APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

MOUTON

[MOO-tonh]

ACADIA

Jean, also called Jean-Jacques, was a son of Antoine Mouton, maître d'hôtel de M. de Grignan (probably the famous French aristocrat François de Castellane-Ornado-Adhémar de Monteil, Comte de Grignan, of Provence and Marseille) and Jeanne Merlasse, de Marsalle or Marsal, of the bishopric of d'Albi in Languedoc.  Jean, born at Marseille in c1689, arrived at Port-Royal as a young man and married Marie, 16-year-old daughter of Alexandre Girouard dit de Ru and Marie Le Borgne de Bélisle, in January 1711; Marie was a granddaughter of Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, former French governor of Acadia and seigneur of Port-Royal and also was a descendant of former governor Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour.  Jean and Marie moved to Grand-Pré in c1712, where Jean earned his living as a surgeon, and then to Chignecto in c1725, where he also worked as a surgeon and where he and his family remained.  Sieur Jean, as he was addressed, and Marie had 10 children, including seven sons, five of whom created families of their own.  Two of their daughters married into the Hébert and Richard families.  Sr. Jean and wife Marie died at Chignecto before Le Grand Dérangement.  

Oldest son Jean, fils, born at Grand-Pré in November 1712, married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Poirier and Cécile Mignot, at Chignecto in January 1734. 

Jacques, born probably at Minas, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Marie-Thérèse Mirande, at Chignecto in November 1734.  

Charles, born probably at Minas in c1721, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Susanne Bézier, probably at Chignecto in c1755.  

Justinien, born at Grand-Pré in May 1721, died young.

Pierre, born at Chignecto in December 1730, also died young.  

Salvator, born at Chignecto in c1733, married Anne, daughter of Jean Bastarache and Angélique Richard, at Port-Royal in January 1752 but settled at Chignecto with the rest of the clan.  

Youngest son Louis, born at Chignecto in c1737, married Marie-Modeste, another daughter of Jean Bastarache and Angélique Richard, at Restigouche in c1760 during Le Grand Dérangement.  

In 1755, Sr. Jean Mouton's children and grandchildren could be found at Chignecto, Minas, Annapolis Royal, and on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  

~

One other Mouton family lived in Acadia, that of Jean Mouton dit Fleury, an artilleryman born at St.-Michel-de-Carcassonne in the south of France in 1735, and probably no kin to Sr. Jean Mouton of Marseille and Chignecto.  This younger Jean also was son of an Antoine Mouton, but his mother was Catherine Boucher.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

The Chignecto Moutons were some of the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana, but they were not among the first.  They came to the colony in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  Mouton family legend insists they were among the first Acadians to settle in the colony (see, for instance, the brochure that accompanies the Robert Dafford Mural at the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, which says the Moutons "Arrived with a group of twenty believed to be the earliest refugees from Acadia in Louisiana...."), but no creditable source places the Moutons with the party from Georgia who reached the colony via Mobile in February 1764.  The Moutons most likely arrived sometime in the autumn of 1765 with one of the parties from Halifax.  They were not even members of the earliest group of Acadians who reached Louisiana that year--the Broussard dit Beausoleil party, which reached New Orleans in February and went to Bayou Teche two months later.  

Nearly a dozen Moutons stepped off the ship at New Orleans in 1765:

Salvator Mouton, age 32, came with wife Anne Bastarche, age 34, and two sons--Marin, age 12, and Jean le jeune, age 11.  When they reached New Orleans, Anne may have been pregnant.  A New Orleans church record hints that she gave birth to daughter Marie-Geneviève in mid-September of that year, but the girl may have been born en route to the colony; Marie-Geneviève was baptized at New Orleans on December 2, giving an idea of when the family reached the colony.  Anne died perhaps in childbirth probably at Cabanocé soon after they settled there, and Salvator remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Forest, probably a widow, at New Orleans in c1768.  Salvator died at hopital de la Nouvelle-Orleans in April 1773; he was only 40 years old; his burial was recorded by the priest at St.-Jacques.  Sons Marin and Jean le jeune remained at St.-Jacques, where Marin married in January 1777.  Later that year, they followed their older cousin Jean dit Neveu to the Attakapas District, where Jean le jeune and Marie-Geneviève also created families of their own and where Marin remarried.

Louis Mouton, age 28, Salvator's younger brother, came with wife Marie-Modeste Bastarache, age 32, and infant daughter Anne-Charlotte, who also was baptized at New Orleans on December 2.  They had more children in Louisiana and remained on the river.  

Jean dit Neveu Mouton, age 18, Salvator and Louis's nephew, came with wife Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Bastarche, age 18, and no children.  However, when they reached New Orleans, Élisabeth was pregnant.  She gave birth to daughter Marguerite-Françoise in late November, but the girl was not baptized until Christmas Day.  Jean dit Neveu and Élisabeth had more children at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  In c1777, Jean and his family accompanied his younger cousins Marin and Jean le jeune to the Attakapas District.  

Descendants of Louis MOUTON (c1737-?)

Louis, seventh and youngest son of Sr. Jean Mouton and Marie Girouard, born probably at Chignecto in c1737, escaped the British roundup at Chignecto in 1755 and followed his older brothers to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Bastarache and younger sister of brother Salvator's wife Anne, at Restigouche in October1760.  They were captured by the British later that year, and Louis was imprisoned with older brother Salvator at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, in 1761-62.  From Halifax, Louis and his wife and their infant daughter followed Salvator and his family and a nephew to Louisiana in 1765.  They settled with them at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where they had more children.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at St.-Jacques in 1777.  When Louis's three nephews, including Salvator's two sons, left for the Attakapas District in c1777, Louis and Marie-Modeste remained on the river.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard and Theriot families.  Louis and his wife had no sons who created families of their own, so this family line, except for its blood, probably did not survive in the Bayou State. 

David, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1770, likely died young. 

~

Sometime between 1766 and 1768, Salvador and Louis's older brother Charles Mouton, his wife Anne Comeau, their son Georges, and Anne's daughter by her first marriage, reached New Orleans from Martinique in the Caribbean Basin, where French officials had counted them at Champflore in January 1766.  They joined their Mouton kin on the Acadian Coast.  Like younger brother Louis, Charles remained on the river.  He and Anne had no more children in Louisiana.  Chares died a widower at St.-Jacques in November 1798, age 87.  Son Georges married at St.-Jacques but had no sons of his own:  

Descendants of Georges MOUTON (c1756-?; Jean)

Georges, son of Charles Mouton and Anne Comeau of Chignecto, born in c1756 during Le Grand Dérangement, followed his family to Champflore, Martinique, in the Caribbean Basin, where French officials counted them in January 1766.  They moved on to Louisiana between 1766 and 1768 and joined their Mouton kin at St.-Jacques on the river, where Georges married Rosalie-Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Gaudet, in January 1781.  Their daughter married into the Oubre family.  Georges and his wife had no sons, at least none who appear in local church records. 

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Compared to many other Acadian families, the Moutons came "late" to the western prairies.  In c1777, Jean dit Neveu Mouton and his younger cousins Marin, Jean, and Marie-Geneviève Mouton, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled in the Attakapas District.  This western branch of the family soon eclipsed that of their cousins back on the river:

Marie-Geneviève married Jean, son of fellow Acadian Joseph Guilbeau, at Attakapas in July 1783.  She died at Attakapas in August 1784, only 18 years old. 

Descendants of Jean dit Neveu MOUTON (c1747-1802; Jean)

Jean dit Neveu, or Nephew, son of Jacques Mouton and Marguerite Caissie, born probably at Chignecto in c1747, probably did not follow his family into exile in South Carolina aboard the British ship Cornwallis, which reached Charleston in October 1755.  Judging from his movements during Le Grand Dérangement, he more likely escaped the British roundup at Chignecto in 1755 and followed his uncles Pierre, Salvator, and Louis to Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the fall of Restigouche in the autumn of 1760, Jean remained with his uncles' families while they were held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.   Jean married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Bastarache, a kinswoman of the wives of his uncles Salvator and Louis, probably at Halifax in c1763.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they followed his uncles from Halifax to Louisiana in 1765.  A daughter, Marguerite-Françoise, was born at New Orleans in November either en route to Louisiana or soon after they reached the colony.  They followed his uncles to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where Spanish officials counted them in April 1766.  In c1777, four years after his uncle Salvator died, Jean dit Neveu and Salvator's sons, Marin and Jean le jeune, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled in the Attakapas District, where Spanish authorities counted them that May.  Élisabeth died at Attakapas in April 1798.  Jean dit Neveu did not remarry.  Like his cousins, Jean dit Neveu also claimed land as far west as the Mermentau River valley, but he and most of his descendants, like those of his cousins, remained in the old Attakapas District.  Jean dit Neveu died at Attakapas in August 1802; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was 58 years old when he died, but he probably was closer to 55.  All three of his sons created families of their own and settled in what became Lafayette Parish, but only two of their lines survived.  That of his oldest son Frédéric, who married a Cormier, was especially vigorous. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Frédéric, called Frédéric, born probably at Cabanocé in c1769, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Cormier, fils, at Attakapas in June 1788.  They settled on Bayou Vermilion and at Carencro.  Their son Jean Sylvestre, called Sylvestre le jeune, was born in May 1791, Jean-Éloi, called Éloi, was baptized at Attakapas, age 2 1/2, in May 1795, Jean-Augustin, called Augustin, was born in December 1796, Jean Florent in February 1799, Cyprien in March 1810, and Jean Ursin, called Ursin, in December 1811.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Caruthers, Comeaux, De La Corne, Girard, McBride, and Ware families.  Frédéric died "at his home" on the Vermilion in March 1815; he was only 46 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in July. 

1a

Sylvestre le jeune married Marie Euphrosine, called Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Breaux of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1813.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son Frédéric Demosthenes, called Demosthenes, was born in November 1814, Jean Rosémond, called Rosémond, in February 1816, a son, name unrecorded, died the day after his birth in June 1818, Tiburce Placide or Placide Tiburce was born in April 1820, Eugène Lucien in April 1822 but died at age 7 months the following December, Jude François or François Jules, called Jules, was born in January 1824, Jean Livodé, Livodet, or Livaudais, called Livaudais, in May 1826, Joseph in c1831 but died at age 3 in October 1834, and Joseph Babilas was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 3 months, in April 1833.  Sylvestre le jeune died probably at Carencro in January 1849; the Grand Coteau priest who recorded his burial said that Silvestre died "at age 60 yrs.," but he was 57. 

Rosémond married cousin Marie Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Julien Comeaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in March 1841; Estelle's mother, also, was a Breaux.  Their son Pierre Auguste was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1851.  Their daughters married into the Prejean and Sonnier families. 

Jules married Azélie or Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1843.  Their son Joseph Jules or Jude, called Jules or Jude, was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1844.  Jules died in Lafayette Parish in April 1849; he was only 25 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June. 

Jules/Jude married Anonciade or Armontiade, daughter of fellow Acadian Placide Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1866. 

Placide married cousin Marie Rosalie Azelle or Azélie, another daughter of Julien Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1845.  They settled near Carencro.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at age 1 month between March and May 1847, son Joseph Alcide was born in October 1852, Kleber in April 1854, and a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at birth in September 1859. 

Demosthenes died in Lafayette Parish in November 1854.  He was only 40 years old and probably did not marry. 

Jean Livaudais married Marceline or Marcellite, daughter of Spanish Creole Pierre Hernandez, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1865; Jean was 39 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Pierre Hippolyte was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1867. 

1b

Augustin married Marie Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of French Creole Pierre Baudoin of St. Charles Parish and Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1814.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their son Toussaint was born in November 1816, Éloi le jeune in March 1817[sic], Onésime le jeune in June 1822, another Onésime le jeune in March 1823, and a son, name unrecorded, died 4 hours after his birth in September 1828.  Their daughter married into the Chargeois family.  

Éloi le jeune married Marie, daughter of French Creole Noël Gisclard of St. James Parish, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1838.  Their son Gustave was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1843.  They also had a son named Étienne.  Their daughters married into the Herpin and Richard families. 

Étienne married Remisia, Remizia, or Lemisia, daughter of fellow Acadian Joachim Broussard, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1865.  Their son Alcée Éloi or Éloi Alcée was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1866 but died at age 3 in December 1869. 

Gustave married Eulalie, another daughter of Joachim Broussard and widow of Rosémond Langlinais, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1866.  Their son Albert was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1869. 

Onésime le jeune married cousin Anathasie or Nathalie Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1841; Nathalie's mother was a Mouton.  Their son Pierre Alse, perhaps Alcée, was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1842 but died the following August, Honoré Césaire was born in November 1843, Édouard in June 1847, Philippe Albert in August 1854, and Maurice in December 1857.  They also had a son named Jean, John A., or John O.  Their daughter married into the Gladu family. 

Jean/John O. married Alvina, daughter of fellow Acadian Onésime Boudreaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1867.  Their son Jean Franklin was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1868. 

1c

Cyprien married cousin Elise or Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1833; Eliza's mother was a Mouton.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Bonneau, Dugas, and Richard families.  Cyprien's succession records were filed at the St. Martinville and Vermilionville courthouses in March 1846; he would have been 36 years old that year.  Did he father any sons? 

1d

Éloi married Carmelite, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Domingue of Lafourche Interior Parish, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1834.  Their son Michel or Mitchel Éloi was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 1 month, in October 1835 but died at age 6 1/2 in April 1842, Étienne Raphaël or Gabriel was born in August 1839, Jean in November 1841, Jean Dermas or Darmas, called Darmas, in November 1843, a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at age 3 in June 1848, and Joseph was born in March 1851 but died at age 11 in April 1862.  Their daughters married into the Albarado and Gilbert families.  Éloi died in Lafayette Parish in September 1851; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Éloi died "at age 60 yrs.," but he was only 56; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September 1854. 

Étienne Raphaël/Gabriel married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Terence Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1858, and remarried to Eliska, daughter of fellow Acadian Rosémond LeBlanc, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1866. 

Darmas died in Lafayette Parish in March 1865.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Darmas died "at age 19 yrs.," but he was 22.  He probably did not marry.  Was his death war-related? 

Jean married cousin Victoire or Victorine, daughter of Spanish Creole Joseph Hernandez, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1867; Victorine's mother, also, was a Domingue.  Their son Jean Sidney was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1870. 

1e

Ursin married Sébastienne, called Bastienne, another daughter of Jean Domingue, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1838.  Their son Jean Frédéric le jeune, called Frédéric, was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1840, François in December 1842, Alexandre in February 1845 but died at age 5 in May 1850, Raymond was born in January 1847 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1849, and a child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in August 1851.  Their daughter married into the Hernandez family. 

Frédéric le jeune died in Lafayette Parish in June 1858.  He was only 17 1/2 years old and probably did not marry. 

A François Mouton, age 21, died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in August 1862.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give François's parents' names, but this likely was Ursin's son.  Did François marry?  Was his death war-related? 

2

Nicolas-Joseph, called Joseph, born probably at Cabanocé in c1770, married fellow Acadian Marie-Josèphe Doucet at Attakapas in January 1788.  Their daughter Émilie attended the Grand Coteau academy from April 1826, when she was 10, until July 1829.  Joseph does not seem to have fathered any sons, at least none who appear in local church records. 

3

Youngest son Sylvestre, born probably at Cabanocé in c1771, married Susanne, or Suzette, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Comeaux, at Attakapas in October 1791  They settled at Carencro.  Their son Sylvestre, fils was born in December 1795, and Jean-Eugène, called Eugène, in August 1801.  Their daughters married into the Caruthers and Prejean families.  Sylvestre, père died at his home at Carencro in December 1814; he was only 43 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, the following May.   

3a

Sylvestre, fils died "at the home of Aurien[Aurelien] Braud on Bayou Vermillion[sic]" in July 1817.  He was only 21 years old and probably did not marry.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in August. 

3b

Eugène married Cidalise Eugènie, called Eugènie, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Savoie of Opelousas, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1821.  Their son Sylvestre le jeune was born near Grand Coteau in August 1825, Joseph in January 1828, Césaire in April 1835, Félix in November 1843, and Omer or Homere in December 1846.  Their daughters married into the Kidder, Richard, and Robin families. 

Joseph married Azélie Marie or Marie Azélie, daughter of German Creole Louis Taylor or Teller, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1853; Azélie's mother was a Leger.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near Grand Coteau in June 1860 but died at age 3 1/2 in December 1863, and Louis was born in February 1869.  Their daughter married into the Landry family. 

Félix married Clara, daughter of Jean Baptiste Kidder, at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1866.  They remained near Arnaudville. 

Homere married Marie Louise or Louisa, daughter of German Creole Don Louis Stelly, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1870. 

Descendants of Marin dit Capuchon MOUTON (c1753-1836; Jean)

Marin, elder son of Salvator Mouton and his first wife Anne Bastarache, born at Chignecto in c1753, followed his parents and infant brother to Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where his father and uncle fell into British hands in the autumn of 1760.  Marin and brother Jean le jeune remained with their mother while the British held their father as a prisoner of war at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they probably joined their fellow Acadian exiles at Halifax, from where they sailed to Louisiana in 1765.  They reached New Orleans later in the year and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  Their mother died at Cabanocé in c1767, and their father promptly remarried there in 1768.  Five years later, in April 1773, their father died at New Orleans.  Marin married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Lambert of Mobile, at St.-Jacques in January 1777.  In c1777, Marin and younger brother Jean le jeune followed their older cousin Jean dit Neveu to the Attakapas District, where they made their fortunes.  Jean settled at Carencro, at the northern edge of the district, but Marin settled at the southern end of the district along the lower Vermilion River, south of present-day Abbeville at what became known as Mouton Cove, and at Fausse Pointe on Bayou Teche.  His daughters married into the Baudoin, Boudreaux, Hébert, and Luquet families.  In February 1815, when he was 62 years old, Marin dit Capuchon remarried to Marguerite, daughter of French Creole André Bernard of St.-Jacques and widow of Jean Roy and Josime LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish; she was living at Fausse Pointe.  According to family tradition, Marin was called Capuchon for the hat that he wore.  Along with brother Jean, who their neighbors called Chapeau, Marin acquired much land along the upper and lower Vermilion during the early antebellum period.  Marin died at Mouton's Cove in September 1836, when he was in his early 80s; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, the month of his death.  His three sons created families of their own and settled in present-day southern Lafayette and northeastern Vermilion parishes; however, his middle son's family line probably did not survive.  One historian notes that Marin's descendants remained in the Youngsville and Abbeville areas well into the 1800s.  Some of them migrated westward into Acadia and Calcasieu parishes by the late 1880s and even into southeast Texas in the early twentieth century, but most of them remained in Lafayette, St. Martin, and Vermilion parishes.

1

Oldest son Marin, fils, by his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in October1781, married Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Théodore Broussard, at Attakapas in June 1800.  Their son Sylvestre le jeune was born at Attakapas in c1801.  Marin, fils remarried to Césaire, daughter of French Creole Pierre Baudoin and widow of Jean Trahan, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1832; he was in his early 50s at the time of the wedding.  Marin, fils's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in July 1857; he would have been 76 years old that year. 

Sylvestre le jeune, by his father's first wife, married Adélaïde, 14-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste dit Mano Cormier, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1821.  Their son Sylvestre Alcide was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1832 but died at age 1 in November 1833.  They also had a son named Marin le jeune.  Their daughters married into the Merriman and Morton families. 

Marin le jeune married Marie Zulma, called Zulma, daughter of fellow Acadian Onésime Landry, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in June 1866.  Their son Horace was born near Abbeville in November 1868. 

2

Salvator-Marin, by his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in November 1784, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Comeaux, at Attakapas in February 1804, and remarried to Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Charles Boudreaux of Bayou Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1807.  They settled on Bayou Vermilion.  Their son Aurelien was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1808.  Called a "res. Attakapas" by the priest who recorded his burial, Salvator died in St. James Parish in October 1811; he was only 26 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in August 1813.  

Aurelien married Carmelite, daughter of French Creole Olivier Blanchet, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1828.  Aurelien died in Lafayette Parish in August 1830; the priest who recorded his burial said that Aurelien was 23 years old when he died, but he was only 21; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1833.  He evidently fathered no sons. 

3

Youngest son Joseph-Onésime, called Onésime, from his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in December 1798, married Aspasie, also called Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Hébert of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1815.  They settled on the lower Vermilion.  Their son Onésime, fils, perhaps also called Lesime, was born in November 1821, Placide in September 1826, Bélisaire in January 1827, and Athanase in May 1837.  They also had a son named Arvillien.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Dartes families. 

3a

Arvillien married cousin Scholastique Cidalise, called Scolastie, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Boudreaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1836; Cidalise's mother, also, was an Hébert.  They settled near Youngsville.  Their son Placide le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in March 1838, Augustin was born in March 1844, and twins Onésime le jeune and Théodore in January 1855.  They may have had a son named Ursin Augustin.  Their daughter married an Hébert cousin. 

Augustin married Esilda, daughter of fellow Acadian Ozémé Vincent, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1865, and remarried to Arminie or Herminie, daughter of fellow Acadian Eusèbe Lessin Hébert, at the Youngsville church in February 1868.  Their son André Neuville was born near Youngsville in November 1869. 

Ursin Augustin married cousin Félicia, daughter of fellow Acadian Euclide Bourg, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1870; Félicia's mother, also, was a Boudreaux

3b

Onésime, fils may have married French Creole Clarisse or Laclaire Lapointe and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the mid-1840s.  Their son Placide le jeune was born in January 1849, Salvator in December 1850, Théodore in February 1853, Lessaint in December 1854, and Homere in November 1856. 

Salvator married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Euclide Hébert, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1870. 

3c

Placide may have married French Creole Amelia or Azilia Meaux and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the early 1850s.  Their son Félix was born in March 1858, and Oseah in June 1863.  Placide may have remarried to fellow Acadian Julie or Julia Bourg.  Their son Placide Numa was born near Abbeville in December 1867. 

3d

Athanase married Clara, daughter of fellow Acadian Drosin Boudreaux, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in July 1854.  Their son Omer was born near Abbeville in June 1855, and Ploucide, perhaps Placide, in December 1858. 

3e

Bélisaire married fellow Acadian Lezima LeBlanc and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1850s.  Their son Eraste was born in April 1856. 

Descendants of Jean dit Chapeau MOUTON (c1754-1834; Jean)

Jean, younger son of Salvator Mouton and his first wife Anne Bastarache, was born at Chignecto in c1754.  Still an infant, he was taken to Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where his father and uncle fell into British hands in the autumn of 1760.  Jean le jeune and his older brother Marin remained with their mother while the British held their father as a prisoner of war at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, in Nova Scotia. After the war with Britain finally ended, they probably joined their fellow Acadian exiles at Halifax, from where they sailed to Louisiana in 1765.  They reached New Orleans later in the year and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  Their mother died at Cabanocé in c1767, and their father promptly remarried there in 1768.  Five years later, in April 1773, their father died at New Orleans.  In c1777, now in his late teens, Jean followed brother Marin, now married, and older cousin Jean dit Neveu to the Attakapas District.  It was Jean, called Chapeau for the kind of hat he wore, who established the Moutons as one of the most influential Acadian families in Louisiana.  In June 1783, when he was 29 years old, he married at Attakapas Marie-Marthe, called Marthe, daughter of New Orleans retired surgeon Antoine Borda, a native of Châteaudun, France, and his Acadian wife, Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé, who, like Jean, was a native of Chignecto.  Jean dit Chapeau and Marthe settled at Carencro.  Their daughters married into the Bernard, Dugas, Guidry, Malchaux, and Potier families.  The success of this branch of the Mouton family may be attributed not only to Jean's ambition in acquiring land and accumulating a fortune, but also to the well-educated Marthe, "who introduced her children to the French intellectual tradition, a trait retained by most of their descendants."  Jean and brother Marin purchased much of their land from the remnants of the Atakapas tribe, including an 1802 purchase of 4,251 acres near Bayou Cypress Point, on the west side of the lower Vermilion River, from one of the last surviving Atakapas chiefs.  However, after Louisiana became a part of the United States, federal officials refused to certify some of the Mouton land claims.  No matter, Jean dit Chapeau became a cattleman and later a prominent sugar planter in present-day Lafayette Parish.  As early as 1812, he owned 28 slaves on his Carencro plantation.  He claimed tracts of land as far west as the Mermentau River, where he probably herded cattle.  He helped establish the village of Vermilionville, now the city of Lafayette, in 1824.  He died in Lafayette Parish, a widower, in November 1834; he was 80 years old.  He was buried in the cemetery behind the church in Vermilionville on land he had donated to the parish; that church is now the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, named in honor of Jean Mouton's patron saint.   Eight of Jean dit Chapeau's 11 sons married, and all but one of their lines survived.  Most of Jean's sons and grandsons, especially his younger son Alexandre, did well in life, becoming prominent cattlemen, sugar planters, or cotton growers in the old Attakapas District.  One of Jean's sons served as governor of Louisiana, a grandson was briefly lieutenant governor, and another grandson became a Confederate general and died heroically during the War Between the States.  Jean's descendants became the quintessential "genteel Acadians"; one would be hard-pressed, in fact, to find a more distinguished family line in South Louisiana.  Interestingly, many of Jean's descendants married their cousins. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, fils, born at Attakapas in April 1784, married cousin Marie Angélique, called Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Claude Martin, at Attakapas in June 1801.  The settled at La Grand Pointe on upper Bayou Teche and at La Butte on upper Bayou Vermilion.  Their son Jean Baptiste Sosthène, called Jean Sosthène and Sosthène Jean, was born in April 1804, and Edmond Eugène in June 1811.  Their daughter married into the Antoine and Voorhies families.  Jean, fils remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Anglo Creole James Andrews or Andrus, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1834; Jean, fils was 50 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died 4 days after its birth in October 1836.  Jean, fils, called "Jean of Mermentau River" by the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial, died in May 1837; the priest said that Jean died "at age 55 yrs.," but he was only 52. 

1a

Jean Sosthène, by his father's first wife, married Marie Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of French Creole Joseph Latiolais of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1822.  Their son Jean Joseph Sosthène, called Joseph Sosthène and Sosthène Joseph, was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1824, Louis Alexandre Sidney, called L. A. Sidney and Sidney, in December 1826, Stanislas Correar in May 1832, Jacques Alcée or Alcide in February 1834 but died at age 6 1/2 in October 1840, and Charles Auguste was born in August 1841.  Their daughters married into the Martin, Mouton, and Olivier (French Creole, not Acadian) families.  Jean Sosthène remarried to French Creole Célestine Vavasseur at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1846.  Their son Joseph Edmond, called Edmond, was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1848, François Émile in February 1850, Eugène Emma in April 1852, and Benjamin in May 1856, when his father was in his early 50s.  Jean Sosthène died in Lafayette Parish in February 1863; he was 58 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in March. 

Sidney, by his father's first wife, married cousin Marie Coralie, called Coralie, daughter of his great uncle Joseph Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1847.  Their son Joseph was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1851, Joseph Léonard in July 1853, Albert near Breaux Bridge in July 1859, Martin in Lafayette Parish in August 1856, and Charles André in September 1861 but died the following May.  Their daughter married into the Martin family. 

Joseph Sosthène, by his father's first wife, married cousin Henriette Odèide, called Odèide, daughter of his great uncle, former governor Alexandre Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1852.  Their son Alexandre le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1853, Antoine Borda in August 1855, Charles Olivier in June 1856, Frédéric in June 1858, Émile died at age 3 in February 1863, Frank was born in April 1863, Alfred in July 1866, and Sidney le jeune in July 1868.

Joseph Edmond, by his father's second wife, married Emérite, daughter of Dutch Creole Horace Voorhies, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1870; Emérite's mother was a Guidry

1b

Edmond Eugène, by his father's first wife, married Eulalie, daughter of Dutch Creole Cornelius Voorhies, père of St. Landry Parish, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in July 1828; Edmond's sister Cidalise married Eulalie's brother Cornelius, fils.  Edmond and Eulalie's son Félix Flavius Horace, called Horace, was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1829 but died at age 14 in August 1843, Adolphe Alexandre was born in January 1831, Eugène Édouard, called Édouard, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months, in May 1838, William Edgar was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1848, and Paul in April 1850 but died at age 3 1/2 in January 1854.  They also had a son named James Edmond.  Their daughters married into the Broussard and Guidry families.  Edmond died in Lafayette Parish in November 1852; he was only 41 years old. 

Adolphe Alexandre married Marie Elmire, called Elmire, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Charles Durand, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1853; Elmire's mother was a LeBlanc.  Their son Charles Edmond was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1854 but died at age 1 in December 1855. 

Édouard, residing in Lafayette Parish, married Marie Athanaise, called Athanaise, daughter of French Creole François Vavasseur, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in November 1866; Marie's mother was an Arceneaux.  A daughter was born in August 1869 and baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, so they did not remain on the river. 

James Edmond married Héloise or Éloise, another daughter of Charles Durand, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1870.  A daughter had been born the previous march, so James and Héloise may have married civilly before sanctifying the marriage at the St. Martinville church. 

2

Joseph, born at Attakapas in January 1791, married Marie Cidalise, called Cidalise, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Arceneaux of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1809.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son Joseph, fils was born in July 1810 but died at age 4 1/2 in January 1815, Louis Valsin was born in February 1812, Pierre Léonard in January 1815 but died at age 16 in September 1831, and Willfrid Emar or Aymar, called Aymar, was born in February 1830.  Their daughters married into the Latiolais and Mouton families.  Joseph died in Lafayette Parish in August 1835; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 47 years old when he died, but he was only 44; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following December.

2a

Louis Valsin married Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Martin, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1828, and remarried to Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Dugas of Pont Breaux, at the St. Martinville church in November 1829.  Their son Louis Joseph or Joseph Louis was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1831, Roché in October 1832, Félix in August 1839, Jacques Antoine in September 1842, Thomas in St. Martin Parish in May 1844, Valsin Alcide, called Alcide, in Lafayette Parish in January 1847, and Henry in May 1852.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Butcher, Guidry, Martin, and Olivier (French Creole, not Acadian) families.  Louis Valsin died died in Lafayette Parish in November 1867; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Louis, père, as he called him, died "at age 55 to 60 yrs."; he was 55; his succession record, calling him Louis V. and naming his second wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December. 

Louis Joseph, by his father's second wife, married cousin Ophelia, daughter of his great uncle Charles Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1853.  Their son Joseph Félix was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1858 but died the following September. 

Roché, by his father's second wife, married cousin Marie Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of French Creole Alexandre Latiolais, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1858; Émilie's mother was a Mouton.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Joseph Coklin was born in December 1860 but died at age 3 1/2 in September 1864, Louis was born in March 1862, Marie Gustave, called Gustave, perhaps a son, in February 1869 but died at age 6 months the following September, and Homere was born in March 1870. 

Alcide, by his father's second wife, married Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Rosémond Breaux, at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in April 1869. 

Thomas, by his father's second wife, married Anaïse, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Babin, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1870. 

2b

Aymar married Marie Elvina or Adelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Treville Bernard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1851.  Their son Pierre Joseph was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1852, Alexandre died at age 4 in January 1863, and Louis Aymar was born in April 1861. 

3

François, born at Attakapas in November 1792, married Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1814.  Their daughter Eugènie attended the Grand Coteau academy from April 1826, when she was 11, until July 1829, and married a Bernard whose mother was a Dugas.  François "committed suicide ... at his home" in Lafayette Parish in September 1827; the priest who recorded his death said that François died "at age 38 years," but he was only 34; the priest noted that François was buried "by the inhabitants of this parish in the cemetery indicated by the Pastor," which probably was away from the graves of those who had not died at their own hand.  François fathered no sons, at least none who appear in local church records, so his family line, except perhaps for its blood, probably did not survive.  

4

Charles, born at Attakapas in March 1797, married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Dugas of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1817.  They settled at La Butte.  Their son, name unrecorded, died "at the home of Mrs. François Bernard at La fausse pointe," age 1 month, in April 1818, and Charles, fils was born in February 1819.  Charles remarried to Marie Julie, called Julie, daughter of French Creole Joseph Latiolais of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in October 1821.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish at birth in December 1822, a son, name unrecorded, died 2 days after his birth in July 1823[sic], Charles Alexandre Homere, called Charles Homere, Charles Homer, and Homere, was born in December 1823[sic], Charles Césaire Orther or Arthur, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 11 1/2 months, in May 1826, Pierre Joseph Ernest was born in January 1827 but died at age 2 1/2 in November 1829, Charles Eraste, called Eraste, was born in June 1828, Charles Rosémond Gesner in February 1834, Zesnaire in c1835 but died at age 2 in August 1837, and Jean Persifont was born in November 1847.  Their daughter Marie Elena "Entered Society" at the convent at Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1860; she was only 19 years old.  Their other daughters married into the Bienvenu and Mouton families.  Charles, père died in Lafayette Parish in April 1848; he was only 51 years old. 

4a

Charles, fils, by his father's first wife, died in Lafayette Parish in August 1839.  He was only 20 years old and probably did not marry. 

4b

Charles Homere, by his father's second wife, was educated in local private schools, graduated from St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, read law, was admitted to the Louisiana bar in 1844, and practiced law in Lafayette Parish.  He married Henriette Celimene or Celimene Henriette, daughter of French Creole Lasty Dupré, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1848; Celimene was a granddaughter of former Louisiana governor Jacques Dupré.  Charles and Celimene's son Charles Kossuth was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1849, Émile Antoine in St. Landry Parish in April 1854, André or Andrew Herron in January 1855, Arthur Charles in October 1858, and Julien Jouberty in August 1860.  During the late antebellum period, Charles Homer served as appointed district attorney for the parishes of Lafayette, St. Landry, Vermilion, and Calcasieu.  He served in the Louisiana state Senate and was elected the state's fifth lieutenant governor in 1855, serving as a Democrat, but only briefly.  After resigning that office in 1856, he was elected a district judge.  During the War Between the States, he served as aide-de-camp to his first cousin, General Alfred Mouton.  After the war, he practiced law again, in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes as well as in New Orleans.  He was elected district attorney for St. Martin and Iberia parishes, and, resuming private practice, served as attorney for the Lafayette Parish police jury.  Charles Homer remarried to Marguerite Eméranthe or Emérite, daughter of French Creole Charles St. Maurice du Closel Olivier de Vezin, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July or August 1867; Charles Homere was in his mid-40s at the time of the wedding.  Their son Charles Maurice was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1868, and Jean Homere in January 1870.  They also had sons named Philip, Jérôme, and Frank T.  Charles Homere died at Lafayette in March 1912, in his late 80s, and was buried in St. John Cemetery behind the cathedral. 

4c

Eraste, by his father's second wife, married Louise Corinne, called Corinne, daughter of Jean Joss Louaillier or Louiellier, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1856.  Their son Jean Jules was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1857, and Joseph Charles in November 1866.  During the War of 1861, Eraste served as captain of Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, the "Lafayette Prairie Boys," raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi (he was, in fact, the commander of the author's paternal great-grandfather's company, in which Joachim Cormier and two of his brothers, all from Carencro, served as privates). 

4d

Charles Césaire Orther, by his father's second wife, died in Lafayette Parish in September 1855.  He was only 30 years old.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in November.  Did he marry?     

5

A son, name unrecorded, died in Attakapas 8 days after his birth in March 1799. 

6

Louis le jeune, called Don Louis and Jean Louis, born at Attakapas in August 1800, married Marie, called Lulotte, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Cormier of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1817.  They settled at Grand Prairie.  Their son Louis, fils, also called Don or Jean Louis, fils, was born posthumously in Lafayette Parish in November 1822.  Their daughters married into the Chaix and Creighton families.  Daughter Marie Arsène, called Arsène, attended the Grand Coteau academy from October 1828, when she was 10, until September 1830.  Don Louis died in Lafayette Parish in September 1822; he was only 22 years old; his succession records were filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the month of his death and at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1825.

Don Louis, fils married Célestine, daughter of French Creole François Bordelon of Avoyelles Parish, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1840.  Their child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish in July 1840, and Erneste was born in October 1841. 

7

Pierre-Treville, born at Attakapas in November 1802, died "at his parents' home" at Carencro, age 6,  in October 1808. 

8

Alexandre, born at Attakapas in November 1804, was educated by his mother in his early years, but as a teenager he was sent to Georgetown College in Washington, D.C., a Jesuit school, where he learned to speak fluent English.  Back in his native Louisiana, in June 1822, at age 17, Alexandre filed a succession record at the St. Martinville courthouse, naming his younger brothers Émile and Césaire as his heirs.  Alexandre married Célestine Zélie or Zelia, called Zelia, daughter of French Creole Jean Jacques Rousseau of Opelousas and granddaughter of former Louisiana governor Jacques Dupré, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1826.  They settled at Grand Prairie on Bayou Vermilion, site of the present city of Lafayette, and at Carencro.  Their son Jean Jacques Alexandre Alfred, called Alfred, was born at Opelousas in 1829, and Alexandre Ambroise, called Ambroise, in Lafayette Parish in June 1832 but died at age 1 in July 1833.  Their daughters married into the Gardner and Mouton families.  Alexandre practiced law for a while, but he also turned to planting.  In the early 1830s, the voters of Lafayette Parish elected him to the state legislature.  He served as speaker of the House of Representatives from 1831-32, when he was not yet 30 years old.  Zelia died in November 1837 while Alexandre was serving a short term as United States Senator from 1837-38.  At age 37, Alexandre remarried to Anne Emma Kitchel, called Emma, daughter of Charles K. Gardner of New York, a former high ranking army officer and clerk of the U.S. Treasury Department, in New York City in January 1842.  Their son Paul Joseph Julien was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1848, Georges or George Clinton in September 1853, and William Rufus King in January 1857.  They also had a son named Charles Alexandre.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  Alexandre, a Jacksonian Democrat, was Louisiana's first popularly-elected governor, serving from 1843 to 1846.  He became president of the state railroad commission in the early 1850s, when he was recorded as owning 91 slaves on his plantation outside of Vermilionville.  He named his Greek-revival mansion on Bayou Vermilion Île Copal for the trees that grew around it.  In the late 1850s, he led a vigilance committee against marauding cattle rustlers who preyed on local cattle herds from their hideouts in the prairies west of Vermilionville.  In early 1861, he served as president of the Louisiana secession convention, but soon afterwards, for the first time in his distinguished political career, he was defeated in a bid for office, this time for a seat in the Confederate Senate.  He survived the War of 1861-65, though it devastated him personally and financially, and died at his home near Vermilionville in February 1885; he was 80 years old.   [photo]

Alfred, by his father's first wife, graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, Class of 1850, at age 21.  He married cousin Philomène Zelia, called Zelia, daughter of his first cousin Jean Sosthène Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Jacques Dupré was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1855.  Alfred served as a brigadier general in the Louisiana militia before the War of 1861.  He owned 13 slaves on his Carencro farm in 1860.  In October 1861, Alfred was appointed colonel of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry.  Nine of the regiment's 10 companies were raised in South Louisiana, and no regiment in the Confederate army contained as many Acadians as this one.  After being wounded at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 while leading his regiment in action, Alfred was promoted to brigadier general and given a new command that he took to South Louisiana in the autumn of 1862; his old regiment, the 18th Louisiana Infantry, and its later configuration, the Consolidated 18th Louisiana Infantry, was part of the brigade.  Sadly, Alfred did not survive the war--on 8 April 1864, during the Red River Campaign, he was killed in action at the Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana; he was only 35 years old when he died.  A daughter, Cécilia, had been born back in Lafayette Parish only two weeks before his death.  He was buried in St. John the Evangelist Cemetery, Lafayette, not far from his father and grandfather.  An imposing monument in the form of an obelisk marks the general's final resting place.  A statue of him, serving as Lafayette Parish's Confederate monument, stands in front of the parish courthouse in downtown Lafayette.  [photo]

9

Antoine-Émile, called Émile, born at Attakapas in January 1807, married Marie Madeleine Gadrate, Gadrat, Gardrate, or Guadratte, called Gadrate, another daughter of Jean Jacques Rousseau of St. Landry Parish, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1828; Gadrate was a sister of Émile's older brother Alexandre's first wife Zélia.  Émile and Gadrate settled at what became known as Pointe Émile Mouton in present-day Acadia Parish.  Their son Alexandre Antoine was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 4 hours, in March 1829 but died 10 days later, Joseph Antoine Alcide, called Joseph Alcide and Alcide, was born in January 1831, Onésime Rousseau, called O. Rousseau, O. R., and Rousseau, in August 1835, Ambroise in May 1840, and Jean Jacques Alexandre le jeune in October 1843.  They also had a son named Pierre Ignace, called P. Ignace and Ignace.  Their daughter may have married into the Dupré family.  Antoine Émile died probably at Pointe Émile Mouton in March 1865; he was 58 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, the following September.  Was his death war-related? 

9a

Alcide may have married fellow Acadian Amelia Broussard in Lafayette Parish in the early 1850s, and remarried to Aurelie or Aurelia, daughter of French Creole Lasty Dupré, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1855.  Their son Antoine Alcide was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1858, Cornelius Ambroise in October 1859 but died at age 9 in November 1868, and Joseph was born in July 1864.  Alcide died in Lafayette Parish in January 1865; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Alcide died "at age 36 yrs.," but he was only 34; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in March.  Was his death war-related? 

9b

Onésime Rousseau married Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian André Martin, fils, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1857.  Their son Valéry Rousseau, called V. R., was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1859 but died at age 8 (the recording priest said 10) in September 1867, Alcée was born in April 1863, David in March 1865, and André in June 1867.  Onésime Rousseau died in Lafayette Parish in October 1867; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial and who called him Rousseau did not bother to give any parents' names, mention a wife, or even give Onésime Rousseau's age at the time of his death; he would have been only 32 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December.  One can only imagine Clarisse Martin's heartache during that terrible autumn of 1867. 

9c

Pierre Ignace married Arsène, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Martin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1864.  Their son Émile Ignace was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1866, and Jean Jacques Rousseau in June 1868. 

9d

Ambroise married Marie Lodoiska, called Lodoiska, daughter of Adam Rhiel, Rhul, Ruth, or Baul, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1864.  Josèphe Rhule, perhaps a son, was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1870 (but for some reason the Vermilionville priest who recorded the baptism gave only the mother's name). 

9e

Jean Jacques married Émilie, daughter of French Creole Joseph Beraud, at the Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1864.  They settled near Arnaudville.  Their son Joseph Beraud was born in January 1866. 

10

Césaire, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1809, married first cousin Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian David Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1829; Clarisse's mother, also, was a Borda and Césaire's mother's sister; Clarisse also was sister of Césaire's sister Céleste's husband Joseph Guidry.  Césaire and Clarisse remained near Grand Coteau.  Their son Guillaume or William Césaire, called William, was born in June 1831.  Césaire's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in January 1841, probably in anticipation of his remarriage.  Césaire remarried to Félicienne, daughter of French Creole Barthelemus Dejean and widow of Abraham Andrus, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1841.  Césaire died in Lafayette Parish in July 1843; he was only 34 years old; his postmortem succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse a week after his death. 

William, by his father's first wife, married first cousin Céleste or Marie Lesima, daughter of his uncle Charles Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1852.  Their son Joseph Césaire was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1853, Charles or Joseph Latiolais in August 1857 but died at age 4 1/2 in April 1862, and Joachim William was born in October 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, William served first as captain of Company F of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana; the regiment, in fact, was commanded by William's first cousin, Colonel Alfred Mouton.  William enlisted in Company F in October 1861, when he was 30 years old.  He was promoted to major in July 1862, when the regiment was at Tupelo, Mississippi.  He served on the staff of the 18th Infantry and then on the staff of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, which was created at Simmesport, Louisiana, in November 1863.  (Confederate records also show him as a major on the staff of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, also called the 4th Louisiana Cavalry, raised in South Louisiana in March 1864.)  On 8 April 1864, the same day as the Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana, in which the 18th Consolidated Infantry played a conspicuous role and in which his cousin Alfred, now a brigadier general, was killed in action, William was promoted to lieutenant colonel.  He served as second in command of the Consolidated 18th Regiment, under Colonel Joseph Collins, until the end of the war.   

11

Their youngest son, name unrecorded, died in St. Martin Parish at birth in November 1816. 

Other MOUTONs on the Western Prairies

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link many Moutons in the western parishes with known lines of the family there.  The priest who served the Abbeville parish from September 1856 to January 1866, Father J. A. Poyet, was especially remiss in his recording keeping, though succeeding priests at Abbeville and those at Vermilionville could be just as negligent.  One suspects that some of the Moutons who lived on the prairies during the immediate post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned, and perhaps freed, by members of the family:

Treville, son of Florian Mouton and Katherine ____, died in Lafayette Parish "at age 4 mths." in June 1842.  Was this Florian the same as Jean Florent, son of Jean Frédéric Mouton

Lessaint or Lessin Mouton married Clementine Lapointe and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1840s.  Their son Onésime was born in July 1855.  Their daughters married into the Morton, probably Mouton, and Thibeaux families.  Was Lessaint/Lessin Acadian? 

Antoine Mouton married cousin Madeleine Mouton and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the early 1850s.

Sosthène Mouton married Elisa Prejean and settled in Lafayette Parish by the mid-1850s.  They may have had a son named Émile who died at age 3 in February 1863. 

Osémé Mouton married Caroline Bonnet.  Their son Césaire was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1857. 

Lezima Mouton married Éloi Guidry at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in August 1859.  The priest who recorded the marriage, probably Father Poyet, did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Léon Mouton married Louise Broussard and settled probably in Lafayette Parish.  Their daughter married into the Landry family in 1860. 

Anastasie Mouton gave birth to son Joseph Bob in Lafayette Parish in March 1860.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name nor the mother's parents' names.  Was Anastasie Acadian? 

Azélie Mouton married Marius Guidry at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in April 1860.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Lessin Mouton married Adélaïde Mouton, perhaps a cousin, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in May 1860.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Aspasie Mouton married fellow Acadian Jean Bernard in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in October 1860.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Onésime Mouton married Lesima, Lezima, or Lezinia Baudoin at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in April 1861.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Othanase, perhaps Athanase, was born near Abbeville in March 1866, Jules in May 1867, and Euphémon in April 1870. 

Anastasie Mouton married fellow Acadian Olivier Hébert at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in September 1861.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Belzire Mouton married fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Hébert at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in December 1861.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Jules Mouton died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in June 1862.  He was only 2 years old.  The priest who recorded Jules's burial, probably Father J. A. Poyet, did not give the boy's parents' names. 

Charles O. Mouton married cousin Élodie Mouton and settled in Lafayette Parish by the early 1860s. 

Romaine, also called Auguste, Mouton married Mithelda, probably Mathilde, Plowden or Plowding and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the mid-1860s.  Their son Francis was born near Abbeville in July 1869. 

Lessin Mouton married Mélanie ____ and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Thomas Mouton married Ebert[sic] Mouton and settled in St. Landry Parish by the late 1860s. 

Valéry Mouton married Marie Daigle and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Sosthène Mouton married Eve Philomène and settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Louisa Mouton married Henri Harrington at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in January 1866.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marice married Jean Baptiste Broussard in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in August 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Valérie Mouton died in Lafayette Parish in August 1868.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Valérie died "at age 2 yrs."  Will history ever know who his parents might have been? 

Amus, perhaps Amos, Mouton, fils married Odilia Johnson in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Lezeda or Lezida Mouton married Joseph Pascal in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Alcée Mouton died in Lafayette Parish in November 1869.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Alcée died "at age 10 days." 

Walter, son of Jean Mouton and Marie ____, both deceased, married Mary Colbert, Cobbett, or Codley at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's parents' names.  Their son Émile was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1869, and Amédée in December 1870. 

Marcus, son of Jean Mouton and Adélaïde Mouton, both deceased, married Belzire, daughter of Lessin Mouton, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in February 1870.  Were Jean and Marcus Acadians? 

Louis Mouton married Bernice Trahan.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in April 1870. 

Louisa Mouton married Buck Long in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Célestin Mouton married Mélanie Boudreaux at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in October 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  A daughter had been born near Abbeville in June 1869, so Célestin and Mélanie may have been married civilly before they sanctified the marriage at the Abbeville church. 

Frédéric Mouton married Marie ____.  Their son Euclide was born near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in December 1870. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

A Mouton family who settled near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, during the antebellum period cannot be linked by church records to any Acadian branch of the family:

Richard Mouton married Adèle, also called Harietta, Pikins or Pipkine.  Their infant son, name unrecorded, died near St. Gabriel in March 1837, and Thomas was born in June 1838.  One wonders who were Richard's parents. 

.

Moutons from France, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, came to New Orleans during the late antebellum period, but most of them did not stay there: 

Jean Mouton, a 30-year-old tailor from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cabot out of Bordeaux, France, in December 1848.  With him were "Miss" Mouton, age 25, perhaps his wife, and a 6-month-old child.  They were heading to Texas. 

Joseph Mouton, a 27-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vesta out of Le Havre, France, in November 1849. 

.

Moutons who lived in South Louisiana during the wartime and immediate post-war periods were Afro Creoles once owned, and perhaps freed, by members of the family.  Area church and civil records do not always reveal their ethnicity, but the record keepers sometimes provided tantalizing clues

Clairville, son of Adam Mouton and Victoire ____, married Clementine, also called Lyda, daughter of Acadian Robin LeBlanc, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1864.  Their son Joseph Clairville was born near Lockport in September 1865.   How was Adam kin to the Moutons of the western prairies? 

Sam, son of Marcellite Mouton, married Célestine, daughter of Héloise George, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in December 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's fathers' names. 

Gorelias Mouton, freedman, married Amelina Comeaux, freedwoman, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Célestine, daughter of Jean Mouton and Agnèle ____, married Paul, son of Baube Baube and ____ Patry, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in June 1868. 

Félicité Mouton, freedwoman, married Charles Bernard, freedman, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Elisa, daughter of Charles Mouton and Céleste Bouck, married Eugène, son of Manuel Manuel and Charlotte ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869. 

Elisa, daughter of Jean Mouton and Louise ____, married Joseph, son of Alexandre Alexandre and Aimée ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1869. 

CONCLUSION

Moutons settled "late" in Acadia, but they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them--two brothers and a nephew--came to New Orleans in 1765 from Halifax via St.-Domingue.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where kinsmen from Martinique joined them later in the decade.  In the late 1770s, the nephew and two of his younger cousins left the river and settled on the western prairies.  Their uncle and a cousin from Martinique remained on the river, but neither of those lines survived.  Despite their relatively small numbers and their "late" arrival on the prairies, the Moutons of Chignecto contributed significantly to the development of the old Attakapas region.  Especially influential was Jean dit Chapeau Mouton, founder of the village of Vermilionville, today's city of Lafayette, and his son Alexandre, who was Louisiana's first popularly-elected governor.  No other family exemplified more fully the expression "genteel Acadians."  During the antebellum period, Moutons from all three prairie lines--that of Jean dit Chapeau being the largest--settled in every part of Lafayette Parish, especially at Grand Prairie and Vermilionville and at Carencro, north of the village.  A few could be found in nearby St. Martin, St. Landry, and Vermilion parishes as well.  A significant number of Moutons chose non-Acadian spouses, and many of them married cousins. 

The great majority of the Moutons of South Louisiana are descendants of Sr. Jean of Marseille and Chignecto, but a few of their non-Acadian namesakes lived in the region.  During the antebellum period, at least four Moutons from France, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, came to New Orleans from Bordeaux and Le Havre, but most of them moved on to Texas.  A Mouton family lived near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in the late 1830s and may not have been Acadian.  Moutons who lived on the prairies during the immediate post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned, and perhaps freed, by members of the family.  ...

According to one historian, the Moutons of Louisiana have produced not only a governor, a U.S. Senator, and a Confederate general, but also three lieutenant governors, several U.S. congressmen, state legislators, local mayors, and other political and administrative leaders, as well as military officers, engineers, physicians, and lawyers; they, in fact, take up three double-columned pages of the Dictionary of Louisiana Biography.  They have also produced at least one computer software architect and probably more than their share of public school teachers.  ...

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 702, 1026-27, 2247-48, 2306, 2560-64; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 358; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 11-12; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 2:250, 3:223; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5 (rev.), 6, 10; Joseph G. Tregle, Jr., "MOUTON, Alexandre," in DLB, 587-90; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 335-36; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vol. 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Stanley LeBlanc's <thecajuns.com/acad1764.htm>, "Acadians who arrived in New Orleans in 1764"; Milling, Exile Without End, 41, 42; NOAR, vol. 2; <pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/qc/ristigouche/index_e.asp>; Oubre, Vacherie, 75; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 112-13, 182-83, quote about Jean dit Chapeau & his wife from p. 113; White, DGFA-1, 811, 1238-40; White, DGFA-1 English, 263. 

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne-Charlotte MOUTON 01 1765 StJ, BR born 15 Feb 1764, probably Halifax; daughter of Louis MOUTON & Marie-Modeste BASTARACHE; baptized 2 Dec 1765, New Orleans; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Anne, age 12, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married François-Xavier, son of Joseph THÉRIOT & Françoise MELANÇON, 1780s, probably St.-Jacques; moved to Baton Rouge District
Charles MOUTON 02 1766-68 StJ born c1721, Grand-Pré; son of Sr. Jean MOUTON & Marie GIROUARD; brother of Louis & Salvator, uncle of Jean dit Neveu; married, age 34, Anne, daughter of Pierre COMEAUX & Susanne BEZIER, & widow of Sylvain BOURGEOIS, c1755; deported to GA 1755, age 34?; on list of Acadians at Champflore, Martinique, Jan 1766, with wife Anne COMMEAU, stepson Joseph BOURGEOIS, stepdaughter Anne-Esther BOURGEOIS, & sons Georges & Abraham; arrived LA probably from Martinique 1766-68; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 56, with wife Anne age 55, son George age 21, & niece Marie[-Geneviève] MOUTON age 12; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 4 whites, 0 slaves, 50 qts. rice, 2 qts. corn; died [buried] St.-Jacques 17 Nov 1798, age 87[sic], a widower
Georges MOUTON 03 1766-68 StJ born c1756, GA?; son of Charles MOUTON & Anne COMEAUX; on list of Acadians at Champflore, Martinique, Jan 1766, with parents, step siblings, & brother; arrived LA probably from Martinique 1766-68; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called George, age 21, with parents & cousin Marie[-Geneviève] MOUTON; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & 1 other; married, age 25, Rosalie-Victoire, daughter of Joseph GAUDET & his first wife Marguerite BOURGEOIS, 19 Jan 1781, St.-Jacques
Jean dit Neveu MOUTON 04 1765 StJ, Atk born c1747, probably Chignecto; son of Jacques MOUTON & Marguerite CAISSIE [ROGER]; nephew of Charles, Louis, & Salvator; exiled to SC aboard Edward Cornwallis or Endeavour Oct 1755, age 8; probably among the Acadians who left SC in early 1756 & returned to the Bay of Fundy region; married, age 16, Élisabeth/Isabelle BASTARACHE, c1763, probably Halifax; arrived LA 1765, age 18; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Juan, with 1 woman in his household; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 30, head of family number 54, with wife Élizabeth age 30, son [Jean-]Frédéric age 8, daughter Silvestre age 6, 3 slaves, 5 cattle, 3 horses, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; on Attakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Juan MOUTON or MUTON; died [buried] Attakapas 17 Aug 1802, age 58[sic]
Jean dit Chapeau MOUTON 05 1765 StJ, Atk born c1754, Chignecto; son of Salvator MOUTON & his first wife Anne BASTARACHE; brother of Marie-Geneviève & Marin; arrived LA 1765, age 11; not in Cabanocé census, 1766; not in Attakapas census, May 1777; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1781, with 10 individuals, 100 animals, & 10 arpents; married, age 29, Marie-Marthe, called Marthe, daughter of Surgeon Antoine BORDA & Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé, 22 Jun 1783, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Chapeau MOUTON, with 3 unnamed free individuals, 3 male slaves, 4 female slaves; on Attakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Juan MOUTON or MUTON; father of U.S. Senator/Gov. Alexandre MOUTON; settled at Grand Prairie & Carencro, Attakapas District; founder of Vermilionville, now the city of Lafayette, 1824; died Lafayette Parish 22 Nov 1834, age 80, buried St. John Catholic Cemetery, Lafayette; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville, as a child with father & brother
Louis MOUTON 06 1765 StJ born c1737, probably Chignecto; son of Sr. Jean MOUTON & Marie GIROUARD; brother of Charles & Salvator, uncle of Jean dit Neveu; fled to Restigouche fall 1755, age 18; married Marie-Modeste, daughter of Jean BASTARACHE & Angélique RICHARD of Port-Royal & younger sister of brother Salvator's wife Anne, 24 Oct 1760, Restigouche; captured by the British 1760 & imprisoned with brother Salvator in Fort Edward, Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, 1761-62; arrived LA 1765, age 28; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Luis, with 1 woman in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 40, with wife Marie[-Modeste] age 44, son David age 7, daughters Anne[-Charlotte] age 12, & [Marie-]Élizabeth age 3; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 5 unnamed whites, 0 slaves, 10 qts. rice, 15 qts. corn
Marguerite-Françoise MOUTON 07 1765 StJ, Atk? born 20 Nov 1765, New Orleans; daughter of Jean dit Neveu MOUTON & Élisabeth/Isabelle BASTARACHE; baptized 25 Dec 1765, New Orleans
Marie-Geneviève MOUTON 08 1765 StJ, Atk born 15 Sep 1765, New Orleans; called Marie; daughter of Salvator MOUTON & his first wife Anne BASTARACHE of Chignecto; sister of Jean & Marin; baptized 2 Dec 1765, New Orleans; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Marie, age 12, with family of uncle Charles MOUTON; married, age 18, Jean, son of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL, 9 Jul 1783, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; died [buried] Attakapas 18 Aug 1784, age 18
Marin dit Capuchon MOUTON 09 1765 StJ, Atk born c1753, Chignecto; son of Salvator MOUTON & his first wife Anne BASTARACHE; brother of Jean & Marie-Geneviève; arrived LA 1765, age 12; not in Cabanocé census, 1766; married, age 24, (1)Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste LAMBERT & Catherine LACROIX of Mobile, 20 Jan 1777, St.-Jacques; moved to lower Vermilion River, Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Marrin, age 24, head of family number 55, with wife Marie age 19, no economics statistics shown; in Attakapas census, 1781, with 4 unnamed individuals, 20 animals, & 5 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Mre. or Min., with 4 or 5 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; on Attakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Martin MUTON; married, age 62, Marguerite of Fausse Pointe, daughter of André BERNARD & Marguerite EDELMEYER of St.-Jacques, & widow of Joseph ROY & Josime LEBLANC, 27 Feb 1815, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; died Mouton Cove, then Lafayette but now Vermilion Parish, Sep 1836, age 82; succession record dated 28 Sep 1836, Lafayette Parish courthouse; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville, as a child with father & brother
Salvator MOUTON 10 1765 StJ born c1733, probably Chignecto; son of Sr. Jean MOUTON & Marie GIROUARD; brother of Charles & Louis, uncle of Jean dit Neveu; married, age 18, (1)Anne, daughter of Jean BASTARACHE & Angélique RICHARD of Port-Royal, 24 Jan 1752, Port-Royal; settled Chignecto; fled to Restigouche fall 1755, age 22; captured by British 1760 & imprisoned with brother Louis in Fort Edward, Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, 1761-62; arrived LA 1765, age 32; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, with 1 unnamed woman in his household; married, age 35, (2)Anne, daughter of Joseph FORET & ______, c1768, New Orleans; died hopital de la Nouvelle-Orleans 9 Apr 1773, age 40; paternal grandfather of Governor Alexandre MOUTON; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville, with sons Jean & Marin

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 23, calls her Anne-Charlotte MOUTON; NOAR, 2:213 (SLC, B5, 109), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Anne-Charlotte MOUTON, gives her parents' names, says her father was Acadian, & that her godparents were Pierre SONGY, militia officer, & Charlotte RILIEUX, wife of Joseph SONGY, scrivener.

For evidence of her marriage to François-Xavier THERIOT, see the endnote to his profile. 

02.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Charles MOUTON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2560, the LA section, calls him Charles MOUTON, says he was born in 1720, gives his parents' names & his wife's name, says she was sans doutte daughter of Jean-Baptiste COMEAUX & Anne-Marie THIBODEAUX, says they were married in c1744 but gives no place of marriage, says he was at St.-Jacques in 1777 with his niece Marie, & list his children as George, born in 1756, but gives no birthplace; White, DGFA-1, 1239, calls him Charles MOUTON, says he was born in c1721 but give no birthplace, gives his parents' names, his wife's name, says she was daughter of Pierre COMEAU and Susanne BÉZIER & widow of Sylvain BOURGEOIS, says they were married in c1755 but gives no place of marriage, says he was at Champflore in 1766 & at Cabahannocer [St.-Jacques] in 1777, & gives his burial information; BRDR, 2:560 (SJA-4, 13), his burial record, calls him Carlos MOUTON, "age 87 years, a widower," gives his parents' names, says they were "of Acadia," but does not mention a wife.  See also Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 600; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 18; De Ville, Acadian Coast, 1779, 24; Oubre, Vacherie, 75.  

Why did he wait so late to marry?  Were he, Anne, & her 2 children by her first marriage, who would have been ages 6 & 4 in 1755, deported from Chignecto to SC or GA?  Charles's younger brothers Louis & Salavator escaped the British roundup at Chignecto in 1755 & found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Perhaps Charles was no so lucky. 

What happened to son Abraham, listed at Champflore in 1766?  When did Charles, Anne, Georges, & Anne's daughter Anne-Esther BOURGEOIS reach LA?  Sometime between 1766 and 1769, the year Anne-Esther married at Cabanocé, is the best we can do with the records we have found.

03.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him George MOUTON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2560, 2562, calls him Georges MOUTON, gives his parents' names, & information on his marriage; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 600, the Champflore list, calls him Georges MOUTON; BRDR, 2:309-10, 560 (SJA-1, 51a), his marriage record, calls him Georges MOUTON, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says all parents were Acadian, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Francois TERRIO & Joseph LEBLANC.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 18; De Ville, Acadian Coast, 1779, 24; Oubre, Vacherie, 75.

04.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Jean MOUTON dit Neveu; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2561-62, calls him Jean MOUTON dit Neveu, says he was born in 1740 but give no birthplace, says his parents were probablement Jacques MOUTON & Marguerite CAISSY, gives his estimated marriage date, lists his children as Jean-Fréderic, born in c1765, Sylvestre in c1768, Madeleine in 1773, died 1785, & gives his death place & date; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:538 (SM Ch.: v.4, #280), his death/burial record, calls him Jean MOUTON m. to Isabelle BASTARACHE, says his parents were Jacques MOUTON & ____, & that he died "at age 58."  See also Milling, Exile Without End, 41, 42; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 11; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 115, 416, 417.

The age given in the Attakapas census of 1777 provides an estimated birth year of c1747, used here.  Arsenault's birth year probably comes from Jean dit Neveu's burial record. 

05.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Jean MOUTON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2561, profile of his father in the LA section, calls him Jean & says he was born in c1755 but gives no birthplace; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2562, his profile in the LA section, calls him Jean MOUTON, says he was born in 1755 but gives no birthplace, give his parents' names, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' names, says her father was a surgeon, that Jean settled at Carencro, & lists his children as Jean-Baptiste, born in 1784, Marie-Modeste in c1785, Marie-Adélaïde in 1789, Joseph in 1791, François in 1792, Marie-Marthe in 1795, Charles in 1797, Louis in 1800, Pierre-Tréville in 1802 but died in 1808, Alexandre was born in 1804, Antoine in-Émile in 1807, & Césaire in 1809, but give no birthplaces; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:80, 585 (SM Ch.: v.2, #114), one of his marriage records, calls him Jean MOUTON, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says his parents were "de la Cadie" & hers were "du Attacapas," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean MOUTON [probably his cousin dit Neveu], Joseph LANDRY, Jean HÉBERT, & Jean GUILBAUT; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:80, 586 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol.3, #26), another record of his marriage, calls him Jean MOUTON, "from the parish of Prission [probably Beaubassin] in Acadie," gives his & his wife's parents' names, calls her father "surgeon," says both fathers were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean MOUTON, "uncle [sic, actually his first cousin]," C. MARTIN, & Alexandre Chevalier DECLOUET.

Why was he not in the Attakapas census of May 1777 with his brother Marin & his cousin Jean dit Neveu?  Where was he then?  Still living on the river?  He does not appear in an Attakapas census until Apr 1781. 

Jean was buried in St. John Catholic Cemetery, Lafayette, behind the cathedral.  His grave stone says that he died on 22 Nov 1834 at age 80 & gives his birth year as 1754, which, according to the age given for Marin in the Attakapas census of May 1777 (24, giving an estimated birth year of c1753), makes Jean dit Chapeau the younger brother of Marin dit Capuchon.  See photo.  Arsenault's birth year of 1755 for Jean only makes him younger. 

06.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Louis MOUTON.

07.  Wall of Names, 23, calls her Marguerite MOUTON; NOAR, 2:213 (SLC, B5, 113), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marguerite-Françoise MOUTON, gives her parents' names, says they were Acadians, & that her godparents were Raimond DUBRUEIL ROSEMONT & Margueritte DUVERGES. 

What happened to her in LA?

08.  Wall of Names, 23, calls her Marie-Geneviève MOUTON; NOAR, 2:213 (SLC, B5, 109), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie-Geneviève MOUTON, gives her parents' names, says her father was an Acadian, places a question mark next to 1765 in recording her birth date, & says her godparents were ____ TRUDEAU & ____ TRUDEAU; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:379-80, 588 (SM Ch.: v.2, #116), her marriage record, calls her Marie-Geneviève MOUTON, gives her parents' names, calls her a minor daughter, gives her husband's father's but not his mother's name, calls him a minor son, says all parents were "of Acadie," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Charles MOUTON, "her tutor" [& her uncle], Jean-Charles BOUDRO, Joseph BABINO, Jean MOUTON [her brother or cousin], & Charles COMMEAU; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:588 (SM Ch.: v.3, #10), her death/burial record, calls her Marie-Geneviève MOUTON m. Jean GUILLEBAUT, but does not give her parents' names or her age at the time of her death. 

09.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Marin MOUTON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2561, profile of his father in the LA section, calls him Marin & says he was born in c1758 but gives no birthplace; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2562, his profile in the LA section, calls him Marin MOUTON, says he was born in 1758 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, details only his first marriage, including his first wife's parents' names, & lists his children as Marin, born in 1781, Marie-Anne in 1782, Salvador in 1784, Marguerite in c1785, Marie in 1789, Julie in 1791, Aspasie in 1795, Louise in 1796, & Joseph-Onésime in 1798, but give no birthplaces; BRDR, 2:560 (SJA-1, 39), the record of his first marriage, calls him Marin MOUTON "of Acadia," calls his wife Marie Joseph LAMBERT "of des Allibamont," gives his & her parents' names, says his & her fathers were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Charles GODET & Paul DUEÉ; Hébert., D., Southwest LA Records, 3:484, his succession record, gives no death or burial date.  See also De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 11.

His estimated birth year is based on the age given in the Attakapas census of May 1777, one of the few enumerations in the area that included ages. 

The brochure that accompanies the Robert Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville, says:  "Marin, it is said, wore a homespun hat called a capuchon, and his descendants became known as Capuchon MOUTONs to distinguish them from descendants of Jean MOUTON, who wore a more traditional chapeau."  A number of church records refer to brother Jean MOUTON as chapeau.  See, for example, Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:638.  And Jean was called simply Chapeau MOUTON in the Attakapas census of 1785.  See De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1785, 12.  However, this researcher has seen no primary source that calls Marin Capuchon

His first wife's parents' names can be found in her burial record, dated 17 Sep 1811, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:560 (SM Ch.: v.4, #715).  She was 58 years old when she died at home "on Bayou Vermillion[sic] at the place known as Petit Bayou."

His gravestone at Mouton Cove reads:  "Marin MOUTON père/Father of Mouton Cove & Capuchin MOUTONs/1758-1836."  See the Martin Guidry essay in <acadianmemorial.org/news.php?id=27>.  The 1758 birth year is from Arsenault, which, sadly, is undocumented.  Vermilion Parish was not carved out of Lafayette Parish until 1844. 

10.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Salvador MOUTON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2560-61, the LA section, calls him Salvador MOUTON, says he was born in c1730 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says they were from Beaubassin, details his first marriage, including his wife's parents' names, says his second wife was Anne, daughter of Joseph FOREST, but does not give her mother's names, & says they married at New Orleans in 1768 but gives no specific date; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171, & Voorhies, Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 425, the record of his second marriage, call him Salvatorre MOUTON, call his wife Anne FORREST, give no date for their marriage but list it under the heading "Married in New Orleans," & give no marriage witnesses; BRDR, 2:560 (SJA-1, 67), his death/burial record, calls him Salvador MOUTON, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.

Who actually was his second wife?  Was she the Anne-Marie FOREST who was the widow of Augustin LANDRY?  

If he died at the hospital in New Orleans, why was his burial recorded at St.-Jacques?

[top of page MOUTON]

Copyright (c) 2007-16  Steven A. Cormier