APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

ORILLION dit Champagne

[oh-RILL-ee-onh]

ACADIA

A Frenchman named Orion, also spelled Orionne, Orillon, and Orillion, married an unidentified woman at La Rochelle, France, in c1644.  The next year their daughter Marthe was born at La Rochelle.  They also had another daughter, Marguerite, born probably at La Rochelle.  The family migrated to Plaisance, Newfoundland, in 1662, where both girls married seven years later, Marthe to Louis or Guillaume de Beaufet, and Madeleine to Michel Grégoire.  Marthe died at Port-Toulouse, Île Royal, today's Cape Breton Island, in January 1715.  

~

Charles dit Champagne, son of Julien Orillon and Anne Roger of St.-Thomas de La Flèche, Angers, France, born in c1652, probably no kin to the Orions at Plaisance, arrived at Port-Royal in c1703, early in Queen Anne's War, to serve as a soldier and mason in the garrison at Port-Royal and also as a servant in the home of Acadian governor Jacques-Francois de Bouillan.  Not along after he reached the colony, Charles dit Champagne married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean Bastarache, at Port-Royal in January 1704.  This gave him good reason to remain in the colony when the war finally ended in 1714.  Charles dit Champagne died at Annapolis Royal, formerly Port-Royal, in December 1742, age 90.  He and Marie-Anne had nine children, including seven sons, all born at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, five of whom created families of their own.  One of their daughters married into the Hébert family.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Champagne l'aîné, born in November 1704, married Cécile, daughter of René Labauve, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1735.  They moved to Chignecto.

Jean, a twin, born in November 1708, died 10 days after his birth.

Joseph died the day before his twin brother Jean.  

Charles dit Champagne, fils, born in August 1713, married first to Anne, daughter of Francois Richard, at Annapolis Royal in September 1734.  They remained in the Annapolis area until Le Grand Dérangment.  Charles dit Champagne, fils's second wife was Marie, daughter of Louis Doucet, whom he married at Nicolet, Québec, in June 1763 after Le Grand Dérangement.    

Pierre dit Champagne, born in December 1715, became a blacksmith and married Brigitte, daughter of Jean Brun dit Le Brun, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742.  They also remained there.  

Joseph, born in August 1718, married Marguerite, daughter of François Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in February 1746.  They remained in the area until the late 1740s or early 1750s, when they moved to Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto.  

Youngest son Jean-Baptiste dit Champagne le jeune, born in January 1722, followed older brothers Jean-Baptiste l'aîné and Joseph to Chignecto, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Deveau, in October 1746. 

In 1755, descendants of Charles Orillon dit Champagne could be found at the family's home base at Annapolis Royal and at Chignecto. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family to the winds:

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by Abbé Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Orillons may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto Acadians, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French regulars, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

Joseph Orillon dit Champagne of Pointe Beauséjour, wife Marguerite Dugas, and at least two of their children, Joseph, fils, age 7, and Marguerite, age 5, ended up in South Carolina.  In 1756, the year after their arrival in the colony, they evidently were among the Acadians who did not take advantage of the South Carolina governor's permission to return to greater Acadia on their own hook.  British officials counted Joseph, fils and Marguerite at Charleston, South Carolina, in August 1763, six months after the war with Britain had ended.  They were orphans by then, ages 15 and 13, living with relatives Joseph Marant and his wife Angélique Dugas, their maternal aunt.  The Orillion orphans seem to have been among the few Acadians from South Carolina who found they way to Louisiana, probably via French St.-Dominque.

In 1764, hundreds of Acadians in the British Atlantic colonies, especially South Carolina, emigrated to French St.-Domingue, present-day Haiti, where the French were building a naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island.  The French promised a new start for the Acadian exiles who had been languishing in the British colonies, but for many Acadians in St.-Domingue their dream of liberation became a nightmare. ...

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Joseph Orillion, fils, age 17, and sister Marguerite, age 15 came to Louisiana in 1765 with uncle Joseph Marant and aunt Angélique Dugas probably directly from St.-Dominique, among the relatively few Acadians who did so.  The Orillions followed their relatives to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans, where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before, and where the majority of the Acadian refugees coming to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, were settling. 

Joseph and Marguerite first appear in Louisiana records in the census of April 1766.  Marguerite married first, to fellow Acadian Paul, son of Étienne Foret, at Cabanocé in c1768.  By 1770, they were living on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension, just upriver from Cabanocé.  Marguerite died a widow at Ascenson in March 1800; she was 50 years old.  Brother Joseph, fils married at Ascension in c1770 but settled in a different Acadian community.

Descendants of Joseph ORILLION dit Champagne, fils (c1748-1810; Charles dit Champagne)

Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Orillon and Marguerite Dugas, born at either Annapolis Royal or Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, in c1748, came to Louisiana probably from French St.-Domingue in 1765 as a teenaged orphan with a younger sister and relatives.  He followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, on the river above New Orleans, but did not remain there.  He married Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Breaux, at Ascension, on the river above Cabanocé, in c1770.  Rose, a native of Grand-Pré, had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768 with the extended family of kinsmen Alexis and Honoré Breau.  By 1777, Joseph, fils and Rose were living at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, upriver from Ascension, where Spanish officials counted them on the "left bank ascending."  Their daughters married into the Babin, Melançon, and Roth families.  Joseph, fils died near St. Gabriel in January 1810; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 70 years old when he died, but he was probably in his early 60s.  All Acadian Orillions are descended from Joseph, fils and his two sons, who settled on the west side of the river near Plaquemine and Bayou Goula in Iberville and Ascension parishes.  The younger son's line, except for its blood, ended early, but the older son's line carried on the name.  One of Joseph, fils's grandsons settled on Bayou Lafourche in the 1850s, but the others remained in Iberville Parish.  

1

Older son Joseph III, born at Ascension in February 1775, married Marie-Clothilde, called Clothilde, daughter of French Creole Francois-Charles Marrionneaux, at St.-Gabriel in March 1794.  Their son Joseph IV was born at St.-Gabriel in December 1796, Louis Rosémond, called Rosémond and Don Louis Rosémond, in January 1800, Louis Théodore, called Théodore, in September 1808, and Pierre Francois Derosier, called Derosier or Drosin, in September 1811.  They also had a son named Joseph Dosithé or Dosilien, called Dosithé.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Bujole, Dupuis, and Roth families. 

1a

Joseph IV married Marie Arthémise Aubry, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Aubry Dupuis, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1819.  Their son Joseph Lovinsky was born in Iberville Parish in October 1820, a child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died at age 7 months in August 1822, and Joseph or Pierre Célestin, called Célestin and P. C., was born in July 1824.  Their daughters married into the Bedunah, Robert, and Townsend families.  Joseph, Jr., so called by the priest who recorded his burial but did not bother to give his parents' names or his age at the time of his death, died in Iberville Parish in August 1829; if this was Joseph III, he would have been 54 years old; if this was Joseph IV, he would have been only 32 years old; it probably was Joseph IV, who in some of his children's marriage records was called Joseph, Jr.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 22 slaves--12 males and 10 females, 15 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ages 65 to 7, living in 3 houses--on the Dupuy & Orillion plantation two doors down from Théodore Orillion; this was probably Joseph IV's widow, Arthémise Dupuis.  The same census taker counted a single slave--a 28-year-old black female--in Arthémise Orillion's household in the town of Plaquemine; this also was Joseph IV's widow.  

Joseph Lovinsky married Marie Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Treville Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1847.  Their son Joseph Lovinsky, fils was born in Iberville Parish in January 1847, Jacques Célestin in December 1849, André Surville in October 1851, Joseph Thomas was baptized at the Plaquemine church, age 1, in May 1857, George Samuel was born in June 1860, and John Adélard in October 1866.  

Célestin married Marie Adele, called Adele, daughter of fellow Acadian Mathurin Landry, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1853.  Their twin sons Peter Aubry and Peter Célestin were born near Plaquemine in December 1854, Alfred in November 1856, and Joseph Célestin in November 1862 but died at age 2 in October 1864.  

1b

Rosémond married Anglo American Marie Antoinette, called Antoinette, Blake at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in March 1826.  Their son Joseph Hortaire was born near in Iberville Parish in December 1834, and Roselius Alexandre in May 1836.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Robert families; one of the daughters, Clothilde, moved to the Bayou Teche valley, but the others remained on the river.  In July 1850, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 41 slaves--28 males and 13 female, all black except for 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 65 to 1--on D. R. Orillon's plantation; this probably was Rosémond.  After the War Between the States, Rosémond's older son Joseph Hortaire followed his sister Clothilde to Bayou Teche, establishing a western branch of the family. 

Joseph Hotaire married Marie Delmise, called Delmise, daughter of French Creole Anthony Lacroix, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in February 1856.  Their son Antoine Adolphe le jeune was born near Plaquemine in September 1858, Don Louis Hotaire in October 1860, and Louis Erwin near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, in March 1866.  Their daughter married into the Richard family.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Hortaire served as a sergeant in Company I of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  As the birth of a younger son reveals, Joseph Hortaire survived the war, returned to his family, and promptly moved them to Bayou Teche.  They were still living near New Iberia in 1870. 

Roselius Alexandre married cousin Mathilda, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Dupuy, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in April 1861; Mathilda's mother was an Orillion.  Their son Roselius Alexandre, fils was born posthumously near Plaquemine in August 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Roselius Alexandre served as a lieutenant in the same unit as his brother Joseph Hotaire, but Roselius did not survive the war.  While being held as a prisoner of war in New Orleans, he died of consumption in April 1864, five months before his son was born.  Evidently family members retrieved Roselius's body; he was buried at the Plaquemine church in March 1864; he was only 27 years old. 

1c

Dosithé married Marie Pauline, called Pauline, Lacroix, widow of Baptiste Bergeron, probably in Iberville Parish in the early 1830s; Pauline's father may have been an Orillion, so she may have been Dosithe's cousin.  Their son Jean Latour died at age 1 in Iberville Parish in June 1835, and Joseph Osilien was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, age 3 years, 3 months, in February 1846.  Their daughters married into the Abadie and Richard families.  

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Osilien may have been the Joseph D. or J. D. Orillion of Bayou Goula, Iberville Parish, who served in Company B of the 11th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, and Mississippi.  After his regiment was broken up because of heavy casualties, J. D. was transferred to second Company E of the 20th (Lovell) Regiment Louisiana Infantry and served in Mississippi, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama.  J. D. survived the war. 

1d

Théodore married Victoire, daughter of Baptiste Roland, Rolland, or Rollande, in a civil ceremony in Iberville Parish and sanctified the marriage at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in December 1835.  Their twin sons François Théodore and Joseph Francois were born in Iberville Parish in March 1832 but Francois Théodore died at age 1 in June 1833, Antoine Adolphe was born in September 1835, Théodore Frédéric, called Frédéric Tobie, often spelled Frederick, in December 1836, Gabriel Théodore in June 1848, and Jean Baptiste in December 1855.  Their daughters married into the Kleinpeter, LeBlanc, Marrionneaux, and Shanks families.  In July 1850, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 2 slaves--a 25-year-old black female, and a 17-year-old black male--on T. Orillon's farm; this was probably Théodore.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 7 slaves--2 males & 5 females, 4 blacks and 3 mulattoes, ranging in age from 55 to 3, living in a single house--on Théodore Orillion's farm.  

During the War of 1861-65, Frederick served as a sergeant and then as a lieutenant in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  He was captured in Kentucky in May 1863, spent the rest of the war in prison camps, including the notorious camp for Confederate officers at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and returned to his family.  Frédéric married cousin Victoria, daughter of fellow Acadian Paulin Dupuy and widow of ____ Landry, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in February 1870; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry; Frédéric was 34 years old at the time of the wedding. 

1e

Drosin married fellow Acadian Zulma Bourgeois at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in May 1851; this was a sanctification of a civil marriage that probably had been made in the 1840s; the priest who recorded the marriage called Drosin "Therosine."  Their son Jean Joseph had been born in Iberville Parish in June 1849.  Drosin remarried to Hélène, daughter of Anglo-American John L. Seely, at the Thibodeaux church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1855.  They settled on Bayou Lafourche.  

2

Younger son Nicolas-André, also called Nicolas-Gabriel and Joseph-Nicolas, born at St.-Gabriel in November 1781, married first cousin Marie Renée or Rose, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Foret, at St. Gabriel in October 1805; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry; Marie Renée's mother was Nicolas's paternal aunt, Marguerite Orillion.  Their son Joseph Nicolas was born near St. Gabriel in December 1806 but died the following May, a newborn child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died in March 1811, and Gabriel Arbonaut was born in October 1818 but died at age 1 in September 1819.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Melançon families.  Nicolas died in Ascension Parish in April 1832; the priest who recorded his burial said that Nicolas was 48 years old when he died, but he was 50.  None of his sons survived childhood, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Other ORILLIONs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Orillions on the river with the Acadian line of the family:

D. R. Orillion married Anglo-American Marie Lavinia Dodd at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in March 1851, on the same day that Marie Lavinia was baptized into the Roman Catholic Church.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give either the bride's or the groom's parents' names.  

Louis Orillion married Sarah Anne Lowhead.  Their son Louis Sam died in Iberville Parish, age 1, in October 1851, and a child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died at age 13 months in May 1855.  

Rolland Orillion died near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in May 1859.  He was only 3 1/2 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not bother to name the boy's parents.  

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

By the mid-1850s, a grandson of Joseph Orillion, fils had moved from the family's seat in Iberville Parish to Bayou Lafourche.  The rest of his kin remained on the river:  

Descendants of Pierre François Derosier ORILLION (1811-1864; Charles dit Champagne, Joseph, Joseph, fils)

Pierre François Derosier, called Derosier or Drosin, youngest son of Joseph Orillion III and Marie-Clothilde Marrionneaux, born in Iberville Parish in September 1811, married fellow Acadian Zulma Bourgeois in a civil ceremony in Iberville Parish probably in the 1840s, and sanctified the marriage at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in May 1851, when their son was almost two years old.  Probably after the death of his wife, Drosin moved to Bayou Lafourche and remarried to Hélène, daughter of Anglo American John L. Seely, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1855; Drosin was 44 years old at the time of the wedding.  He died in Lafourche Parish in August 1864; the priest who recorded the burial said that "Jean," as he called him, died "at age 42 yrs.," but he probably meant 52, which was Drosin's actual age; a petition for succession inventory, listing Drosin's wife and surviving children, was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in August 1867.  

1

Oldest son Jean Joseph, by his father's first wife, was born in Iberville Parish in June 1849.  He was not listed in his father's succession record in August 1867, so he may have died young. 

2

Albert, by his father's second wife, was born in Lafourche Parish in March 1858.  

3

Youngest son Jules Léogard, called Léogard, by his father's second wife, was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1860.

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

During the antebellum period, Orillons emigrated from France to Louisiana, where they were known as Foreign French:

Louis-Francois Orillon, age 20, and Théodore Orillon, age 17, probably brothers and both tailors by trade, reached New Orleans from aboard the ship St. James out of LeHavre, France, in July 1837.  According to the ship's papers, they were headed to Ohio.  Théodore, son of Louis Orillon and Francoise Huneault of Ville de Vihiers, Department of Maine-et-Loire, France, probably the same Théodore who landed at New Orleans in July 1837, married Celina, daughter of French Creole Jean Louis Picou of Ascension Parish, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1846.  Their son Ernest had been born in Iberville Parish in January 1844, and Alphonse in January 1846.  Théodore died in Iberville Parish in October 1854; the priest who recorded his burial said that Théodore was 40 years old when he died, but he was probably in his early 30s.  One wonders if Théodore and his brother Louis-Francois were distant cousins of the Acadian Orillions of Iberville Parish.  

CONCLUSION

The Orillon dit Champagne family settled fairly early in Acadia, and they were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  Only two of them, a teenage brother and his younger sister from Chignecto who had been exiled to South Carolina, came to the colony probably from St.-Domingue in 1765 with a Dugas aunt and her husband.  Joseph and Marguerite Orillon dit Champagne and their aunt and uncle settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques among Acadian refugees from Halifax who had transshipped at Cap-Français, Haiti, on their way to the colony.  Joseph married into the Breaux family at nearby Ascension but settled at St.-Gabriel, just upriver.  All of the Acadian Orillions of Louisiana come from this union.  Joseph's two sons married and remained in Iberville Parish, but his younger son's line died out early.  One of Joseph's grandsons moved to the Bayou Lafourche valley in the 1850s, but the others remained on the river near where their immigrant ancestor had settled.  Only during the immediate post-war period did Orillions, from Iberville Parish, establish a western branch of the family on lower Bayou Teche. 

Judging by the number of slaves they owned, some of the Orillions of Iberville Parish lived well on their farms and plantations along the river.  In 1850, Rosémond Orillion owned 41 slaves on his plantation in Iberville, twice the number needed to be considered a planter.  In 1860, Rosémond's older brother's widow held 22 slaves on her plantation.

At least four Orillions served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, and one of them died in Confederate service.  Two of Iberville Parish planter Rosémond Orillion's sons, one a sergeant, the other a lieutenant, both married, served in Company I of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry, a front-line unit raised in Iberville Parish that fought gallantly in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  Joseph Hortaire, the sergeant, survived the war, but his younger brother Roselius Alexandre, the lieutenant, did not.  After the Confederate garrison at Port Hudson, Louisiana, surrendered in July 1863, the Federals did not parole Roselius but sent him as a prisoner of war to New Orleans, where he died of consumption in the spring of 1864.  Evidently family members retrieved Roselius's body; church records show him being buried at Plaquemine in March 1864; he was only 27 years old.  Joseph's and Roselius's first cousin, Frederick Orillion, served as a lieutenant in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, a front-line unit raised in Iberville Parish that served gallantly in Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Frederick was captured at Mill Springs, Kentucky, in May 1863 and spent most of the rest of the war as prisoner at Camp Chase and Johnson's Island, Ohio.  He survived the ordeal and returned to his family, as did cousin Joseph Orillion of Bayou Goula, who served in Company B of the 11th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, another front-line unit raised in Iberville Parish that served gallantly throughout the Western Theatre of Operations.

Meanwhile, back on the home front, the war took a terrible toll on the family's economic standing.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This included the Orillion holdings in Iberville Parish.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantation houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were driven off.  ...

During Le Grand Dérangement, the family's surname evolved from Orillon to Orillion.  The family's name also is spelled Aurion and Orillan in Louisiana.  Although the Acadian Orillon/Orillions used the dit Champagne in Acadia, they did not use it in South Louisiana, so they should not be confused with the Champagnes there, who were French Creoles, not Acadians. 

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Iberville Parish; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Iberville Parish; Arsenault, Généalogie, 482, 703-07, 896, 1030-31, 2457, 2564; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:411; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vol. 7, 8, 9; White, DGFA-1, 1254-56; White, DGFA-1 English, 267.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Joseph ORILLION dit Champagne 01 1765 StJ, Asc, StG born c1748, Annapolis Royal or Chignecto; son of Joseph ORILLION dit Champagne & Marguerite DUGAS; brother of Marguerite; in report of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called orphan Joseph OVILION age 13, with [uncle] Joseph MOREAU [MARANT] et al.; arrived LA 1765 probably from St.-Domingue, age 17; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, called Joseph AURION, age 18, with uncle & aunt Joseph MARANT & Angélique DUGAS & sister Marguerite; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 50, next to his aunt & uncle, right [west] bank, called Joseph ORILLOUT, age 21, listed singly so still a bachelor; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Joseph ORILLON, age 21, head of "family" number 18, listed singly so still a bachelor, with 6 arpents; married, age 22, Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of Pierre BREAUX & Marguerite GAUTREAUX, c1770, probably Ascension, now Donaldsonville; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, left bank ascending, called Jausephe AURILION, age 36[sic, probably 29], with wife [Marie-Rose] age 29, 1 daughter [Marie-Josèphe] age 3, 12 cattle, [0 horses?] 14 hogs, 30 fowl, 6 arpents; died [buried] St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, 19 Jan 1810, age 70[sic]
Marguerite ORILLION dit Champagne 02 1765 StJ, Asc born c1750, Annapolis Royal or Chignecto; daughter of Joseph ORILLION dit Champagne & Marguerite DUGAS; sister of Joseph; in report of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called orphan Margte. OVILION age 11, with [uncle] Joseph MOREAU [MARANT] et al.; arrived LA 1765 probably from St.-Domingue, age 15; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, called Marguerite AURION, age 17, with uncle & aunt Joseph MARANT & Angélique DUGAS, & brother Joseph; married, age 18, Paul, son of Étienne FORET & his first wife Marie CHIASSON, c1768, probably Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Margueritte ORSILLON, age 19, with husband & 1 daughter; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Margueritte ORILLON, age 20, with husband & 1 daughter; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Margueritte ORILLION, age 27, with husband, 1 son, "publican" Joseph MARANS, & his wife Angélique DUGAS [her aunt]; died [buried] Ascension 19 Mar 1800, age 50, a widow

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Joseph ORILLON; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2564, the LA section, calls him Joseph ORILLON, says he was born in 1748 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names & says they were from Port-Royal, does not give his wife's parents' names, says he married Marie-Rose BREAUX in c1770 but gives no place of marriage, says he occupied lot number 50 on the west bank of the river at St.-Jacques in 1769, & lists his children as Marie-Josèphe, born in 1772, & Joseph in 1775, but gives no birthplaces.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 165, 175; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 11; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 2.  

The birth year given in Arsenault conforms to the Cabanocé censuses of 1766 & 1769 & the Ascension census of 1770.  The age given at St.-Gabriel in 1777 seems way off.  

How did he & his sister get from SC to LA?  They probably went to St.-Domingue in 1764 & hooked up with the refugees from Halifax who changed ships at Cap-Francois in early 1765 on their way to New Orleans.  If so, they are among the few Acadians in St.-Domingue who moved on to LA.  See Appendix

02.  Wall of Names, 23, calls her Marguerite ORILLON; BRDR, 2:571 (ASC-4, 35), her burial record, calls her Margarita ORILLION, age 50 years, widow of the late Pablo FORET, & gives her parents' names.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 165.  

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