APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LABAUVE

[lah-BOHV]

ACADIA

Louis-Noël (de?) Labauve, called Noël, came to Acadia by 1678, the year he married Marie, daughter of René Rimbault and Anne-Marie ____ of Port-Royal.  They settled at Grand-Pré and then at Chignecto before moving back to the Minas Basin.  They had a dozen children, including seven sons, five of whom created families of their own.  Four of their daughters married into the Bastarache, LevronHébert dit Baguette, and LeBlanc families.  One of their daughters, the one who later married an Hébert, had an illegitimate daughter at Port-Royal in 1713.  

Oldest son René dit Renochon, born probably at Minas in c1679, married Anne, daughter of Martin Lejeune dit Briard and Jeanne Kagigconiac, probably at Minas in c1702.  In 1708, Renochon and his family were counted at La Hève on the Atlantic side of the peninsula.  He and Anne had six children, including five daughters, four of whom married into the LeBlanc, Bourey, Tudal, Le Marchand, and Orillon dit Champagne families.  Two of the daughters settled on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, by the 1730s.  Renochon's son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1703, does not seem to have created a family of his own, so only the blood of this family line survived in Acadia.  

Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1681, never married.  He died at Québec in May 1714, age 30.  

François, born probably at Minas in c1683, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard, at either Minas or Chignecto in c1712.  François and his family moved to Chignecto by 1714 and then moved on to Île St.-Jean in the 1730s.  They had six children also, half of them sons.  Two of their daughters married into the Poirier and Héon families.  Only one of François's sons, Louis, born probably at Chignecto in c1716, created a family of his own.  Louis married Marie, daughter of Jean Landry and Claire LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in October 1742.  By the early 1750s, they, too, had joined the rest of his kinfolks on Île St.-Jean.  

Louis, born at Chignecto in August 1684, married Anne La Vache in c1712.  They moved to Minas, back to Chignecto, and then back to Minas again.  They had nine children, including four sons who married into the Benoit, Dubois, Saulnier, La Vache, and Laurent dit Provencal families.  Two of Louis's sons settled at Chepoudy.  Two of their daughters married into the Gautrot and Dubois families.  

Antoine, born at either Chignecto or Minas in c1690, married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Lejeune dit Briard and Marie Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in October 1718.  They moved on to the French Maritimes, settling on Île Royale, where Antoine died in April 1733, age 43.  Three of his daughters married into the Beaulieu, Varenne, and Legendre families.  Son Antoine, fils married into the Vincent family and emigrated to Louisiana in 1765.  

Jérôme, born probably at Minas c1692, did not survive childhood.

Youngest son Jean married Madeleine, daughter of François Levron and Catherine Savoie, at Port-Royal in August 1722. 

In 1755, descendants of Louis-Noël Labauve could be found at Annapolis Royal, Minas, Chignecto, Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family even farther:

The first Acadians in Nova Scotia rounded up by the British in the fall of 1755 were the ones in the Chignecto area, including Chepoudy.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French regulars, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto area Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  ...

Living in territory controlled by France, the Labauves in the Maritime islands escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Le Grand Dérangement caught up to them with a vengeance, however, with the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758.  Later in the year, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on the islands and transported them to France.  The Labauves suffered terribly in the deportation. ...  Louis Labauve, age 16--called Louis La Bore, son of René, on the passenger's list--a surgeon's apprentice, crossed on one of the Five Ships with the family of surgeon Claude-Antoine Duplessis of Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean.  The young apprentice died in a St.-Malo hospital on 15 June 1759, probably from the rigors of the crossing. ...

After the war with Britain finally ended, the Labauves being held in Nova Scotia faced a dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of the previous February stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Chignecto was no longer French territory, and Port-Royal and Minas had been held by the British for half a century.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in Nova Scotia, they could live only in the interior of the peninsula in small family groups and work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the hated oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, no self-respecting Acadian would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they would not remain in old Acadia.  So the Labauves gathered up their money and prepared to leave their homeland.  

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Only two Acadian Labauve families emigrated to Louisiana, 20 years apart.  The first to arrive were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  They reached New Orleans from Halifax in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above the city where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before:

Antoine Labauve of Grand-Pré, age 39, came with wife Anne Vincent, age 27, two young sons, perhaps twins--Jean and Marin, age 6--and nephew Jean-Baptiste Labauve, age 22, son of his brother Charles.  Antoine and Anne had more children in Louisiana.  Jean-Baptiste created a family of his own, not on the river but on the western prairies.  

Descendants of Antoine LABAUVE, fils (c1726-1779; Louis-Noël)

Antoine, fils, son of Antoine Labauve and Catherine Lejeune, was born probably at Grand-Pré in c1726.  He escaped the British roundup of the Acadians in the fall of 1755 and went into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where he married Anne Vincent in c1756.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, he and his family fell into the hands of the British, who held them as prisoners at Halifax.  British officials counted them there in August 1763.  They came to Louisiana via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766 and 1769.  Antoine and Anne had many more children in Louisiana, including sons.  Their daughters married into the Doiron, Legendre, and Vincent families.  (Antoine's daughter Adélaïde married first cousin Louis Legendre at St.-Jacques in December 1785, and at New Orleans in January 1792; Louis's mother was Marguerite Labauve, Antoine's older sister!  Louis and Adélaïde settled at New Orleans.  Adélaïde's daughter Marie, called Maneta, Labauve was born at New Orleans in June 1802 but died in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche, age 12, in October 1814, and son François Labauve was born in the city in July 1803.  Strangely, the priest who recorded the children's baptisms in September and November 1803 did not list Louis Legendre as the father and recorded the names only of the maternal grandparents.  One wonders who the father might have been and what motivated Adélaïde to leave the city and settle on upper Bayou Lafourche.)  Meanwhile, Antoine died at St.-Jacques in March 1779, in his early 50s.  Three of his five sons created families of their own.  Two of them settled at Baton Rouge, another at New Orleans.  Four of his grandsons moved to the western prairies in the early 1800s.  His other grandsons remained on the river, in the Baton Rouge area and in St. James Parish.  His fourth son's line was especially vigorous.  Some of his descendants were living in southeastern Texas during the late antebellum period. 

1

Oldest son Jean, perhaps a twin, born during Le Grand Dérangement in c1759, probably died young.  

2

Marin, perhaps Jean's twin, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Richard, at St.-Jacques in February 1786.  Their son Marin-Joseph, called Joseph, was born at St.-Jacques in July 1787, Adolphe in July 1790, and Antoine at New Orleans in c1796.  Marin died a widower at New Orleans in February 1797; the priest who recorded his burial said that Marin was 35 years old when he died, but he was probably closer to 37.  Two of his sons settled on the western prairies, and the other returned to St. James Parish.  A grandson also returned to the river. 

2a

Marin Joseph married Anne Marine, called Marine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Dupuis, in the 1800s.  Their son Joseph Bernardin, called Bernard, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in May 1809.  They moved to lower Bayou Teche in the 1810s and had more sons there, but oldest son Bernard returned to the river.  

Bernard married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Bénoni Daigle and widow of Pierre LeTullier, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1837.  Their son Damas Cleopha, called Cleopha, was born near Baton Rouge in October 1838.  Their daughter married into the Baron family.

Cleopha married Julienne Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadian François Henry, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1859.  Cleopha died near Baton Rouge in September 1866; he was only 28 years old.  His family line may have died with him. 

2b

Adolphe married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Louis Hébert of Côte aux Puces, or the Flea Coast, near New Iberia, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1812.  They settled on lower Bayou Teche.  Their older son, however, returned to the river, but his family line may not have survived. 

Théodule Clairville of St. Mary Parish married first cousin Marie Irma, daughter of his uncle Antoine Labauve, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1840.  One wonders if they had any children. 

2c

Antoine married Anastasie, daughter of French Creole Alexis Rome, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1824.  Their son Adonis was born near Convent in June 1828, Damanche or Domas in June 1830, and St. Hilaire, called Hilaire, in January 1833.  Their daughters married into the Cantrelle and Labauve families.  Antoine died near Convent in March 1848; he was only 52 years old.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 16 to 4--on Wdw. Ant. Labauve's farm in the parish's Eastern District next to Sébastien Rome; these were the slaves of Antoine's widow, Anastasie Rome.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 8 slaves--4 males and 4 females, 6 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ages 22 to 2, living in 3 houses--on Wd. Ant. Labauve's farm in the parish's Second District on the Left Bank of the river. 

Adonis married Marie Zulma, called Zulma, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Cantrelle, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1857.  Their son Alfred was born in St. James Parish in February 1859.  Adonis died near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1869; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Adonis died at "age 38 years," but he was 41.  A daughter had been born the previous February. 

Hilaire died near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1856.  He was only 23 years old and probably did not marry. 

Domas married Louisa, daughter of Spanish Creole Prosper Plaisance, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in December 1870; Louisa's mother was a Guidry

3

Pierre, born at St.-Jacques in c1767, married Henriette Renée, called Renée, daughter of fellow Acadian Daniel Benoit, at Baton Rouge in February 1793.  Their son Isidore-Pierre, called Pierre, was born near Baton Rouge in August 1796, and Zenon in February 1801.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and Trahan families, and one of them settled on the western prairies.  One of Pierre's sons also settled on the western prairies.  

3a

Isidore Pierre married Élise, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Hébert and widow of Placide Hébert, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1820.  They remained on Bayou Teche.  

3b

Zenon married first cousin Eulalie Élisabeth, called Elise or Eliza, daughter of his uncle Isidore Labauve, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1828; they had to secure dispensation for second degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Adison, Edison, or Olidon was born near Baton Rouge in August 1832, Isidore Labeo near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1847, John Fernand near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in April 1853, and Joseph Alberti in July 1857.  Their daughters married into the Caneza, Haggerty, Lauve, Mille, and Scratchley families. 

Olidon married Ann Pamelia, called Pamelia, daughter of French Creole Thomas Mille, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in April 1853.  Their son Thomas Wilfrid was born near Plaquemine in September 1857, and Paul in October 1859.

4

Joseph-Isidore, called Isidore, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in December 1771, married Jeanne-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Granger, at Baton Rouge in January 1798.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Jean-Ambroise, called Jean-Baptiste, J. B., and Ambroise, was born near Baton Rouge in September 1798, Joseph-Dominique or Dominique-Joseph in August 1799, Pierre-Marie in March 1803, Joseph Isidore, fils in November 1804, Victor in July 1806, Louis Onésime, called Onésime, in July 1814, and Simon in February 1821.  They also had a son named Guy.  Their daughters married into the Derichebourg, Hébert, and Labauve families.  Isidore died near Baton Rouge in February 1824, in his early 50s.  One of his sons settled on the western prairies.  The others remained in West Baton Rouge Parish.  One of his younger sons and a grandson were among the relatively few Acadians who settled in Pointe Coupee Parish.  His oldest son married five times!

4a

Jean Baptiste married Anne Virginie, called Virginie, daughter of fellow Acadian Magloire Dupuis, probably at Baton Rouge in the late 1810s.  Their son Victorin was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1820, Nuan near Baton Rouge in August 1824, and Baptiste Ulysse in September 1828.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Jean Baptiste remarried to Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1835.  They had a son named Numa.  Jean Baptiste remarried again--his third marriage--to fellow Acadian Eurasie Dupuis of West Baton Rouge Parish at the Baton Rouge church in June 1838, and remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Marie Felasie, Ferelie, or Forelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Daigre of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1842.  Their son Jean Alcide was born near Brusly in January 1849.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 11 slaves--6 males and 5 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 43 to 2--on John B. Labauve's farm next to brother Dominique.  Jean Baptiste remarried a fourth time--his fifth marriage--to first cousin Alide or Alida, daughter of Terence Derichebourg, at the Brusly church in February 1858; Alida's mother, also, was a Granger; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry; Jean Baptiste was nearly 60 years old at the time of the marriage.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 14 slaves--7 males and 7 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ages 48 to 2, living in 4 houses--on Jean Bte. Labauve's farm. 

Victorin, by his father's first wife, married Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Daigre of West Baton Rouge Parish and sister of his stepmother, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1846.  Was he the Victorin Labauve who settled in Lafourche Parish by the late 1850s?  If so, he remarried. 

Numa, by his farher's second wife, married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Foret, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1857.  Their son Homer was born near Brusly in May 1858, Jean Olidon in May 1861, and Henri in October 1869. 

4b

Dominique Joseph married Azélie, another daughter of Magloire Dupuis, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1821.  Their son Isidore Dorval or Dorville, called Dorval, was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1821.  Dominique remarried to Dorsille, daughter of fellow Acadian Victor Chiasson, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1829.  Their son Adolphe was born near Baton Rouge in September 1829.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  Dominique remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church in October 1835.  Their son Joseph Isidore le jeune was born near Baton Rouge in July 1836, Joseph in March 1838, Joseph Gilbert was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in April 1840, Joseph Thelesmar was born in near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1849, and Joseph Aristide in February 1853.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 9 slaves--4 males and 5 females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 1--on Dominique Labauve's farm next to brother John B.  Dominique's daughter Ulyssia was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1855, so Dominique may have moved his family there by then.   During the late 1850s, when he was in his late 50s, Dominique and younger brother Victor, who had settled on lower Bayou Teche, moved to the prairies of southeastern Texas.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Jackson County, Texas, counted 8 slaves--4 males and 4 females, all black, ages 46 to 2, living in 1 house--on Dominique Labauve's farm next to brother Victor. 

Dorval, by his fathere's first wife, while a resident of West Baton Rouge Parish, married Émelie, daughter of French Creole Zenon Bergeron, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in August 1842.  Their son Joseph Aloysius was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1844 but died in December, Joseph Dominique Zenon, called Zenon, was born in September 1845 but died at age 5 1/2 in August 1851, Joseph Roselius was born in April 1847, and Joseph Louis Odilon in June 1849.  Their daughter married into the Bueche family.  Dorval died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1852; the priest who recorded his burial said that Dorval died at "age 32 years," but he was only 30.  A daughter was born posthumously in early 1853. 

Adolphe, by his father's second wife, married Marie Séverine, called Séverine, daughter of fellow Acadian Séverin Lejeune, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, January 1848.  Their son Joseph Edgard was born near Brusly in November 1848, and Joseph Alcide in March 1851. 

4c

Pierre Marie married Henriette Coralie, called Coralie, yet another daughter of Magloire Dupuis, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1831.  Their son Simon le jeune was born near Baton Rouge in December 1837, and Joseph Aulim near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1849.  Their daughters married into the Gassie, Hébert, Richard, Saurage, and Thibodeaux families.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 6 slaves--4 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 14, living in 2 houses--on Pierre Labauve's farm; the probably was Pierre Marie. 

4d

Guy married Elisa, daughter of fellow Acadian J. B. LeBlanc, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1832.  Guy remarried to Emma, daughter of French Creole Antoine Serret of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1843; Emma's mother was a LeBlanc.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 12 slaves--6 males and 6 females, 10 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 3, living in 3 houses--on Guy Labauve's farm.  One wonders if he fathered any sons by either of his two wives. 

4e

Joseph Isidore, fils married Hélène, also called Melina, daughter of Jean Baptiste Juge, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1833.  Their son Jules was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1844 but died at age 3 1/2 in August 1847, Louis Albert, called Albert, was born in July 1846 but died at age 8 in September 1854, and Jean Baptiste le jeune was born in October 1848.  They also had sons named Léon and Numa.  Their daughter married into the David (French Creole, not Acadian) and Major families.  Joseph, a resident of Chenal, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1850; he was only 46 years old.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 18 slaves--11 males and 7 females, 6 blacks and 12 mulattoes, ranging in age from 61 years to 8 months, living in 5 houses--on Wdw. Jos. Labauve's farm; these were the slaves of Joseph Isidore's widow Hélène Juge

Léon married Julie, daughter of French Creole Bruno Lejeune, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1857.  Their son Joseph Jules, called Jules, was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1863 but died age 2 in January 1866. 

Numa married Adèle Lelia, daughter of French Creole Lelio Lebeau, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870. 

4f

Victor married Marie Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Dugas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1833.  They lived on lower Bayou Teche for decades before moving to southeastern Texas in the late 1850s.  

4g

Onésime married Doralise, daughter of fellow Acadian Ursin Landry, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1837.  Their son Louis Timoléon was born near Baton Rouge in April 1838, Joseph Simon in March 1840, and Pierre Armant in May 1848.  Onésime died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1849; he was only 34 years old. 

5

Youngest son Paul, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in July 1776, probably died young.  

~

Labauves came to the colony from France aboard at least two of the Seven Ships of 1785.  One settled at Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, but no new family lines came of it:  

Marguerite Labauve, age 55, widow of François Legendre and older sister of Antoine, fils of St.-Jacques, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July.  With her were two sons, ages 22 and 17.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their vessel to Manchac.  

~

Other LABAUVEs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Labauves on the river with known lines of the family there:

Edgard Labove, as the recording priest called him, died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1847.  The boy was only 11 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Edgard's parents' names. 

Deresis Labauve died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1848.  He was only 10 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Deresis's parents' names. 

In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave--a 55-year-old black female--on Wdw. D. Labauve's farm.  Which D. Labauve was this?

Celimen Labauve died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1850.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Celimen died at "age 16 yrs." . 

In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 182 slaves on a plantation owned by "Hotard & Labauve."  Hotard was Alexander Hotard, but who was Labauve

Joseph Horce or Horace Labauve died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1864.  He was only five months old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

Paul Labauve, also called Labove, married Caroline Morgan and settled near Baton Rouge by the mid-1860s.  Was he Acadian? 

Adolphe Labauve died near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any p parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Adolphe died at "age ca. 35 years." 

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

During the late 1760s, Antoine Labauve's nephew, Jean-Baptiste Labauve, left the Acadian Coast, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin, and settled in the Attakapas District.  In c1770, he married and created a western branch of the family:

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE (c1743-1803; Louis-Noël, Antoine)

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, son of Charles Labauve and Marie Hébert, born probably at Grand-Pré in c1743, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755 and became an orphan soon afterwards.  British officials counted him with the family of his uncle Antoine Labauve at Halifax in August 1763.  He followed his uncle to Louisiana in 1765 and settled with them at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  Later in the decade, he moved to the Attakapas District, where he married Françoise, daughter of Acadian resistance leader Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil, in c1769.  Their daughter married into the Benoit and Landry families.  Jean-Baptiste died at Attakapas in February 1803; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean-Baptiste died "at age 65 yrs.," but he probably was closer to 60.  He had only two sons, and only one of them married.  That son also had two sons, but only one of them married.  The grandson had many sons, however, so the line survived.  

1

Older son Jean-Baptiste, fils, called Jean, born at Attakapas in April 1771 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest later that month, probably died young.  

2

Younger son François, baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in May 1776, married Marguerite dite Éloise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Hébert of New Iberia, at Attakapas in June 1795.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their son Placide, a twin, was born in February 1796, and Nicolas in July 1799 but died at age 2 in September 1801.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Landry families.  François remarried to Marie-Angèle, daughter of Jacques Fostin of Illinois and widow of Augustin Trahan, at Attakapas in June 1802.  François's succession was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in April 1835; he would have been in his late 50s that year.  

Placide married Anne, called Annette and Manette, daughter of fellow Acadian Anselme Thibodeaux of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1817.  Their son Placide, fils was born "at Vermilion" in November 1818, David in September 1820, Émile Saule in January 1825, Toussaint was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 1 1/2 months, in October 1826, Celibate at age 10 months in August 1835, and Désiré was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in May 1841.  Their daughter married into the Venable family.   In December 1850, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 12 slaves--6 males and 6 female, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 50 to 3--on Placide Labauve's farm; was this Placide, père or Placide, fils?  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 13 slaves--8 males and 5 females, 4 blacks and 9 mulattoes, ages 55 years to 4 months, living in 3 houses--on Placide Labauve's farm; again, which Placide was this? 

Placide, fils married Marie Nathalie, called Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Drosin Broussard, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1843, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  Their son Théogène was born near Grand Coteau in January 1849, David le jeune in September 1852, Jean near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in May 1855, and Ozémé near Grand Coteau in March 1858.  They also had an older son named Placide III.  They were living near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in the mid-1860s. 

Placide III married Amelia, daughter of Spanish Creole Dominique Gary, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in February 1867.  Their son Joseph was born at Coulee Triffe, now Estherwood, Acadia Parish, in July 1867. 

Théogène married cousin Uranie, daughter of fellow Acadian Béloni Broussard, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1867.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish. 

Émile married Nancy, daughter of Anglo American James Griffin, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1850.  Their son Émile, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1855.

Désiré may have married fellow Acadian Mare Zelima Richard.  Their son Simon was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in September 1866. 

~

During the early antebellum period, four Labauve cousins, including two brothers, moved from the river to the western prairies, adding substantially to that center of family settlement.  They settled on lower Bayou Teche near New Iberia or in St. Mary Parish: 

Descendants of Marin Joseph LABAUVE (1787-1865?; Louis-Noël, Antoine, Antoine, fils)

Marin Joseph, called Joseph, eldest son of Marin Labauve and Françoise Richard, born at St.-Jacques in July 1787, married Anne Marine, called Marine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Dupuis, in the 1800s.  They lived near St. Gabriel on the river before moving to the western prairies in the 1810s.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Marin Joseph remarried to Marie, daughter of Anglo American William Perry of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1822; Marie's mother was a Roger.  They settled on the lower Teche near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish.  Their daughters married into the Etie, French, and Miguez families.  Marin Joseph may have died near New Iberia in April 1865; the New Iberia priest who recorded the burial of "Mr. Labauve" said he died "at age 70 yrs.," but the priest did not bother to mention a wife; if this "Mr. Labauve" was Adolphe, he would have been 78 years old at the time of his death; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following August.  Marin Joseph's oldest son returned to the river and settled near Baton Rouge.  The others probably remained on the prairies. 

1

Oldest son Joseph Bernardin, called Bernard, from his father's first wife, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in May 1809, married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Bénoni Daigle and widow of Pierre LeTullier, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1837.  They remained on the river.

2

Jean Baptiste, by his father's first wife, died at his parents' home on the Vermilion, age 1, in September 1815.  

3

Joseph Émile, called Émile and J. E., from his father's second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1828, married Martha, daughter of William Cobbom, Colborm, or Carmon, and widow of ____ French, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in June 1867.  Their son Joseph Abner was born near New Iberia in October 1869. 

4

Marc Joseph, by his father's second wife, was born near New Iberia in October 1833. 

5

Youngest son Joseph, by his father's second wife, was born near New Iberia in October 1841. 

Descendants of Adolphe LABAUVE (1790-?; Louis-Noël, Antoine, Antoine, fils)

Adolphe, second son of Marin Labauve and Françoise Richard and Marin Joseph's younger brother, born at St.-Jacques in July 1790, married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Louis Hébert of Côte aux Puces, or the Flea Coast, near New Iberia, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1812.  They settled in St. Mary Parish.  Their daughter married into the Curtis family.  Adolphe's older son returned to the river, but his younger son settled in the coastal marshes of what became Cameron Parish.  In 1855, Adolphe, in his mid-60s, testified in a lawsuit over who was the rightful owner of Île Dernière, or Last Island, a popular resort off the coast of Terrbonne Parish; the resort, popular among Teche valley planters, was destroyed by a hurricane in August 1856 with a frightful loss of life. 

1

Older son Théodule Clairville, born in St. Mary Parish in July 1815, married first cousin Marie Irma, daughter of his uncle Antoine Labauve and his aunt Anastasie Rome, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1840.  One wonders if they had any children. 

2

Younger son Théogène, born probably in St. Mary Parish in April 1823, married French Creole Lise Ardoin.  Their son Hermogène was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in June 1852, Léo near Creole, then in Calcasieu but now in Cameron Parish, in June 1853, Alex McDonald in January 1859, Désiré in July 1860, and Joseph Philogène near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in September 1861. 

Descendants of Isidore-Pierre LABAUVE (1796-1848; Louis-Noël, Antoine; Antoine, fils)

Isidore-Pierre, called Pierre, son of Pierre Labauve and Henriette-Renée Benoit, born near Baton Rouge in August 1796, married Élise, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Hébert and widow of Placide Hébert, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1820.  They settled at Le Grand Bois near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish.  Their daughter married into the Arceneaux family.  Pierre's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May 1824, years before he died.  Pierre died in St. Martin Parish in April 1848; he was only 51 years old.  His post-mortem succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following July.

1

Oldest son Pierre Adolphe, called Adolphe, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1820, married Marie Pouponne, called Pouponne, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul David, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in November 1850.  Their son Pierre was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1852 but died at age 2 1/2 (the recording priest said 2 1/2 months) in October 1854, Joseph Thelimpe was born near New Iberia in April 1855, and Eugène in July 1859.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family. 

2

Telesphore, born in St. Martin Parish in September 1822, died in St. Martin Parish at age 11 in October 1833.

3

François Valcour, called Valcour, born in St. Martin Parish in December 1826, married Émilie, probably another daughter of Paul David, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in April 1857, nine years after a daughter was born to them in St. Martin Parish.  Their son François Oscar was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1860, and Demascart in December 1861. 

4

Joseph Théolin, called Théolin, born in St. Martin Parish in July 1829, died in St. Martin Parish in September 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Théolin died "at age 22 yrs.," but he was 24.  He probably did not marry. 

5

Jean Baptiste was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1834. 

6

François Ovide was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1837.  Was he the O. Labauve who held 2 slaves--both of them 22-year-old mulatto males--in the Western District of St. Mary Parish in June 1860? 

7

Youngest son Joseph Livaudais, born in St. Martin Parish in January 1841, married Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Eugène Trahan, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1861. 

Descendants of Victor LABAUVE (1806-?; Louis-Noël, Antoine, Antoine, fils)

Victor, also called Victorin, fifth son of Joseph Isidore Labauve and Jeanne-Marie Granger, born near Baton Rouge in July 1806, married Marie Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Dugas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1833.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Victor remarried to Joséphine Elina or Helina, daughter of French Creole Valcour Gonsoulin, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1844; Joséphine's mother was an Hébert.  They remained near New Iberia until the late 1850s, when they followed Victor's older brother Dominique to southeastern Texas.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Jackson County, Texas, counted 10 slaves--4 males and 6 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 1, living in 2 houses--on Victor Labauve's farm next to brother Dominique. 

1

Oldest son Charles Auguste or Gustave Charles, by his father's first wife, born near New Iberia in November 1838, married Suzanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Sosthène Vincent, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1858.  Their son Sosthène was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1859 but died at age 2 1/2 in February 1862, and Joseph Numa le jeune was born in March 1862.  When his father and uncle migrated to southeastern Texas in the late 1850s, Gustave and Suzanne remained in St. Martin Parish. 

2

Romain Dupré, by his father's first wife, born near New Iberia in February 1841, was granted emancipation by the St. Martin Parish court in November 1859, after he turned 18.  One wonders if this had anything to do with his father's migrating to southeastern Texas in the late 1850s. 

3

Victor Éloi, called Éloi, from his father's first wife, born near New Iberia in April 1843, died the following August. 

4

Victor, fils, by his father's second wife, was born probably near New Iberia in December 1851.

5

Odilon, by his father's second wife, was born near New Iberia in January 1857. 

6

Joseph Numa, by his father's second wife, was born probably near New Iberia in August 1858. 

7

Youngest son Charles William, by his father's second wife, was born near New Iberia in January 1859. 

~

Other LABAUVEs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Labauves in the western parishes with known lines of the family there:

Elina Labauve married French Creole Désiré Judice.  Their daughter married into the Dugas family in May 1870. 

Marie Labouve, as she was called, married Silas Vigé in a civil ceremony probably in St. Martin Parish in June 1847, and sanctified the marriage at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1852.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Rose Labauve, wife of Darcourt Landry, fils, died in St. Martin Parish in August 1855.  She was only 18 years old.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names, but she probably was a daughter of Dominique Joseph Labauve of West Baton Rouge Parish who married on the river and then followed her husband to Bayou Teche. 

Bélisaire Labauve married cousin Marie Élisabeth Labauve and settled at the edge of the coastal marshes near Creole, then in Calcasieu but now in Cameron Parish, by 1850.  Their son William was born near Creole in March 1851, and René in July 1855.  They were still living near Creole on the eve of the War Between the States.

Mérant Labove, probably Méranthe Labauve, married Acadian Osémé Savois, probably Savoie, and settled near Creole, then in Calcasieu but now in Cameron Parish, by the late 1850s. 

Jules J. Labauve died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in January 1862.  He was only 10 years old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give his parents' names. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Two of the Labauves who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche, but no new family lines came of it:

Pierre, son of Jean Labauve and Agnès Sonnier, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1747, followed his family to Chepoudy and then to Île St.-Jean.  In 1758-59, the British deported him to Morlaix, France, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Brun of Chignecto and Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in  September 1770.  They went to Poitou in the early 1770s and then retreated to Nantes after the Poitou venture failed.  Pierre remarried to Anne or Jeanne, daughter of Frenchman François Bonfils of St.-Martin-de-Cheix and widow of Jean Dugas, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in October 1784.  They and a son by her first marriage came to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, which reached New Orleans in September.  Pierre and his first wife had a number of children in France, but they all died young.   He had no children by his second wife, so this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Pierre's sister Marie Labauve, whose name appears on none of the Seven Ships passenger lists but who also came to the colony in 1785, age unrecorded, probably joined her brother on Bayou Lafourche. 

~

During the late antebellum period, a Labauve, probably from the river, created a family line, finally, on Bayou Lafourche:

Descendants of Victorin LABAUVE (1820-; Louis-Noël, Antoine, Antoine, fils, Joseph-Isidore)

Victorin, son of Jean Baptiste Labauve and his first wife Anne-Virginie Dupuis, born in Iberville Parish in September 1820, married Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Daigre of West Baton Rouge Parish and sister of his stepmother, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1846.  Augustine died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1847; she was only 22 years old.  Victorin may have remarried to Amelia or Émelia Bélagie, probably Pélagie, Ansoward or Enswart and settled in Lafourche Parish by the late 1850s.

1

Older son John William was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1858.

2

Robert Isaac Moïse was born in Lafourche Parish in April 1860. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Church records reveal no non-Acadian Labauves living in Louisiana during the colonial period.  However, a Frenchman with the name lived on the Acadian Coast during the early antebellum period:

Alexis Thibout Joseph Labauve, "nat. of the Diocese of Poiteau[sic] in France," died near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1813.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Alexis was "age 64" when he died.  No Acadian Labauve would have been born in Poitou in c1749.  If Alexis had reached Louisiana not long before his death, his neighbors would have called him a Foreign Frenchman.  

CONCLUSION

The Labauves settled early in Acadia, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  In 1765, Antoine Labauve, fils, his wife, two sons, and a nephew reached New Orleans from Halifax and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  The nephew, Jean-Baptiste Labauve, moved to the Attakapas District in the late 1760s, married, and started a western branch of the family.  Pierre Labauve and his small family came to Louisiana from France in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but his line did not survive.  Meanwhile, during the late colonial period, some of Antoine Labauve's sons moved upriver to the Baton Rouge area; their descendants settled in what became East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, and Iberville parishes; several families moved to Pointe Coupee Parish, where few Acadians settled.  During the early antebellum period, four young Labauves from the river joined their cousins on the western prairies.  A Labauve from the river created a family line on Bayou Lafourche during the late antebellum period.  By then, the western branch of the family, scattered in St. Landry, Lafayette, St. Martin, St. Mary, Vermilion, and Calcasieu parishes, and even on the prairies of southeastern Texas, nearly rivaled in size the eastern branch, centered in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Emulating their ancestors in Acadia, few Acadian families of South Louisiana were as peripatetic as the Labauves. 

Church records show that no non-Acadian Labauves established families in the Bayou State before the War of 1861.  Most, if not all, of the Labauves of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of Louis dit Noël of Port-Royal, Chignecto, and Minas.

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, some Labauves lived comfortably on their farms and vacharies along the river and on the prairies.  In 1850, brothers Jean Baptiste and Dominique Labauve held 11 and 9 slaves apiece on their adjacent farms in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Cousin Placide Labauve held a dozen slaves on his Calcasieu Parish farm that year.  A decade later, Jean Baptiste owned 14 slaves in West Baton Rouge Parish.  His younger brother Guy held a dozen slaves on his West Baton Rouge farm.  In nearby Pointe Coupee Parish, the widow of Jean Baptiste and Guy's brother, Joseph Isidore, fils, owned 18 slaves.  Out on the prairies of Calcasieu Parish, Placide Labauve now owned 13 slaves.  In St. James Parish, the widow of cousin Antoine Labauve held 8 slaves on her left-bank farm.  Amazingly, in Iberville Parish, a Labauve was co-owner of a huge plantation of 182 slaves also owned by German Creole Alexander Hotard; census records for 1860, however, do not reveal the identity of this wealthy Labauve.  Most remarkable of all, however--in 1860, two of Jean Baptiste and Guy's brothers, Victor and Dominique, held 10 and 8 slaves, respectively, in Jackson County, Texas.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Labauf, LaBauvre, Labeauve, Labeaux, Labeuve, Laboff, Laboffe, Labouve, Labove, LaBove, Laubauve, Lavauve, Lavob, LeBau.  This Acadian family should not be confused with the French Creole Lebeaus or Le Boeufs.  

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, St. James, & West Baton Rouge parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, Iberville, Pointe Coupee, St. James, St. Mary, & West Baton Rouge parishes, & Jackson County, Texas; Arsenault, Généalogie, 610, 1007-08, 1195-98, 1660, 2519-20; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Dixon, "Who Owned Last Island?," 431; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 262; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Menn, Large Slaveholders of LA, 1860, 240, 244-45; NOAR, vols. 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family Nos. 33, 34; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Families No. 72, 181; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 775; White, DGFA-1, 884-90; White, DGFA-1 English, 188-89.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Antoine LABAUVE 01 1765 StJ born c1726, probably Grand-Pré; son of Antoine LABAUVE & Catherine LEJEUNE; brother of Marguerite; uncle of Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE; married, age 29, Anne VINCENT, c1756; on list of Acadians prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, called Entoine, with wife & 5 children (probably including nephew Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE); arrived LA 1765, age 39; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Miliitia, called also Antonio LABAUBE, age 40, with wife Anne age 28, son Marin age 7, nephew [Jean-]Baptiste LABAUVE age 8, & orphan François[e] SPITRE [PITRE] age 3, 0 slaves, 8 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 1 hog, 1 gun; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 90, left [east] bank, age 4[sic, probably meant 44], with wife Anne age 35, sons Mazain [Marin] age 10, Jean age 6, Pierre age 2, & orphan Françoise SPITRE [PITRE] age 6; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, age 50, with wife Anne age 40, sons Marain age 18, Jean age 18, Pierre age 9, Izidorre age 5 or 3, Paul age 5 months, daughters Adélayde age 7, Ludevine [Marie-Divine] age 3, & Modeste age 5 months; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 11 whites, 2 slaves, 30 qts. rice, 20 qts. corn; died [buried] St.-Jacques 13 Mar 1779, age 53
Jean LABAUVE 02 1765 StJ born c1759; son of Antoine LABAUVE & Anne VINCENT; [twin?] brother of Marin; first-cousin of Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents, siblings, & cousin; arrived LA 1765, age 2; not in Cabanocé census, 1766, with family; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, age 6[sic], with parents, brothers, & orphan Francois SPITRE [PITRE]; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 18, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others
Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE 03 1765 StJ, Atk born c1743, probably Grand-Pré; called Baptiste; son of Charles LABAUVE & Marie HÉBERT; nephew of Antoine LABAUVE; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with family of Entoine LABAUVE; arrived LA 1765, age 22; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, age 8[sic, probably 23], with uncle Antonio LABAUBE & family, also orphan François SPITRE [PITRE]; moved to Attakapas District; married, age 26, Françoise, daughter of Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil & Agnès THIBODEAUX, c1769, Attakapas; in Attakapas census, Dec 1769, called Baptiste LABEAUVE, age 27, with unnamed wife [Françoise], no children, 3 cows, 1 suckling calf or yearling, 4 bulls or heifers, 1 horse, 3 pigs; took oath of allegiance to Spanish monarch 9 Dec 1769 & made his mark, called Baptiste LEBEAU; in Attakapas census, 1771, called Baptiste LE BAU, age 28(?)[sic], with unnamed wife [Françoise] age 25, unnamed boy [probably Jean] age 8(?)[sic, probably 1], 0 slaves, 9 cattle, 5 horses, 12 arpents without title; in Attakapas census, 1774, called Bte., with unnamed wife [Françoise], no children, 0 slaves, 20 cattle, 6 horses & mules, 20 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Baptiste, age 34, head of family number 74, with wife Françoise age 32, son François age 1, 0 slaves, 30 cattle, 6 horses, 15 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1781, called Baptiste, with 4 unnamed individuals, 72 animals, & 20 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called B LABAUVE, with 4 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; died Attakapas 15 Feb 1803, age 65[sic]
Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE 04 ???? ? double listing?  same as Baptiste LABAUVE?  same as Jean LABAUVE?
Marguerite LABAUVE 05 Jul 1785 StG, BR born 12 Aug 1726, baptized 18 Aug 1726, Grand Pré; daughter of Antoine LABAUVE & Catherine LEJEUNE; sister of Antoine; married, age 23, François, son of Mathurin LEGENDRE & Marie MOREL of St.-Malo, France, 6 Apr1750, Louisbourg, Île Royale; moved to Île St.-Jean, 1750; at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, Aug 1752, age 25, with husband & 18-month-old daughter Henrietta; deported from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo, France, aboard one of the Five Ships 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 23 Jan 1759, called Margerite LE BEAUVE, acadienne, age 32; at Meillac, France, 1759-60; at Châteauneuf, France, 1760-65; at St.-Servan, France, 1765-69; at Châteauneuf 1769-71; at St.-Servan 1771-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Marguerite LA BAUVE, widow LE GENDRE, with 2 unnamed daughters [actually sons]; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 55, widow, head of family; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Margarita LEBEAU, widow, with 2 unnamed persons in her family, 1 1/2 barrels corn, 1/4 qt. rice
*Marie LABAUVE 06 1785 Asp? born probably Rivière-aux-Canards; daughter of Jean LABAUVE & Agnès SONNIER; sister of Pierre; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, with 1 orphan, listed next to brother Pierre; granted head-of-family status by Intendant NAVARRO  until reunited with brother Pierre
Marin LABAUVE 07 1765 StJ, NO born c1759; son of Antoine LABAUVE & Anne VINCENT; [twin?] brother of Jean; first-cousin of Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents, siblings, & cousin; arrived LA 1765, age 6; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, age 7, with parents, cousin Baptiste LABAUVE, & orphan François SPITRE [PITRE]; in Cabanocé census, 1769, called Mazain, age 10, with parents, brothers, & orphan Francois SPITRE [PITRE]; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 18, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married, age 28, Françoise, daughter of Joseph RICHARD & Agnès HÉBERT dit Manuel, 6 Feb 1786, St.-Jacques; died [buried] New Orleans 10 Feb 1797, age 35[sic], a widower
Pierre LABAUVE 08 Sep 1785 Asp born c1747, Rivière-aux-Canards; son of Jean LABAUVE & Agnès SONNIER; brother of Marie; followed his family to Chepoudy; deported from probably Île St.-Jean to Morlaix, France, 1758-59; carpenter; married, age 23, (1)Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Charles BRUN & Anne CAISSIE of Chignecto & Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, St.-Martin des Champs, Morlaix, France, 10 Sep 1770; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, listed singly, next to sister Marie, so he must have been a widower; married, age 37, (2)Anne/Jeanne of St.-Martin-de-Cheix, France, daughter of François BONFILS & Marie SEVIN, & widow of Jean DUGAS, 26 Oct 1784, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 36[sic]; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, called Pierre LABOVE, age 47[sic], with wife Jeanne BON FILS age 41, stepson Jean DUGATS age 13, 6 arpents, 15 qts. corn, 1 horned cattle, 1 horse, 2 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, called Pierre LABAUVE, age 48[sic], with wife Jeanne BONFILS age 40, [step]son Jean DUGA age 17, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 100 qts. corn, 4 horned cattle, 3 horses, 24 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Pedro LABAUVE, age 50[sic], with wife Juana BONFIS age 47, [step]son Pedro [DUGAS] age 22, & [daughter? orphan?]  Maria no surname given age 7; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Pierre LABOVE, age 51, with wife Jeanne no surname given age 48, [step]son Pierre [DUGAS] age 23, & orphan [daughter?] Marie age 8, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Pierre LABOVE, age 50, with wife Jeanne [no surname given] age 49, & no children, next to stepson Jean DUGATS

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Antoine LA BAUVE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1196, the Grand-Pré section, calls him Antoine-Zenon [LABAUVE] & says he was born in 1732; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2519, the LA section, calls him Antoine LABAUVE, says he was born in 1732 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says they were from Grand-Pré, says he married his wife in c1756 but does not give the place of marriage, says she was born in 1738 but gives no birthplace, says he & his family were at St.-Jacques on the Mississippi in 1766, that nephew Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE, born in 1758, that orphan François[sic] PITRE, born in 1763, were with them, that they occupied lot number 90 on the east bank of the Mississipi[sic] in 1769, & lists his children as Marin, born in 1759, Jean in 1763, Pierre in 1767, Adélaïde in 1770, Isidore in 1772, Ludivine in 1774, & Paul & Modeste in 1776, but give no birthplaces; BRDR, 2:401 (SJA-1, 63), his burial record, calls him Antoine [LA BAUVE], says he was buried 13 Mar 1779, does not give his wife's or parents' names, nor his age at the time of his death.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 166; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 13.

His estimated birth year is based on the ages given in the Cabanocé/St.-Jacques censuses in which he is found, not on Arsenault.

02.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Jean LA BAUVE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2519, says he was born in 1763.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 166; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 13.  

His estimated birth year is based on the Cabanocé/St.-Jacques censuses in which he is found, not on Arsenault.  Was he the twin of brother Marin?  Why was he not listed in the Cabanocé census of 1766, when he was only 7?

03.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Baptiste LA BAUVE neveu [of Antoine LA BAUVE], & lists him with his uncle's family; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2519, calls him Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE, says he was born in 1750 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says he married Françoise BROUSSARD in c1770 but does not give her parents' names, lists his children as Jean, born in 1771, Anne in 1772, François in 1776, & Christine in 1782, but gives no birthplaces, & says he died "aux Attakapas" on 15 Feb 1803; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:410 (SM Ch.: v.4, #293), his death/burial record, calls him Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE of Acadia, m. to Françoise BROUSSARD, gives his parents' names, & says he died "at age 65 yrs."  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 7, 23, 37; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 166; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 12; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 13.  

The Cabanocé census of 1766 says he was only age 8, obviously far off the mark.  His estimated birth year is based on the ages given in the Attakapas censuses of 1769, 1771, & 1777.  His burial record would have us believe that he was born in c1738. 

04.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Jean-Baptiste LA BAUVE, & lists him singly.  I have found him in no other source, unless he is a double listing for either Jean-Baptiste or Jean LABAUVE. 

05.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls her Margueritte LABEAUVE veuve LEGENDRE, & lists her with 2 sons; BRDR, 1a(rev.): 103 (SGA-2, 71), perhaps her birth/baptismal record, calls her Margueritte LABAUVE, says her parents were Antoine LABAUVE & Magdeleine BRIARD, & that her godparents were Joseph BABIN, who signed the baptismal record, & Margueritte LEBLANC; Robichaux, Acadian in St.-Malo, 581-82, Family No. 657; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 262, 295, her marriage record, calls her Margueritte LABAUVE, called her husband Francois LEGENDRE, pecheur en chaloupe, gives her & his parents' names, says her father was deceased at the time of the wedding, that his parents demeurant à Maillard, évéché de Dol en Bretagne, says the marriage was recorded in the Notarial Acts, Series G3, Carton 2047, at Louisbourg, but gives no witnesses to the marriage; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 181, show that in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, she, her husband, called Firmin LE GENDRE de Meillac, age 36, & 1 of their children, Henriette, age 8, survived, but that 2 of their children--son [Jean-]Francois, age 5, & daughter Anastasie[-Angélique], age 2--died at sea; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 10-11, calls her Margueritte LA BEAUVE, veuve LEGENDRE, age 55, on the embarkation list, Margarita LAVEAUX, viuda LEGENDRE, on the debarkation list, & Marguerite LABAUVE, widow LEGENDRE, age 55 on the complete listing, says she was in the 33rd Family aboard Le Bon Papa with 2 sons, details her marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, & says son Jean-Francois [LEGENDRE] was born 1 Aug 1754, & daughter Anastasie-Angélique [LEGENDRE] was born 25 Feb 1757.  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:133. 

Briard was a dit in the LEJEUNE family, so her mother's full name may have been Catherine-Madeleine LEJEUNE dit Briard. 

06.  Not in Wall of Names.  Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 507, the Sep 1784 Spanish report at Nantes, calls her Marie LABAUVE & lists her with brother Pierre; Winzerling, Acadian Odyssey, 193, note 117, citing a Spanish record, calls her Maria LA BOUVE, "whom he [Intendant Martin NAVARRO] felt ought to be united with her brother, Pedro LA BOUVE," evidence that she, too, had reached the colony.  

Her parents' names are from Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 100-01, Family No. 186, which calls her mother Anne SAULNIER, & White, DFGA-1, 888, which calls her mother Agnès SAULNIER, used here.

07.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Marin LABAUVE; BRDR, 2:402, 622 (SJA-2, 1), his marriage record, calls him Maren LAVOB (LA BAUVE), calls his wife Francisca RICHAR, gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of Acadia" & hers "of this colony," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Josef MIR & Felicitas BOBILA; NOAR, 6:160 (SLC, F4, 43), his death/burial record, calls him Marin LABOVE, "widower of Francisca RICHARD, native of Acadie, 35 yr., "& gives his parents' names.

The burial record of daughter Eulalie, a "little girl," dated 20 Oct 1796, in NOAR, 6:160 (SLC, F4, 39), shows that the family had been in the city for a while. Why, & when, did they leave St.-Jacques? 

08.  Wall of Names, 37 (pl. 9R), calls him Pierre LA BOVE, & lists him with his second wife Anne BONFILS & a stepson; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 61, 262, the record of his first marriage, calls him Pierre LABAUVE de St.-Joseph en Québec, calls his wife Marie Magdalen BRUN de St.-Jacques-Québec, gives his & her parents' names, calls his mother Agnès SONNIER, but gives no witnesses to his marriage; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 100-01, Family No. 186, calls him Pierre LABAUVE, says he was born in c1748 "in the Parish of Saint-Joseph in Acadie," which was Rivière-aux-Canards, gives his parents' names, calls his mother Anne SAUNIER, details his first marriage, says they were married in c1767 but gives no place of marriage, that his first wife was born in c1745 but gives no birthplace, does not give her parents' names, says she died age 38 & was buried 10 Dec 1783 at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, details his second marriage, gives his second wife's parents' names & her first husband's name, says she was born in c1753 "in the Parish of St.-Martin of Cheix, in this diocese" [Nantes], includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of daughter Marie-Madeleine by his first wife, died age 8 & buried 12 Mar 1778, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, son Pierre-Marie by his first wife, baptized 16 Apr 1779, died age 5 & buried 8 Feb 1784, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, daughter Jeanne-Eulalie by his first wife, baptized 19 Mar 1781, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, died age 9 mos. & buried 11 Dec 1781, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, & daughter Victoire-Reine by his first wife, baptized 3 Dec 1782, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, died 12 Mar 1784, no place given but probably St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, & details his first family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as his second family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 52-53, calls him Pierre LABOVE, charpentier, age 36, on the embarkation list, & Pierre LABAUVE, carpenter, age 36, on the complete listing, says that he was in the 43rd Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with his wife Anne BONFILS, age 32, & a stepson, & details his second marriage, including his & his second wife's parents' names, says they were married in 1784 but gives no place of marriage.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 40, 64, 101, 146, 172.  

White, DGFA-1, 888, calls his mother Agnès, not Anne, SAULNIER.  

His estimated birth year is taken not from the passenger list of Le St.-Rémi but from an average of the ages given in the LA censuses in which he is found. 

Evidently by Sep 1784, when he was listed singly in the Spanish census of Acadians in France, his wife & all of his children had died.  He had no more sons by his second wife, so none of the Acadian LABAUVEs of LA are descended from him.  

Anne/Jeanne BONFIL's first husband's name also is in her son Jean DUGAS's marriage record in BRDR, 2:257 (ASM-2, 20).  

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