APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LANOUX

[lah-new]

ACADIA

Pierre Lanoue, "young scion of a noble Huguenot family in France," came to Acadia in c1667 as a cooper after converting to Catholicism.  He was only 19 years old.  When he was 34 years old, he married Jeanne, 17-year-old daughter of François Gautrot, père and Edmée Lejeune, at Port-Royal in c1682.  They had only one child, son Pierre, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1683.  Pierre, père died at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal sometime between 1707 and 1714, in his late 50s or early 60s.  Jeanne died at Annapolis Royal in October 1749, in her mid-80s.  

Son Pierre, fils married Marie, daughter of Laurent Granger and Marie Landry, at Port-Royal in November 1702.  Pierre, fils and Marie had nine children, including six sons, all born at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, who created families of their own.   Only one of their three daughters married, into the Melanson family.  (According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, Pierre, fils, native of Dol in Brittany, France, died at Lorembec, Île Royale, near Louisbourg, in January 1754, when he would have been in his early 50s.  One suspects this was another Pierre Lanoue.)

Oldest son Joseph, born in October 1703, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marie Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in October 1725.  They had to receive a dispensation for "4-4 cons" in order to marry.  

Pierre III, born in January 1706, married first to Françoise, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau l'aîné and Anne-Marie Bourg, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1727, and then to Anne, another daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marie Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in November 1737.  Pierre and Anne had to secure a dispensation for "4-4 cons" in order to marry.  

Charles, born in February 1709, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Landry and Catherine-Josèphe Broussard, at Grand-Pré in June 1729. 

René, born in December 1710, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel dit Lafond Richard and Agnès Bourgeois, at Annapolis Royal in January 1732.  René died at Belle-Île, upstream from Annapolis Royal, in May 1751; he was only 41 years old.  Marguerite did not remarry. 

Honoré, born in December 1713, married Agnès, another daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marie Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in February 1745.  They had to secure a dispensation for "4-4 cons" in order to marry.  

Youngest son Michel, born in February 1717, married Marie-Judith, yet another daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marie Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742.  They had to secure a dispensation for "4-4 cons" in order to marry.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, they settled at Beaubassin, Chignecto.  Two of Michel's sons emigrated the Louisiana. 

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Lanoue could still be found at Annapolis Royal, Grand-Pré, and Chignecto, and perhaps in the French Maritimes.  

~

Three individuals living in the French Maritimes on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, and on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, bore similar-sounding surname:

François Laneau, also Lanaud and Laneaur, married Anne Paris, Hero, Heros, or Heto.  They had at least four daughters, all born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean:  Françoise in February 1733, Anne in June 1735, Marie-Judith in August 1738, and a second Marie-Judith in August 1740. 

Servanne Laman, who Bona Arsenault calls a Lanoue, was born at Petit-Bras-d'Or, Île Royale, in c1730.  She married Pierre Le Gros, a carpenter born at Paris in c1718, and settled at Baie-de-l'Indienne, Île Royale.  When a French official counted them there in April 1752, they had only a single child, daughter Marguerite, age 2.  One wonders if Servanne was the daughter of one of Pierre Lanoue, fils's sons who emigrated to Île Royale. 

Perrine Lanos married François Dauphin.  They settled probably Île St.-Jean and had at least six children.  Perrine became a widow by the fall of 1758. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Despite the large size of the family in Acadia, only two Lanoues emigrated to Louisiana:

Brothers Joseph, age 19, and Pierre, age 18, came to the colony in 1765 with other Acadians from Halifax via St.-Domingue, today's Haiti.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians had settled the year before.  It was younger brother Pierre who established the Acadian branch of the family in the Bayou State:

Joseph LANOUX (c1745-?; Pierre)

Joseph, elder son of Michel Lanoue and Marie-Judith Belliveau of Port-Royal, born at Port-Royal or Chignecto in c1745, followed his family into exile in 1755 and ended up as a prisoner in Nova Scotia in the final years of the war with Britain.  He came to Louisiana with his younger brother Pierre from Halifax in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  In 1769, at Cabanocé, Joseph, a 23-year-old bachelor, was living on lot number 133 on the left, or east, bank of the river.  There was no one else in his household.  He probably did not marry. 

Descendants of Pierre LANOUX (c1746-1817; Pierre)

Pierre, younger son of Michel Lanoue and Marie-Judith Belliveau of Port-Royal, born at Port-Royal or Chignecto in c1746, followed his family into exile in 1755 and ended up as a prisoner in Nova Scotia in the final years of the war with Britain.  He came to Louisiana with his older brother Joseph from Halifax in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  Pierre married Catherine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques LeBlanc of Minas, probably at St.-Jacques in c1770.  Catherine had come to the colony in 1766 from Maryland.  They owned a slave in 1779.  Their daughters married into the Landry, Laudenbach, LeBlanc (French Canadian, not Acadian), Melançon, Mire, and Triat families.  Pierre died in St. James Parish in July 1817; the priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was 72 years old when he died.  Two of his three sons married and settled in St. James and Ascension parishes.  His descendants, with the exception of a great-granddaughter, remained on the river, one of his grandsons settling in Iberville Parish.  Several of his granddaughters and great-granddaughters married Foreign Frenchmen.  

1

Oldest son Simon, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in March 1771, married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadian Joachim dit Bénoni Mire, at Ascension in January 1798.  They must have lived near the boundary between St.-Jacques and Ascension.  Their son, name unrecorded, "recently born," died at St.-Jacques in October 1798, Simon, fils was born at Ascension in October 1798, Augustin in February 1801, Jordan or Jourdain at St.-Jacques in July 1802, Jean Dominique, called Dominique, at Ascension in August 1805, and Romain or Roman in August 1806.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Gassin, Jaume, LeBlanc, and Savoie families.  Simon, père died in Ascension Parish in June 1838; the priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was "ca. 60 yrs." old when he died, but he closer to 67.  Four of his five sons married, but not all of the lines survived.  His sons and grandsons settled in St. James, Ascension, and Iberville parishes. 

1a

Simon, fils married cousin Osite, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvain LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1819; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their daughter married into the Jaume family.  Simon, fils died in Ascension Parish in April 1845; he was only 46 years old.  He probably fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, would have died with him. 

1b

Romain married Marie Émelie, called Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Savoie, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1827.  Their son Simon Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, was born in St. James Parish in 1828, Tiburce near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1832, Romain, fils in Ascension Parish in April 1836 but died at age 12 in January 1849, and Simon Pierre was born in April 1843.  Their daughters married into the Grégoire and Pelletier families.

Bienvenu married Marie Eglantine, called Eglantine, daughter of fellow Acadian Narcisse LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1851.  Their son Charles Eucher, called Eucher, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1856 but died the following November, and Joseph Flavien was born in February 1868.

Simon Pierre married Adeliar or Adelia L., also called Deleria, daughter of Joseph Yarbrough, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Roma was born near Gonzales in December 1867, and Henry Clay in February 1869. 

1c

Augustin married Célestine or Céleste, daughter of Martin Angèle, Anger, Angere, Auger, or Hinger, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in November 1829.  Their son Auguste was born near Convent in September 1830, Félix in Ascension Parish in January 1834, Édouard in January 1838 but died at age 16 months in May 1839, Jean Baptiste in February 1840 but died at age 9 in April 1849, and François was born in February 1843 but died in April.  Their daughters married into the Balso, Gaudin, and LeBlanc (French Canadian, not Acadian) families.  Augustin died in Ascension Parish either in July 1845 at age 44, or in November 1867 at age 65 (the Ascension church, believe it or not, buried him twice!); if he died in November 1867, he would have been a widower.  One of his sons settled upriver in Iberville Parish.  The other remained in Ascension Parish. 

Auguste married Pucherie or Pulcherie, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1853.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son Jim August was born in November 1855, Alphred in August 1865, and twins Joseph Arthur and Louis Albert in January 1869. 

Félix married cousin Marie Eléonore, daughter of John Anger and widow of William Malbrough, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in March 1855.  During the War of 1861, Félix served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Félix's time with his unit was short-lived, however.  He enlisted in May 1861 but was discharged for reasons not revealed in his Confederate service record the following November or December.

1d

Dominique married Sidalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Sylvain LeBlanc and niece of Dominique's brother Simon's wife Osite, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1841.  Their daughter married into the Grégoire family.  Did Dominique father any sons?

1e

Jourdain died in Ascension Parish in September 1845.  He was 43 years old and probably did not marry. 

2

Michel, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in May 1773, married Marie-Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Sonnier, at St.-Jacques in February 1795.  Like older brother Simon's family, they must have lived near the boundary between St.-Jacques and Ascension.  Their son Pierre-Élie, called Élie lejeune, was born at St.-Jacques in February 1796, André-Decomine, called Decomine and Alexandre, in September 1803, Michel Marine at Ascension in April 1805 but died in St. James Parish, age 4, in July 1809, Jacques was baptized at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, age 27 months, in September 1809, Louis Zéphirin was born in Ascension Parish in April 1809, and Jean Casimir, called Casimir, was born in St. James Parish in June 1813.  Their daughters married into the Cazales, Gisclard, Hinger or Anger, and Hymel families.  Michel died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1843; the priest who recorded his baptism said that Michel died at "age 72 yrs."  Four of his six sons married, but one of the line, except for its blood, did not survive.  A granddaughter settled on Bayou Lafourche, but his other descendants remained on the river, in St. James and Ascension parishes. 

2a

Élie le jeune married Marie Apollone or Polonne, called Polonne, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Louis Gautreaux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1816.  Their son Magloire was born near Convent in November 1818, Edmond in November 1820, Paul Aristide, called Aristide, in January 1823 but died at age 13 in February 1835, Zéphirin Anselme was born in April 1827, and Narcisse Trasimond, called Trasimond, in Ascension Parish in April 1829.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Melançon families.  Élie le jeune died near Convent in October 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Élie died at "age 53 yrs.," but he was only 51. 

Zéphirin Anselme may have died near Convent in April 1852.  If so, he would have been 25 years old.  Or he may have died in September 1864 at age 37, though the priest who recorded his burial said that Zéphirin died at age 30.  In either case, he probably did not marry. 

Trasimond married Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Gaudin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in May 1853.  Their daughter married into the Louvière family.  Trasimond died near Convent in October 1855; the priest who recorded his burial said that Trasimond died at "age 27 yrs.," but he was only 24.  Did he father any sons? 

Magloire married Odalie, daughter of French Creole Jean Louis Parent, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1853; Odalie's mother was a Dupuy.  Their son Louis Augustin was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in December 1858, Louis Euphémon in May 1861, Élie Sainteville in October 1863 but died at age one in September 1864, and Joseph was born March 1866.  They were living near Gonzales in the late 1860s. 

2b

Jacques married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Savoie, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1828.  Their daughters married into the Gautreaux, LeBlanc, Marchand, and Martin families, one of them on Bayou Lafourche.  Jacques died in Ascension Parish in January 1868; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Jacques J., as he called him, died at "age ca. 64 years;" Jacques was "only" 60.  Did he father any sons? 

2c

André Decomine married Elise or Lise, daughter of French Creole Nicolas Gisclard, at the the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1829.  Their son André Zéphirin was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1830 but died at age 5 months the following January, André Émile, called Émile, was born in January 1832, Jean Baptiste in January 1841, and Michel le jeune was born in March 1834.  Their daughter married into the Brasset family.  André Decomine died in Ascension Parish in August 1868; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that André D., as he called him, died at "age 75 yrs.," but André Decomine was a month shy of age 65. 

Émile married Virginie, daughter of Anglo-American Bartheleme Hamilton and widow of Marius Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1854, and remarried to Alide, Alzide, or Alcida Thomlett or Tomelette at the Donaldsonville church in March 1864.  Their son Robert Lee was born in Ascension Parish in July 1867.

Michel le jeune married cousin Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadian Arsène Bourgeois, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1864; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Jean Baptiste married Irma, daughter of fellow Acadian Aristide Theriot, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1867.   Their son Jean Adélard was born in Ascension Parish in March 1868. 

2d

Casimir married first cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Donat Landry, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in September 1831; Marie's mother was Casimir's aunt, Marthe Lanoux; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Adam was born in Ascension Parish in June 1836 but died at age 8 months in March 1837, Michel Douradoux, called Douradoux, was born in near Convent in April 1838, a son, name unrecorded, who had been baptized at age 5 weeks, died, age unrecorded, in December 1842, Louis Landry, called Landry, was baptized at the Convent church, age 4 months, in February 1845, Joseph Casimir was born in October 1847, and Louis Benjamin in October 1850.  Casimir died near Convent in December 1858; he was only 45 years old. 

Michel Douradoux married cousin and fellow Acadian Philomène Boudreaux at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1861; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Douradoux died near Convent in October 1867; he was only 29 years old.  He father a daughter who died very young, but did he father any sons? 

Landry married cousin Louisa, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Richard, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for second and third degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Fortune was born near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in May 1870. 

2e

Louis Zéphirin may have died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1852.  If so, he would have been 43 years old.  He did not marry. 

3

Youngest son Élie, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in January 1781, died at St.-Jacques at age 14 in May 1795.  

Other LANOUXs on the River

Area church and civil records, especially during and after the War Between the States, make it difficult to link some Lanouxs on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Jacobum Lannoux married Modeste Savoie at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in February 1864.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

Madeleine Lanoue married Joseph Peytavin at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in November 1866.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

Helena, daughter of Charlotte Thureaud Lanoux, married into the Mire family at Convent, St. James Parish, in February 1867.  One wonders who was Helena's father and who were her maternal grandparents. 

Pierre Lanoux married Victorine Lanoux and settled in Iberville Parish by the late 1860s.  Were they Acadians?  Who were their parents? 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

South Louisiana church records reveal no non-Acadian Lanoue families in Louisiana during the colonial period, unless one counts the Chevalier de Lanoue, who was commandant of the Alibamon District in present-day Alabama, then a part of French Louisiana, during the early 1760s. 

~

During the antebellum period, a family headed by a young French nobleman moved from New Orleans to Baton Rouge:  

Descendants of Marie-Michel-Hippolyte-Louis de LANOUE de VAIR (c1779-1849)

Marie-Michel-Hippolyte-Louis, called Hippolyte and Hippolyte-Louis, son of Count Joseph-François-Louis-Marthe de Lanoue de Vair and Hippolyte-Lessage de Laville, was born at Pontijac, near Toulouse, in the lower Pyrenees Mountains of France, in c1779.  Known as Louis de Lanoue, Count of Vere, he came to North America as a young man during the French Revolution to escape the guillotine.  He married Adélaïde, daughter of Jean Baptiste Marie Colla of Pensacola and New Orleans, probably at New Orleans.  They settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1830s.  Their daughters married into the Corney, Larguier, and Matta families.  Hippolyte died at Baton Rouge in May 1849, age 70, and was buried on May 10.  Amazingly, two of his younger sons, ages 13 and 18, were buried on May 10 and 11, respectively, so one wonders what accident may have befallen them.

1?

Eugène Théodore, born probably at New Orleans, appears as godfather for his sister Lucie Adélaïde at Baton Rouge in June 1834.  He may have died at Baton Rouge in April 1867.  If so, the priest who recorded his burial did not bother to give his parents' names, mention a wife, or give his age at the time of his death. 

2?

Jean Charles, born probably at New Orleans, appears as godfather for his younger brother Alexandre at Baton Rouge in July 1836. 

3?

Hippolyte, fils, born perhaps at New Orleans in c1818, died near Baton Rouge in December 1853.  He was only 35 years old and probably did not marry. 

4

Antoine Émile, called Émile, born near Baton Rouge in July 1831, died in May 1849, perhaps on the same day as his father and younger brother, though he was buried a day after them.  Émile was only 18 years old and did not marry. 

5

Youngest son Alexandre, born near Baton Rouge in May 1836, died at age 13 in May 1849, and was buried on the same day his father was interred. 

.

Joseph Oser, son of Joseph Laneau and Irma Boutte, married Marie Erasie, daughter of Acadian Norbert Dugas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1858.  Were Joseph Oser and his father French Creoles or Foreign French? 

CONCLUSION

Lanoues settled early in Acadia and were a large family there, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana, but they remained a relatively small family in the Bayou State.  Two brothers, Joseph and Pierre Lanoue, came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where only Pierre created a family of his own.  His descendants, except perhaps for a great-granddaughter, remained on the Acadian Coast.

Non-Acadian Lanoues do not appear in South Louisiana church records during the colonial period.  However, a Frenchman named de Lanoue de Vair, son of a count from the lower Pyrenees, settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1830s.  He and his two teenage sons died on a terrible day in May 1849, but he had older sons who could have carried on the line in the Bayou State.  A Laneau, probably Foreign French, appeared along Bayou Teche during the 1850s. 

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Lanouxs of the old Acadian Coast participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  None of them appears on either of the slaves schedules compiled by the federal census bureau in 1850 and 1860.  As wartime and post-war church records reveal, some of the Lanouxs of Ascension Parish settled in the Gonzales area, away from the river and its incomparable soil deposits, so they did not live in a location that was conducive to plantation agriculture. 

Only a few Lanouxs served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65. ...

In Louisiana, the Acadian family's name evolved from Lanoue to Lanoux and also is spelled D'Anous, Laneaux, Lanneau, Lannoux, Lanoir, Lanoire, Lanore, Lanorie, Lanou, LaNoüe, Lanue, Lenoux.  These Acadians should not be confused with French Creoles and Afro Creoles with similar-sounding surnames, such as Lanau, Lanaud, Lanausse, Lanaux, Laneau, Laneaux, Laneur, Lanon, Lannon, Lanoesse, Lanois, Lanoix, Lanos, Lanoy, and Lanusse, some of whom, like the Lanoixs, settled near the Lanouxs and married Acadians. 

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 628-34, 2028, 2031, 2535; Carl A. Brasseaux & Michael J. Leblanc, "Franco-Indian Diplomacy in the Mississippi Valley 1754-1763: Prelude to Pontiac's Uprising?," p. 337, in Conrad, ed., The French Experience in LA; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 274-75; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-B, 2-B, 2-C, 6; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 204, 249; Milling, Exile Without End, 30-32, source of quotes; NOAR, vols. 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 46; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 545; White, DGFA-1, 958-60; White, DGFA-1 English, 204.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Atakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Joseph LANOUX 01 1765 StJ born c1745, Port-Royal or Chignecto; son of probably Michel LANOUX & Marie-Judith BELLIVEAU; brother of Pierre; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with widowed mother?; arrived LA 1765, age 20, with his brother; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 133, left [east] bank, called Joseph LANOUE, age 23, listed singly so still a bachelor; probably did not marry
Pierre LANOUX 02 1765 StJ, Asc born c1746, Port-Royal or Chignecto; son of probably Michel LANOUX & Marie-Judith BELLIVEAU; brother of Joseph; arrived LA 1765, age 19, with his brother; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Pedro, with no one else in his household; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 130, left [east] bank, called Pierre LANOUE, age 22, listed singly so still a bachelor; married Catherine, daughter of Jacques LEBLANC & Catherine-Marie-Josèphe FORET, c1770, probably St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 30, with wife Catherine age 25, sons Simon age 6, Michel age 4, & daughter Marianne age 18 mos.; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Pierre LANOUE, with 6 unnamed whites, 1 slave, 4 qts. rice, 40 qts. corn; in JUDICE's Company, Acadian Coast Militia, Aug 1779, called Pierre LANOUE, fusileer; died [buried] St. James Parish 19 Jul 1817, age 72[sic]

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 21, calls him Joseph LANOUE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2535, calls him Joseph LANOUE, says he was born in 1743, that he was probablement son of Michel [LANOUE] & Marie-Judith BELLIVEAU of Port-Royal, that he occupied lot number 133 on the east side of the Mississippi at St.-Jacques in 1769, & mentions no wife or children.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 178.  

He seems to have disappeared from the records after being counted at Cabanocé in 1769.  Did he die young?  There is no evidence in the church records of St. James & Ascension parishes that he ever married & fathered children.

02.  Wall of Names, 21, calls him Pierre LANOUE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2535, calls him Pierre LANOUE, says he was born in 1747, that he was probablement son of Michel [LANOUE] & Marie-Judith BELLIVEAU of Port-Royal, that he married Catherine LEBLANC, born in 1752, but give no date or place of marriage, says he occupied lot number 130 on the east side of the Mississippi at St.-Jacques in 1769, & list his children as Simon, born in 1771, Michel in 1773, Marianne in 1775, & Euphrosine in 1778, but gives no birthplaces; BRDR, 3:519 (SMI-8, 30), his death/burial record, calls him Pierre LANOUE, "nat. Acadia," does not give his parents' names or mention a wife, & says he was 72 years old at the time of his death.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 178.  

His & Catherine's approximate wedding year, à la Bona Arsenault, is based on the baptismal date--Mar 1771--of oldest child Simon.  She would have been 20 years old in 1770.  

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Copyright (c) 2007-16  Steven A. Cormier