BOOK ELEVEN:  The Non-Acadian "Cajun" Families of South Louisiana

 

INTRODUCTION

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK THREE:     Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats"

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:        The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK TEN:          The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

BOOK TWELVE:  Acadians in Gray

 

The Non-Acadian "Cajuns" of South Louisiana

Soon after Acadian exiles reached Louisiana they wasted little time taking wives and husbands from among the non-Acadian families living in the colony.  The earliest recorded marriage in Louisiana between an Acadian and a non-Acadian--what sociologists call exogamy--occurred on 17 January 1766, almost exactly two years after the first Acadian exiles reached the colony.  At New Orleans, Rose Thibodeau, widow of Claude Richard, married Jacques LaChaussée, fils from Côte-de-Beaupré, just below Québec.  A native of Pointe-Beauséjour, Chignecto, Rose had come to the colony from Halifax via French St.-Domingue a few month earlier.  The couple settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Rose died soon after the marriage, perhaps from the rigors of childbirth, and Jacques remarried to Acadian Marie-Marthe LeBlanc at Cabahannocer in early February 1768.01 

In the decades that followed, non-Acadians who married Louisiana Acadians included not only French Canadians, but also French, Italian, Swiss, German, Spanish, and Anglo-American immigrants, as well as créoles of those nationalities.  During the colonial period, some of the progenitors of these non-Acadian families had come to Louisiana from Maryland and France with Acadian spouses.  Some had come to the colony before the Acadians, while others came after and chose to live in Acadian communities.  Members of many of these polyglot families eagerly married their Acadian neighbors, contributing to the creation of an exotic new culture--the "Cajuns" of South Louisiana:02 

Adam

Barras

Baudoin

Begnaud

Blouin

Bonin

Caillouet

Caruthers/Credeur

William Caruthers of Carolina, born in c1740, moved to New Jersey while still a young man and married Elizabeth, daughter of ____ Bickham and Elizabeth Hamton, at Deptford Township, Gloucester County, in June 1761.  Elizabeth was a native of New Jersey, and her mother evidently was a widow at the time of the marriage.  The couple's oldest son James married Elizabeth Saunders at Deptford in May 1785.  William and Elizabeth also had sons named Thomas, born probably at Deptford in c1764; and David in c1766.  They also had three daughters:  Sarah, born in c1773 probably at Deptford; Mary; and Marguerite.  Sometime in the early 1790s, William, Elizabeth, their younger sons and youngest daughter emigrated to Spanish Louisiana.  One suspects they were among the two dozen Anglo Americans lured to the Spanish province by Henri-Marie Peyroux de la Coudronière, who was at Philadelphia in 1792 recruiting settlers for Governor Carondelet.  Despite their Protestant religion, William and his family settled at Carencro in the Attakapas District, surrounded by Acadian and Creole Catholics.  When William took his family to Louisiana, older daughters Sarah and Mary remained in New Jersey, where they married Richard Apes and Peter Sutter, respectively.  William's oldest son James and his wife Elizabeth, meanwhile, resettled in New York state, where their son James Samuel, called Samuel, was born in c1792; and James, Jr., in October 1796.  They also had a daughter named Sally or Sarah, born in New Jersey; and another son, William. 

William, the family's progenitor, died at his home at Carencro in April 1808, age 68.  By then, his sons Thomas and David and daughter Marguerite had established their own families in the Carencro area. 

Third and youngest son David married Élisabeth- or Isabelle-Eulalie, daughter of Acadians Joseph Dugas and his first wife Anastasie Henry and widow of Joseph Prejean, probably at Carencro in October 1793.  Isabelle, a native of St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, France, came to Louisiana with her father, stepmother, and eight siblings aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, in August 1785.  She was one of the few passengers from her ship to move from upper Bayou Lafourche to the western prairies, where she married her first husband at Attakapas in June 1786 when she was age 20.  She gave him at least one son and a daughter before his death.  Isabelle was age 25 at the time of her remarriage to David, who would have had to convert to Catholicism to marry her.  He was age about 27 when they married.  Their son Julien was born at Carencro in December 1796; David Onésime, called Onésime, in June 1799; daughter Marie Arthémise in November 1801; son John Marcellin, called Marcellin, in March 1804 but died at age 2 in March 1806; Jean Arvillien, called Arvillien, was born in October 1806; and Louis in January 1809.  They also had an older daughter named Louise, who married François, son of Acadians Jean Bernard and Marguerite Broussard of Carencro, probably at Carencro in April 1812.  Louise died at Carencro in March 1813, perhaps from the rigors of childbirth.  Meanwhile, her mother Isabelle Dugas died at Carencro in September 1810, age 42.  Her father David, now in his late 40s, remarried to Marguerite Lise, daughter of Acadians Jean Savoie and Marguerite Boutin and widow of Charles Peck, probably at Carencro in November 1813.  Their daughter Marie Silvanie was born probably at Carencro in October 1814; Marguerite Louisa in May 1818; an unnamed son died at birth in March 1821; Amelanie was born in February 1824; and Marie Mélaïde, called Mélaïde, was born posthumously in July 1826, nine months after her father's death.  David died at two o'clock in the morning on 31 October 1825 probably at Carencro, age 59 or 60.  His succession records were filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1826 and August 1827. 

David Caruthers's children by both of his wives created their own families in the Carencro area, which included the southeast corner of St. Landry Parish.   Most of David's children married Acadians.  Oldest son Julien, at age 22, married Céleste, daughter of Acadians Sylvestre Mouton and Susanne Comeaux, probably at Carencro in October 1818.  Their daughter Marguerite Arthémise was born probably at Carencro in c1817; Marie Arthémise in September 1819; and son Julien, fils in December 1820.  On the same day in October 1818 and probably at the same place, David and first wife Isabelle's second son Onésime, at age 19, married Marguerite Emerente, daughter of Acadians Frédéric Mouton and Anastasie Cormier.  Céleste and Marguerite Emerente Mouton were first cousins.  Onésime remarried to Marie Sidalise, daughter of Acadians Dominique Prejean and Marie Savoie, at Grand Coteau in January 1827.  Their son Louis Damonville was born near Grand Coteau in October 1827 but died at age 6 in August 1834, daughter Marie was born in April 1829 but died at age 1 in April 1830, son Pierre Neuville was born in May 1831, Onésime Dupréville in February 1833 but may have died at age 7 in September 1840, Charles Wilson was born in September 1835, daughter Marie Lezime or Lezima in October 1836 but died at age 6 in August 1843, Marie Célestine or Céleste was born in March 1841 but may have died at age 3 in August 1844, and Marie Coralie was born in July 1843.  David and Isabelle's daughter Marie Arthémise, at age 18, married Jean-Baptiste, son of French Creole Jean Baptiste Neraut and his Acadian wife Félicité Prejean, at nearby Grand Coteau in December 1819.  David and Isabelle's fourth son Jean Arvillien, at age 21, married Marie Louise, daughter of Acadians Jean Thibodeaux and Marie Louise Broussard, at Grand Coteau in October 1827.  Their daughter Aurelia was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1828, son Jean Aurelien in November 1830, Euclide in January 1833, David le jeune in April 1835, and Onésime le jeune was baptized at age 2 in September 1839.  Julien, Sr. remarried to Marguerite Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of Acadians Jean Bernard and Marguerite Broussard and widow of Alexandre Guilbeau, at Grand Coteau in March 1845.  Julien, Sr. died near Grand Coteau in December 1853, age 57.  David and Isabelle's fifth and youngest son Louis married Elisa, daughter of Acadian Augustin Boudreaux and his German-Creole wife Françoise Ritter and widow of Jean Achille Prejean, at Grand Coteau in December 1849.  Louis was age 40 at the time of the wedding, so one wonders if this was a remarriage for him as well.  His and Elisa's son Louis D. was born in c1852 but died at age 6 in January 1858, and daughter Aselie was born in June 1855.  Louis died near Grand Coteau in May 1856, age 47.  David and second wife Marguerite Lise Savoie's fourth and youngest daughter Mélaïde married Jacob Caruthers, perhaps a cousin, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1846.  Julien, Jr., by his father's first wife Céleste Mouton, married cousin Eliza or Elisa, daughter of Acadians Alexandre Babineaux and Marie Cléonise Dugas, at Grand Coteau in July 1843.  Their son Aurelien was born in December 1845, daughter Emelina in January 1849 but died at age 1 in September 1850, and son Thelesmar was born in August 1851.  They also had an older daughter named Marie Émelie.  Julien, Jr. remarried to Adélaïde, daughter of Anglo American James Bruce or Brousse and his Acadian wife Marie Richard, at Grand Coteau in June 1854.  Their son Julien III was born in February 1856, Louis in October 1857 but died at age 1 in November 1858, and daughter Marie Josette was born in December 1858 but died at age 1 in December 1859.  Julien, Jr. died near Grand Coteau in November 1859, age 38.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse within a week of his burial.  Julien, Sr.'s oldest daughter Marguerite Arthémise, by first wife Céleste Mouton, married Onésime, son of Acadians Jean Baptiste Richard and Élisabeth Cormier and widower of Delphine Thibodeaux, at Vermilionville in May 1837 and became a widow in July 1851.  Julien, Sr.'s second daughter Marie Arthémise, by first wife Céleste Mouton, married first cousin Onésime, son of Jean Baptiste Neurat and her paternal aunt Marie Arthémise Caruthers, at Grand Coteau in December 1852.  Onésime's daughter Marie Coralie, by second wife Marie Sidalise Prejean, married Marcel Galbert, son of Acadian Simon Méance Broussard and his French-Creole wife Octavine Bonin, at Grand Coteau in October 1859.  Julien, Jr.'s daughter Marie Émelie, by first wife Elisa Babineaux, married cousin Dejean, son of Acadians Jean Lessaint Dugas and Marguerite Azélie Broussard, at Vermilionville in May 1860.

By the late antebellum period, David Caruthers's sons were doing well on their farms, vacharies, and plantations in Lafayette and St. Landry parishes.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted seven slaves--five males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 10 to 1--on Julien, Jr.'s farm in the parish's Western District.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted four slaves--two males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 25--on Onésime's farm in the parish.  The same census taker counted 10 slaves--five males and five females, all of them black, ranging in age from 35 to 2--on Louis's farm next to older brother Onésime.  The same census taker counted 20 slaves--10 males and 10 females, 13 blacks and seven mulattoes, ranging in age from 70 to 2--on Julien, Sr.'s plantation next to younger brother Louis's farm.  Sometime in 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted seven slaves--two males and five females, all black, ranging in age from 44 to 3--on Onésime's farm in the parish.  The same federal census taker counted 15 slaves--11 males and four females, six blacks and nine mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 2--on Margaret A Caruthers's farm in the parish.  This likely was Julien, Sr.'s second wife and widow, Marguerite Azélie Bernard.  The same federal census taker counted two slaves--a 16-year-old black males and an 11-year-old black female--in Mélaïde Caruthers's household next to Margaret A.  This could have been Julien, Sr.'s youngest half-sister, who likely was a widow as well. 

William and Elizabeth's second son Thomas, at age 40, was baptized into the Roman Catholic faith in June 1804 on the eve of his marriage to Rosalie Clara, daughter of French Canadian Jean-Baptiste Jeannot and his Acadian wife Marguerite Hébert, probably at Carencro.  Their son Joseph was born probably at Carencro in November 1805; daughter Marie Clémence, called Clémence, in September 1807; and son Hypolite in February 1822.  Thomas, a widower, died in Lafayette Parish in November 1822.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Thomas was age 50 when he died, but he likely was closer to 58.  Daughter Clémence married Onésime, son of Anglo American William Gilchrist and his Acadian wife Marguerite Savoie, at Vermilionville in June 1825.  Thomas's son Joseph died in Lafayette Parish in November 1827, age 22, probably still a bachelor at the time of his death.  

William and Elizabeth's youngest daughter Marguerite married Jean, son of Acadians Augustin Boudreaux and Judith Martin of Opelousas, probably at Carencro in September 1806. 

During the 1810s and early 1820s, William and Elizabeth's oldest son James and oldest daughter Sarah joined their siblings on the western prairies of South Louisiana.  James's line was as prolific as his brother David's. 

James, Sr.'s son Samuel married Victoire, daughter of French Canadian Augustin Royer and his Acadian wife Victoire Cormier of nearby La Prairie Basse, at Carencro in February 1816, the first indication that this line of the family had moved from the northeastern United States to South Louisiana.  Samuel and Victoire's son Samuel, Jr. was born probably at Carencro in March 1817; Victorin in July 1818; Guillaume dit William in March 1820; Onésime in January 1823; an unnamed child died 13 days after his or her birth in December 1824; daughter Marie Caroline, called Caroline, was baptized at age 2 months in July 1826; son Sosthène was born in June 1828; daughter Uranie was baptized at age 12 months in July 1831 on the eve of her death; son Edmond was born in August 1832; Césaire was baptized at Vermilionville at age 1 in April 1836; and another unnamed child died 2 days after his or her birth in January 1837.  James, Jr. was baptized a Roman Catholic in November 1816 at age 22.  James, Sr.'s son William evidently married French Creole Marie Jeanne Carrière in the 1810s and fathered a son named Célestin William.  James, Jr. married Marcelline, also called Carmelite and Émilie, daughter of Acadian Charles LeBlanc and his Spanish-Creole wife Marie Quintero, at Grand Coteau in July 1819.  James, Jr. remarried to German Creole Émilie Hoffpauir a few years later.  James, Jr.'s daughter Céleste, by his first wife, was born near Grand Coteau in August 1820, and daughter Arvenie, by his second wife, was baptized at Vermilionville in April 1826.  James, Sr.'s daughter Sally married fellow Anglo American James Jenkins of Maryland in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1822 and settled in Lafayette Parish, where her succession record, which called her Sarah, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August 1838; one wonders if it was post-mortem.  James, Sr.'s son William remarried to fellow Anglo American Margaret Rosana Hamilton, widow of ____ Carpenter of Vincennes County, Indiana, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in March 1824.  James, Sr.'s succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in October 1830; one wonders if it was post-mortem.  A succession record for William Caruthers was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in September 1833; one wonders if this was James, Sr.'s son William and if it was a post-mortem document.  James, Jr.'s daughter Céleste, by first wife Marcelline LeBlanc, married Joseph, son of Acadian Joseph Melançon and his FrenchCreole wife Marie Ledoux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1836.  Samuel's son Victorin married Elizabeth, daughter of Anglo Americans Isaac Halloway and Adelaide Baird, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in July 1837.  Their daughter Eliza was baptized at Vermilionville at age 2 months in February 1840; Marie Azélie, called Azélie, was born in December 1841; son Joseph Haynes in January 1845; daughter Marie Victoria in July 1847; and Elvina in February 1850.  Evidently Samuel's son Samuel, Jr., called Samuel John by the recording priest, married Julienne Clément, probably a French Creole, in St. Landry Parish.  Their son Samuel Césaire was born near Mermentau in December 1837, daughter Marie Zelienne in January 1845, Marguerite Euremie in March 1847, son Jean Neuville in January 1849, daughter Elodie in July 1851, and Anatalie near Church Point in February 1853.  William's son Celestin William, by first wife Marie Jeanne Carrière, married Léocadie, daughter of French Creoles François Ozenne and Chalinette DeBlanc, at St. Martinville in December 1839.  Samuel, Sr.'s son William married Marie Irénée, daughter of  French Creole Louis Clément and his German-Creole wife Marianne Stelly, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in July 1841.  Their son Lucien was born in May 1842; daughter Marie Marianne in March 1844; son Ursin in June 1846; Israel in February 1849; William, Jr. in January 1851; Athanase near Church Point in March 1853; and Joseph Lessin in February 1855.  Samuel, Sr.'s daughter Caroline married Anglo American Charles Halloway in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1844.  One wonders if Charles was a brother of Caroline's brother Victorin's wife Elizabeth.  Caroline's son Cyprien was born near Grand Coteau in February 1853; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not record the father's name.  Samuel, Sr.'s son Onésime married Oliva, daughter of Isleño Creole Balthazar Placentia or Plaisance, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1845, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in February 1851.  Their son Ignace was born in December 1845, Horace in September 1847, daughter Azelina in February 1850, son Aurelien in January 1852, Joseph Arvilien in November 1854, daughter Marie Anaïs in September 1857, and Henriette Adelaïde in January 1860.  Samuel, Sr.'s son Victorin died near Grand Coteau in September 1850, age 32.  A succession record for Samuel Caruthers, husband of Isabelle Alloway, which would have been Victorin, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in June 1855.  Samuel, Sr.'s son Sosthène married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of Acadians Gerard Babineaux and Eugènie Bourque, at Grand Coteau in February 1851.  Their daughter Marie Amelida was born in June 1855, Marie Eugènie in September 1856, Marie Victoire in May 1858, and Célestine in May 1860.  James, Jr.'s daughter Céleste, by first wife Marcelline LeBlanc, remarried to Onésime, fils, son of Acadian Onésime Trahan and his French-Canadian wife Émilie Primeaux and widower of Adeline Plaisance, at Grand Coteau in January 1854.  Samuel, Sr. died in Lafayette Parish in June 1855.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Samuel died "at age over 60 yrs."; he probably was closer to 63.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July.  Samuel, Jr.'s son Samuel Césaire evidently married Acadian Marie Julie, called Julie, Comeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1856.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage called the groom simply Samuel but did not give the bride's or the groom's parents' names.  Their son Joseph Olivier was born near Grand Coteau in November 1856, and daughter Marie Odelia near Church Point in January 1858.  Samuel, Sr.'s son William remarried to Celima, daughter of Acadian Hippolyte Thibodeaux and his German-Creole wife Arsène Brandt, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1856.  Their son Joseph was born near Grand Coteau in April 1858.  Samuel, Sr.'s daughter Caroline remarried to Joseph, another son of Onésime Trahan and Émilie Primeaux, at Church Point in November 1858.  Victorin's daughter Marie Azélie married Acadian Augustave, called Gustave, Breaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1858, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church the following March.  Samuel, Sr.'s son Césaire married Célestine, daughter, perhaps, of Acadian Anselme Doucet and his second wife Adélaïde Venable, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1859.  Their son Césaire, Jr. was born near Church Point in November 1860.  Eliza, perhaps Victorin's daughter, married Acadian Joseph Breaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1859.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's or the groom's parents' names. 

William and Elizabeth's oldest daughter Sarah's "natural son" John was baptized at Grand Coteau in February 1827 at age 9, so she, too, had joined the family on the western prairies.  John, called Jean by the recording priest, married Céleste, daughter of Acadians Jean Bourg and Marguerite Richard, at Vermilionville in May 1836.  Céleste died probably at Carencro in April 1839, age 31.  John, again called Jean by the recording priest, remarried to Adélaïde, daughter of Acadian Charles Hébert and his French-Creole wife Pélagie Dumesnil, at Vermilionville in February 1840.  Their daughter Élisabeth was born in February 1841, Céleste in July 1843 but died at age 4 in August 1847, son Louis was born in May 1842, and Jean Joseph in April 1849.  John seems to have remarried again--this would have been his third marriage--to Acadian Euphémie Chiasson in c1855 or 1856, his second wife having died in January 1854 at age 47.  John and Euphémie's son Ignace was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1857, Edgar in February 1858, Eucharis in May 1859 but died at age 1 in June 1860, and an unnamed son died at birth in December 1860.  John's daughter Élisabeth, by second wife Adélaïde Hébert, married Hippolyte, son of Acadians Baptiste Chiasson and Julie Dugas and widower of Divine Nezat and Sidalise Morvant, in Lafayette Parish in June 1859.  In late June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted four slaves--one male and three females, two blacks & two mulattoes, ranging in age from 21 years to 11 months--on John's farm in the parish. ...

Not everyone who carried the name Caruthers during the antebellum period were descendants of William and Elizabeth of New Jersey.  Margaret L. Caruthers, parents' names unrecorded, married fellow Anglo American Alexander Nelson, whose parents' names also were unrecorded, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1835.  On the same day in August 1835, Mary M. Caruthers, parents unrecorded, married Lewis Cyphers in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish.  One suspects that Margaret L. and Mary M. were sisters  Were they descendants of William of Carolina, or did they spring from a different line of the family?  Charles William Caruthers,  described by the recording priest as a couleur libre, or free black, died near St. Martinville in October 1855, age 56. 

During the antebellum period, members of the family began calling themselves Credeur, a gallicizied version of Caruthers.  Southwest Louisiana phone books reveal that the gallized version of the family's name is more common today than the Anglo version.04

Castille

Chauvin

Domingue/Domingues

Dupré

Falgout

Fontenot

Frederick

Fremin

Freoux/Friou

Gaspard

Gros

Hernandez

Himel/Hymel

Huval

Lagrange

LeBoeuf

Ledée/Ledet

Ledoux

Lirette

Malbrough

Matherne

Meaux

Miller

Mollere

Monté/Montet

Morvant

Oubre

Patin

Picou

Poché/Porche

Roth

Rousseau

Roussel

Sevin

Simon

Simoneaux

Teller/Taylor

Toups

Trosclair

Tuillier/Tullier

Verret

Webre

.

Dozens of other non-Acadian families also helped create the Cajun culture:03

Aillet

Albert

Alexandre/Alexandrie

Allemand

Andrus

Angelle

Arnaud

Aubert

Augeron/Ogeron

Authement

Autin

Ayo

Badeaux

Barbier

Barrios

Baye

Beard

Belanger

Belaire

Bellard

Berard

Berthelot

Bienvenu

Blanchet

Blanco

Bodin

Bonvillain

Borel

Borne

Boudeloche

Boudery/Boutary

Boulee/Boulet

Boyer

Brown

Bruce/Bruze

Campos

Cancienne

Cantrelle

Capdeville

Carmouche

Carrière

Cedotal

Champagne

Charpentier

Chatagnier

Cheramie

Darce

Darden

Dartes/Dartez

Daunis/Danos

Dejean

Delatte

Delhomme

Demarest

Derouen

Desormeaux

Dias/Dies

Doré

Ducharme

Duet

Dufrene

Duplantis

Durio

Exnicios

Fabre/Favre

Faulk

Folse

Frugé

Gary

Gatt

Gaubert

Gautier/Gauthier

Gisclard

Gomez

Gonsoulin

Grabert

Green

Grégoire

Guilbert

Guillory

Hamilton

Haydel

Hayes

Henderson

Istre

Janise

Johnson

Joly

Joubert

Judice

Juneau

Labie/Labit

Lacase

Lacombe

Lagarde

Lagrange

Laine

Lambremont

Lanclos

Lançon

Langlinais

Langlois

Lapointe

Lasseigne

Latiolais

Lecompte

Leleux

Lemaire

Leonard

Lessard

Levert

Lopez

Lyons

Maillard

Mallet

Manuel

Marcantel

Marcel

Marchand

Marks

Maronge

Marrionneaux

Mars

Martinez

Matte

Maurin/Morin

Mayer

Meche

Ménard

Migott

Miguez

Missonnier

Moore

Moreau

Navarre

Nezat

Nunez

Parent

Pelletier/Peltier

Penisson

Percle

Picard

Pichoff

Placentia/Plaisance

Pontiff

Prevost/Provost

Primeaux

Reaux

Rils

Ritter

Rodrigue

Rodrigues/Rodriguez

Rome

Romero

Royer

Sanchez

Seguin

Segura

Sellers

Smith

St. Cyr/Cire

St. Pierre

Stelly

Stephen

Stutes

Suarez

Terrebonne

Thomas

Tircuit

Touchet

Triche

Truxillo

Vaughan

Vallot

Vasseur

Viator

Vigé

Villaneuva/Villeneuve

Waguespack

Watkins

Williams

Wiltz

Wood/Woods

.

Among the families of South Louisiana who intermarried with the Acadians were those who bore "Acadian" surnames but whose progenitors were not Acadian.  It was, in fact, the rare Acadian family in South Louisiana who could not acknowledge a Canadian, Creole, or Anglo-American namesake living in the region.  The exceptions were the Arcement, Aucoin, Brasseaux/Brasset, Chiasson, Clouâtre, Doiron, Guidry, Longuépée, Mazerolle, Robichaux, Theriot, Usé, and Villejoin families, for whom this researcher has found no non-Acadian namesakes, other than Afro Creoles, in South Louisiana before 1870.  In some instances, the non-Acadian branch of the family was more prolific than the Acadian one.  Many of the non-Acadians spelled their surnames differently, and some were not even French: 

Acher/Achet/Haché

Allain

Ancelet

Arcenot

Babin

Babino

Barrios

Benoit/Benoist

Bergeron

Bernard

Bertaud/Berteau

Bigeau/Bigeot/Bijeon/Pujo

Blanchard

Boudreau

Bourg

Bourgeois/LeBourgeois

Boutin/Bouton

Braud/Brou

Brossard/Broussard

Clément

Comeaux

Cormier

Crouchette/Crouchet/Crochet

D'Aigle/Daigle

Dantin/Danton

David

DeLaunay/DeLonay/Delonne

DeRoche/Deroche/Derochet/Durocher

Doucet

Dubois

Dugas

Duhon/Dehon

Dupuis/Dupuy

Foré/Forée/Forêt/LaForet/LaForest

Gaudet/Godet

Gaudin/Godin

Gautrand/Gautraud/Gautreau/Gautherot

Giroir

Gusman/Guzman

Granger

Gravois

Guilbau/Guilbeau/Guillebot

Guillot/Guio/Guiot/Guého/Guyot

Harbour

Hébert dit Milan

Henry/Henri/Henrique

Jeanseaume/Johnson

Labauve

Lachaussée

Lalande/Lalondel/Laland/Lauland

Lambert/Lamberti

Landry

Laneau/Lanoue

Leber/Lebert

LeBlanc de Villeneuve

Lebron

Legendre

Leger/Legere

Lejeune

Loubière/Louvière/d'Amour

Martin/Martín

Melançon

Michel

Mire/Lemirre

Moïse

Monlezun

Mouton

Naquin

Orillon

Parr

Pinet

Pitre

Poiré/Poirier/Porée

Poitier/Portier/Pothier/Potier

Préjean

Prince/Leprince

Richard

Rivet

Roger

Roy

Saunié/Saunier

Savoy

Semere

Talbot

Temple/Templé

Thibodaux/Thibodeaux

Trahan/Trahon

Vincent

 

INTRODUCTION

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK THREE:     Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats"

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:         The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK TEN:          The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

BOOK TWELVE:   Acadians in Gray

 

SOURCE NOTES - BOOK ELEVEN

01.  See NOAR, 2:159, 261 (SLC, M2, 21); Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 425; Appendix; Books Eight & Ten. 

02.  Members of the following families married into at least a dozen different Acadian families between 1766 & 1861.  See Appendix; Books Eight, Nine, & Ten.

For details on the créoles of LA, see Book Seven. 

03.  Members of the following families married into at least a half dozen different Acadian families between 1766 & 1861.  See Appendix; Books Eight, Nine, & Ten.

04.  See 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette & St. Landry parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette & St. Landry parishes; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6; Book Eight; Caruthers family sketch. 

William is described as "of North Carolina" in son Thomas's baptismal record, dated 17 Jun 1804, in D. Hébert, 1A:170 (SM Ch.: v.6, #111).  Daughter Sara's baptismal record, dated 24 Apr 1811, in D. Hébert, 1A:169-70 (SM Ch.: v.6, #1169), says William is "from South Carolina," hence the generic description of his native province.  A transcript of William & Elizabeth's marriage contract, dated 22 Jun 1761, at Deptford, NJ, is in D. Hébert, 1A:64, 170. 

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Copyright (c) 2016-17  Steven A. Cormier