APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LEJEUNE

[luh-JHERN, luh-JHAN, luh-JHOON]

ACADIA

Lejeune is a common name in France, so it is no surprise that a number of individuals with that name who were not kin to one another lived in the Acadia:

Edmée or Aimée Lejeune, born in France in c1624, married François Gautrot, widower of Marie _____, in c1644Catherine Lejeune, also born in France, in c1633, married François Savoie in c1651 and also lived in Acadia.  After analyzing a number of dispensations for kinship, Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White says that Edmée and Catherine were sisters, but he concludes that they were not sisters of the other Lejeunes in Acadia.   

~

Jean Lejeune died at Port-Royal by c1686.  Stephen A. White writes of him:  "It has not been possible to determine who ... Jean Lejeune was.  Nevertheless, it seems evident that he figured among the early colonists of Acadia, because all the other grantees at Bélisle [on present-day Annapolis River] were of that group.  Given that Barnabé Martin and François Savoie were among these grantees, one may deduce that the grants took place before their deaths, which both occurred some time before the 1686 census.  It must be presumed that the allotment to Jean Lejeune's heirs likewise would have taken place some time before this census.  Note that no relationship, either by blood or by marriage, is known to have existed between the brothers-in-law Alexandre Hébert and Michel Richard who occupied the grant in 1734 and the Lejeune family." 

~

Pierre Lejeune dit Briard of the Brie region of France married a daughter of Germain Doucet, sieur de La Verdure, at Port-Royal in c1650; her given name has been lost to history; interestingly, the bride's father, Germain Doucet, also was from the Brie area of France.  Pierre dit Briard does not appear in the first Acadian census of 1671.  Given the family's tendency to move around, he may have temporarily left the colony with his family.  Pierre dit Briard and his wife had two sons, both born at Port-Royal, who created families of their own: 

Older son Pierre, fils, also called dit Briard, born in c1656, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau and Jeanne Thériot, at Port-Royal in c1678.  In 1686, Pierre, fils and Marie were counted at La Hève, on the Atlantic coast.  On 7 November 1689, Acadian Governor Meneval wrote a letter to the Minister of Marine back in France and had this to say about Pierre dit Briard, fils:  "The Srs de Soulègre and Desgouttins, both being eager for pelts, sent a man name Briard, a sort of Indian and Sr Desgouttins's brother-in-law [colonial official Mathieu de Goutin had married Jeanne, another daughter of Pierre Thibodeau, earlier that year], to trade in the woods towards Cape Sable, contrary the prohibition I had imposed against going there without my permission, and they have gave him among other things brandy to trade to the Indians, contrary to the special prohibition I had imposed against that....  Besides that, I knew that Briard had repeated a hundred insults to the Indians, in contempt of the governor's authority, in order to increase that of his brother-in-law, Sr Desgouttins; among other things, that the governor did not have the authority to ban brandy, and that he would not let it be brought in, etc., etc., just as two French inhabitants settled in those districts have testified...."  Meneval goes on to detail other alleged offenses of Pierre, fils, insisting that they were encouraged by Pierre's influential brother-in-law, de Goutin.  In October 1690, de Goutin testified that Meneval had done his best to capture Pierre "in order to put him in prison, and that Pierre "was obliged to escape in order to avoid such treatment."   In 1693, three years after Meneval had been captured by New Englanders during King William's War, Pierre and Marie were back in Port-Royal, but in 1708 they were counted again at La Hève.  They had nine children, including four sons who married into the Benoit, Trahan, Guédry, and Pitre families.  Four of their daughters married into the Boutin, Roy, Trahan, Gautrot, Labauve, and Duplessis families. 

Younger son Martin dit Briard (Labrière), born in c1661, married an Indian woman, Jeanne, or Marie, Kagigconiac, probably at Port-Royal in c1684.  They, too, were counted at La Hève in 1686.  They had four children, including three sons, one of whom married into the Gaudet family.  One of their daughters married into the Labauve family.  In c1699, Martin dit Briard remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Gaudet, fils.  They were counted again at La Hève in 1708, but they moved on to Pigiguit in the Minas Basin.  Martin dit Briard's second wife gave him six more children, including five more sons, three of whom married into the Landry, Benoit, and Barrieau families.  One of their daughters married into the Viger family.  In October 1729, at Grand-Pré, Martin dit Briard married a third time, to Marie Arnault (Renaud) dit Grislard, widow of Jacques Carne; she gave him no more children. 

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Lejeune dit Briard, père could be found at Annapolis Royal, Grand-Pré, and Pigiguit in the Minas Basin; and in the French Maritimes at Grande-Ascension and Bédec on Île St.-Jean, at Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale, and on Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther: ...  

The family suffered terribly in the deportation from the Maritime islands to France in late 1758 and early 1759. ...

No group of Acadians who came to Louisiana suffered as much as the last group of exiles in Maryland who sailed to their Mississippi valley promised land.  The Britannia (sometimes spelled Britania) left Port Tobacco, Maryland, for New Orleans on 5 January 1769, with seven Acadian families aboard.  Also on the ship were eight Catholic German families who, for reasons of their own, no longer wanted to live in a British colony.  The crew of the Britannia sighted the coast of Louisiana on February 21, but the captain of the ship, either through bad luck or incompetence, missed the mouth of the Mississippi because of heavy fog.  Strong winds drove the ship westward, and a few days later the Britannia ran onto the Texas coast at Espiritu Santo Bay.  The crew went ashore and located a Spanish officer, who suspected them of being spies or smugglers.  Instead of giving them food and fresh water, he arrested them and ordered his men to escort everyone on the ship to the interior post of La Bahía.  The passengers and crew of the Britannia remained at La Bahía for six long months, waiting for the Spanish authorities to decide their fate.  While at La Bahía, they were forced to work as semi-slaves around the presidio and on nearby ranches.  Finally, in early September, a Spanish officer arrived at the presidio with instructions for the commandant there to send the captives overland to Natchitoches in central Louisiana. They could not return to the abandoned Britannia because the Spanish and the coastal Indians had stripped the vessel so thoroughly it was no longer seaworthy.  On September 11, the Acadians joined the other passengers and the English crew on the 420-mile trek to Natchitoches, which they did not reach until late October.  Louisiana Governor O'Reilly, meanwhile, had decided that the Acadian families in the group would settle at Natchitoches because of their familiarity with the growing of rye and wheat.  Natchitoches settlers welcomed the newcomers and supplied them with food, tools, and animals.  The German families were told that they could continue on to New Orleans via the Red and Mississippi rivers, pick up supplies, and then settle at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville on the Mississippi.  The Germans accompanied the English crew to New Orleans and arrived there on November 9.  Most of the Acadians, meanwhile, refused to remain at Natchitoches, which was too far away from their compatriots to the south.  They, too, left the Red River valley and joined their relatives in the established Acadian communities at St.-Gabriel and Opelousas.  ...

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Lejeunes settled early in Acadia, but they came later to Louisiana than many other Acadian families.  The first of them to reach the colony came aboard the ill-fated English vessel Britannia out of Port Tobacco, Maryland, in 1769.   After their harrowing adventures on the Texas coast and the long overland trek from Texas, five Lejeune siblings arrived at Natchitoches in October:  

Jean-Baptiste Lejeune, fils, age 20, came with younger siblings Blaise, age 19, Marguerite, age 17, and Joseph and Nanette, age 13.  Nanette, despite her age, remained in Texas at a place called "the Coquiats."  Blaise married at Ascension on the river in November 1773 and took his bride to the Opelousas District, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where they settled far out on the Opelousas prairie in present-day Acadia Parish.  Jean-Baptiste, fils also married at Opelousas and lived for a time at Avoyelles, north of Opelousas.  Joseph went to the Attakapas District, south of Opelousas, but married and settled along Bayou des Cannes, not far from his older brothers.  Marguerite married into the Croque or Crook family at either Natchitoches or Opelousas and also settled on the Opelousas prairies.

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, fils (c1749-?; Pierre dit Briard, Martin dit Briard Labrière, Paul dit Briard)

Jean-Baptiste, fils, perhaps also called Jean-Vincent, eldest son of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune and Marguerite Trahan, born probably at Pigiguit in c1749, followed his family to Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, by 1752, to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, Nova Scotia, in October 1754, to George's Island, Halifax, in September 1755, and into exile first to North Carolina in December 1755 and then to Maryland in c1760.  In January 1769, he and four of his younger siblings followed their maternal uncle Honoré Trahan and his family to Louisiana aboard the English vessel Britannia.  After they finally reached Natchitoches, Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste, fils and his relatives moved on to Acadian settlements.  Jean-Baptiste, fils married French Creole Isabelle Outré probably at Opelousas in c1779 and settled at Avoyelles, north of Opelousas, or, as a family historian suggests, he and brother Blaise may have lived at Avoyelles before moving to the Opelousas District to be near younger brother Joseph.  Did Jean-Baptiste, fils's family line survive? 

Jean-Baptiste III, born probably at Avoyelles but baptized by an Opelousas priest, age 3 weeks, in September 1781, may have died young. 

Descendants of Blaise LEJEUNE (c1750-?; Pierre dit Briard, Martin dit Briard Labrière, Paul dit Briard)

Blaise, second son of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune and Marguerite Trahan of Pigiguit, born probably on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, in c1750, followed his family to Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, by 1752; to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, Nova Scotia, in October 1754; to George's Island, Halifax, in September 1755; and into exile first to North Carolina in December 1755, and then to Maryland, where he was counted at Port Tobacco, an orphan in the household of Honoré Breau, in July 1763.  In January 1769, he and four of his siblings followed uncle Honoré Trahan to Louisiana aboard the English vessel Britannia.  After they finally reached Louisiana, Blaise lived at Ascension on the river, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Breaux, in November 1773.  They moved to the Opelousas District soon after their marriage and settled far out on the western prairies.  The bayou on which they settled, a tributary of Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé in present-day Acadia Parish, is still called Bayou Blaise Lejeune and on some maps Blaise Lejeune Gully  Their daughters married into the Doucet and Trahan families.  Four of their five sons married and created large families of their own.  Unlike younger brother Joseph and his descendants, who as early as the 1820s anglicized their surname to Young, Blaise and his descendants continued to call themselves Lejeune.  Like many Acadians who settled in St. Landry Parish, Blaise's descendants married relatively few fellow Acadians. 

1

Oldest son Blaise, fils, born either at Ascension or Opelousas in c1775, married Anne-Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of Spanish Creole Manuel Quintero of Pointe Coupée, at Opelousas in May 1792; Anne's mother was a Granger.  They settled on Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born at Opelousas in September 1793, Jean was baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in July 1795, Michel at age 2 in November 1804, Ursin at age 8 months in April 1806, Étienne was born in February 1813 but died at age 3 1/2 in August 1816, and a child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in March 1811.  Their daughters married into the Berwick, Godin (Foreign French or French Creole, not Acadian), Lebleu, and West families.  Blaise, fils may have remarried to Violle Vigé.  Blaise, fils died in St. Landry Parish in August 1848; he was 73 years old. 

1a

Jean married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of French Creole Étienne Lacase of Bayou au Boeuf, Rapides Parish, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1813; Marie Louise's mother was an Hébert.  Their son Blaise le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1818, Zéphirin in July 1829, and Ursin le jeune in February 1832.  Their daughters married into the Buck, Caney or Kenny, Doucet, Emay, LeBoeuf, Maillard or Mayer, and Trahan families. 

Blaise le jeune married Marie Caroline, called Caroline, 15-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Éloi Doucet, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1839.  Their son Ursin le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1844, and Blaise, fils in April 1847.  They also had a son named Émile.

Émile married Élisabeth, daughter of George Tromp, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1865; Élisabeth's mother was a Leger.  Their son Jean le jeune was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in April 1866, and François near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in December 1869. 

Zéphirin married Célesie Odile, called Odile, daughter of French Canadian Pierre Bertrand, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1851, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1852.  Their son Napoléon Zéphirin was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1855, and Onésime Paulastron perhaps posthumously near Grand Coteau in August 1858.  Zéphirin's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in June 1858; he would have been 29 years old that year. 

Ursin le jeune may have married Carmelisse Maillard.  Their son Ursin Oneville was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1863. 

1b

Joseph le jeune married Émilie, daughter of French Canadian Charles Bourassa, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1816; Émilie's mother was a Lalande.  They settled on upper Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé near present-day Church Point.  Their son Louis was born in c1818, Joseph, fils in December 1820, Symphorien in October 1829, Pierre in December 1835, and Charles Dupré, called Dupré, in March 1840.  Their daughters married into the Dies, Leger, and Matte families.  Joseph le jeune died probably on Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé in July 1842; he was only 48 years old. 

Joseph, fils married Philonia, Phelonie, or Phelonise Hall in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1839.  Their son Paulin was born near Grand Coteau in August 1847.  Their son Hypolide was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in December 1855, Eustache Dupré in March 1858, and Albert near Grand Coteau in April 1861.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Daigle (German Canadian, not Acadian), Diaz or Diez, Doucet, and Lejeune families.  Joseph, fils's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in September 1865; he would have been 45 year old that year. 

Louis married Eméranthe, called Méranthe, 17-year-old daughter of French Canadian Pierre Matte, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1839.  Their son Louis Damon was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1840, and Joseph le jeune in November 1843.  They were living near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the early 1850s.  Their daughter married into the Araby family.  A succession record for Louis Lejeune was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in July 1854; this Louis would have been in his mid-30s that year. 

Joseph married Azilda, called Zilda, daughter of French Creole Louis Bellard, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1868, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, the following November.  Their son Louis le jeune was born near Church Point in July 1870. 

Louis Damon married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Julien Doucet, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1870.  Their son Ernest was born near Church Point in December 1870. 

Symphorien married Azélie, Azelima, Selima, or Zelima, also called Lelimon, Araby in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1851.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Augustin was born in November 1854, Michel le jeune in March 1858, Joseph in January 1867, and Paul in June 1870. 

Pierre married Ophelia, daughter of French Creole François Ledoux, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in July 1857. 

Dupré married Élodie, daughter of French Canadian Célestin Matte, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1867.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Joseph was born in December 1868, and Albert in December 1870. 

1c

Michel married fellow Acadian Éloise Doucet in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1823, and remarried to Marie Josèphe or Josette, daughter of French Creole Antoine Bellard, fils, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1824.  Their son Michel, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1831, Onille in December 1834, Edmond Yves in April 1837, François Alcide in June 1839, and Simon in August 1842.  They also had a son named Émile.  Their daughters married into the Andrepont, Doucet, Frugé, Reed, Stroud, and Vigé families and perhaps into the Chiastor family as well. 

Michel, fils, by his father's second wife, married Aglae, daughter of French Creole Augustin Fontenot, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1851; Aglae's mother was an Hébert.  Their son François Homer was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1855, Edmond le jeune near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in December 1856, Sosthène near Grand Coteau in February 1862, and Michel III in October 1868. 

Émile, by his father's second wife, married Célanie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Charles Pitre, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1855.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son William was born in February 1861, Émile, fils in December 1862, and Théodore in November 1867. 

Onille, by his father's second wife, married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Olivier Richard, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1855. 

François Alcide, by his father's second wife, married French Creole Joacine or Joachine Frugé in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1858, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, the following July.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son François Alcide, fils was born in February 1859, and Louis de Gonzague in September 1867. 

Edmond Yves, by his father's second wife, married cousin Marie Euphrosine, daughter of French Creole Dorville Bergeron, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1859; Marie's mother was a Lejeune

1d

Ursin died in St. Landry Parish in January 1831.  He was only 26 years old and did not marry. 

2

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Opelousas in December 1777, married Émilie, daughter of German Creole George Bock, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1809.  They settled on Bayou des Cannes.  Their son Pierre Lessin, called Lessin, Lessaint, and Toussaint, was born in St. Landry Parish in April 1810, Onésime in August 1815 but died at age 15 in December 1830, Jean Baptiste, fils was born in September 1818, Leufroi or Dufroi in July 1823, Rosémond in November 1827, and Blaise le jeune in May 1834.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Hébert (French Creole, not Acadian) families. 

2a

Lessin married Phelonise, daughter of French Creole Antoine Frugé, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1829, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in March 1840; Phelonise's mother was an Hébert.  Their son Valerian was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1831, and Zéphirin le jeune in February 1836. 

Zéphirin le jeune, called Zéphirin Blaise by the recording clerk, may have married French Creole Julie Legros in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1854.

2b

Jean Baptiste, fils married Adeline or Adèle, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste Hébert, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1839.  Their son André was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1840, Jean Baptiste, fils in January 1843, and Ursin Jean Baptiste in November 1848.  They were living near Grand Coteau by 1850.  Their daughters married into the Leger and Villejoin families. 

André may have married Marguerite Maillard in the late 1850s.  Their son Rodolphe was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1860. 

2c

Leufroi married French Creole Aureline or Azéline Frugé in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1841.  Their son Dufroi Théodule was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1842, and Leufroi, fils in August 1847. 

Leufroi, fils married Virginie or Virginia Diaville in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, the following September. 

2d

Blaise le jeune may have married Marie Arsène, also called Joséphine, Martin, widow of Henry Lepage, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1854.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in June 1861, and Blaise, fils in March 1864. 

2e

Rosémond married Joséphine, daughter of French Creole François Marcantel and widow of Joseph Diaville, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1851, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, the following October.  Their son Jean Baptiste le jeune was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in August 1852, and François near Grand Coteau in March 1861.  Rosémond may have remarried to Élodie Roy in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1867; this Rosémond would have been 39 years old at the time of the wedding.  They settled near Eunice.  Their son Louis was born in April 1868, and Rosémond Joseph in May 1870. 

3

Joseph le jeune, baptized at Opelousas, age 5 months, in July 1780, married Geneviève, daughter of French Creole Hubert Janise, at Opelousas in November 1796; Geneviève's mother was a Brasseaux.  Their son, name unrecorded, died at Opelousas, age 2, in October 1802, Hubert was born in July 1803, Hilaire le jeune was baptized at age 5 in November 1805, Joseph Olivier, also called Treville, at age 3 months in April 1806, Baptiste at age 1 in March 1809, Joachim at age 16 months in October 1812, and Joseph François was born in April 1819.  Their daughters married into the Berwick and Patin families, and perhaps into the Daigle (French Canadian, not Acadian) family as well. 

3a

Hilaire le jeune may have married German Creole Rosalie Schexnayder in St. Landry Parish in the early 1820s.  Their son Hilaire, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1826, and Joseph le jeune in January 1829. 

3b

Joseph Olivier married cousin Marie Aurore, daughter of French Creole Mamert Janise, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1826.  Their son Joseph Treville was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1827, and Mamert Harvil in January 1829. 

4

Hilaire, baptized at Opelousas, age 3 months, in July 1782, died at age 4 in May 1786. 

5

Youngest son Joseph Ozier married Euphrosine, called Frosine, daughter of French Creole Michel Carriere, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1805.  Their son Julien was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 1 month, in August 1806, Louis was born in February 1808, Onésime in September 1809, Étienne in September 1811, Charles in September 1820, and Alexandre in March 1823.  Their daughter married into the Bergeron (French Creole, not Acadian) family. 

5a

Julien married cousin Elise, Eliza, Eloise, Lisa, or Lise, daughter of Jean Baptiste Young, originally Lejeune, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1827.  Their son Éloyse, perhaps Éloi, was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1828, John Jefferson in November 1830, François Stivins in April 1838, Pierre Lavigne in May 1840, Houston in June 1844, Oscar in February 1848, Julien, fils in February 1850, and Edjus in August 1852. 

Pierre Lavigne may have married cousin Marie Laure Lejeune.  She died in St. Landry Parish, age 19, in February 1859; the Opelousas priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names. 

5b

Louis married cousin Caroline, daughter of Pierre Young, originally Lejeune, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1829.  Their son Louis, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1830.  A succession record for Louis Lejeune was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1854; this Louis, père would have been 46 years old that year. 

5c

Étienne married cousin Josephine or Joasine, daughter of French Creole Michel Carrière, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1832.  Their son Dasencourt was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1833, Ozene in May 1837, Charles Dupré, perhaps called Dupré, in September 1840 or 1841, Étienne, fils in March 1846, and Aurelien in December 1847 but may have died at age 13 in September 1861.  Their daughter married into the Johnson family.  Étienne remarried to Marie Gaume, Grown, Gand, Gomm, Elgone, or Agamasse, probably in St. Landry Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Solus was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1852, Louis le jeune in October 1854, Angelas in December 1859, Cleopha in November 1862, and Onésime in August 1867.  They were living at Bois Mallet by 1860.  Their daughter married into the Godeaux family. 

Dupré, by his father's first wife, may have married French Canadian Hermoza or Hermosa, perhaps also called Céleste, Matte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1861, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in October 1866.  Their son François was born near Church Point in April 1864. 

Étienne, fils, by his father's first wife, likely married Florentine Darbonne or Derbonne at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1866. 

Descendants of Joseph LEJEUNE/YOUNG (c1756-1847; Pierre dit Briard, Martin dit Briard Labrière, Paul dit Briard)

Joseph, third and youngest son of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune and Marguerite Trahan, born probably in North Carolina in c1756, followed relatives to Maryland, where he was counted at Port Tobacco, an orphan in the household of maternal uncle Honoré Trahan, in July 1763.  In January 1769, he and four of his siblings followed his uncle to Louisiana aboard the English vessel Britannia.  After they finally reached Louisiana, Joseph lived in the Attakapas District for a while and then moved north to the Opelousas prairies and settled near his older brother Blaise on Prairie Faquetaique along upper Bayou des Cannes.  Joseph married Pérrine dite Patsy, daughter of Anglo Creole Gilbert Hayes of Mobile, probably at Opelousas in c1782.  In 1785, they owned three slaves.  Their daughters married into the Barton, Bechum, Bihm, Lacombe, Ortega or Ortego, Prudhomme, and Reed families.  A succession record, which called him Joseph dit Briard, was filed at what would become the Opelousas courthouse in December 1787, years before his death.  A separation-of-community-property record, calling him Joseph Young, Sr., was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in September 1821.  He remarried to Marie, or Mary, daughter of German Creole Michel Ritter and widow of Jean Teller, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1822; he was 66 years old at the time of the wedding; they sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1843; the priest who recorded the ceremony said that Joseph was 106 years old at the time of the sanctification, but he was "only" 87.  Influenced perhaps by his first wife and her Anglo-American relatives, Joseph had anglicized his surname to Young by the 1820s; he was called Joseph Young, Sr. in the civil record of his second marriage.  Joseph, called Joseph Briard Young, died "sur Plaquemen," that is, on Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé, in October 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died "at age 110 years," but he was "only" 90; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse two days after his death.  Most of his descendants called themselves Young also.  One wonders if they spoke English as well as French at home, and if they became Anglophones before the early twentieth century, when Cajuns began speaking American English along with their native French.  Like many Acadians who settled in St. Landry Parish, Joseph's descendants married relatively few fellow Acadians. 

1

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by his father's first wife, born at Opelousas in August 1784, married Marie-Louise, daughter of German Creole Michel Ritter, at Opelousas in September 1805.  Their son Hippolyte, called Polite, was baptized at Opelousas, age 2 months, in October 1807, Lasty or Solasti at age 13 days in October 1810, Guillaume or William was born in September 1814, Jacques, called James and Jim, in May 1816, and Henri, also called Emery, in January 1818.  They also had sons named Barton and Joseph Levi, called Levi, Olivier, and Olivil.  Their daughters married into the Carrière, McGee, and Smith families, and perhaps into the Daigle (French Canadian, not Acadian) family as well. 

1a

Hippolyte, calling himself Young, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Placide Savoie, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1828.  Their son Louis was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1828, Paul, perhaps called Paulite, in October 1830, Onésime in October 1835, Michel in March 1841, and Jesse in January 1847.  They may also have had a son name Hippolyte, fils.  Hippolyte, again calling himself Young, remarried to Amelie or Émelie, called Mélie, daughter of Anglo American Joseph Langley, sometimes misspelled Langlais, Langlay, Langlois, and Lingle, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1852, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church in April 1864.  Their son Louis Barn was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1858, and Ernest was baptized at the Opelousas church at age 10 in August 1873. 

Onésime, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, may have married cousin Louisa Young in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1857. 

Paul, by his father's first wife, called Paulite by the recording priest, and calling himself Young, may have married fellow Acadian Adélaïde Savoie, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in March 1866; Paul would have been 36 years old at the time of the wedding, so one wonders if this was his first marriage. 

Jesse, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, may have married Marie Reed in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1866.  They settled near Eunice.  Their son Arthelus was born in February 1870. 

Hippolyte, fils, perhaps by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Baptiste Jean Baptiste, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1866; the recording clerk said nothing about the bride's ethnicity. 

1b

Lasty, calling himself Young, married Sally, 16-year-old daughter of William Link, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1833.  Did the family line survive? 

1c

Henri/Emery, calling himself Young, married Celimone, Elimone, Alimon, Clémence, Simone, or Simonese, daughter of French Creole Louis Simon Fontenot, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1835.  Their son Henry, Jr. was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1838, William in January 1840, Joseph in April 1852, and Pierre near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in September 1854.  They also had a son named Louis.  Their daughters married into the Fontenot, Manuel, and McGee families.  Henri/Emery, père, still calling himself a Young, remarried to Iréné Smith, widow of Joshua Huk, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1860. 

Henry, Jr., by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married Virginie, daughter of Anglo-American John McGee, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1855; Virginie's mother was a Savoy; Henry, Jr.'s sister Eliza married Virginie's brother Pierre.  Henry, Jr. and Virginie's son Lucius was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1857. 

William, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married Marie Doluce, called Doluce, daughter of French Creole Jean Pierre Lafleur, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1857.  Their son Théophile was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in September 1848, Théodore in May 1862, William, Jr. in August 1863, and Artellus "at Faqua Taique" in February 1868. 

Louis, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married cousin Sydonia, daughter of Joseph Levi Young, formerly Lejeune, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in January 1867.  They settled between Ville Platte and Eunice. 

1d

James, calling himself Young, married cousin Iréné, daughter of fellow Acadian Anselme Doucet, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1837; Iréné's mother was Angèle Lejeune.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in April 1845, Pierre near Grand Coteau in September 1848, and Louis in July 1856.

1e

Barton, calling himself Young, married Anglo American Lucinda or Lucenne, also called Lucindy and Melis, Lee in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1839.  Their son Alfred Barton was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1841.  They also had a son named Lorenzo Barton, called Lorenzy.  Barton remarried to Melissa N., daughter of Anglo American George Lee, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1845. 

Alfred, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married Cephaline or Zéphaline, daughter of Spanish Creole Pierre Manuel, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1858, and sanctified at the Eunice church, St. Landry Parish, in March 1870; the ecclesiastical record recognized the legitimacy of their three sons.  They settled between Ville Platte and Eunice.  Their son John Uranza or Laurenze, called Laurenze, was born in October 1860, Jean Baptiste in c1863, and Joseph, also called Gilbert, in April 1867. 

Lorenzo Barton, by his father's first wife, calling himself Young, married Arthémise Isaure, daughter of probably fellow Acadian Pierre Valcourt Savoie, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1860, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, the following December.  Their son Lorenzo Barton, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1860. 

1f

Joseph Levi, calling himself Young, married Amelia, Amelie, Émeline, or Émelia, daughter of French Creole Lasty Lagrange, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1844.  Their son Lasty was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1845, Don or Jean Louis in July 1846, and Louis in April 1848.  Their daughter married a Young (formerly Lejeune) cousin. 

Lasty married Fanny H., daughter of John McGee, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1865; Fanny's mother was a Savoie.  They settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish. 

1g

William, calling himself Young, married Anglo American Bekhen Lee.  Their son Gilbert was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  William's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1850; he would have been 36 years old that year. 

2

Jean-Baptiste, by his father's first wife, born at Opelousas in March 1786, married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of German Creole Jacob Bihm, at Opelousas in December 1807.  They settled on Prairie Faquetaique.  Their son David was born in September 1808, Jean Baptiste, fils, called John B., in September 1810, Étienne, called Stephen or Steven, in August 1817, Joseph le jeune in August 1821, and Fagny, a twin, in July 1823.  Their daughters married into the Amy, Chachere, and Prudhomme families.  Jean Baptiste, père died in St. Landry Parish in June 1843; the Opelousas priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste dit Joung, as he called him, died "at age 53 yrs.," but he was 57. 

2a

David, calling himself Young, married Azélie, daughter of French Creole Louis Fontenot dit Belaire, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1827.  Their son Onésime had been born in St. Landry Parish in May 1826, a son, name and unrecorded, died in St. Landry Parish in August 1828, Alfred was born in February 1834, Jerry in March 1836 but died at age 6 1/2 in September 1842, and Louis was born in February 1840.  They also had a son named Jesse, perhaps also called J. T.  Their daughters married into the Hébert (French Creole, not Acadian) and Manuel families.  David's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in March 1854; he would have been 46 years old that year. 

Jesse, calling himself Young, married Émelie, daughter of Anglo American Thomas Buller, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry parish, in February 1854.  They settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish.  Their son Thomas was born in March 1855, Jesse, fils in September 1860, and Adam was baptized at the Ville Platte church, age 2 months, in December 1869. 

Alfred, calling himself Young, may have married Domelise, daughter of French Creole Jules Jacques Fontenot, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1857.  Their son Christoval was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in November 1860, and Alfred, fils in May 1862. 

Onésime, calling himself Young, may have married cousin Louisa Young, originally Lejeune, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1857.  Their son Pierre was born in St. Landry Parish in April 1861, and Onésime, fils in May 1863.  Onésime's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in February 1864; he would have been 38 years old that year.  Louisa remarried to Adolphe Manuel in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1864. 

Louis, calling himself Young, married Lise, daughter of French Creole Arsène Saucier, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1861.  They settled between Ville Platte and Eunice.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in October 1861 but died at age 11 months in September 1862, Alfred was born in December 1866, and Eugène in August 1870. 

2b

Jean Baptiste, fils, calling himself John B. Young, married double cousin Evelina or Evelyn, daughter of German Creole Michel Bihm, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1829; Evelina's mother was Eugènie Lejeune.  Their son John, Jr. was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1832, and François in February 1849.  John B.'s succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1854; he would have been 44 years old that year. 

John, Jr., called Jonathan Young, may have married Celina Ellender.  Their son St. Germain was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1855. 

2c

Stephen or Steven, calling himself Young, married Marianne Hortence, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Victor Richard, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1839.  Their son Houston was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1846, Taylor in March 1849, and Pierre Jeff Davis in August 1861.  Their daughters married into the Guidry and Prudhomme families.

During the War of 1861, Houston served in Company K of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Louisiana and Arkansas.  Houston married Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Anglo American Don Hopkins, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1868. 

2d

Joseph le jeune, calling himself Young, may have married Tabitha Lyons in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1845.  Their son James Mendoza was born near Grand Coteau in March 1848, John Wesley, perhaps called J. W., in October 1849, Josephus Richemond in February 1851, Jonathan Lyon in October 1852, and Jefferson Ahart in February 1854. 

John Wesley, called J. W. by the recording clerk, and calling himself Young, may have married Elizabeth J. Steen in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868. 

James Mendoza called James M. by the recording clerk, and calling himself Young, likely married Isidore[sic] M. Steen in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1869. 

3

Pierre dit Pitre, by his father's first wife, born at Opelousas in January 1791, married Marie Louise, called Louise and Lise, daughter of French Creole Louis Fontenot dit Belaire, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1810.  Their son Pierre, fils, called Peter, was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 6 weeks, in September 1811, and Louis was born in June 1817.  Pierre, called Peter Young "of l'anse aux Pailles," died in St. Landry Parish in June 1847; he was 56 years old. 

Pierre, fils married Céleste, 16-year-old daughter of French Creole Michel Carrière, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1836.  Their son Onésime was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1837.  Pierre, fils, called both Pierre Lejeune and Peter Young in the marriage records, remarried to first cousin Mélanie, daughter of James Young, originally Lejeune, Pierre, fils's uncle Jacques, at the Opelousas church in January 1839.  Peter's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1856; he would have been 45 years old that year. 

Onésime may have married Clementine Aguillard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1869. 

4

Hubert dit Briard, also called Gilbert, from his father's first wife, born at Opelousas in March 1793, married Céleste or Célestine, daughter of French Creole Jacob Fontenot, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1814; Célestine's mother was a Jeansonne.  Their son Hubert, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1815, and Olivier dit Briard in September 1819.  Hubert dit Briard died by September 1821, when he was listed as deceased in his father's succession record.

Olivier dit Briard, called Olivier Lejeune in the marriage record, may have married Alexandrine Daigle, probably German Canadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1841.  Their son Joseph Olivier was born near Grand Coteau in October 1845, Gilles in August 1848, and Alexandre in February 1854.  They were living near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the mid-1850s.  A succession record for Olivier Young was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in September 1856; he would have been 37 years old that year. 

5

Jacques or James, by his father's first wife, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in June 1796, married Iréné, daughter of French Creole Michel Prudhomme, fils, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1815.  Their son André was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1827.  Their daughters married into the Demarest, Hay, Lejeune, Rider, and Vallet families.  Jacques was calling himself James Young by the late 1820s.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in March 1828; he would have been in his early 30s that year. 

André may have married cousin Lovigna Young, originally Lejeune.  Their son Joseph was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in February 1862.  Their son Oska, probably Oscar, was born near Eunice in November 1866. 

6

Youngest son Zenon, by his first wife, baptized at Opelousas, age 5 months, in July 1801, probably died young. 

Other LEJEUNE/YOUNGSs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link many Lejeune/Youngs in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there.  The Grand Coteau priests were especially remiss in their record keeping:

Adeline, daughter of Joseph Lejeune, married Louis, son of German Canadian Alexandre Daigle, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1831, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1843.  The parish clerk and the priest who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's mother's name. 

Louis, or Don Louis, Lejeune married Louise, or Lise, Lejeune, perhaps also called Louisiana Smith, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1837.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Alexandre was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1837. 

Eline Young married A. J. Black in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1839.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  One wonders if Eline was an Acadian Lejeune

Geneviève, daughter of Joseph Lejeune and Geneviève St. Amy, married Joseph, fils, son of French Creole Joseph Patin and Acadian Julienne Robichaux and widower of Joséphine Lambre, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1841.  Was Joseph Lejeune an Acadian?

Célestine Lejeune married Thomas J. Watkins in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1842; the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Célestine remarried to German Creole Christophe Gatte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1856; again, the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Suzan Young, probably an Acadian Lejeune, married James H. Stahes in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1843.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

André Young, perhaps an Acadian Lejeune, married French Creole Edmonia or Eléonore Fontenot and settled in St. Landry Parish by the early 1840s.  Their daughter married a Fontenot cousin. 

Odilia Young, probably an Acadian Lejeune, married Anglo Creole Jesse Andrus in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1845.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Odilia, called Adile by the recording clerk, remarried to Anglo American John B. McCoy, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1867.  Again, the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Pierre Briard Lejeune died in St. Landry Parish in March 1845.  He was only 17 years old.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial did not give Pierre Briard's parents' names. 

Louise P. Young, probably an Acadian Lejeune, married French Creole Evariste B. Fontenot at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1846.  The parish clerk and the priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  The marriage "legitimated" the couple's son, Voorhies Fontenot, born in St. Landry Parish the previous April. 

Hermogène Lejeune married Armine Duhon in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1848.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Laurent, also called Laurence, Lawrence, and Laurony, Young married Joséphine, daughter of French Creole Joseph Carrière, also called Gallien.  Their son Benjamin Aloysus was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1850.  They were living near Grand Coteau by 1860.  Lawrence died "at Petit Bois," St. Landry Parish, in August 1863; he was only 39 years old.  Was Lawrence an Acadian Young?  Son Benjamin Aloysius died "at Petit Teche, at grandfather's house, Mr. Joe Carrière," St. Landry Parish, in December 1866; the Opelousas priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Benjamin died "at age 17 yrs.," but he was only 16 1/2. 

Evelina Lejeune, widow of Alexandre H. Barras, married Verneuil Villeneuve in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in July 1852.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Fanny Young married Joseph Harmon in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1852.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Fanny an Acadian Young?

Émelia Lejeune married German Creole Olin Matte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1854.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Émelia's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in June 1870. 

Jean Baptiste Lejeune married French Creole Froisine Begnaud in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1856.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Onésime Young married Marianne Constance Mudd and settled in St. Landry Parish by the late 1850s.  Was Onésime a descendant of Joseph Lejeune/Young?

Mélasie Young married Jules Broussard and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1850s. Was Mélasie an Acadian Young?

Adélaïde Lejeune married French Creole Cyprie, probably Cyprien, Lacombe in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1857.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Louisa Young married cousin Onésime Young in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1857.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Célestine Young married Lucien McGee in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1857.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Amelia Lejeune married Valérien Diaville in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1858.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

André Young married Anglo American Uranie Smith and settled in St. Landry Parish by the early 1860s. 

Paulin Lejeune died near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in March 1861.  He was only 13 or 14 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Paulin's parents' names. 

Louis Lejeune married Amelia or Émelia Trahan in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish May 1861, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Jean Baptiste Sébastien Young married Céleste Fontenot.  Their son Joseph was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1862. 

Élodie Young married François Cyprien Fontenot in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1863.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Don Louis Young married Marie McGee at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1864.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Lasty Eugène was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in September 1864. 

Clément Young, perhaps an Acadian Lejeune, married Clara Gall in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in November 1865.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Louisa Lejeune married Louis Bellard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Amelie Manuel, daughter of Manuel Young and Caroline Frugé, married Valmont, son of Valcourt Gath, probably Gatt, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1866.  Strangely, Manuel, also called Emmanuel, son of Denis Young and Meline Dixon, married Caroline, daughter of French Creole Lasty Frugé, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1870, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church in November.  Judging by the marriage of their daughter in June 1866, Manuel and Caroline had been "married" for decades.  Was Manuel an Acadian Young

Caroline Lejeune married Thomas A. Baley, perhaps Bailey, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Johana Young married Jules Aguillard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Johana an Acadian Young

A succession record for Joseph Young was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in February 1867  Was Joseph an Acadian Young?  If so, which one? 

Susan Lejeune married Lewis Evariste in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Fannie Young married John P. Gurnett in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Fannie an Acadian Young?

Annette Young married William Smith in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Annette an Acadian Young?

A succession record for Joseph Lejeune, married to Felonise Teal, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in March 1868. 

Blaize, probably Blaise, Lejeune married Marie Mélanie Matte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph Young married Elizabeth Rougeau or Rougeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Osmen was born near Eunice in January 1870.  Was Joseph an Acadian Young?

Mary Young married Victor Esidoie in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Mary an Acadian Young?

Marie M. Young married Jarvais Doucet in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Marie an Acadian Young?

Eliza Lejeune married Jean Matte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Amos Lejeune married Ophililia Chatman.  Their son Lucien was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in September 1869. 

Alexandre, son of Louis Lejeune and Henriette Cunningham, married Louisiana, daughter of John Smith, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1869, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December.  Were Louis and Alexandre Acadian Lejeunes?

Asida or Elizida Odilia Lejeune married Joseph Diaville in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Edmond Young married Madeleine Smith in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Edmond an Acadian Young

Irma Lejeune married Jean Baptiste Martin in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Don Louis Young married Marie McGee.  Their son John was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in September 1870.  Was Don Louis an Acadian Young

Alfred Lejeune married Marcile, Marcila, or Marcella Blum at the Eunice church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

Amelie Lejeune married Narcisse Cormier in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

.

A Lejeune whose antecedents are difficult to determine produced a vigorous family line in St. Landry Parish:

Descendants of Jean LEJEUNE (?-; Pierre dit Briard?)

Jean, also called Blaise, Lejeune married Emena, Emma, Armina, or Aimée, also called Divine and Anne, Roy, probably French Canadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1833, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1843; both the parish clerk and the priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  Their daughters married into the Aguillard family, and perhaps into the Chiastor family as well.  Jean, père's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in March 1853. 

1

Oldest son Jean, fils, born in St. Landry Parish in August 1835, married Félicité Clementine, called Clementine, daughter of French Creole Léon Lepage, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1854, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1856.  Their son Edmond Silves was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1857, and Hildevert in August 1860.  Jean, fils remarried to Irma, daughter of Acadian Charles Pitre and widow of Antoine Ledoux and Elisha McDaniel, at the Opelousas church in December 1866.  Their son Christoval Pulcherie was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1867. 

2

Ambroise, born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in October 1843, may have married Felonise McGee, widow of Louis Miller, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1863, or he may have married Élodie Roy during the early 1860s.   Ambroise may have remarried to Anglo American Ophilia Chapman in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1866.

3

Edmond was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1845. 

4

Youngest son Philemon, born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1848, married Susanne or Susanna, daughter of French Canadian Julien Royer or Maillard, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1866 (in which the clerk called the bride a Maillard), and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1867 (in which the priest called the bride a Royer); Susanna's mother was a Trahan

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Most of  the Acadian Lejeunes who came to Louisiana arrived 16 years after the siblings from Maryland reached the colony.  Five families, one led by a widow, and a Lejeune wife--17 members of the family in all--came to Louisiana from France on four of the Seven Ships of 1785.  Some of them chose to settle on the river, creating another center of family settlement:

Eustache Lejeune, age 53, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans from Paimboeuf, France, in July.  With him were second wife Jeanne-Pérrine Gicquel, a Frenchwoman, age 42, three children--Marie-Jeanne-Pérrine-Madeleine, age 23, Servan-Mathurin, age 15, and François-Marie, age 13--and Pélagie-Marie Gautrot, his 15-year-old niece, daughter of his sister Anne.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  Eustache and Jeanne had no more children in Louisiana.  Their daughter married into the Babin family and died at Baton Rouge in the late 1780s, in her late 20s.   Son Servan-Mathurin moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche during the late 1790s.  Niece Pélagie-Marie moved to the western prairies, where she married a Trahan who had immigrated to the colony from Maryland. 

Eustache's oldest son Jean-Baptiste, age 25, crossed on Le Bon Papa, with wife Marie-Geneviève Doiron, age 19.  They followed his family to Manchac, where their children were born.

Grégoire Lejeune, age 48, Eustache's brother, crossed on Le Bon Papa with second wife Hélène Dumont, age 38, three children--Marie-Josèphe, age 14, Grégoire-Alexis, age 4, and Julien, age 2--and niece Marie-Geneviève Gautrot, age 19, Pélagie-Marie's sister.  They also went to Manchac.  They had another daughter but no more sons in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Longuépée and Trahan families.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe died near Baton Rouge in January 1824, age 53.  Niece Marie-Geneviève remained on the river.  Grégoire died near Baton Rouge in July 1826; the priest who recorded his burial said that Grégoire was 91 years old when he died, but he was probably closer to 89.   

.

Eustache and Grégoire's sister Félicité, age 45, crossed with husband Ambroise Hébert, age 54, a 16-year-old daughter, and niece Anne-Angelique Gautrot, age 20, Pélagie-Marie and Marie-Geneviève's sister, on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December.  They chose to go to Nueva Gálvez, also called San Bernardo, an Isleño community on the river below the city, with another Acadian family from their ship.  Félicité remarried to French Creole Jean-Baptiste Salier at either San Bernardo or New Orleans and died in the city in September 1792, in her mid-50s.

.

Most of the Lejeunes who went to the Manchac/Baton Rouge area settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish: 

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE (1760-1854; Pierre dit Briard, Pierre dit Briard, fils, Jean)

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, eldest son of Eustache Lejeune and his first wife Marie Caret, born at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, France, in April 1760, followed his parents to the Poitou region in the early 1770s and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in November 1775.  Baptiste married Marie-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian Séverin Doiron, in France in the early 1780s.  Still childless, they sailed with his family to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785, and followed them to the Baton Rouge area, where their children were born.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Aillet, Babin, and Templet families.  Baptiste died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1854; he was 94 years old and probably a widower.  Four of his five sons created families of their own and settled in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

1

Oldest son Mathurin, born probably near Baton Rouge in December 1792 and baptized at St.-Gabriel the following August, married cousin Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Trahan, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1811; Émilie's mother was Marie-Josèphe Lejeune.  Their son Célestin Valentin was born near Baton Rouge in December 1813, and Eugène in March 1816.  Their daughters married into the Doiron and Thibodeaux families.  Mathurin died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1855; he was 63 years old. 

Célestin died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1847.  He was only 33 years old and may not have married. 

2

Zenon, born near Baton Rouge in June 1794, married Élisabeth, called Lise, Elise, and Elida, daughter of Isleño André Martin, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1824.  Their son Alfred was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in August 1828, Charles in January 1833, Ursin Privat or Privat Ursin in August 1835, Théodore in January 1838, and Joseph Théogène in August 1842.  Their daughter married into the Foret family.  Zenon died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Zenon died at "age 47 years," but he was 53. 

2a

Alfred married Élisabeth, called Élise and Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Foret, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1852; Élise's brother Adonis married Alfred's sister Alida.  Alfred and Élise's son Jean Anatole was born near Brusly in July 1855, and Charles le jeune in June 1861. 

2b

Privat Ursin married Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Magloire Dupuy, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1856.  Their son Joseph Numa was born near Brusly in January 1857. 

2c

Charles died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1856.  He was only 23 years old and did not marry. 

3

Jean-Baptiste, fils, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 1, in May 1800, married Roseline, daughter of fellow Acadian Landry Allain, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1838; Jean Baptiste, fils was in his late 30s at the time of the wedding.  Their son Jean Célestin was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1841.  Their daughter married into the Bourg and Hébert families. 

4

Eusèbe, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 10 months, in December 1801, may have died young. 

5

Youngest son Séverin, also called Zéphirin, born near Baton Rouge in July 1808, married Séraphine, daughter of French Creole Thomas Aillet, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1830.  Their son Donatien was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in July 1832, Théodule near Brusly in March 1841, Joseph Théophile in September 1842, Achille Théodore in May 1848, Séverin Forestal in May 1850 but died at age 3 in August 1853, and Thomas Isidore was born in May 1854.  Their daughters married into the Alexandrie, Labauve, and Leray families. 

5a

Donatien married Mirza, daughter of fellow Acadian Landry Landry, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1853.  Their son Joseph Arthur was born in Brusly in February 1855, Donatien Otard in January 1857, and François Alphonse in December 1858. 

5b

Théodule married Théodorice, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Paul LeBlanc, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1865. 

Descendants of François-Marie LEJEUNE (1771-; Pierre dit Briard, Pierre dit Briard, fils, Jean)

François-Marie, third and youngest son of Eustache Lejeune and his first wife Marie Caret, born at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in May 1771, followed his parents to the Poitou region in the early 1770s and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in November 1775.  He sailed with his father, stepmother, and siblings to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785, and followed them to the Baton Rouge area, where he married Marguerite-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Lebert, in January 1798.  Marguerite-Marie also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Doiron, Henry, Longuépée, and Richard families. 

1

Older son Jean-Marie, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 5 months, in June 1800, married cousin Adélaïde, daughter of Grégoire Alexis Lejeune, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1830; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Jean Alphonse was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1833, Marcel Ursin in December 1837, and François Théodore in September 1845.  Their daughter married into the Sarradet family.  Jean Marie died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1846; he was only 46 years old. 

1a

Jean Adolphe, called Adolphe, may have married fellow Acadian Élodie LeBlanc.  Their son Jean was born in Ascension Parish in February 1858. 

1b

Marcel Ursin may have married Françoise Dubroca.  Their son Aristide Marcel was born near Baton Rouge in September 1869. 

2

Younger son Élie-Hyacinthe, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 3 months, in November 1801, married cousin Marie Eléonore, called Eléonore and sometimes Hélène, daughter of French Creole Louis Julien Aillet of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1832; Eléonore's mother was Marie Lejeune; they had to secure a dispensation for second and third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Joachim Élie was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in April 1833, and Louis in March 1837.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Hébert families. 

Louis died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1857.  He was only 20 years old and probably did not marry. 

Descendants of Grégoire-Alexis LEJEUNE (1781-; Pierre dit Briard, Pierre dit Briard, fils, Jean)

Grégoire-Alexis, called Alexis, elder son of Grégoire Lejeune and his second wife Hélène Dumont, born at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, France, in February 1781, sailed to Louisiana with his parents and siblings aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He followed them to the Baton Rouge area, where he married Marie, also called Marguerite, daughter of French Creole Charles Tardit, in May 1806; Marie's mother was an Hébert.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Doiron, Henry, Lejeune, and Thibodeaux families.  One wonders if either of his sons created a family of his own.  

1

Older son Marcellin Alexis, born near Baton Rouge in February 1807, may have died young.

2

Younger Jean Fergus, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1817, also may have died young. 

Descendants of Julien LEJEUNE (1783-; Pierre dit Briard, Pierre dit Briard, fils, Jean)

Julien, younger son of Grégoire Lejeune and his second wife Hélène Dumont, born at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, France, in February 1783, sailed to Louisiana with his parents and siblings aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He followed them to the Baton Rouge area, where he married Élizabeth, daughter of Anglo American William Gibson of Kentucky, in c1808.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughter married into the Doiron family. 

1

Oldest son Alexis died near Baton Rouge 5 days after his birth in April 1809.

2

Zenon, born near Baton Rouge in January 1813, married Delphine, also called Elvina, Delvina, and Telvina, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Daigre of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1834.  Their son Théodule Zenon was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1835, Valière Euchadis in October 1842 but died at age 11 in October 1853, Forestin or Forestal, called Forestal, was born in January 1845, and Edgard near Brusly in February 1847. 

2a

Forestal married Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Thibodeaux, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1868. 

2b

Edgard married Alphonsine, daughter of Louis Lavigne, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1869; Alphonsine's mother was a Landry

3

Paul Léon, called Léon and also Élie, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, age 13 months, in May 1820, married Eléonore, called Léonore, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Leger Daigre of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1843.  Their son Jean Baptiste Abraham was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1849, Joseph Oscar in August 1851, Numa Alcide in May 1854, and Jean Baptiste in March 1858.  Their daughter married into the Serrett family. 

4

Ursin Amand, also called Victorin and Zenon, born near Baton Rouge in December 1824, married fellow Acadian Rosalie Trahan probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the early 1840s.  Their son Alphonse was born probably near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1845, Michel Arthur in April 1851, Julien Albert in July 1858, and Lucien in November 1860.  Their daughter married into the Lemoine family. 

Alphonse married first cousin Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Élien Doiron, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish,  in January 1867; Eugénie's mother was Alphonse's paternal aunt Hélène Lejeune.

5

Youngest son Eugène, born near Baton Rouge in August 1827, married Joséphine, daughter of Augustin Seguin, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1858; Joséphine's mother was a Longuépée.  Their son Joseph Anatole was born near Brusly in December 1860.

Other LEJEUNEs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Lejeunes on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Thosin Lejeune married Florestine Templet.  Their son Derosin was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, age unrecorded, in March 1840. 

Charles Lejeune married Marie Espinard and settled near Baton Rouge by the mid-1840s. 

Léon Lejeune married Louise Trahan and settled near Baton Rouge by the late 1840s. 

Élie Lejeune died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1851.  He was only 41 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Élie's parents' names or mention a wife. 

Omere Lejeune died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1866.  He was only 3 years old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not bother to give any parents' names. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Some of the Lejeunes who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche:

Jean Lejeune, age 29, crossed aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in September.  With him was wife Félicité Boudrot, age 31, and no children.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

.

Anastasie Levron, age 49, widow of Amand Lejeune and Jean's mother, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were six more of her children--Joseph, age 22, Marie-Rose, age 18, Marie-Marguerite, age 16, Alexis-Simon, age 12, Anne-Adélaïde, age 6, and Rosalie, age 2.  Her daughters married into the Chiasson, Menou or Menous, and Trahan families.  Daughter Marie Rose, a widow, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1851; the Thibodaux priest who recorded her burial said that Marie Rose died "at age 85 yrs.," but she was "only" 83; a "petition for inventory" in her name was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse the following November. 

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Two of the Lejeunes from France created a third center of family settlement on Bayou Lafourche: 

Jean LEJEUNE (c1756-1824; Pierre dit Briard, ?)

Jean, eldest son of Amand Lejeune and Anastasie Levron, born at Liverpool, England, in c1756, followed his family to France in 1763.  Still a child, he participated with his parents in a settlement scheme in the Poitou region in the early 1770s and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in March 1776.  He married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadian Félix Boudrot, at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, in November 1782.  They sailed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  Jean died in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1824, in his late 60s. 

Descendants of Joseph LEJEUNE (c1763-1825; Pierre dit Briard, ?)

Joseph, second son of Amand Lejeune and Anastasie Levron, born at Liverpool, England, in c1763, followed his parents to France later that year.  He participated with his family in a failed settlement scheme in the Poitou region during the early 1770s and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in March 1776.  Still a bachelor, he followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, in 1785 and married fellow passenger Bonne-Marie-Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Germaine Landry, at New Orleans in November 1785 soon after they reached the colony.  They followed his widowed mother and siblings to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Daigle and Levron families.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Lebert and widow of Pierre-Janvier Guidry, at Assumption on September 1798.  Marie-Josèphe had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships.  Joseph's succession record was filed in what became the Thibodauxville courthouse, Interior Parish, in August 1798.  He died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1825, in his early 60s.

1

Oldest son Jean-Joseph, by his father's first wife, baptized at Lafourche, age unrecorded, in February 1788, may have died young.

2

Alexis-Joseph, also called Alexis-Simon, from his father's first wife, born at Lafourche in April 1791, married Marie Rosalie or Marie Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Thibodeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1816.  Their son Célestin Alexis was born in Assumption Parish in March 1818, Auguste or Augustin, called Gustin, in February or June 1823, Joseph Wilfride in August 1827, and Jean Louis in August 1832.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron and Schulanberg or Schmlenbury families.  Alexis died in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1833; the Thibodauxville priest who recorded his burial said that Alexis was 46 years old when he died, but he was only 42; his succession inventory record was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse the following August, and a petition for family meeting was filed there in April 1848. 

2a

Augustin married Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of Spanish Creole Manuel Garci, Garcie, Garcy, or Garcia, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1844; Marie's mother was a Bourque.  Their son Jean Taylor Adam was baptized at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, age 10 days, in May 1849 but died at age 3 in May 1852, and Joseph Alexis was born in January 1854. 

2b

Célestin married Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Blanchard of St. James Parish and widow of Pierre Michel, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1855; Célestin was 37 years old at the time of the wedding.

3

Youngest son Ambroise-André, by his father's first wife, married Justine Annette, also called Augustine, daughter of French Creole Antoine Ledet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1818.  Their son Joseph Jean Baptiste, called Jean Baptiste, was born in Assumption Parish in February 1819 but died at age 11 1/2 in August 1830, and Eugène was born in January 1822.  Their daughter married into the Roustan family.  Ambroise died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1822.  Did his line, except for its blood, survive? 

Descendants of Alexis-Simon LEJEUNE (1773-1835; Pierre dit Briard, ?)

Alexis-Simon, third and youngest son of Amand Lejeune and Anastasie Levron, born at St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, France, in March 1773, was taken to Poitou soon after his birth and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in March 1776.  He crossed with them to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, in 1785, and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Françoise-Barbe, called Barbe, daughter of fellow Acadian Marin Trahan, at Assumption in January 1794.  Barbe, also a native or Morlaix, had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  They lived near the boundary of what became Ascension and Assumption parishes before moving down bayou to Lafourche Interior Parish.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, LeBlanc, Molaison, Pontiff, and Thibodeaux families.  Alexis died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1835; he was 62 years old.; his succession records were filed at the Thibodauxville and Houma courthouses in December 1835 and September 1836, so he may have owned property in Terrebonne as well as Lafourche Interior Parish.   

1

Oldest son Pierre-Amand, -Laman, or -Lamant, born at Assumption in January 1797, married Marie Clémence or Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Martin LeBlanc, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1826.  Their son Charles Alexis, called Alexis, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1833, Joseph Cyprien in October 1840, Joachim Elmond in November 1842, and Bierrek in September 1853.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Estivenne or Estivens, Lamoureux (Foreign French, not Acadian), Lapeyrouse, and Pitre families.  An interdiction for insanity, filed against Pierre Amand in Terrebonne Parish in August 1837, was "cancelled & declared void" in October 1838. 

1a

Alexis married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Eugène Bourgeois, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1861.  Their son Pierre Lovinci was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1865. 

1b

Joseph Cyprien may have married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Crejustin Martin, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in April 1863 (the parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the groom's parents' names).  Their son Joseph Amédée was born near Raceland in February 1864 but died the following January, Paul Alcide was born in March 1868, and Michel Adélard in May 1870. 

2

Antoine-Marcellus, called Marcellus, born at Ascension in March 1799, married Marie Célanie, called Célanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Bernard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1835.  Their son Pierre or Joseph Jackson, called Jackson, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1835.  Marcellus remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Aucoin, at the Thibodaux church in May 1842.  They settled near the boundary of Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes.  Their son Aurestile Louis Evariste or Louis Evariste Aurestile was born in October 1843 but died at age 2 1/2 in July 1845, and Alexis Emelius, called Emelius, was born in July 1845, 5 days before the death of his older brother Louis.  One of his sons moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War Between the States. 

2a

Jackson, by his father's first wife, married Aurelie, daughter of German Creole Onésime Bernard, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in November 1856; Aurelie's mother was an Hébert; her father and Joseph Jackson's mother were from entirely different Bernard families.  Their son Norbert Avil was born near Lydia, Iberia Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, in February 1870. 

2b

Emelius, by his father's second wife, married Ophelia Marie, daughter of Lucien Cointment, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in January 1869; Ophelia's mother was an Acadian Bernard.  Their son Edgard Antoine was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1869. 

3

Alexis-Jean-Baptiste, called Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in May 1801, married Marie Rose, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian François Doucet, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1823.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1824 but died 16 days after his birth, Jean Baptiste Sylvain was born in March 1826, and François Alexis posthumously in February 1828.  Jean Baptiste, called Maximilien Jean Baptiste by the recording priest, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1827; the Thibodauxville priest who recorded Jean Baptiste's burial said that he was 30 years old when he died, but he was only 26. 

4

Joseph-Marin, born at Assumption in October 1802, may have died young. 

5

Joseph Benjamin, born probably in Assumption Parish in c1814, married Marie Louise, called Élise, 18-year-old daughter of French Creole Louis Baudoin, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1833.  Their son Joseph Alex or Raphaël was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1834 but died at 1 in October 1835.  Their daughter married into the Lagarde family.  Joseph Benjamin died in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1838; the Thibodauxville priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 20 years old when he died, but he probably was closer to 24; his succession record was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse the following month.  His line of the family died with him. 

6

Youngest son Antoine Marcel, born in Assumption Parish in July 1815, may have died young. 

~

A Lejeune from France who had followed his family to a river settlement joined his cousins on upper Bayou Lafourche during the late 1790s: 

Descendants of Servan-Mathurin LEJEUNE (1769-; Pierre dit Briard, Pierre dit Briard, fils, Jean)

Servan-Mathurin, second son of Eustache Lejeune and his first wife Marie Caret, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in July 1769, followed his parents to the Poitou region in the early 1770s and retreated with them to the port city of Nantes in November 1775.  He sailed with his father, stepmother, and siblings to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, in 1785, and followed them to the Baton Rouge area, where he married Geneviève-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon dit Pierre Pitre, in November 1792.  Marguerite had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche in the late 1790s.  Their daughter married into the Guillot family. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born near Baton Rouge in October 1794, married Modeste Théotiste, called Théotiste, daughter of fellow Acadian François Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1821.  Their son Jean Cyprien Treville was born in Assumption Parish in September 1825, Jean Baptiste Oville or Clovis, called Clovis, in April 1828, and Jean Baptiste Octave Ernest, called Ernest, in August 1840.  They also had a son named Taylor, unless he was Jean Cyprien Treville.  Their daughters married into the Burton, LeBlanc, Tabor, and Thibodeaux families. 

1a

Clovis married Eulalie Uranie, called Uranie, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Bourgeois, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in April 1854.  They settled near the boundary of Lafourche and Assumption parishes.  Their son Michel Désiré Ambroise was born in December 1855, Aristide Anatole in May 1857, Camille Arthur Théodore in January 1860, Joseph Robert Augustin in October 1862 but died at age 2 in October 1864, and Cordelius Joseph Arthur was born in July 1868. 

1b

Ernest died in Lafourche Parish in August 1859.  He was only 19 years old and did not marry. 

1c

Taylor married Charlotte Elvire, called Elvire, daughter of Anglo American Joseph Walker, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in April 1869; Elvire's mother was a Breaux.  Their son Henri Ernest was born in Lafourche Parish in July 1870. 

2

Élie, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 9 months, in May 1797, may have died young. 

3

Youngest son Michel-Mathurin, also called Joseph-Mathurin, born near Baton Rouge in October 1798 and baptized at Assumption  11 months later, married Rosalie Clémence, also called Marie Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Ambroise Mathurin Hébert and widow of Auguste Pichot, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1832.  Their son Michel Fulgence was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1832 but died at age 9 months in August 1833, Joseph Marcellin was born in January 1835, Zenon in January 1836 but died at age 9 months the following October, Jean Baptiste Adélard Paulin, called Adélard, was born in June 1838, Ovile Forestile Evariste in November 1839, Eutope Amédée, called Amadéo, in May 1842, and Henry died at birth in July 1844.  Their daughter married into the Granger family at Baton Rouge. 

3a

Adélard died in Lafourche Parish in October 1859.  He was only 21 years old and did not marry. 

3b

Amadéo married Eveleda or Evellida, daughter of Charles Lepine, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in February 1862.  Their son Valère was born near Raceland in August 1869. 

~

Other LEJEUNEs in the Lafourche Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Lejeunes in the Bayou Lafourche valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Levran Lejeune's succession inventory was filed at what became the Thibodauxville courthouse, Interior Parish, in February 1806. 

A "petition for inventory" was filed for Joseph A. Lejeune at the Thibodaux courthouse, Lafourche Parish, in March 1856.  Who was he?

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Lejeune is a common surname in France, so it is no surprise that many Lejeunes of South Louisiana are not Acadians.  Members of the family came to the colony as early as the 1720s.  Most remained at New Orleans, but some settled on the river above the city at St.-Gabriel, Baton Rouge, and Pointe Coupée, and at Opelousas on the western prairies.  The most famous Lejeune born in Louisiana, in fact--Marine General John Archer Lejeune--was a French Creole from Pointe Coupee Parish whose ancestor came to the colony years before the first of his Acadian namesakes arrived: 

Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Claude Lejeune and Marieanne Le Seur, married Charles, son of François Vincent, at Old Biloxi, present-day Mississippi but then a part of Louisiana colony, in August 1721.

Marguerite, daughter of Claude Lejeune, "cavalryman of the Parish of Castelheim," and Christine Colson, married Antoine-Joseph, son of Pierre De Latte, at New Orleans in November 1728.

Jean-Jacques Lejeune, native of Hofnich, Diocese of Basel, Switzerland, a sergeant, died at New Orleans in July 1732. 

Augustin Lejeune married Louise Piliot.  Their son Jean-Baptiste was born at New Orleans in November 1751. 

Michel Lejeune died a widower at Pointe Coupée in March 1788.  He was 60 years old.  One wonders if he was a kinsman of the other Michel Lejeune at Pointe Coupée. 

Henri Lejeune died near St.-Gabriel in February 1795.  The priest who recorded his burial did not list Henri's parents' names, mention a wife, or give his age at the time of his death. 

Antoine Lejeune married Marguerite Dulat.  Their daughter Marie married Anglo Creole Creid, son of Nathaniel West of North Carolina, at Baton Rouge in April 1800. 

David Lejeune lived at Bayou Sara, where his wife, Anne Lejeune, died in April 1803.  She was only 50 years old.  Were they Pointe Coupee Lejeunes?

.

One of the most prolific Lejeune families in South Louisiana was founded during the middle colonial period by a former resident of Illinois who settled at Pointe Coupée.  Typical of the settlers there, few, if any, members of this family married Acadians: 

Descendants of Michel LEJEUNE (?-?)

Michel Lejeune married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, Enet or Hennette perhaps at Ste.-Anne, Illinois, and settled at False River, Pointe Coupée.  Their daughters married into the Bélanger, Chutz, Gueho dit La Jennese, Janis, and Picard families.  Michel died probably at his home at False River in March 1766; the priest who recorded Michel's burial did not give his age at the time of his death.  Most, if not all, of his descendants are from his oldest son, Michel, fils.  During the early antebellum period, some of them moved down to the Baton Rouge area and out into the St. Landry prairies, but most of them remained in Pointe Coupée.  One of their descendants was Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune of Pointe Coupee Parish, hero of World War One and thirteenth commandant of the United States Marine Corps. 

1

Michel, fils, born in either Illinois or Pointe Coupée in c1740, married Catherine, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Barras, at Pointe-Coupée in July 1770.  Their son Michel III was born at Pointe Coupée in April 1771, Joseph in October 1772, Hubert was baptized at Pointe Coupée, age 2 months, in March 1783, Antoine was born in October 1789, Jean in May 1795, and Vital in c1817.  Their daughters married into the Gremillion, Langlois, Methode, and Sicard families.  Michel, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1826; he was 86 years old. 

1a

Michel III married Émelie, daughter of Joseph Labrie, at Pointe Coupée in August 1793, the same day his younger brother Joseph married.  Michel III and Émelie's infant son, name unrecorded, died at Pointe Coupée in October 1796, Levere was baptized at Pointe Coupée, age unrecorded, in April 1797, Octave was born in January 1801, a son, name and age unrecorded, died in November 1801, a son, name unrecorded, died the day of his birth in July 1803, and Bruno, a twin, was baptized at age 11 months in May 1805.  Michel III remarried to Barbe, daughter of French Creole Guillaume Guérin, at Baton Rouge in March 1806.  Their son Paulin or Napoléon, also called Léon, was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1813.  They also had a son named Desolive. Their daughter married into the Porche family.  Michel III died in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1826; he was 55 years old. 

Bruno, by his father's first wife, perhaps also called Séverin, may have married French Creole Odile Picard in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish in the early 1820s.  The Philorin Lejeune who died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 3, in October 1824, may have been their son.  Their daughters married into the Henderson and Labauve families, and perhaps into the Lejeune (French Creole, not Acadian) family as well.  Bruno died in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1859; he was 55 years old. 

Octave, by his father's first wife, married cousin Augustine, daughter of French Creole Denys Lemoine and widow of Joseph Lejeune, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1824; they had to secure a dispensation for the second degree of ____ in order to marry.  Octave died in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1826; he was only 25 years old.  His family line probably died with him. 

Napoléon, by his father's second wife, married cousin Marie Aonide, called Aonide, Arnide, Oneide, Onilde, and Oneil, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Sicard, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in October 1835; Marie's mother was Eulalie Lejeune.  Their son Jean Paul was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1840, François Émile, called Émile, in March 1842 but died at age 5 in June 1847, François Joseph was born in October 1843, François Alfred in February 1845, Éloi Uranus in December 1847, and Michel Thomas in December 1849.  Napoléon died "at the 'Island,'" Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1852; he was only 39 years old. 

François Joseph may have married French Creole Clara Olinde and settled near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, by the early 1860s. 

Jean Paul, called John, married cousin Mélanie, daughter of French Creole Georgette Chutz and widow of ____, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1865; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  John remarried to Lidia, daughter of French Creole Rosémond Sicard, at the Lakeland church in February 1867. 

Desolive, by his father's second wife, married cousin Marie Ophelia, called Ophelia, another daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Sicard, at the bride's home in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1839.  Their son François had been born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1838, Jean Baptiste was born in early 1841 but died at age 1 1/2 in October 1842, Léon was born in March 1843, Michel Paul, called Paul, in December 1846 but died at age 7 months in July 1847, Joseph A. Emmanuel was born in October 1853, and Étienne Olivier in December 1857. 

1b

Joseph married Louise, daughter of French Creole Antoine Gosserand, at Pointe Coupée in August 1793, the same day his older brother Michel III married.  Joseph and Louise's son Joseph, fils was born at Pointe Coupée in February 1795, and a son, name unrecorded, died at age 3 months in August 1802.  Their daughters married into the Major and Pain families.  Joseph, père remarried to Marie, daughter of French Creole François Legros, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1810.  Their son Adolph was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, age 1 1/2, in March 1810, and Saintville Joseph at age 3 months the same day as brother Adolph.  Joseph, père died in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1821; the priest who recorded Joseph's burial said that he was 55 years old when he died, but he was only 48. 

1c

Hubert married Clarisse, also called Annette, daughter of French Creole J. B. Saison, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1804.  Their son Hubert, fils was baptized at Pointe Coupee, age 2 months, in May 1805, and Octave in c1817.  They also had sons named Jean Baptiste, called Baptiste, and Dorsineau.  Their daughter married a Lejeune cousin.  Hubert, père died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1822; he was only 38 years old. 

Hubert, fils married cousin Marie Augustine, called Augustine, daughter of French Creole Hubert Perault, at Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1825; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Anatif was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1838.  Their daughter married into the Gauthier family.  Hubert, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1846; he was only 41 years old. 

Octave married Marie Adveline, Eveline, or Edveline, daughter of French Creole Baptiste Neurat, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1832.  They settled at Grand Coteau, near some of his Acadian namesakes.  Their daughter married into the Chutz family in Pointe Coupee.  Octave died near Grand Coteau in February 1848; he was only 31 years old.  Except for its blood, his family line may have died with him. 

Baptiste married Phelonise Pérrine, called Pérrine, daughter of French Creole Louis Chenevert, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in November 1833.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Pointe Coupee Parish a day after his birth in September 1837, Louis was born in June 1839, Hubert le jeune in March 1847, Célestin in October 1849, François in June 1856, and Alfred Sydney in August 1861.  Their daughters married into the Lacour and Patin families.  Baptiste likely remarried to fellow French Creole Marie Félicie, called Félicie, Lacour.  Their son Jean Baptiste Marius was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1863, Joseph in April 1865, and Ovide in January 1870. 

Hubert le jeune, by his father's first wife, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1868.  He was only 21 years old and probably did not marry. 

Célestin, by his father's first wife, married Marie Laura, daughter of Charles F. Mix, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870. 

Dorsineau married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of Louis Viales, Vialese, or Vialez, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1836.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Pointe Coupee Parish 20 days after his birth in March 1838, Simon Donatien, called Donat, was born in May 1839 but died at age 1 1/2 in February 1841, Arthur was born in June 1844, Jacques in September 1847, Dorsin died at age 6 months in August 1849, and Vileor was born in December 1852 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1855. 

Arthur married Alosia Neff at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in June 1867.  Their son Prosper Evariste died near Lakeland, age 17 months, in September 1868, François Evariste was born in April 1868, and Jean Maurille in September 1870. 

1d

Antoine married Françoise, daughter of French Creole Louis Sicard, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1809.  Their son Antoine, fils was born near Baton Rouge in November 1816.  They also had a son named Ovide.  Their daughter married into the Barras familyAntoine, père died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1820; the priest who recorded his burial said that Antoine was 20 years old when he died, but he was 30. 

Antoine, fils married cousin Marie Émilie, called Émilie, Amelie, Ofilia, and Olivia, daughter of Séverin Lejeune and widow of Bruno Lejeune, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in June 1836.  Their son Jean Alexandre, called Alexandre, was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in December 1838, Ambroise in April 1842 but died at age 1 1/2 in July 1843, and Théoville was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, age 6 months, in June 1854.  Their daughter married into the Philippe family. 

Alexandre married Estelle, daughter of Guillaume Prieur, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1859.  Their son Denis died near Lakeland, age 1 1/2, in July 1862, François Alexandre was born in May 1863, and Antoine Sébastien in December 1868. 

Ovide married double cousin Marie Euphrosine or Euphrasie, called Franie, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Sicard, at the bride's home in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1839; Euphrosine's mother was Eulalie Lejeune.  They settled at False River.  Their son Joseph was born in October 1844, Jean Numa, called Numa, was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, age 1 month, in July 1848 but died at age 2 1/2 in March 1851, and François Ovide, called Ovide, fils, was born in June 1856 but died at age 2 in June 1858. 

1e

Vital married Marcelline, also called Françoise, another daughter of Louis Sicard, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1817.  Their son Marcel was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in c1820, and a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Pointe Coupee Parish at age 2 months in November 1821.  They also had a son named Théodule.  Their daughter married into the Neff family.  Vital, "res. of L'isle," died in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1849; he was only 32 years old. 

Marcel "of False River" married cousin Oliva or Olivia, 27-year-old daughter of Hubert Lejeune, père, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1847.  Olivia died near Lakeland in March 1868; she was only 47 years old.  Marcel likely remarried to Cécilia Bello in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in 1868 or 1869.  Their son Fermin Levegne was born near Lakeland in September 1869. 

Théodule married Jeanne, daughter of Siméon Major, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1850.  They settled near Lakeland.  Their son Jean Macloux was born in November 1851, and Charles Émile in October 1861.  

2

Charles, born probably at Pointe-Coupée in c1753, married Félicité, 30-year-old daughter of French Creole Louis Langlois and widow of Pierre-Augustin Porché, at Pointe Coupée in November 1798; he was 45 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Charles, fils was born at Pointe Coupée in September 1801.  Their daughters married into the Patin and Porche families.  Charles died in Pointe Coupee Parish in March 1825; he was 72 years old.  His only son died young, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Charles, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in April 1820.  He was only 18 years old and did not marry. 

.

Area church records make it difficult to link some of the Lejeunes at Pointe Coupée with Michel and his wife Madeleine Hennette, but they probably were descendants of the couple:

Pélagie, daughter of Geneviève Lejeune, was born at Pointe Coupée in August 1784.  The priest who recorded the girl's baptism did not give the father's name. 

Nicolas Lejeune married Marguerite Lejeune probably at Pointe Coupée.  Their son Hubert was born at Pointe Coupée in March 1785. 

Marie, daughter of Marie-Françoise Lejeune, was born at Pointe Coupée in April 1786.  The priest who recorded the girl's baptism did not give the father's name. 

Marie-Françoise Lejeune, widow of ____ Pourciau, died at Pointe Coupee in January 1806.  She was 70 years old.  Was she an older daughter of the original Michel Lejeune

Séverin Lejeune died in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1823; he was only 24 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Séverin's parents' names or mention a wife. 

Pierre Lejeune died in Pointe Coupee Parish in April 1843.  He was only 3 months old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

Octave Lejeune revalidated his marriage to Marie Ophelia, called Ophelia, daughter of Béloni Major, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1845; the priest who recorded the revalidation did not give Octave's parents' names.  Their son Alexandre married first cousin Virginie, daughter of Veronic Major, at the Pointe Coupee church in January 1866.  Their son Georges Alexandre was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1867 but died the following October.  Alexandre remarried to Evelina, daughter of Jules Fabre, at the Pointe Coupee church in November 1868. 

Desolive Lejeune married Constance Pourciau.  Their son Victorin was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in March 1847.  Their daughter married into the Guérin (French Creole, not Acadian) family.  Victorin married Marie Alexandrine, daughter of Auguste Saizan, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in December 1869. 

Power Lejeune married Séverine Leduf.  Their son Joseph Théophile was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1849. 

Desolive Lejeune married Thérèse Chenevert.  Their son Jean Baptiste died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 2, in February 1852, and Joseph was born in September 1852.  Their daughter married into the Bouanchaud family. 

Eulalie Lejeune married Eustache Bueche at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in August 1857.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Antoine Lejeune married Marie Louise, called Louise, Prieur.  Their son François Antoine was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1859. 

Charles Lejeune, husband of Marie Joséphine, called Joséphine, Swindler, died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in June 1862.  He was only 30 years old.  Was his death war-related? 

Hippolyte Lejeune died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in October 1865.  He was 75 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Hippolyte's parents' names or mention a wife. 

John Lejeune married Lydia Sicard and settled near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Paul Lejeune married Palmyre ____ and settled near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Octavie Lejeune married Charles Joffrion at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in November 1867.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

~

During the antebellum period, a few more non-Acadian Lejeunes settled in Pointe Coupee, in other river communities, or on the western prairies: 

David, son of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune and Marian David of Becardia, France, married Constance, daughter of French Creole Charles Beauvais, at Pointe Coupée in May 1804. 

Catherine, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and widow of Maurice Olivier, married Benjamin, son of Jacob Kidder of London, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1810.

Michel Lejeune, a "Middle-age Canadian," age unrecorded, died at Baton Rouge in January 1845.  One wonders how long he had been living there and if his Canadian roots also were Acadian. 

~

Some Lejeunes of the antebellum period were products of the South's peculiar institution, in which Acadian Lejeunes participated: 

Hélène, "slave of Lejune," gave birth to daughter Sidalise near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in November 1851. 

CONCLUSION

Lejeunes settled early in Acadia, but they were relative late-comers to Louisiana.  The first to arrive were five siblings following their maternal uncle from Maryland aboard the British vessel Britannia in 1769--the last group of Acadian exiles to go to Louisiana from that British colony.  Two of the siblings, brothers Blaise and Joseph, lived at Ascension on the river for a while, where Blaise married.  During the 1770s, they crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District, where they settled along upper Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé in present-day Acadia Parish.  Both brothers raised large families.  Typical of Acadians in the Opelousas area, many of their descendants married non-Acadians, especially German Creoles and Anglo Americans.  Meanwhile, 17 of their Lejeune cousins came to Louisiana from France in 1785.  None of these late comers crossed the Atchafalaya Basin.  They settled, instead, in what became West Baton Rouge Parish or on upper Bayou Lafourche.  During the antebellum period, Acadian Lejeunes could be found in three distinct centers of family settlement--the earliest and largest one on the western prairies, especially around Opelousas, Church Point, and Ville Platte in present-day St. Landry, Acadia, and Evangeline parishes; another in West Baton Rouge Parish; and a third along the upper and middle stretches of Bayou Lafourche.  At least one Bayou Lafourche Lejeune moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861. 

Non-Acadian Lejeunes came to the colony decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived.  Most remained at New Orleans, but one family from the Illinois country settled at Pointe Coupée by the 1750s.  Michel Lejeune and his descendants, typical of the French Creoles at Pointe Coupée, tended to marry their own kind.  A few of Michel's grandsons moved downriver to the Baton Rouge area, and one settled in St. Landry Parish near his Acadian namesakes, but most of his many descendants remained in Pointe Coupee Parish.  (One of Michel's descendants was Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, hero of World War I and commandant of the United States Marine Corps, for whom Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, is named.)

During the early antebellum period, Acadian Joseph Lejeune of St. Landry Parish, who married a Hayes from the Carolinas, anglicized his surname to Young, adding yet another complexity to the family's genealogy.  These Acadian Youngs should not be confused with their Anglo-American namesakes who settled in South Louisiana before the War of 1861. ...

The family's name also is spelled Lejeunne, Lejune. 

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 662-64, 1415-19, 1504-05, 2245, 2547-50; Brasseaux, Founding of New Acadia, 105; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Bunnell, French & Native North American Marriages, 70-71; Guidry, "Guédrys Exiled to North Carolina"; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 297-98; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 140-42.; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 4, 5; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family Nos. 13, 14, 15, 22; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 72, 103, 106, 135, 136, 139, 159; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 70-71; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-28; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 582-90; White, DGFA-1, 1048-58; White, DGFA-1 English, 223-28.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Alexis-Simon LEJEUNE 01 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born 25 Mar 1773, baptized next day, St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, France; son of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; brother of Anne-Adélaïde, Jean, Joseph, Marie-Marguerite, Marie-Rose, & Rosalie; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 13[sic], traveled with widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 12[sic], with widowed mother & sisters; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 18, with widowed mother & sisters; married, age 20, Françoise-Barbe, called Barbe, of Morlaix, daughter of Marin TRAHAN & his first wife Marie-Madeleine LEBLANC, & sister of sister Anne-Adélaïde's husband Jean-Marie, 8 Jan 1794, Assumption, now Plattenville; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Alexos, age 25[sic], with wife Barbara age 20, & daughter [Adélaïde-]Constancia age 1, next to brother-in-law Juan Bautista TRAHAN; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 26[sic], with wife Barbe age 21, & daughter Constance age 2, next to brother-in-law Jean-Baptiste TRAHAM; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 27[sic], with wife Élisabet[sic] age 28, son Hemon age 3, 4/50 arpents, 0 slaves, next to brother Joseph; died Lafourche Interior Parish 29 or 30 Nov 1835, age 62; petition for succession inventory dated 3 Dec 1835, Lafourche Interior Parish courthouse; succession release record dated 16 Sep 1836, Terrebonne Parish courthouse
Anne-Adélaïde LEJEUNE 02 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf baptized 6 Oct 1779, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; called Adélaïde; daughter of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; sister of Alexis-Simon, Jean, Joseph, Marie-Marguerite, Marie-Rose, & Rosalie; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 6, traveled with widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, called Adélaïde, age 6[sic], with widowed mother & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Adélaïde, age 10[sic], with widowed mother & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Adélaïdes, age 16, with widowed mother, [nephew?] Pedro HÉBERT, & sister Margarita; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Adélaïde, "her granddaughter," age 17, with widowed mother, & [nephew?] Pedro "her son" no surname given; married, age 20, Jean-Joseph-Marie, son of Marin TRAHAN & his first wife Marie-Madeleine LEBLANC, & the brother of brother Alexis's wife Françoise-Marie-Barbe, 28 Jan 1799, Assumption, now Plattenville; died Lafourche Interior Parish c1827, age 48; succession inventory dated 5 Apr 1827, Lafourche Interior Parish courthouse
Blaise LEJEUNE 03 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Asc, Op born c1750, probably Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale; son of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN; brother of Jean-Baptiste, fils, Joseph, Marguerite, & Nanette, nephew of Honoré TRAHAN; at Baie-des-Espagnols Apr 1752, age 2; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, Oct 1754; imprisoned on Georges Island, Halifax, Sep 1755, exiled to NC, Dec 1755, aboard sloop Providence, age 5; moved to MD, c1760; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, orphan with family of Honoré BRAUX; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahía, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 19; settled below Bayou Plaquemine, St.-Gabriel District, with other Acadian exiles from the Britannia, Apr 1770; married, age 23, Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre BREAUX & Marguerite GAUTREAUX of St.-Gabriel, 3 Nov 1773, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; moved to Opelousas District, settled along bayous Blaise LeJeune & des Cannes, now Acadia & Evangeline parishes; in Opelousas census, 1774, with 1 unnamed child, 0 slaves, 0 cattle, 0 horses & mules, 0 swine; in Opelousas census, 1777, age 27, head of family number 130, with wife Marie-Josèph[e] BRAUX age 30, sons Blaise age 4, Joseph age 1, 0 slaves, 8 cattle, 3 horses, 4 hogs, 0 sheep; in Opelousas census, 1785, called Bse, with 8 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; in Opelousas census, 1788, Bellevue, with 3 unnamed males, no woman, 0 slaves, 24 cattle, 7 horses, 8 arpents; on Opelousas militia list, Jul 1789, fusilier; in Opelousas census, 1796, Faquetaic District, with 4 unnamed white males, 3 unnamed white females, & 0 slaves, next to son Blaise, fils; one of the author's maternal ancestors~~
Eustache LEJEUNE 04 Jul 1785 BR born 23 Dec 1732, baptized 27 Sep 1734, Grand-Pré; son of Jean LEJEUNE & Françoise GUIDRY; brother of Félicité & Grégoire; carpenter; at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, Apr 1752, age 20; married, age 23, (1)Marie, daughter of Ignace CARRET & Cécile HENRY, 7 May 1753, Louisbourg; deported from Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, aboard one of the Five Ships 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 23 Jan 1759, age 26; at St.-Suliac, France, 1759-64; at St.-Servan, France, 1764-72; married, age 41, (2)Jeanne-Pérrine, daughter of Jean GICQUEL & Pérrine LE COUET of Plouër, France, 22 Jun 1773, St.-Servan; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with wife Anne GIQUET, 3 sons, & 2 daughters; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 52, head of family; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, called Eustaquio LEJENE, with unnamed wife [Jeanne], 2 unnamed children [probably sons Servant-Mathurin & François-Marie], 6 units corn, 0 units rice; on list of inhabitants of Baton Rouge, Nov 1792, called Eustache LEJEUNE
Félicité LEJEUNE 05 Dec 1785 SB, NO born c1739, Grand-Pré; daughter of Jean LEJEUNE & Françoise GUIDRY; sister of Eustache & Grégoire; at Baie-des-Espagnois, Île Royale, Apr 1752, age 13; married, age 16, (1)Ambroise HÉBERT, probably Île Royale, c1755; deported from Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, aboard one of the Five Ships 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 23 Jan 1759, age 20; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with husband, 3 unnamed sons, & 1 unnamed daughter; sailed to LA on La Caroline, age 45; married (2)Jean-Baptiste SALIER, late 1780s or early 1790s, probably New Orleans; died New Orleans 22 Sep 1792, age 55[sic], buried next day
François-Marie LEJEUNE 06 Jul 1785 BR born & baptized 20 May 1771, St.-Servan, France; son of Eustache LEJEUNE & his first wife Marie CARRET; brother of Jean-Baptiste, Marie-Jeanne-Perrine-Madeleine, & Servan-Mathurin; at St.-Servan 1771-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 13; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & sibling; married, age 26, Marguerite-Marie, daughter of Pierre LEBERT & Marguerite BOUDREAUX of St.-Malo, France, 16 Jan 1798, Baton Rouge
Grégoire LEJEUNE 07 Jul 1785 BR born c1737, Grand-Pré; son of Jean LEJEUNE & Françoise GUIDRY; brother of Eustache & Félicité; at Baie-des-Espagnois, Île Royale, Apr 1752, age 15; deported from Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, 25 Nov 1758 aboard Supply, arrived St.-Malo 9 Mar 1759, age 22; sailor; married, age 27, (1)Charlotte, daughter of Pierre DES CROUTES & Élisabeth GALLISON, 21 Feb 1764, St.-Servan, France; married, age 30, (2)Hélène, daughter of Joseph DUBOIS dit DUMONT & Marie-Madeleine VECO of Île St.-Jean, 30 Jun 1767, St.-Servan; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with wife, 2 unnamed sons, 1 unnamed daughter, & 2 unnamed orphans; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 45[sic], head of family; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, called Gregorio LEJOUNE, with unnamed wife [Hélène], 3 unnamed children [sons Grégoire-Alexis & Julien, & daughter Marie-Josèphe], 7 1/2 units corn, 0 units rice; died [buried] Baton Rouge 1 Jul 1826, age 91[sic]
Grégoire-Alexis LEJEUNE 08 Jul 1785 BR

baptized 13 Feb 1781, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; called Alexis; son of Grégoire LEJEUNE & his second wife Hélène DUMONT; brother of Julien & Marie-Josèphe; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 4; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; on list of inhabitants of Baton Rouge, Nov 1792; married, age 25, Marie or Marguerite, daughter of Charles TARDIT & Gertrude-Anne HÉBERT, 15 May 1806, Baton Rouge

Jean LEJEUNE 09 Sep 1785 Asp, Lf born c1756, Liverpool, England; son of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; brother of Alexis-Simon, Anne-Adélaïde, Joseph, Marie-Marguerite, Marie-Rose, & Rosalie; repatriated to France 1763, age 7; at Morlaix, France, 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; sailor; at St.-Martin, Chantenay, France, 1782; married, age 27, Félicité, daughter of Félix BOUDREAUX & his first wife Marie-Josèphe LEBLANC, 5 Nov 1782, St.-Nicolas, Nantes; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with wife & no children; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 29, head of family; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 32, with wife Félicité age 33, no children, 6 arpents, 18 qts. corn, 5 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 32[sic], with wife Félicité age 35, no children, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 100 qts. corn, 8 horned cattle, 2 horses, 3 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Juan, age 40, with wife Félicitas age 43, no children, & [sister-in-law?] Maria BOUDRAUX age 13; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 41, with wife Félicité age 44, no children, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 42, with wife Félicité age 44, no children, his nephew Jean [LEJEUNE?] age 1, & his niece Constance [LEJEUNE?] age 4, 6/50 arpents, 0 slaves; died Lafourche Interior Parish 17 May 1825, age 72[sic]
Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, fils 11 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Op born c1749, Pigiguit or Île Royale; called Jean; son of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN of Pigiguit; brother of Blaise, Marguerite, Joseph, & Nanette, nephew of Honoré TRAHAN; at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, Apr 1752, called Jean, age 3; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, Oct 1754; imprisoned on Georges Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC, Dec 1755, aboard sloop Providence, age 6; moved to MD, c1760; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La La Bahía, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, called Jean Bicente, age 20; settled below Bayou Plaquemine, St.-Gabriel District, with other Acadian exiles from the Britannia, Apr 1770; moved to Avoyelles & then to the Opelousas District; married, age 30, Isabelle OUTRÉ, c1779, Opelousas
Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE 10 Jul 1785 BR born & baptized 11 Apr 1760, St.-Suliac, France; son of Eustache LEJEUNE & his first wife Marie CARRET; brother of François-Marie, Marie-Jeanne-Perrine-Madeleine, & Servan-Mathurin; sailor; at St.-Suliac 1760-64; at St.-Servan, France, 1764-72; married Marie-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of Séverin DOIRON & Geneviève LEBLANC, early 1780s, France; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 25, head of family; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, called Juan Bta. LEJENE, with unnamed wife [Geneviève], 2 unnamed children, 4 1/2 units corn, 1/4 rice; on list of inhabitants of Baton Rouge, Nov 1792; died West Baton Rouge Parish 10 Apr 1854, age 94  #
Joseph LEJEUNE/YOUNG 12 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Atk, Op born c1756, probably NC; son of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN of Pigiguit; brother of Blaise, Jean-Baptiste, fils, Marguerite, & Nanette, nephew of Honoré TRAHAN; moved to MD, c1760; in report of Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Joseph LE JEUNNE, orphan, with family of his uncle Honoré TRAHAN & his brother orphan Antoine LE JEUNE; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with family of Honoré TRAHAN; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahía, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 13; settled below Bayou Plaquemine, St.-Gabriel District, with other Acadian exiles from the Britannia, Apr 1770; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 14[sic, probably closer to 21], bachelor, head of "family" number 102, with 0 slaves, 2 cattle, 0 horses, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; moved to Opelousas District, settled on Bayou des Cannes, present-day western Acadia Parish; married, (1)age 26, Perrine dite Patsy, daughter of Gilbert HAYES & Jeanne JACKSON of Carolina, c1782, Opelousas; in Opelousas census, 1785, called LE JEUNE, with 3 unnamed free individuals, & 3 male slaves; on Opelousas militia list, Jul 1789, fusilier; in Opelousas census, 1796, Faquetaic District, with unnamed wife [Patsy], 6 unnamed white males, 3 unnamed white females, 1 male slave, & 1 female slave; anglicized his surname to YOUNG in the early 1800s; separation of community property petition dated 20 Sep 1821, St. Landry Parish courthouse; married, age 66, (2)Marie or Mary, daughter of Michel RITTER & Marie Louise STELLY, & widow of Jean TELLER, 21 May 1822, St. Landry Parish, marriage sanctified 11 Oct 1843, Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish; died "sur Plaquemen," St. Landry Parish, 14 Oct 1847, age 110[sic]; succession record dated 16 Oct 1847, St. Landry Parish courthouse
Joseph LEJEUNE 13 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born c1763, Liverpool, England; son of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; brother of Alexis-Simon, Anne-Adélaïde, Jean, Marie-Marguerite, Marie-Rose, & Rosalie; repatriated to France 1763, an infant; at Morlaix, France, 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; sailor; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 22, traveled with widowed mother; married, age 22, (1)Bonne-Marie-Adélaïde, daughter of Germaine LANDRY & Cécile LAGARELLE, 24 Nov 1785, New Orleans, soon after they reached LA on the same ship; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 24, with wife Marie age 19, son Jean-Joseph age 1, 4 arpents next to wife's grandfather François LANDRY, 50 qts. corn, 10 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 28, with wife Bonna-Adélaïde age 24, daughter Rosalie age 1, 0 slaves, 3 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 100 qts. corn, 4 horned cattle, 1 horse, 10 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Josef, age 33, with wife Bona age 24, sons Alexos age 6, Andrés age 4, daughters Rosalia age 7, & Maria age 1, next to brother-in-law Pedro MENOU; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 34, with no wife so probably a widower, sons Alexis age 7, André age 5, daughters Rosalie age 8, & Marie age 2, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 36, with no wife, son Ambroise age 5, daughters Rose age 8, Élise age 6, & Marie age 3, 7/50 arpents, 0 slaves, between his brother-in-law Pierre MINOUE & brother Alexis; married, age 35, (2)Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Paul LEBERT & Madeleine LAPIERRE, & widow of Pierre-Janvier GUIDRY, 5 Sep 1798, Assumption, now Plattenville; succession record dated 14 Aug 1798; died Lafourche Interior Parish 6 Dec 1825, age 60[sic]
Julien LEJEUNE 14 Jul 1785 BR baptized 7 Feb 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; son of Grégoire LEJEUNE & his second wife Hélène DUMONT; brother of Grégoire-Alexis & Marie-Josèphe; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 2; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 25, Elizabeth, daughter of William GIBSON & Marie MCKENNA of KY, c1808, probably Baton Rouge; settled West Baton Rouge Parish
Marguerite LEJEUNE 15 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Op born Feb 1752, Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale; daughter of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN; sister of Blaise, Jean-Baptiste, fils, Joseph, & Nanette, niece of Honoré TRAHAN; at Baie-des-Espangnols Apr 1752, age 2 months; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, Oct 1754; imprisoned on Georges Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC, Dec 1755, aboard sloop Providence, age 3; moved to MD, c1760; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769 aboard English schooner Britannia; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahía, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 17; married (1)Jacques CROUQUE or CROOK/CROOKS, 1769 or 1770, probably Natchitoches; settled below Bayou Plaquemine, St.-Gabriel District, with other Acadian exiles from the Britannia, Apr 1770; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1777, age 24, with husband Jacques CROUQUE (CROOK, CROOKS?)[sic] age 30, who was head of family number 125, son Jean-Baptiste [CROUQUE] age 1, daughters Marie [CROUQUE] age 7, Théotiste [CROUQUE] age 3, 0 slaves, 6 cattle, 2 horses, 14 hogs, 0 sheep
Marie-Jeanne-Perrine-Madeleine LEJEUNE 17 Jul 1785 BR born & baptized 28 Jan 1762, St.-Suliac, France; called Marie; daughter of Eustache LEJEUNE & his first wife Marie CARRET; sister of François-Marie, Jean-Baptiste, & Servan-Mathurin; at St.-Suliac 1762-64; at St.-Servan, France, 1764-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 23; married, age 25, Magloire-Simon or Simon-Magloire, son of Simon BABIN & his first wife Anastasie THÉRIOT, 9 Jun 1787, probably Baton Rouge; died before Jul 1788, when her husband was listed in the Baton Rouge census without a wife
Marie-Josèphe LEJEUNE 16 Jul 1785 BR born & baptized 14 May 1770, Pleurtuit, France; daughter of Grégoire LEJEUNE & his second wife Hélène DUMONT; sister of Grégoire-Alexis & Julien; at Pleurtuit 1770-72; at St.-Enogat, France, 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 14; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 17, Jean-Paul, son of Jean TRAHAN & Marguerite CLÉMENT of St.-Malo, France, 31 Mar 1788, probably Baton Rouge; died [buried] Baton Rouge 10 Jan 1824, age 53
Marie-Marguerite LEJEUNE 18 Nov 1785 Asp born & baptized 14 Aug 1769, St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, France; called Marguerite; daughter of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; sister of Alexis-Simon, Anne-Adélaïde, Jean, Joseph, Marie-Rose, & Rosalie; at Morlaix 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 16, traveled with widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, called Margueritte, right bank, age 16[sic], with widowed mother & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Margrithe, age 20[sic], with widowed mother & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Margarita, age 25, with widowed mother, [son] Pedro[-Félix-Ambroise] HÉBERT age 2, & sister Adélaïdes; married, age 28, Joseph-François, son of Jean CHIASSON & Anne JOANNE of St.-Servan, France, & widower of Marie SIMONEAUX, 7 Jan 1797, Assumption, now Plattenville; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Margueritte, no surname given, age 26[sic], with husband, 1 HÉBERT son, & 1 CHIASSON stepson; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Margueritte, no surname given, age 32[sic], with husband, 1 HÉBERT son, 1 CHIASSON stepson, & brother-in-law Pierre [CHIASSON]
Marie-Rose LEJEUNE 20 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born & baptized 10 Sep 1767, St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, France; daughter of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; sister of Alexis-Simon, Anne-Adélaïde, Jean, Joseph, Marie-Marguerite, & Rosalie; at Morlaix 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-76; in Fourth Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Mar 1776; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 18, traveled with widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 18[sic], with widowed mother & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 22, with widowed mother & siblings; married, age 24, Pierre of St.-Servan, France, son of Alain MENOU/MENOUS & Marie GIROIR, 7 Feb 1791, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Maria Rosa, age 30[sic], with husband Pedro MENOU age 23, son Januario [MENOU] age 4, & daughter Modesta [MENOU] age 2, next to her widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 31, with husband Pierre MINOUE age 26, son Pierre [MINOUE] age 5, & daughter Modeste [MINOUE] age 3, 0 slaves, next to her widowed mother; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Marie, no surname given, age 30, with husband Pierre MINOUE age 34, son Janvier [MINOUE] age 6, daughters Modeste [MINOUE] age 4, & Eutisse [MINOUE] age 2, 4/50 arpents, 0 slaves, next to her brother Joseph & near her brother Alexis; died Lafourche Interior Parish 27 Feb 1851, age 85[sic], a widow; succession inventory record dated 13 Nov 1851, Lafourche Interior Parish courthouse  #
*Nanette LEJEUNE 21 Oct 1769 Natc? born c1756, probably NC; daughter of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN; sister of Blaise, Jean-Baptiste, fils, Joseph, & Marguerite, niece of Honoré TRAHAN; moved to MD, c1760; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahía, TX, age 13; "she remained at the Coquiats"--actually the settlement of El Orcoquisac near present-day Liberty, TX
Rosalie LEJEUNE 22 Nov 1785 Asp? baptized 4 Aug 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; daughter of Amand LEJEUNE & Anastasie LEVRON; sister of Alexis-Simon, Anne-Adélaïde, Jean, Joseph, Marie-Marguerite, & Marie-Rose; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 2, traveled with widowed mother; not in the Valenzuéla censuses of 1788 & 1791 with the rest of her family, so she probably died young
Servan-Mathurin LEJEUNE 23 Jul 1785 BR born & baptized 1 Jul 1769, St.-Servan, France; son of Eustache LEJEUNE & his first wife Marie CARRET; brother of Francois-Marie, Jean-Baptiste, & Marie-Jeanne-Perrine-Madeleine; at St.-Servan 1769-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 15; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & 1 other; married, age 23, Geneviève-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of Simon dit Pierre PITRE & Geneviève RICHARD, 11 Jan 1792, probably Baton Rouge; on list of inhabitants of Baton Rouge, Nov 1792

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls him Alexis [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his widowed mother & 5 siblings on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 297, his birth/baptismal record, at St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, calls him Alexis-Simon LEJEUNE, gives his parents' names, says they were Acadians, but does not give his godparents' names; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, calls him Alexis [LEJEUNE], gives his parents' names, & details his family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls him Alexis, son [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fils, age 13, on the embarkation list, & Alexis LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, widow LEJEUNE's] son, age 13, on the complete listing, says he was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with his mother & 5 siblings, & that he married Françoise-Marie-Barbara TRAHAN, daughter of Marin [TRAHAN] & Marie-Magdelaine LEBLANC on 8 Jan 1794 but gives no place of marriage; BRDR, 2:493, 704 (ASM-2, 5), his marriage record, calls him Alexos LEJEUNE, calls his wife Francisca-Maria-Barbara TRAHAN, gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of Acadia" & hers "of Morlaix in Britany, France," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Juan LEJEUNE [his brother] & Juan Bautista TRAHAN [her brother]; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:361 (Thib.Ch.: v.1, #716), his death/burial record, calls him Alexis LEJEUNE, "born in Acadia," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:361 (Houma Ct.Hse.: OA: v.2, #379-A), a succession release record, calls him d. Alexis LEJEUNE, & lists his heirs as Marie LEJEUNE m. ____, P. Amand LEJEUNE, Joseph Bn. LEJEUNE, Antoine LEJEUNE, Constance LEJEUNE m. Joseph MOLAISON, Rosalie LEJEUNE m. Joseph A. HÉBERT, Melanie LEJEUNE m. Nicolas THIBODAUX, Marie Rose DOUCET m. Barthole BARRAS, release "to heirs of Jean Martin LEBLANC" [his son Pierre Amand's father-in-law]; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:519 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ.: Year 1835), a petition for succession inventory under his wife's name, calls her Barbe TRAHAN m. Alexis LEJEUNE, gives her & his death dates, says he died 29 Nov 1835, says "his succession papers were found," & lists their children as Constance m. Joseph MOLAISON, Amand, Rosalie m. Joseph Auguste HÉBERT, Marie m. Joseph LEBLANC, Madeleine m. Justin PONTIFFE, Melanie m. Nicolas THIBODAUX, Joseph, Antoine Marcellus, & d.Jean Baptiste m. Marie Rose DOUCET.

His & his wife's birthplace is found in the baptismal record of son Joseph-Marin, dated 12 Jul 1803, in BRDR, 2:496 (ASM-1, 275).

For a detailed comment on his family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for his mother's profile.  

02.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls her Adélaïde LEJEUNE, & lists her with her widowed mother & 5 siblings on L'Amitié; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Anne-Adélaïde LEJEUNE, but does not give her godparents' names, &, calling her Madeleine [LEJEUNE], details her family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls her Madeleine, sa [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fille, age 6, on the embarkation list, & Madelaine LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 6, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her mother & 5 siblings; BRDR, 2:493, 705 (ASM-2, 38), her marriage record, calls her Adélaïde LEJEUNE, calls her husband Juan-Marie TRAHAN, gives her & his parents' names, says all parents were Acadians, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Juan LEJEUNE [her brother] & François HÉBERT; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:361 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ.: Year 1827), her succession record, calls her Anne Adélaïde LEJEUNE, married to Jean Marie TRAHAN, dates her inventory 5 Apr 1827, & lists her children as --Melanie [TRAHAN], married to Marcelin THIBODEAUX, Constance [TRAHAN], married to Huberville ARSENAUX, Zephyrin [TRAHAN], Marie Célesie [TRAHAN], Rosalie Agathe [TRAHAN], Michel Surville [TRAHAN], Francois Hubert [TRAHAN], & Marie Carmelite [TRAHAN], but does not say if her husband was still living, only implying that he was.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 31, 54, 82, 162.

Why does the passenger list of Le St.-Rémi call her Magdeleine/Magdelaine, when that was not even a part of her name?  This is the only place where she is called that.

For a detailed comment on her family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for her mother's profile.  

03.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Blaise LE JEUNE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2547-48, calls him Blaise LEJEUNE, says he was born in 1750 but gives no birthplace, that he was son of Jean-Baptiste [LEJEUNE] & Marguerite TRAHAN de Pisiguit, Acadie, that he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre BREAUX & Marguerite GAUTREAUX, at Ascension (now Donaldsonville) on 3 Nov 1773, that they settled in the Opelousas District, & lists their children as Blaise, born in c1774, Joseph in c1775, Jean-Baptiste in 1777, Joseph in 1780, Hilaire in 1782, Céleste in 1783, & Marie-Ange in 1786, but give no birthplaces; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 142, calls him Blaise LE JEUNE, says he was age 18, & notes that he was brother of Jean Bicent (that is, Jean-Vincent); Arsenault, Généalogie, 2548; BRDR, 2:154, 494 (ASC-1, 125), his marriage record, calls him Blaise LEJEUNE, calls his wife Marie-Joseph BREAU, gives his & her parents' names, says her parents were "of St. Gabriel," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Romaine DE LA FOSSE, Joseph ORILLION, & Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:50; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 153. 

For details on his family's wanderings from 1754-63, see the footnote to his uncle Honoré TRAHAN's  profile. 

Why didn't he go to LA in 1768 with the BREAU clan?  Note that he was counted with Honoré BREAUX le jeune, son of Alexis, one of the BREAU clan leaders, at Port Tobacco, MD, in Jul 1763.  What compelled Blaise & his siblings to wait another year before they left Port Tobacco, MD?  My guess is that they followed their maternal uncle, Honoré TRAHAN, not the BREAU brothers, to LA--& almost paid dearly for it. 

His wife's parents' names are from their marriage record & Arsenault, cited above.  There were 3 Marie-Josèphe BREAUXs who came to LA.  This one died in Jul 1818 at a son-in-law's home on Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé; the priest who recorded her burial said that she was married to Blaise LEJEUNE & that she was 73 years old when she died.  So why was she not counted with him at Prairie Bellevue in 1788?  Was Blaise still alive in 1818?

Was the Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE who witnessed his marriage a brother, whom some sources call Jean-Vincent? 

Bayou Blaise Lejeune, also called Blaise Lejeune Gully, a tributary of Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé in present-day Acadia Parish, is named after him.  For his settlement along the bayou, see Brasseaux, Founding of New Acadia, 205.  

04.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Eustache LEJEUNE, & lists him with his wife Jeanne CHIQUED, 4 children, & a niece; BRDR, 1a(rev.):154 (SGA-2, 142), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Eustache LEJEUNE, gives his parents' names, & says his godparents were Eustache BOUTIN & Marie BIGÉ; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 139, shows that he & his first wife, Marie CARRET, age 26, survived the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, but lost both of their children, daughters Marie-Madeleine, age 5, & Marguerite, age 14 months, at sea; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 587-88, Family No. 662; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 583-85, Family No. 659; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 1077, the record of his second marriage, dated 22 Jun 1773, calls him Eustache LEJEUNE, says he was native of Acadie & resident of St.-Malo, says his father & perhaps his mother were deceased at the time of his marriage, calls his first wife Marie CARET, calls his second wife Jeanne-Pérrine GIQUEL, gives her parents' names, says her parents & perhaps her mother were deceased at the time of the marriage, calls her a native of the parish of Plouër & resident of St.-Servan, & that the witnesses to their marriage were Jacque BOURBON, cousin of the groom (who signed), Ollivier TRAHAN, brother-in-law of the groom (who did not sign), René REVEILLARD, nephew of the bride (who signed), Jean RENAUX (who signed), & Louis SALMON (who signed); Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 125, Family No. 228, calls him Eustache LEJEUNE, says he was born in 1732, gives his parents' names, says he was a ship's-carpenter, says his first wife was born c1733 & that they married c1753, calls his second wife Jeanne CHIQUET, says she was born c1740, that they married c1775, details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s, provides the baptismal & burial records of 3 of his children by his second wife--daughter Jeanne-Marie, baptized 31 Jul 1781 at St.-Martin, Chantenay, died 21 Aug 1781, Chantenay, son Pierre-Alexis, baptized 26 Apr 1783, St.-Martin, Chantenay, died age 12 months, buried 2 Apr 1784, St.-Martin, Chantenay, & daughter Rosalie [Marie-Rose], baptized 22 Apr 1784, St.-Martin, Chantenay--& details the family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him Eustache LEJEUNE, charpentier, age 52, on the embarkation list, Eustachio EL JOVEN, on the debarkation list, & Eustache LEJEUNE, carpenter, age 52, on the complete listing, says he was in the 18th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his second wife Jeanne CHIQUET/Juana CLIQUET/Jeanne GICQUEL, age 42, 4 children (1 of whom died), & a niece, details his second marriage, gives his parents' names, calls his second wife Jeanne CHIQUET & Jeanne GICQUEL, says they were married in 1773, that son Servan-Marthurin was born in 1769, & daughter Marie-Jeanne-Pérrine-Madeleine in 1762; Winzerling, Acadian Odyssey, 131, calls him Eustaquis EL JOVEN & his second wife Juana CHIQUET, & says the death of their infant daughter Rosa [Marie-Rose, age 2], the only person to die aboard Le Bon Papa, "marred an otherwise perfect voyage."  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:48. 

05.  Wall of Names, 47, calls her Félicité LE JEUNE; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 106, shows the fate of her family in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, detailed in the footnote to her husband's profile; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 587-88, Family No. 662; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 54, Family No. 105; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 85, Family No. 160; NOAR, 5:240 (SLC, F2, 54), her death/burial record, calls her Félicitas LEIJEUNE, "native of ___, sp. Juan Bautista SALIER," but does not give her parents' names or mention an earlier husband.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:48. 

The age, as well as the name, in the burial record cited above gives the clue that this is her.  But where is the record of her second marriage?

06.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him François [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 583-85, Family No. 659; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 125, Family No. 125, calls him François-Mathurin LEJEUNE & François LEJEUNE, & provides his parents' names; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him François, son [Eustache LEJEUNE's] fils, age 13, on the embarkation list, Francisco, su [Eustachio EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Francois LEJEUNE, his [Eustache LEJEUNE's] son, age 13, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 18th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin; BRDR, 2:458, 495 (SJO-3, 19), his marriage record, calls him Francisco-Maria LEJEUNE, calls his wife Margarita-Maria LEBERE, gives his & her parents' names, says both sets of parents were "of San Malo," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Juan-Bautista LEJEUNE [his brother] & Pedro LEBERE [her brother].  

07.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Grégoire LEJEUNE, & lists him with his wife 3 children, & a niece; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family No. 14, shows that on the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59 his father, called Jean LE JEUNE, de l'Isle Saint Jean, age 60, his mother, age 50, sister Anne, age 14, brother Jean, age 9, & cousin Théotiste HÉBERT, age 15, survived the crossing, but 2 of his siblings died as a result of the ordeal--sister Hélènne, age 16, died on 27 May 1759 probably in the hospital at St.-Malo 2 1/2 months after they reached France, & brother Barnabé, age 18, died on 16 May 1759, probably in the same hospital at St.-Malo; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 587-88, Family No. 662; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 586-87, Family No. 661; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him Grégoire LEJEUNE, charpentier, age 45, on the embarkation list, Juan Bautista [sic] EL JOVEN, on the debarkation list, & Grégoire LEJEUNE, sailor, age 45, on the complete listing, says that he was in the 20th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his wife, 3 children, & a niece, & details is second marriage, including the names of his & his second wife's parents, & the name of his first wife, but gives no place of marriage; BRDR, 4:370 (SJO-11, 16), probably his death/burial record, calls him Grégoire LEJEUNE, age ca. 91 yrs., but does not give his parents' or his wife's name.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:48. 

His estimated birth year is based on the passenger list of 1758-59, the earliest one on which he is found. 

So why does his wife's burial record in BRDR, 3:295 (SJO-4, 87), dated 17 Sep 1815 at Baton Rouge, call her a widow?  Was the Grégoire LEJEUNE who died at Baton Rouge in Jul 1826 his son Grégoire-Alexis & not him?  The Jul 1826 burial record states clearly that the deceased was about 91 years old.  Grégoire-Alexis would have been only 45 in 1826.  My guess is that the priest at Baton Rouge in 1815 was a bit off in his record keeping.  

08.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Grégoire [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him Grégoire, son [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] fils, age 4, on the embarkation list, Gregorio, su [Juan Bautista (sic) EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Grégoire LEJEUNE, his [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] son, age 4, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 20th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin; BRDR, 3:570, 807 (SJO-3, 54), his marriage record, calls him Alexio LEJEUNE, calls his wife Maria TARDIT, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Francisco LEJEUNE, Francisco TRAHAN, & Pedro GÉDERY.

09.  Wall of Names, 35 (pl. 9L), calls him Jean LE JEUNE, & lists him with his wife & no children; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, his birth record, calls him Jean LEJEUNE, says he was born c1755 in Liverpool, England, & details his family's participation in the Leigne-les-bois settlement in Poitou in the early 1770s; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 46-47, calls him Jean LEJEUNE, marin, age 29, on the embarkation list, & Jean LEJEUNE, sailor, age 29, on the complete listing, says he was in the 16th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with his wife & no children, & details his marriage, including his & his wife's parents' names, but gives no place of marriage; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:362 (Thib.Ch.: v.1, p.14), his death/burial record, calls him Jean LEJEUNE, says he died "at age 72 yrs.," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

He & his wife were that rare Acadian couple who had no children. 

10.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, & lists him with his wife Genneviève DOUAIRON & no children; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 583-85, Family No. 659, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, gives his parents' names, says his godparents were Ignace CARRET & Marie DUPLESSIS, & says his family resided at St.-Suliac from 1759-64 & at St.-Servan from 1764-72; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 125, Family No. 228, calls him Jean-Baptise LEJEUNE, gives his parents' names, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him Jean Bte LEJEUNE, marin, age 25, on the embarkation list, does not include him on the debarkation list, & calls him Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, sailor, age 25, on the complete listing, says that he was in the 19th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with wife Geneviève DOIRON & no children, & details the birth/baptism of sons Eusèbe, baptized 25 Dec 1801, age 10 months, no place given, & says his grandparents were Eusèbe LEJEUNE & Marie LEJEUNE, & son Zeno, born 19 Jun 1794, no place given; Hebert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 10-11, does not include him on the embarkation list, calls him Juan Bautista EL JOVEN, on the debarkation list, & Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, no age given, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 35th/36th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with wife Elena DOWISON/Hélène DOIRON; BRDR, 8:381 (SJB, Brusly-4, 52), his death/burial record, calls him Baptiste LEJEUNE, "age 94 yrs.," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

Where is his marriage record in France?  No matter, there can be no doubt who this Jean-Baptiste married.  The baptismal records of 2 of his sons born in LA, all recorded at Baton Rouge, provide more proof--Zeno, born on 19 Jun 1794, baptized on 5 Oct 1794, son of Juan Batista LEJEUNE & Marie Genevièva DOIRON of Baton Rouge, godson of Antonio DESOTELLES & Sophia BOUDRAUX, no grandparents' names given; & Eusèbio, baptized 25 Dec 1801, age 10 months, son of Juan Bautista LEJEUNE & Geneveva DUARON, grandson of Eusèbio LEJEUNE & Maria LEJUNE & Severain DUARON & Geneveva ____, no godparents given.  See BRDR, 2:495, 498 (SJO-1, 35, 172 & 173). 

Was he a widower when he died at age 94?  Most likely he was.  He was one the last Acadian immigrants in LA to join our ancestors.

11.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Jean-Vincent LE JEUNE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2548, calls him Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE, says he was born in c1758 but gives no birthplace, that he probablement was son of Jean-Baptiste [LEJEUNE] & Marguerite TRAHAN de Pisiguit, Acadie, that he married Isabelle OUTRÉ at Opelousas in c1779, says they settled in the Opelousas District, & lists their children as Marie, born in 1779, Jean-Baptiste in 1781, & Céleste in 1788, but gives no birthplaces; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 142, calls him Jean Bicente LE JEUNE, says he was age 20, & notes that Blaise was his brother; André Vachon, family historian, calls him Jean-Baptiste, not Jean-Vincent.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:50. 

Sadly, no LA church record links this Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE to the parents Arsenault gives him.  See Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:516-19.  Jean Bicente is Spanish for Jean-Vincent, not Jean-Baptiste.  The likely explanation for this confusion in names is that the Spanish misrepresented his middle name on their 1769 report, cited in Kinnaird, above, & Wall of Names repeated the error.  Arsenault seems to think so.  A clue that Arsenault may be right is in Blaise LEJEUNE's marriage record, dated 3 Nov 1773, in BRDR, 2:154, 494 (ASC-1, 125), which lists Jean-Baptiste, not Jean-Vincent, LEJEUNE as a witness.  Another clue that favors Arsenault is the baptismal record of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE's son Jean-Baptiste, fils, dated 2 Sep 1781, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:518 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.25), which lists the boy's godparents as ... Blaise LEJEUNE & Barbara OUTRÉ.  Yet another hint that favors Arsenault can be found in the baptismal record of Jean-Baptiste's daughter Anne, dated 15 Oct 1786, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:516 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.61, Folio OA, p.28), which says the girl's godfather was Simon BELAR/BELARD.  Simon, who had come to LA aboard the Britannia in 1769 as a 2-year-old, was son of Antoine BELLARD & Marie TRAHAN, daughter of Honoré TRAHAN, so Simon was a cousin of the LEJEUNE orphans. 

Note the age given for Jean Bicente/Jean-Baptiste, fils in the Spanish report of 1769--age 20.  This gives him an estimated birth year of c1749, not Arsenault's ridiculous c1758.  The birth year c1749 is dead on for the Jean, son of Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN at Baie-des-Espagnols in Apr 1752. 

For details on his family's wanderings from 1754-63, see the footnote to his uncle Honoré TRAHAN's  profile. 

12.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Joseph LE JEUNE, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2548, calls him Joseph LEJEUNE, says he was born in c1760 but gives no birthplace, that he was son of Jean-Baptiste [LEJEUNE] & Marguerite TRAHAN de Pisiguit, Acadie, says he married Pérrine dit Patsy, daughter of Gilbert HAYES & Jeanne JACKSON de Caroline, at Opelousas in c1782, that they settled at Bayou-des-Cannes in the Opelousas District, & lists their children as Marie-Josèphe, born in 1783, Joseph in 1784, Jean-Baptiste in 1786, Marguerite in 1788, Suzanne in 1789, Pierre in 1791, Hubert in 1793, Jacques in 1796, Eugènie in 1798, Louise in 1803, & Caroline in 1805, but gives no birthplaces; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 141, calls him Joseph LE JEUNE, orphan, says he was age 13, & lists him with the family of Honoré TRAHUN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:955 (LSAR: Opel.: 1821), petition for Separation of Community Property, calls him Joseph YOUNG, Sr. m. Patsy HAYE, & lists his children as Joseph, Marie Josette m. Samuel REED, Jean Baptiste, Susanne m. Jacob BIHM, Marguerite wid. BARTON, Pitre, James, Jane m. Michel BIHM, Eliza m. Joseph ORTEGO, Caroline m. Michel PRUDHOMME, & Gilbert, "now deceased"; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:955 (Opel. Ct.Hse.: Mar. #23), the civil record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph YOUNG, Sr., calls his wife Mary RITTER, "wid. of Jean TELLOR," but gives no parents' names or any witnesses to his marriage; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 4:319 (GC Ch.: v.1, p.148), the ecclesiastical record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph LEJEUNE, "106 yrs. old," calls his wife Marie RITTER, does not give any parents' names or witnesses to his marriage, & says they were "Married by Judge in Opel. for 26 yrs."; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 4:512 (Opel. Ch.: v.2, p. 49), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph Briard YOUNG, says he died "at age 110 yrs. old sur Plaquemen," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 4:512 (Opel.Ct.Hse.: Succ. #1325), his succession record, calls him Joseph YOUNG Sr., but does not mention a wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 25.  

For his estimated birth year, the Spanish record of 1769 is followed here; the census taker of 1777 seems to have grossly understated his age, & the age in his burial record--110!--is improbable.

As Jehn, cited above, shows, he was counted in the household of Honoré TRAHAN at Port Tobacco, MD, in Jul 1763, & was listed as an orphan with the TRAHANs in the Spanish report of Dec 1769, cited in Kinnaird, above.  But why is he not listed next to Jean-Vincent, Blaise, Marguerite, & Nanette LE JEUNE in the 1769 report?  An entire family, that of Antoine BELAR, his wife, & their son, stand on the list between Joseph & Jean-Vincent.  Also, Joseph is given the same age as Nanette.  Were they twins?  Note also that Joseph's marriage, burial, & succession records do not give his parents' names.  However, the baptismal record of daughter Eugènie, dated Sunday, 15 Jul 1798, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:517 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.203), gives the girl's paternal grandparents ... Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Marguerite TRAHAN, the same parents as Blaise et al., so one can safely assume that he was Blaise's younger brother. 

Was Antoine LEJEUNE another one of his brothers?  What happened to Antoine in MD?  Was Joseph sister Nanette's twin?

Perhaps under the influence of his Anglo-American wife and her relatives, he anglicized his surname to YOUNG by the 1820s.  Most of his descendants still use that surname. 

His second wife was kin to his oldest son's wife. 

13.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls him Joseph [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his widowed mother & 5 siblings; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, calls him Joseph [LEJEUNE], & details his family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls him Joseph, son [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fils, marin, age 22, on the embarkation list, & Joseph LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, widow LEJEUNE's] son, sailor, age 22, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with his mother & 5 siblings; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 62-63, under Lista parcial de vientitres casamientos acadianos arregalados par Navarro, 20 novembre 1785 [Partial List of 23 marriages Navarro arranged on 20 November 1785], A. Marriages celebrated on 20 November 1785, calls him Josef LEJEUNE (son of Anastasia LEBRON, widow LEJEUNE/Joseph LEJEUNE (Anastasie LEVRON, wid. LEJEUNE), calls his wife Marie LANDRY, says she was in the 18th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi, &, calling him Josef LEGEUNE, native of Liverpool, England, details his marriage, calls his wife Bonne Maria Adélaïde LANDRY of Normandy, France, & gives his & her parents' names; NOAR, 4:180, 189 (SLC, M5, 43), the record of his first marriage, calls him Josef LEGEUNE, "native of Liverpool in England," calls his wife Bonne-Marie-Adélaïde LANDRY, "native of Normandy in France," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Vicente LLORCA & Josef MARTINEZ; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:473, 518 (NO Ch.: v.2, p.43, #87), another record of his first marriage, calls him Josef LEJEUNE, "native of Lebrepoul (Liverpool) in England," calls his wife Bonne-Maria-Adélaïde LANDRY, "native of Normandy in France," gives his & her parents' names, but gives no witnesses to his marriage; BRDR, 2:458, 495-96 (ASM-2, 36), the record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph LEJEUNE, "widower of Maria Bona LANDRY," calls his wife Maria-Josefa LEBERT, "widow of Pedro-Januario GUÉDRY," gives his & her parents' names, says all parents were Acadians, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean-Marie LEVRON & Ambroise HÉBERT; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:362 (Thib.Ch.: v.1, p.26), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph LEJEUNE, says he died "at age 60 yrs.," but does not give her parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:362 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ.: #2), his succession record, calls him Joseph LEJEUNE m. Adélaïde LANDRY. 

For a detailed comment on his family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for his mother's profile.  

14.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Julien [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 7-8, calls him Julien, son [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] fils, age 2, on the embarkation list, Julian, su [Juan Bautista (sic) EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Julien LEJEUNE, his [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] son, age 2, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 20th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin.  

I have not found his marriage record, but substantial evidence of his marriage to Elizabeth GIBSON can be found in their children's' baptismal & burial records:  BRDR, 3:570 (SJO-4, 47), the burial record of Alexio LEJEUNE, age 5 days, buried at Baton Rouge 12 Apr 1809, son of Julien LEJEUNE & Isabel ____; BRDR, 3:572 (SJO-6, 99), the baptismal record of Maria Eloisa LEJEUNE, born 3 Dec 1810, baptized 2 Feb 1811, Baton Rouge, daughter of Julian LEJEUNE, son of Gregario LEJEUNE & Helena DUMONTE, & Elizabeta WILSON[sic], daughter of Guillermo [GIBSON] & Maria SMITH, & goddaughter of Juan Bautista LONGEPE & Leocadia HEBERRE; BRDR, 3:574 (SJO-6, 170), the baptismal record of Zenon LEJEUNE, born 17 Jan 1813, baptized 18 Jul 1813, Baton Rouge, son of Juliano LEJEUNE, son of Gregorio LEJEUNE & Elena DUMEAU, & Elisabetha GILSON[sic], daughter of Guillaum [GIBSON] & Maria SMITH, & godson of Zeno LEJEUNE & Maria GILSON[sic]; BRDR, 3:571-72 (SJO-6, 247), the baptismal record of Josefina LEJEUNE, born 17 Jan 1814, baptized 13 Oct 1816, daughter of Juliano LEJEUNE & Élisabeth GIBSON, & goddaughter of Guilliermo GIBSON & Modesta LEJEUNE; BRDR, 3:571 (SJO-6, 266), the baptismal record of Helena LEJEUNE, born 15 Apr 1811[sic], baptized 18 Jun 1819, Baton Rouge, daughter of Juliano LEJEUNE & Elizabeth GIBSON, & goddaughter of Isaac GIBSON & Clemencia BROUSSARD; BRDR, 4:371 (SGA-11, 335), the baptismal record of Paul Léon LEJEUNE, baptized 22 May 1820, age 13 mos., St. Gabriel, son of Julien LEJEUNE, son of Grégoire LEJEUNE & Hélène DUMON, & Elizabeth GUIMBSON (GIBSON), daughter of Guillaume GIBSON & Marie SHUNET[sic], & godson of Mathurin LEJEUNE & Mathile HÉBERT; BRDR, 4:371 (SJO-19, 16), the baptismal record of Victoria LEJEUNE, baptized 18 Apr 1824, age 2, Baton Rouge, daughter of Julien LEJEUNE & Elizabeth GIBSON, & goddaughter of Jean Marie LEJEUNE & Josephine LEJEUNE; BRDR, 4:371 (SJO-9, 42), the baptismal record of Ursin Emant LEJEUNE, born 26 Dec 1824, baptized 14 Dec 1826, Baton Rouge, son of Julien LEJEUNE & Elisabeth GIBSON, & godson of Zenon LEJEUNE & Seraphine LEJEUNE; BRDR, 4:370 (SJO-9, 73, & SJO-7, 22), the baptismal record of Eugènes LEJEUNE, born 15 Aug 1827, baptized 23 Feb 1829, Baton Rouge, son of Julien LEJEUNE & Elizabeth GIBSON, & godson of Louis AILLET & Élizabeth HÉBERT; & BRDR, 4:371 (SJO-9, 79), the baptismal record of Virginie Carmelite LEJEUNE, born 15 Feb 1829, baptized 18 Jun 1829, Baton Rouge, daughter of Julien LEJEUNE & Elizabeth GIBSON, & goddaughter of Leger DAIGRE & Virginie DAIGRE.  

The marriage record of daughter Helen LEJEUNE, dated 7 Oct 1833, in BRDR, 5(rev.):408 (SJO-10, 66), says that Julien and Elizabeth lived in West Baton Rouge Parish.  The same notation is made by the priest in the marriage record of son Zenon LEJEUNE, dated 27 Oct 1834, in BRDR, 5(rev.):410 (SJO-10, 68).  More Acadians lived in West Baton Rouge than in East Baton Rouge Parish, so this makes sense.

Elizabeth GIBSON's father, William, called Guillaume by his Acadian neighbors, was from Kentucky.  In his children's baptismal records in BRDR, 2:322 (SJO-1, 206), which reveals an entire family's conversion to Catholicism, the priest calls his wife Marie MACKENNA, not SMITH.  Elizabeth, born in 1793 according to her baptismal record, probably in KY, was baptized 27 May 1803 at St.-Joseph's Catholic Church, Baton Rouge, on the same day as her brother Guillermo, born in 1795, brother Juan Baptista, born in 1799, brother Juan Isaac, born in 1797, & sister Maria, born in 1791.  Again, their mother was called Maria MACKENNA by the priest, not Maria SMITH.

15.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Marguerite LE JEUNE.  Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 142, calls her Margarite [LE JEUNE], their [Jean Bicente & Blaise's] sister, & says she was age 17.  See also See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:50; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 27. 

The Marguerite LEJEUNE in the Opelousas census of 1777 is presumed to be this Marguerite LEJEUNE because her name & age fit. 

Her husband's first name is given as John and his family name is spelled CROOKS in the marriage record of their daughter Louise-Marie, dated 30 Apr1787, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:212-13.  Is CROOKS simply an anglicized version of the French name CROUQUE, or is CROUQUE a French version of the Anglo name CROOKS?

16.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls her Marie [LEJEUNE], & lists her with her parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 586-87, Family No. 661; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1815, 7-8, calls her Marie, sa [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] fille, age 14, on the embarkation list, Maria, su [Juan Bautista (sic) EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Marie LEJEUNE, his [Grégoire LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 14, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 20th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with her parents, 2 siblings, & a cousin; BRDR, 2:496, 704 (SGA-14, 10), her marriage record, calls her Maria Josefa LEJEUNE, calls her husband Jean TRAHAN, gives her & his parents' names, calls her mother Elena DEMONDE, says her parents were "of Acadia" & his "of St.-Malo, France," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Servand LEJEUNE [her first cousin] & Charles BRAUX; BRDR, 4:371 (SJO-11, 10), her death/burial record, calls her Marie LEJEUNE, wife of TRAHAN.

Although her marriage was recorded at St.-Gabriel, it probably was performed in the Baton Rouge District, where her family settled.  There was no church at Baton Rouge until 1793, so priests from St.-Gabriel, as well as from Pointe Coupée across the river, administered the sacraments in the area until Baton Rouge got a church of its own.

17.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls her Marie-Magdelaine [LEJEUNE], & lists her with her father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 583-85, Family No. 659; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls her Marie-Magdeleine, sa [Eustache LEJEUNE's] fille, age 23, on the embarkation list, Maria Magdalena, su [Eustachio EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Marie-Magdelaine LEJEUNE, his [Eustache LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 23, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 18th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with her father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin; BRDR, 2:55, 497 (PCP-19, 10), her marriage record, calls her Marie LEJEUNE "of St. Malo," calls her husband Simon BABIN "of Angleterre," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE [her brother], François BABIN [his brother], Grégoire LEJEUNE [her uncle], & Eustache LEJEUNE [her father].

Her marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée because Baton Rouge did not get a church of its own until 1793.  Priests from Pointe Coupée and St.-Gabriel administered the sacraments to residents of the Baton Rouge area until it did.

Her husband remarried at Baton Rouge in Dec 1789 & remarried again in Apr 1822.   

18.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls her Margueritte [LEJEUNE], & lists her with her widowed mother & 5 siblings on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 298, her birth/baptismal record, at St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, calls her Marie-Marguerite HENRY, gives her parents' names, & says her godparents were Pierre LEVRON & Marie-Marguerite GRANGER; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, calls her Marguerite [LEJEUNE], & details her family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls her Margueritte, sa [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fille, age 16, on the embarkation list, & Marguerite LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 16, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her mother & 5 siblings; BRDR, 2:187, 497 (ASM-2, 23), her marriage record, calls her Maria-Margarita LEJEUNE, calls her husband Josef-Francisco CHIASSON, "widower of Maria SIMONAUX," gives her & his parents' names, says all parents were "of Acadia," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Jean LEJEUNE [her brother] & Pierre CHIASSON.  See Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 54, 79. 

For a detailed comment on her family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for her mother's profile.  

The baptismal record of son Pierre-Félix-Ambroise HÉBERT, dated 13 Feb 1795, in BRDR, 2:372 (ASM-1, 37), calls the parents Ambrosio HÉBERT & Maria-Margarita LEJEUNE.  According to the church record, the boy was born on 5 Oct 1794.  Ambroise was not listed in the Lafourche valley census of 1795 with her, but her son was listed as age 2.  There is no evidence that she married the boy's father.  Note that the record of her marriage to Joseph-François CHIASSON names his first wife but says nothing about a previous spouse for her. 

Illegitimacy was rare among Acadians.  Which Ambroise HÉBERT fathered Pierre-Félix-Ambroise?  Was it Ambroise-Mathurin, born at St.-Suliac, France, in Nov 1772, who crossed to LA aboard Le St.-Rémi & married Isabelle-Madeleine GUILLOT at Assumption in Nov 1796 or 1797, a few years after Pierre-Félix-Ambroise's birth.  Was it Ambroise, born in Acadia in c1746, who crossed to LA aboard L'Amitié, never married, & witnessed so many marriages at Assumption in the 1790s?  The only other Ambroise HÉBERT to come to LA was born in Acadia in c1730, married Félicité LEJEUNE probably on Île Royale, crossed to LA aboard La Caroline, & settled at San Bernardo, an Isleño community below New Orleans--an even more unlikely candidate than the unmarried Ambroise because the Ambroise born in c1730 probably died in the late 1780s!  I would guess that the boy's father was Ambroise-Mathurin, who was 3 years younger than Marguerite LEJEUNE & in his early 20s when Pierre-Félix-Ambroise was born.  The next question--why did the boy's parents not marry?  As stated above, there is no evidence that they did. 

20.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls her Marie-Rose [LEJEUNE], & lists her with her widowed mother & 5 siblings on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 298, her birth/baptismal record, at St.-Martin-des-Champs, Morlaix, calls her Marie-Rose LEJEUNE, gives her parents' names, says they were Acadians, & that her godparents were Charles DAIGRE & Anastasie LEBLANC; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, calls her Marie-Rose [LEJEUNE], & details her family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls her Marie-Rose, sa [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fille, age 18, on the embarkation list, & Marie-Rose LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 18, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her mother & 5 siblings; BRDR, 2:497, 541 (ASC-2, 36), her marriage record, calls her Maria-Rosa LEJEUNE, calls her husband Pedro MENOUS "of San Servan, St.-Malo, France," gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were "Acadians, returning from France," & that the witnesses to her marriage were François DUGAS & Jean LEJEUNE [her brother]; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 3:332 (Thib.Ch.: v.1, #720), her death/burial record, calls her Marie Rose LEJEUNE m. Pierre MENOUX, says she died "at age 85 yrs.," but does not give her parents' names; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 3:332 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ. #205), her succession inventory record, calls her Marie Rose LEJEUNE m. d.Pierre MINOU, & says she died in Feb 1851. 

For a detailed comment on her family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for her mother's profile.  

She was one of the last Acadian immigrants in LA to join our ancestors. 

21.  Not in Wall of Names.  Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 142, calls her Nanette [LE JEUNE], their [Jean Bicente, Blaise, & Margarite's] sister, says she was age 13, & that she "remained at the Coquiats."   This was the settlement of El Orcoquisac, near the presidio of San Augustín de Ahumada, on the east bank of the lower Trinity River at present-day Liberty, TX.  In the fall of 1769, the presidio was commanded by Don Rafael Martínez Pacheco, who escorted the Britannia passengers from La Bahía to Natchitoches.  The Spanish abandoned the presidio as well as the settlement in 1771.  The notation in Kinnaird seems to be saying that on the long trek from La Bahía to Natchitoches, this 13-year-old Acadian girl decided to remain at a strange Spanish post while her older brothers & sister, as well as her uncle & aunt, all of whom were responsible for her, continued on to their destination dozens of miles away.  Unless she was severely injured or very ill, why in the world would a girl so young remain behind in such a place?  If Nanette had been 19 or 18 or even 17, one could see her choosing to stay in an exotic locale to make a life for herself despite the Acadian proclivity to remain close to family.  But she was only 13.  If she was still at El Orcoquiac in 1771--she would have been age 15--one wonders what became of her when the place was abandoned & its residents sent to San Antonio de Béxar. 

Was she brother Joseph's twin? 

22.  Wall of Names, 42 (pl. 11L), calls her Rosalie [LEJEUNE], & lists her with her widowed mother & 5 siblings on L'Amitié; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 124-25, Family No. 227, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Rosalie LEJEUNE, but does not give her godparents' names, & details her family's voyage to LA on Le St.-Rémi in 1785 though they actually crossed on L'Amitié; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls her Rosalie, sa [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] fille, age 2, on the embarkation list, & Rosalie LEJEUNE, his[sic] [Anastasie LEVRON, veuve LEJEUNE's] daughter, age 2, on the complete listing, says she was in the 15th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her mother & 5 siblings, & that she was baptized in 1783 but gives no place of baptism.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 31, 162.

For a detailed comment on her family's double listing on the passenger lists of Le St.-Rémi & L'Amitié, see the footnote for her mother's profile.  

What happened to her in LA?  Did she survive the crossing from France?

23.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Servant [LEJEUNE], & lists him with his father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 583-85, Family No. 659; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 125, Family No. 228, calls him Servan-François; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 6-7, calls him Servand, son [Eustache LEJEUNE's] fils, age 15, on the embarkation list, Servando, su [Eustachio EL JOVEN's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Servand LEJEUNE, his [Eustache LEJEUNE's] son, age 15, on the complete listing, says he was in the 18th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his father, stepmother, 3 siblings, & a cousin, calls him also Servan-Mathurin, & says he was born in 1769; BRDR, 2:498, 594 (SGA-14, 17), his marriage record, calls him Servan-Maturin LEJEUNE, calls his wife Margarita PITRE, gives his & her parents' names, says his mother was deceased at the time of the wedding, that her parents were "of Baton Rouge," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Pedro L'AINS & Joseph RICHARD.  See also Kinnaird, Problems of Frontier Defense, 1792-94," 95.  

Although his marriage was recorded at St.-Gabriel, it probably was performed near Baton Rouge, where his family settled.  There was no church at Baton Rouge until 1793, so priests from St.-Gabriel, and from Pointe Coupée across the river, administered the sacraments in the Baton Rouge District until the area got a church of its own.  

The St.-Gabriel priest noted in the marriage record that Servan's wife Marguerite's parents were from Baton Rouge.  Her father had died in France & her mother had remarried to Victor BOUDREAUX, with whom Marguerite came to LA in 1785.  Victor took his family to Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge, with the majority of the passengers from his ship, & probably moved down to the Baton Rouge area in the late 1780s or early 1790s.  

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