOUR 01 1765 StJ, Atk born c1757, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIÈRE & Geneviève BERGERON; sister of Charles, François, Isidore, Jean-Baptiste, & Susanne; exiled to Boston, MA, 1759, age 2; arrived LA 1765, age 8; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, called Nastasie, age 8, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother, & aunt?; married, age 18, Pierre, son of Jacob LEBLANC & Marie-Josèphe RULEAU of Montréal, 30 Jan 1775, St.-Jacques; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Anastasie LOUVIER, age 20, with husband age 28, who was head of family number 53, son Baptiste [LEBLANC] age 2, 1 head of cattle, 0 horses, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; died "at her home" at Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish, 9 Oct 1815, age 68[sic], buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Charles LOUVIÈRE/DAMOUR 02 1765 StJ born c1750, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIÈRE & Geneviève BERGERON; brother of Anastasie, François, Isidore, Jean-Baptiste, & Susanne; exiled to Boston, MA, 1759, age 9; arrived LA 1765, age 15; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Carlos D'AMOUR, age 15, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother, & aunt?, 4 arpents of land & 1 gun; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 119 next to cousin Germain BERGERON, called Charles LOUVIERE, age 20, listed singly so a bachelor; married Anne-Élisabeth/Anne-Isabelle, called Isabelle, daughter of Jacques MELANÇON & Marguerite BROUSSARD, early 1770s, probably St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 26, with wife Élizabeth age 30, son Louis age 6 months, daughters Anne age 6, Félicitée age 4, & Geneviève age 2, & [engagé?] Jacques LHABIT or CHABIT age 14; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Charles LOUVIERE, with 7 whites, 0 slaves, 5 qts. rice, 10 qts. corn
François LOUVIÈRE/DAMOUR 03 1765 StJ, Atk born c1759, Boston, MA; son of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIÈRE & Geneviève BERGERON of Rivière St.-Jean; brother of Anastasie, Charles, Isidore, Jean-Baptiste, & Susanne; arrived LA 1765, age 6; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, age 7, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother?, & aunt?; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, age 10, with cousins Germain BERGERON & Marguerite LEBLANC & brother Baptiste; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called François DAMOUR, age 7 [possibly 17] [sic], with family of Pierre PART & Marguerite MELANSON; moved to Attakapas District; married, age 21, (1)Marie-Louise, daughter of Charles THIBODEAUX & Brigitte BREAUX of Petitcoudiac, c1780, probably Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Attakapas census, 1781, called François LOUVIER, with 2 individuals, 18 animals, & 28 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called F. LOUVIERE, with 4 free individuals, 0 slaves; on Attakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Francisco LUBIER; married, age 40, (2)Angélique, daughter of Michel BOURGEOIS & Anne-Osite LANDRY, & widow of Pierre ARCENEAUX, 26 Nov 1799, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; on Fr. Barriere's list of Acadians & non-Acadians in the Attakapas, 1805-09, called Don François de LOUVIERE, "from Canada"; died "suddenly at his residence," Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish, 14 Aug 1808, age 48; succession record dated 3 Sep 1808, St. Martin Parish courthouse
Isidore LOUVIÈRE/DAMOUR 04 1765 StJ, Atk born c1763, Boston, MA; son of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIÈRE & Geneviève BERGERON of Rivière St.-Jean; brother of Anastasie, Charles, François, Jean-Baptiste, & Susanne; arrived LA 1765, age 2; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, age 3, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother?, & aunt?; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, called Izidore DAMONS, age 7, with family of Pierre HÉBERT & Marie BERGERON, uncle & aunt; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Izidorre DAMOUR, orphan boy, age 14, with family of François PART & Anne BERGERON, probably his uncle & aunt; moved to Attakapas District; married, age 24, (1)Françoise, daughter of Firmin LANDRY & Théotiste THIBODEAUX, 5 Nov 1787, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; married, age 49, (2)Marie, daughter of Simon PICARD & Marie DORÉ of St. Charles Parish, & widow of Jacques TOUCHET, 11 Aug 1812, St. Martinville
Jean-Baptiste LOUVIÉRE/DAMOUR 05 1765 StJ born c1754, probably Rivière St.-Jean; called Baptiste; son of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIÉRE & Geneviève BERGERON; brother of Anastasie, Charles, François, Isidore, & Susanne; exiled to Boston, MA, 1759, age 5; arrived LA 1765, age 11; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Baptiste DAMOUR, age 12, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother, & aunt?; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, called Baptiste DAMOUR, age 14, with cousins Germain BERGERON & Marguerite LEBLANC & brother François; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Jean-Baptiste LOUVIERRE, age 20, engagé with Sieur François MOLLERRE, surgeon; never married?
Marie-Rose DAMOUR 06 Nov 1785 StG?, Asp born c1760, Ste.-Anne, Medoctec, Rivière St.-Jean; called Rose; daughter of Joseph D'AMOURS de CHAUFFOURS & Geneviève ROY; first cousin of of Anastasie, Charles, François, Isidore, Jean-Baptiste, & Susanne; married, age 21, (1)Jean-Baptiste, fils, son of Jean-Baptiste RASSICOT & Marie-Henriette POTIER, 8 May 1781, St.-Martin, Chantenay, France; married (2)Jean-Baptiste-Pierre, son of Olivier THIBODEAUX & his second wife Élisabeth/Isabelle BOUDREAUX, early 1780s, probably Nantes, France; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 24; went to Manchac before going to Lafourche valley?; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Marie-Rose D'AMOUR, age 26[sic], with husband & 2 sons; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Rosa D'AMOUR, age 33[sic], with husband & 3 sons; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Rose DAMOUR, age 34[sic], with husband & 3 sons; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Marie, no surname given, age 30[sic], with husband 3 sons, & 1 daughter; died by Nov 1804, when her husband remarried at Assumption
Susanne LOUVIÉRE/DAMOUR 07 1765 StJ born c1765, probably Halifax; daughter of Jean-Baptiste D'AMOURS de LOUVIERE & Geneviève BERGERON; sister of Anastasie, Charles, François, Isidore, & Jean-Baptiste; arrived LA 1765, an infant; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, age 1, with widowed mother, siblings, widowed grandmother, & aunt?; died young?

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Anastasie [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÉRE]; BRDR, 2:481, 508 (SJA-1, 54), her marriage record, calls her Anastasie LOUVIER "of Acadia," calls her husband Pierre LE BLANC "of Montreale in Canada," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph DUGAS & Étienne LANZON; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:636 (SM Ch.: v.4, #995), her death/burial record, calls her Anastasie LOUVIERE, "native of Acadie, wife of René (probably Pierre, marginal change has Pierre) LEBLANC, inhabitant at la fausse pointe," says she died at home & was buried "in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names. 

02.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Charles [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÉRE].

03.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him François [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÉRE]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:101, 530 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol.19, #96), record of contract for his second marriage, dated 7 Nov 1799, calls him François LOUVIÉRE, "native of Bosthon in N. America," calls his wife Angélique BOURGEOIS, "wid. of Pierre ARCENEAUX, native of Cabahanoce," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Vidor [Isidore] LOUVIERE, "a brother," Louis PELLERIN, Firmain LANDRY, Amédé SAVOYE, & Louis-Charles DEBLANC; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:101, 530 (SM Ch.: v.4, #186), the record of his second marriage, dated 26 Nov 1799, calls him François LOUVIERE "of Boston, widr. of Marie Louise THIBAUDAU," calls his wife Angélique BOURGEOIS "of St. James Parish on the Mississippi, wid. of Pierre ARSONNAU," gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of Isle[sic] St. Jean, Canada" & hers "of LaFourche," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Marin LENORMAND, Amand BROUSSARD, Colas HÉBERT, Hubert LANDRY, André HÉBERT, & Louis CHEMIN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:478 (SM Ch.: v.4, #523), his death/burial record, calls him François LOUVIÉRE "of La fausse pointe," says he died "suddenly at his residence," that he was buried the next day, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:478 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ.#13) his succession record, calls him François LOUVIÈRE, "wid. is Marie Louise THIBODEAUX," & lists his heirs as Eugénie m. Éloi BENOIT, Susette m. Antoine PRINCE, Benjamin, Frédérique, Xavier, "minors are" Polone & Félonice.

The priest who recorded his second marriage, Fr. Michel-Bernard BARRIÈRE, usually a careful record keeper, confused Rivière St.-Jean, where the LOUVIEREs lived, with Île St.-Jean, where they did not. 

04.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Isidore [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÈRE]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:474, 531 (SM Ch.: v.4, #8), the record of his first marriage, calls him Isidore LOUVIERE, calls his wife Françoise LANDRY, gives his & her parents' names, calls his mother Marie DUGAL, says all parents were "of Canada," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean-Marie ____, Augustin DUGA, & Pierre COMO; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 255, 748-49 (SM Ch.: v.5, #269), the record of his second marriage, calls him Isidore DAMOURS dit LOUVIÈRES, "widower of dec. Françoise LANDRY, inhabitant 'au large de (in the surrounding countryside of) New Iberia, native of Boston in Massachusetts," calls his wife Marie PICARD "of this parish, native of St. Charles Parish on the river, widow of dec. Jacques TOUTCHEQUE (TOUCHET)," gives his & her parents' names, says he was a major son & she a major daughter, that his both fathers were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean THOMASSON, Pierre CUVELIER, & Louis CHEMIN. 

His birthplace also can be found in the baptismal record of son Joseph, dated 21 Oct 1798, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:531 (SM Ch.: v.4, #98).

05.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Baptiste [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÉRE]; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2469.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161, 168. 

Why was he in VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia in Apr 1766 if he was only 12 years old?  See Bourgeois, pp. 161, 168.  

06.  Wall of Names, 40, calls her Marie-Rose DAMOUR; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 49, 147; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 52, 78, 161.

Her birth year, birthplace (assumed to be the Ste.-Anne on Rivière St.-Jean because she was a DAMOUR), parents' names, & first marriage are from Robichaux, cited above.  Her first husband must have died soon after their marriage. 

Note how grossly inaccurate were the Spanish census takers in recording her age at Valenzuéla in the 1790s. 

07.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Susanne [D'AMOURS dit de LOUVIÈRE].

What happened to her in LA?

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