APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LONGUÉPÉE

[LONG-aye-pay]

ACADIA

Vincent Longuépée, born probably in France in c1671, married Madeleine, daughter of René Rimbault, at Port-Royal in c1692 and moved to Minas.  By 1703, they were being counted at Cobeguit, where Vincent died by 1714.  He and Madeleine had six children, including a son, Louis, born probably at Minas in c1695.  Louis married Anne, daughter of Pierre Brasseur of Pigiguit, probably at Cobeguit in c1720.  The couple remained at Cobeguit.  Three of Louis's sisters, however, moved to Port-Toulouse on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island.  Another sister settled at Louisbourg, also on Île Royale. 

Louis and Anne had at least seven children, four of them sons, all born at Cobeguit.  They included Marie-Josèphe, born in c1726, Pierre in c1729, Joseph probably in the early 1730s, Ambroise in c1735, Jean in c1739, and Louis, fils in c1743.  Marie-Josèphe married Claude, son of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois of Grand-Pré, at Cobeguit in October 1748; in September 1749, Claude was a delegate from Minas in a meeting with Nova Scotia Governor Edward Cornwallis at the new British capital at Halifax.  Joseph married Cécile Bourg probably at Cobeguit in c1754.  Their daughter Anne was born probably at Cobeguit in c1755, but they had no sons.  

In 1755, descendants of Vincent Longuépée could be found at Cobeguit and on Île Royale. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Two Longuépée brothers and their families sailed to Louisiana from France in 1785 aboard Le Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, today's Thompson Creek, north of Baton Rouge.  In the early 1790s, even before a series of hurricanes devastated Bayou des Écores and most of the Acadians there abandoned the settlement, the Longuépées moved downriver to what is now West Baton Rouge Parish, where most of them remained:     

Ambroise Longuépée, age 52, crossed with wife Marguerite Henry, age 40, and son Janvier-Pierre, age 20.  Ambroise and his wife had no more children in Louisiana.  Ambroise died near Baton Rouge in July 1804, in his early 70s.  His sole surviving son died the following September, only 39 years old, but not before he had sons of his own.  Unfortunately, none of the sons created families of their own.

Jean Longuépée, age 45, crossed with wife Marie-Françoise Bourg, age 40, and nine children--Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, age 21, Anne-Josèphe, age 19, Marguerite-Olive, age 16, Jean-Jacques, age 14, Pierre, age 12, Laurentine-Urienne, called Corentine, age 9, Louis, age 6, Jean-Baptiste, age 4, and infant Hélène.  Jean and his wife also had no more children in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Henry, and LeBlanc families.  One of them moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, but the others remained in the Baton Rouge area.  All of the Longuépées of South Louisiana are descended from three of Jean's four sons, especially his youngest one. 

Descendants of Janvier-Pierre LONGUÉPÉE (1765-1804; Vincent, Louis)

Janvier-Pierre, called Pierre, only surviving son of Ambroise Longuépée and Marguerite Henry, was born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1765.  He followed his parents to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, lived with them at Bayou des Écores, and then followed them down to the Baton Rouge area, where he married cousin Élisabeth- or Isabelle-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Henry, in November 1798; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Élisabeth-Modeste also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  Janvier-Pierre was 33 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their daughter married into the Monjet family.  Janvier Pierre died near Baton Rouge in September 1804, only two months after his father died; his father died in his early 70s, Janvier Pierre at age 39.  None of his three sons seems to have created families of their own, so, except for its blood, this family line probably did not survive in the Bayou State. 

1

Oldest son Rémy-Léandre, baptized at St.-Gabriel, age 7 months, in May 1801, died near Baton Rouge in June 1832.  He was only 31 years old and does not seem to have married. 

2

Hilaire-Constant, born near Baton Rouge in January 1802, probably died young. 

3

Youngest son Jean Baptiste le jeune, born posthumously, died the day after his birth in September 1804.  His father had died a week and a half before. 

Descendants of Jean-Jacques LONGUÉPÉE (1771-?; Vincent, Louis)

Jean-Jacques, eldest son of Jean Longuépée and Marie-Françoise Bourg, was born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in August 1771.  He followed his parents to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, lived with them at Bayou des Écores, and then followed them down to the Baton Rouge area in the early 1790s.  He married cousin Marie-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Charles LeBlanc, at St.-Gabriel in January 1802; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Marie-Rose was a native of St.-Gabriel.  Their daughter married into the Seguin family. 

1

Older son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born near St.-Gabriel in June 1803, probably died young. 

2

Younger son Joseph married cousin Célestine Arthémise, daughter of François Seguin, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1832; Célestine's mother was a Bourg.  Their son Joseph Jules was born near Baton Rouge in January 1834, and Alcée Numa, called Numa, in West Baton Rouge Parish in July 1843.  Their daughters married into the Cline, Getz, Lindsly, and Seguin families.

During the War of 1861, Numa served in Company F of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  Numa married Amelie, daughter of French Creole Pierre Leclerc, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1866; Amelie's mother was a Trahan.

Descendants of Pierre LONGUÉPÉE (c1773-; Vincent, Louis)

Pierre, second son of Jean Longuépée and Marie-Françoise Bourg, was born probably at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in c1773.  He followed his parents to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, lived with them at Bayou des Écores, and then followed them down to the Baton Rouge area.  He married Esther, daughter of fellow Acadian Bonaventure LeBlanc and widow of Théodore Rivet and Simon Goudeau, at St.-Gabriel in January 1794.  Esther was a dozen years his senior, had been born in Baltimore, Maryland, during Le Grand Dérangement, and had come to Louisiana as a girl of six in 1767.  Their daughter married into the Leguinaud family.  Pierre died probably at St.-Gabriel by May 1801, when his wife remarried again.

1

Older son Jean, born near St.-Gabriel in January 1797, probably died young. 

2

Younger son Simon-Pierre, born near St.-Gabriel in March 1799, married Sophie Ludivine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Comeaux, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1833.  Their son Pierre Hilaire, called Hilaire, was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in January 1843, and Jean Baptiste Diogène near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1846.  Their daughter married a Comeaux cousin. 

During the War of 1861, Hilaire served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  He was wounded at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 and at Baton Rouge the following August.  He survived the war. 

Louis LONGUÉPÉE (c1779-; Vincent, Louis)

Louis, third son of Jean Longuépée and Marie-Françoise Bourg, was born probably at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in c1779.  He followed his parents to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He probably died young and may not even have survived the crossing from France. 

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste LONGUÉPÉE (c1781-1854; Vincent, Louis)

Jean-Baptiste, fourth and youngest son of Jean Longuépée and Marie-Françoise Bourg, was born probably at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in c1781.  He followed his parents to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, lived with them at Bayou des Écores, and then followed them to Baton Rouge, where he married Marie Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian Grégoire Lejeune, in March 1808.  Modeste's family had come to Louisiana from France aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785, but she was a native of Louisiana.  Jean Baptiste died in West Baton Rouge Parish in November 1854; he was 73 years old.  Most of the Longuépées of South Louisiana are descendants of Jean-Baptiste and his many married sons. 

1

Oldest son Zenon Gilbert, born near Baton Rouge in August 1808, probably died young. 

2

Jean Alexis, called Alexis, born near Baton Rouge in May 1811[sic], married Constance Caroline, also called Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Comeaux, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1831.  Their son Alexis, fils was born near Baton Rouge in November 1837, and François Amédée, called Amédée, in March 1846 but died in West Baton Rouge Parish at age 8 in August 1854.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Dupuy, Lemoine, and Pino families.

3

Basile Julien, born near Baton Rouge in September 1811[sic], married cousin Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadian François Lejeune, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1835.  Their son Basile Gilbert, called Gilbert, was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in July 1844.  Their daughter married into the Templet family. 

During the War of 1861, Gilbert served as a conscript in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery.  His first cousin Jules also was a conscript in that unit.  Like his cousin, Gilbert deserted his unit after it was captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863.  Gilbert may have married fellow Acadian Marie Augustine Doiron and settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, by the late 1860s. 

4

Louis le jeune, born near Baton Rouge in November 1813, married fellow Acadian Julie, also called Pouponne, Comeaux of West Baton Rouge Parish, in a civil ceremony probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1829, and sanctified the marriage at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1830.  Their son Louis Donis was born near Baton Rouge in September 1830.  They also had a son named Jules.  Louis le jeune remarried to Brigitte Paliou of West Baton Rouge Parish, widow of André Lemoine, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1839.  Their son Jean Louis was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1842.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family.

4a

Donis Longuépée died near Baton Rouge in February 1852.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Donis died at "age 14 years."  Louis Donis, by his father's first wife, would have been 21.  Did the priest record the wrong age for him? 

4b

During the War Between the States, Jules, by his father's first wife, served as a conscript in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery; his first cousin Gilbert also was a conscript in that unit.  Like his cousin, Jules deserted his unit after it was captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863.  He probably went home.  Jules married Cécile, daughter of French Creole Jean Tuillier, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1865; Cécile's mother was an Hébert

4c

During the War of 1861, Jean Louis, by his father's first wife, may have served in Companies H and B of the 11th Regiment Louisiana Infantry and the Consolidated 13th-20th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Pointe Coupee and Iberville parishes, which fought in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama.  Louis, as the Confederate records call him, was captured at Jackson, Mississippi, in July 1863 and was sent to the prisoner-of-war compound at Camp Morton, Indiana.  The prisoner-of-war experience must have been too much for him; in September, Louis agreed to take the oath of allegiance to the U.S. government nearly two years before the war ended. 

5

Jean Baptiste, fils, born near Baton Rouge in August 1816, may have died young. 

6

Joseph Narcisse, called Narcisse, born near Baton Rouge in August 1820, died near Baton Rouge in August 1837.  He was only 17 years old and did not marry. 

7

Augustin or Auguste, born near Baton Rouge in January 1826, married fellow Acadian Carmelite Eugènie Lejeune probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the mid-1840s.  Their son Théodore Gilbert, perhaps called Gilbert, was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1846, Zenon in September 1849 but died at age 8 in August 1857, Edmond was born in December 1851, and Aristide in May 1857.  Despite his age--37--and his being married and the father of several children, in February 1863, Auguste enlisted in Company H of  the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, a front-line unit raised in West Baton Rouge Parish that fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  His younger brother Édouard also was in the unit.  Auguste was killed in action at Jonesboro, Georgia, at the end of August 1864.  His wife and children received $75 from the Baltimore Ladies Fund. 

Théodore Gilbert may have married fellow Acadian Marie Augustine Doiron and settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, by the late 1860s. 

8

Youngest son Édouard was born near Baton Rouge in January 1828.  During the War Between the States, Édouard served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry with older brother Auguste.  Édouard was captured at Nashville, Tennessee, in December 1864 and spent months in a prisoner-of-war camp at Point Lookout, Maryland.  Unlike brother Auguste, Édouard survived the war and came home to his family. 

Other LONGUÉPÉEs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Longuépées on the river with known lines of the family there:

Louis Longuépée died in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1837.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Louis died at age 37. 

Marie Louise Longuépée gave birth to son François Aristide near Baton Rouge in July 1861.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism the following October did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  This was not Marie Louise's first child; she had given birth to a daughter in July 1858.  Again, the priest who had baptized the girl did not give the father's name or Marie Louise's parents' names. 

A. Longuépée died near Baton Rouge in August 1866.  The priest who recorded A.'s burial did not give any parents' names or even his or her age at the time of death. 

CONCLUSION

The Longuépées settled fairly early in Acadia, but they came "late" to Louisiana.  In fact, if the Spanish government had not coaxed over 1,500 Acadians in France to emigrate to the colony, there probably would be no Longuépées in the Bayou State today, at least none with Acadian ancestry.  Two families of them came to the colony in 1785 and settled at Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge.  By the early 1790s, however, they had left that ill-fated community and moved downriver to the Baton Rouge area, where most of them settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  One daughter moved on to Bayou Lafourche, but no family lines appeared there, and no Longuépées crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the western prairies before the War Between the States. 

Church records show no non-Acadian Longuépées coming to Louisiana during either the colonial or the antebellum period.  All of the Longuépées of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of Vincent of Port-Royal and Cobeguit. 

Although they lived in a parish noted for its sugar plantations, no Longuépée appears on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860.  This means that they either owned no slaves or managed to avoid having their slaves counted by federal census takers.  It also means that they participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy. 

Despite the small size of the family, at least 10 Longuépées served Louisiana in uniform during the War Between the States, and at least one of them died in Confederate service.  Auguste Longuépée, age 37, followed his younger brother into Company H of the 4th Louisiana Infantry, a front-line unit raised in West Baton Rouge Parish that fought in the Western Theatre of Operations.  Auguste was killed in action at Jonesboro, Georgia, in August 1864.  His brother, nephews, and cousins survived the war, though not all of them served honorably; three of his nephews deserted their units in 1863.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Longapée, Longépé, Longépée, Longuépé, Longuespée, Longue-épée.

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 1505-06; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:10; NOAR, vol. 4; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family Nos. 16, 17, 25; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Tamerlan.htm>, Family No. 7; Richey, Tirailleurs, 243-44; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 559-560, 599-604; White, DGFA-1, 1098-99; White, DGFA-1 English, 236.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Ambroise LONGUÉPÉE 01 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born c1734, probably Cobeguit; son of Louis LONGUÉPÉE & Anne BRASSEAUX; brother of Jean; deported from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo, France, aboard Supply 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 9 Mar 1759, called Ambroise LONGUESPEE, age 24[sic]; at La Gouesnière, France, 1759-63; at St.-Servan, France, 1763-72; married, age 33, Marguerite, daughter of François HENRY & Marie DUGAS, 8 Feb 1763, St.-Suliac, France; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 52, head of family, no occupation listed; died [buried] Baton Rouge 30 Jul 1804, age 72[sic]
*Anne-Josèphe LONGUÉPÉE 02 Dec 1785 BdE? born & baptized 20 Sep 1766, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; sister of Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; at St.-Servan 1766-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 19
Hélène LONGUÉPÉE 04 Dec 1785 BdE? born Jan 1785, probably St.-Servan, France; daughter of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; sister of Anne-Josèphe, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, an infant; may not have survived the voyage to LA
Janvier-Pierre LONGUÉPÉE 05 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born & baptized 5 Apr 1765, St.-Servan, France; son of Ambroise LONGUÉPÉE & Marguerite HENRY; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 20; no occupation listed; married, age 33, Élisabeth/Isabelle-Modeste, daughter of Jean HENRY & Marie PITRE, 4 Nov 1798, Baton Rouge
Jean LONGUÉPÉE 06 Dec 1785 BdE? born c1740, probably Cobeguit; son of Louis LONGUÉPÉE & Anne BRASSEAUX; brother of Ambroise; deported from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo, France, aboard Supply 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 9 Mar 1759, called Jean LONGUÉSPÉE, age 20; married, age 22, Marie-Françoise, daughter of Joseph BOURG & Françoise DUGAS, 24 May 1762, LaGouesnière, France; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 45, head of family, no occupation listed
Jean-Baptiste LONGUÉPÉE 07 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born c1781, France; son of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; brother of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 4; married, age 23, Modeste Geneviève, daughter of Grégoire LEJEUNE & Hélène DUMONT, 11 Mar 1808, Baton Rouge; died [buried] West Baton Rouge Parish 4 Nov 1854, age 73  #
*Jean-Jacques LONGUÉPÉE 08 Dec 1785 BdE, BR, StG born & baptized 20 Aug 1771, St.-Servan, France; son of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; brother of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; at St.-Servan 1771-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 14; married, age 31, Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean-Charles LEBLANC & Brigitte HÉBERT, 7 Jan 1802, St.-Gabriel
Laurentine-Urienne LONGUÉPÉE 03 Dec 1785 BdE, BR, StG born & baptized 7 Jul 1776, St.-Servan, France; called Corentine; daughter of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; sister of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 10; married, age 24, Joseph, son of Simon LEBLANC & his second wife Marie TRAHAN, & widow of Marguerite LEBLANC, 30 Jul 1799, St.-Gabriel; died [buried] St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, 3 Nov 1814, age 50[sic]
Louis LONGUÉPÉE 09 Dec 1785 BdE? born c1779, France; son of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; brother of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Marguerite-Olive, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 6; may not have survived the voyage to LA
Marguerite-Olive LONGUÉPÉE 10 Dec 1785 BdE, StG born & baptized 22 Oct 1769, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; sister of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marie-Françoise-Jeanne, & Pierre; at St.-Servan 1769-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 15; married, age 21, Pierre-Jean, son of Joseph HÉBERT & his first wife Françoise COMEAUX, 29 Nov 1791, probably Bayou des Écores; moved to St.-Gabriel
*Marie-Françoise-Jeanne LONGUÉPÉE 11 Dec 1785 BdE, Asp, Lf born & baptized 2 Jul 1764, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; sister of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, & Pierre; at St.-Servan 1764-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 20; married, age 21, Pierre, son of Pierre HENRY & Marguerite PITRE, 12 Jan 1786, New Orleans, soon after they arrived in LA on the same ship; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Maria, age 27[sic], with husband & 1 daughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Marie, no surname given, age 28[sic], with husband & 1 daughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 30[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 1 daughter
Pierre LONGUÉPÉE 12 Dec 1785 BdE, BR, StG born c1773, France; son of Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Marie-Françoise BOURG; brother of Anne-Josèphe, Hélène, Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Jacques, Laurentine-Urienne, Louis, Marguerite-Olive, & Marie-Françoise-Jeanne; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 12; married, age 21, Esther, daughter of Bonaventure LEBLANC & Marie THÉRIOT, & widow of Théodore RIVET & Simon GOUDEAU, 21 Jan 1794, St.-Gabriel; died by May 1801, when his wife remarried ... again

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 45, calls him Ambroise LONGUÉPÉE; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family No. 16; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 599-600, Family No. 684; BRDR, 3:584 (SJO-4, 32), his death/burial record, calls him Ambrosio LONGUÉPÉE, age 72 yrs. of Acadia, gives his parents' names, but mentions no wife. 

02.  Not in Wall of Names.  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile, 1785, 88-89. 

What evidence is there that she even survived the crossing from France? 

03.  Wall of Names, 43, calls her Corentine LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Laurentine-Urienne LONGGUÉPÉE, gives her parents' names, & says her godparents were Jean KARGUAINOU & Jeanne GUILLOU; BRDR, 2:469, 505 (SGA-14, 26), her marriage record, calls her Corantin LONGUÉPÉE, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says all of the parents were "of Acadia," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Lonrenzo ANRY [HENRY] & Luis BRAU; BRDR, 3:584 (SGA-8, 70), her death/burial record, calls her "First name omitted" LONGUÉPÉE, spouse Joseph LEBLANC, but does not give her parents' names.

Why is the age in her burial record so far off?  She was only 38, not 50!  Good thing she was not alive to see that age recorded in the St. Gabriel church register! 

04.  Wall of Names, 43, calls her Hélène LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685.

What evidence is there that she even survived the crossing from France?

05.  Wall of Names, 45, calls him Janvier LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 599-600, Family No. 684; BRDR, 2:376, 505 (SJO-3, 23), his marriage record, calls him Javier Pedro LONGUÉPÉE, says he & his wife had to secure dispensation for third degree of consanguinity, gives his & her parents' names, says all of the parents were "of St. Malo," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Estevan DALCOURT & Matheo MANGAN. 

06.  Wall of Names, 43, calls him Jean LONGUÉPÉE; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family No. 16; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685.

Did he survive the crossing from France?

07.  Wall of Names, 43, calls him Jean-Baptiste LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685; BRDR, 3:573, 584 (SJO-3, 66), his marriage record, calls him Juan Bautiste LONGÉPÉE, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says his parents were "of St. Malo, France," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Juan GUÉDRY & Juan LONGÉPÉE [his brother]; BRDR, 8:391 (SJO-11, 112), his death/burial record, calls him Jean Baptiste LONGUEPEE, age 73 years of West Baton Rouge Parish, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

He was one of the last of the Acadian immigrants to join our ancestors.  Most of the LONGUÉPÉEs of South LA are descended from Jean-Baptiste and his many sons. 

08.  Not in Wall of Names.  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685; BRDR, 2:478, 505 (SGA-14, 36), his marriage record, calls him Jean-Jacques LONGÉPÉE, says he & his wife had to secure dispensation for third degree of consanguinity, gives his & her parents' names, says both of his parents were deceased at the time of the wedding & were "of St. Malo," & that the witnesses to his wedding were Jean LEBLANC & Joseph LEBLANC. 

Why is such a well-documented Acadian immigrant not on the Wall of Names with the rest of his family? 

09.  Wall of Names, 43, calls him Louis LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685.

What evidence is there that he even survived the crossing from France?

10.  Wall of Names, 43, calls her Marguerite LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685; BRDR, 2:372-73, 505 (PCP-19, 39), her marriage record, calls her Marguerite LONGUÉPÉE, gives her & her husbands' parents' names, calls  her mother Marie-Francoise COUTE, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Jean LONGUÉPÉE & Pierre LONGUÉPÉE [her brothers].  

Her marriage record, cited above, was recorded at Pointe-Coupée, across the river from Bayou des Écores, which means the wedding probably was performed by the Pointe Coupée priest in someone's house along the bayou, since Bayou des Écores never had a priest of its own. 

11.  Not in Wall of Names.  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie-Françoise-Jeanne LONGUÉPÉE, gives her parents' names, says her godparents were Jean ST. LEGER & Françoise GUSEPEL, & that her family resided at St.-Servan from 1763-72; NOAR, 4:162, 193 (SLC, M5, 44), her marriage record, calls her Maria LONGUÉPÉ, calls her husband Pedro HENRRY, "native of Isle St. Jean in Acadia," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Vicente LLORCA & Josef MARTINEZ.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 59, 92. 

Why are her ages in the Lafourche valley censuses so far off?  And why is such a well-documented Acadian not on the Wall of Names with the rest of her family?

12.  Wall of Names, 43, calls him Pierre LONGUÉPÉE; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 600-01, Family No. 685; BRDR, 2:464, 505 (SGA-14, 20, #70), his marriage record, calls him Pedro LONGUÉPÉE, calls his wife Ester LE BLANC, widow of Simon GODAU, gives  his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of San Malo, Province of Brittany, France," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Bonaventure LEBLANC & Antoine ALVAREZ.

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Copyright (c) 2007-16  Steven A. Cormier