APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

PART/APART

[PAR, ah-PAR]

ACADIA

Pierre dit La Forest, son of Pierre Part and Catherine Piouset of Mouzens, bishopric of Tulle, France, born in c1685, was a soldier in la compagnie de Falaise, serving in the garrison at Port-Royal, when he married Jeanne, daughter of Claude Dugas, in February 1707.  Pierre dit La Forest became a blacksmith at Port-Royal after his term of service expired.  By 1713, he had moved his family to Louisbourg and then to Niganiche on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, probably to escape British authority in Nova Scotia.  He and Jeanne had six children, including three sons who created families of their own.  Their two daughters married into the Jobelet dit Bistoury and Benoit families. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Port-Royal in December 1709, married Angélique, daughter of Gabriel Godin dit Châtillon, sieur de Bellefontaine, and Andrée-Angélique Jeanne, at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, Rivière St.-Jean, in c1737.  They remained there.  

Jean, born probably on Île Royale, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Roy, probably on Île Royale in c1735.

Youngest son Eustache, born at Port-d'Orléans, Île Royale, in c1722, married Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, Rivière St.-Jean, in c1750.  In late winter of 1759, during Le Grand Dérangement, Moses Hazen's New-English Rangers murdered wife Anastasie and three of their children in a raid on St.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas.  Eustache likely was a witness to the killing of his loved one.  The rangers spared at least one of his children and transported them, along with other captives, to the prison compound on Georges Island at Halifax.  The following November, Governor Charles Lawrence deported them, along with Acadians captured at Cap-Sable, to England, but British authorities sent them on to Cherbourg, France, where they arrived in mid-January 1760.  Eustache remarried to second cousin Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Melanson and Marie-Madeleine Petitot, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in February 1761; they had to secure a dispensation of consanguinity in order to marry, and testimony given for the dispensation confirmed the fate of Eustache's first wife.  His daughter Marie-Anne by his first wife Anastasie married into the Delaune family at Cherbourg in February 1773.  Eustache and his new family did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785, but daughter Marie-Anne accompanied her husband and children to the Spanish colony. 

In 1755, descendants of Pierre dit La Forest Part could be found on Rivière St.-Jean and on Île Royale. 

~

According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, Jean-Michel, called Michel, Part, born probably in France in c1693, may have been Pierre dit La Forest's younger brother.  It is more likely, however, that he was from an entirely different family, named Apart.  Michel married Élisabeth, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, probably at Minas in c1720.  They had at least four children there--Jean-Antoine, born in c1721; Joseph in c1723; Alexis in c1725; Brigitte in c1727--before moving on to Cobeguit in the 1730s.  Élisabeth died by 1734.  Michel did no remarry.  He died at St.-Jean, Île d'Orléans, on the St. Lawrence below Québec, in September 1758 during Le Grand Dérangement.  Michel and Élisabeth's daughter Brigitte married Antoine, son of Jean-Baptiste Boudrot and his first wife Cécile Corporon, at Grand-Pré in July 1747 and followed him to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted Brigitte and her family at La Traverse, on the southwest side of the island.  Only one of Michel's sons created a family of his own: 

Oldest son Jean-Antoine, born in April 1721, married Marguerite-Josèphe Breau in c1745.  In 1750, they moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where a French official counted them at Anse-à-Pinnet, on the southeast shore of the island, in August 1752.

Second son Joseph may not have survived childhood. 

Youngest son Alexis, born in July 1725, was infirme and never married.  In August 1752, a French census taker found him at La Traverse on Île St.-Jean living with younger sister Brigitte and her family.

In 1755, Michel Apart and his children could be found on Île St.-Jean. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered these families even farther. ...

.

In August 1763, British officials counted Pierre Paré, his wife, and five of their children in the prison compound at Halifax.  This was Pierre Part, fils of Rivière St.-Jean and his wife Angélique Godin.  Their children were Joseph, who would have been age 25, Olivier, age 17, Pierre III, age 14, Marie, age 12, and François, age 10. 

Now that the war with Britain was over, Pierre, fils and the other Acadians being held at Halifax had a serious dilemma on their hands.  The Treaty of Paris of the previous February stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Rivière St.-Jean was no longer in French territory.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in Nova Scotia, they could live only in the interior of the peninsula in small family groups and work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the hated oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, no self-respecting Acadian would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they would not remain in old Acadia.  So the Parts gathered up what money they could and prepared to leave their homeland.  

Evidently Pierre, fils and his wife Angélique died at Halifax before the Acadians, including their five children, left for St.-Domingue in late 1764. 

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Parts were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  In 1765, five orphaned siblings--Joseph, age 27, Olivier, age 19, Pierre III, age 16, Marie, age 14, and François, age 12--children of Pierre Part, fils and Angélique Godin of Rivière St.-Jean, reached Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  They probably were part of a large extended family led by Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean, whose brother-in-law was Bonaventure Godin dit Bellefontaine, the Parts' maternal uncle.  They settled with their kinsmen at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before. 

Joseph PART (c1738-1811; Pierre dit La Forest)

Joseph, eldest son of Pierre Part, fils and Angélique Godin, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1738, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755 and to the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He led his four younger siblings to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé, where Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766 and 1769.  Joseph died near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1811; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 80 years old when he died, but he was closer to 73.  He did not marry.  

Descendants of Olivier PART (c1746-; Pierre dit La Forest)

Olivier, second son of Pierre Part, fils and Angélique Godin, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1746, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755 and to the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He and his siblings came to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé, where Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766, 1769, and 1777.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Dupuis, at nearby St.-Gabriel in January 1786; Olivier was 40 years old at the time of the wedding.  His two sons settled in Ascension and Iberville parishes. 

1

Older son Joseph-Olivier, born at St.-Jacques in December 1787, married Marie Angèle, called Angèle, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Breaux, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in August 1810.  They settled near the boundary of Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Malcolm was born in Ascension Parish in February 1820, Joseph Drosin in February 1825 but died at age 17 months in June 1826, and a son, name and age unrecorded, died in September 1827.  Their daughter married into the Joly family.  Joseph died in Ascension Parish in May 1832; he was only 44 years old. 

2

Younger son Louis-Olivier, born at St.-Jacques in October 1789, married Marie Constance, daughter of Anglo American Joseph Henderson, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in April 1816; Marie's mother was a Theriot.  They settled near the boundary of Iberville and Ascension parishes.  Their son Valentin Nurville or Murville, also called V. M., was born in March 1826, Louis Duval in c1827 but died at age 6 in August 1833, and Louis, fils was born in December 1830.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Bercegeay, Decauteaux, Hébert, and Laguier families.  Louis Olivier died in Iberville Parish in May 1840; he was only 50 years old; the St. Gabriel priest who recorded his burial called Louis "a resident of Primus Oil Field." 

Murville married fellow Acadian Delphine Élisabeth Landry probably in Ascension Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  Their son Théodore Norbert was born in Ascension Parish in April 1855, Murville Louis in January 1857, and Barnabé Telismard in June 1860.  Despite his age, during the War of 1861-65, Murville, called Marville in the Confederate records, served in Company E of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His service record falls silent after late February 1863, so one wonders if he survived the war. 

Descendants of Pierre PART III (c1749-1826; Pierre dit La Forest)

Pierre III, third son of Pierre Part, fils and Angélique Godin, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1749, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755 and to the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He and his siblings came to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé, where Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766 and 1769.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Melançon, probably at St.-Jacques in c1770.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Blouin, Bourgeois, and LeBlanc families.  Pierre died near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1826; the priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was 67 years old when he died, but he probably was 77.  Only three of his seven sons created families of their own, and one of them had no children, or at least no sons who appear in local church records.  The two older sons remained in St. James Parish; the youngest one settled at nearby Ascension.  During the early antebellum period, some of Pierre III's descendants moved to Bayou Lafourche, creating a second center of family settlement.

1

Oldest son François-Régis, called Régis, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, probably in January 1773, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Bourgeois, at St.-Jacques in February 1794.  Their son François, fils was born at St.-Jacques in April 1797 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1798, Pierre-Paul, called Paul, was born in April 1799, François Luc in October 1808, and Jean Baptiste Eugène, called Eugène, near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1814.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Dantin, and Toups families.  François Régis died near Convent in December 1814; he was only 41 years old.  After this death, his widow and children moved to Bayou Lafourche. 

1a

Paul married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Eusèbe Robichaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1819.  They remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

1b

François Luc married Adèle, 16-year-old daughter of French Creole Marcel Falgout, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1831.  They remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

1c

Eugène married Marie Adèle, 14-year-old daughter of French Creole Joseph Stiven, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1834; Marie's mothers was a Boudreaux.  They remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

2

Pierre IV, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in January 1774, probably died young. 

3

Joseph-Guide, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in June 1775, married Élisabeth or Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Poirier, at St.-Jacques in May 1798.  Their son Pierre-Jacques or Jacques-Paul was born at St.-Jacques in April 1799 but died near Convent, St. James Parish, age 12, in May 1811, Simon was born in January 1804, Damas Rémi or Telder in December 1808 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1811, Evariste was born in June 1817, Étienne in February 1820, and Jean Baptiste Théophile, called Théophile, in December 1824.  Their daughters married into the Cornu and Duhon families.  Joseph died near Convent in March 1844; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died at "age 63 yrs.," but he was closer to 69 or 70. 

3a

Evariste married Marie, daughter of French Creole Jean Grégoire, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in December 1841; Marie's mother was a Bourgeois.  Their son Aristide was born near Convent in January 1845.  Evariste remarried to Justine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Landry, at the Convent church in October 1850.  Their son Joseph Philippe was born near Convent in December 1852, Joseph Justin in September 1855, and Joseph Septime, called Septime, in October 1862 but died at age 1 in September 1863. 

3b

Simon died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1848.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon died at "age 42," but he was 44.  He probably did not marry. 

3c

Théophile died near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1849.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Théophile died at "age 26," but he was only 24.  He did not marry.  

3d

Étienne married Marguerite Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Raphaël Gaudin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1852.  Étienne died near Convent in March 1863; the priest who recorded his burial said that Étienne died at "age 45 years," but he was only 43. 

4

Another Pierre IV, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in April 1779, probably died young

5

Olivier le jeune, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in May 1780, also may have died young.

6

Étienne, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1785, married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Braud, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in March 1810.  Étienne died near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1850; he was 65 years old.  One wonders if he and his wife had any children. 

7

Youngest son Jacques, born at St.-Jacques in October 1789, probably died young. 

Descendants of François PART (c1753-1795; Pierre dit La Forest)

François, fourth and youngest son of Pierre Part, fils and Angélique Godin, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1753, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755 and to the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s.  He and his siblings came to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river in 1766 and 1769.  In the latter year, he was living with the family Joachim dit Bénoni Mire, his brother-in-law.  François married Anne-Marie or Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Bergeron, at St.-Jacques in August 1775.  François died at St.-Jacques in February 1795; he was only 41 years old.  His only son remained in St. James Parish, and his one married grandson settled near Convent. 

Jean-Louis, called Louis and perhaps Pierre le jeune, born at St.-Jacques in October 1786, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Poirier, at St.-Jacques in 1805.  Their son Jean Louis, fils, called Louis, was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1810, and Félicien or Michel in September 1812.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Oubre, Schexnayder, and Tircuit families.  Jean Louis died near Convent in June 1837; he was only 50 years old.  His only married son settled near Convent until the early 1850s, when he moved upriver to Pointe Coupee Parish, but he returned to the Convent area in the late 1860s. 

Michel died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1833.  He was only 21 years old and did not marry. 

Louis, fils married Émelie or Amelia, daughter of German Creole François Oubre, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1843.  Their son Louis Alcée was born near Convent in July 1844, Joseph Clément in November 1845, Charles Elphége in October 1847, François Willis in January 1851, twins Alcide and Alfred in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1852, and Joseph Arthur near Convent in December 1866.  Their daughter married into the Louque family. 

During the War of 1861-65, Louis Alcée may have served in the Pointe Coupee Battalion Louisiana Artillery, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, and Tennessee.  If so, he joined the battalion at Abbeville, Mississippi, probably as a conscript, in September 1862.  He was still serving in the unit as late as August 1864, after which his Confederate service record falls silent.  Louis Alcée married Julia, daughter of Jules Louque, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in December 1866.  Their son Raphaël was born near Convent in October 1869. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Twenty years after the first of their kinsmen came to the colony, a widow and a wife, one an Apart, the other a Part, came to Louisiana from France aboard two of the Seven Ships of 1785.  They chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche, but no family line came of it:

Brigitte, 60-year-old daughter of Michel Apart and Élisabeth Hébert of Minas and Cobeguit and widow of Antoine Boudrot, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were five of her Boudrot children, ages 24 to 16.  Brigitte died at Lafourche in the late 1780s, in her early 60s.  Her sons settled on the river and on Bayou Lafourche.  

Marie-Anne, 34-year-old daughter of Eustache Part and his first wife Anastasie Godin dit Bellefontaine of Île Royale, crossed with husband Jean Delaune, age 42, and two children, both infants, aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December. 

~

In the 1810s, Parts from St. James Parish moved to upper Bayou Lafourche and created a second center of family settlement.  Some of them moved down bayou into Terrebonne Parish.  By the late antebellum period, the Parts of the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley rivaled in numbers their cousins who remained on the river:

Descendants of Pierre-Paul PART (1799-1851; Pierre dit La Forest; Pierre, fils, Pierre III)

Pierre-Paul, called Paul, second son of François-Régis Part and Constance Bourgeois, born at St.-Jacques on the river in April 1799, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Robichaux of Ascension, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1819.  Their daughters married into the Exnicios, Hargis, LeBlanc, and Reussoni or Rusconi families.  Pierre Paul died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1850; he was only 51 years old; petition for a family meeting was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in his name the following January. 

1

Oldest son Louis Pierre or Pierre Louis, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1820, married Élise, 15-year-old daughter of German Creole Telesphore Toups, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1839.  Their son Louis Lumbert was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1842, Onésippe in October 1845, Augustin le jeune in March 1849, Cleopha in September 1850, Léo in April 1853, Paul Émile in October 1855, Joseph Orestile, called Orestile, near Houma, Terrebonne Parish, October 1857, and Pierre Félicien, called Félicien, in January 1862.  Their daughters married into the Duplantis and Vice or Vies families.  Pierre Louis remarried to Eugènie, daughter of French Creole Adam Lasseigne and widow of Nicolas Arceneaux, at the Houma church in May 1866.  Pierre Louis died in Terrebonne Parish in September 1866, only four months after his remarriage; he was only 46 years old; a petition for a succession inventory and a family meeting had been filed at the Houma courthouse the month before his remarriage.  Daughter Marie Louisiane was born posthumously in February 1867. 

1a

Onésippe, by his first wife, married Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Molaison, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1866.

1b

Augustin, by his first wife, married Alvina or Elvina, daughter of French Creole Ulter Chauvin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in December 1869; Alvina's mother was a LeBlanc.

2

Jean Baptiste Adrien, called Adrien and Andressi, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1824, married Marie Marceline or Marcellite, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Babin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1845.  Their son Adrien David or David Adrien was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1846 but died at age 8 1/2 in October 1854, Paul in le jeune was born in June 1848, Marcellin in February 1849, and Joseph Arthur in November 1858.  Their daughter married into the Toups family. 

3

François Aurelien, called Aurelien, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1833, served as a corporal in Company D of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Aurelien enlisted as a private in March 1862 but was promoted to second corporal the following August.  After the war, Aurelien married Mary Frances, daughter of Anglo American Samuel Whittaker, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in April 1868.  Their son Paul William was born in Lafourche Parish in January 1868. 

4

Youngest son Augustin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1841, died at age 2 in September 1843. 

Descendants of François Luc PART (1808-?; Pierre dit La Forest; Pierre, fils, Pierre III)

François Luc, called Luc, third son of François Régis Part and Constance Bourgeois, born in St. James Parish in October 1808, married Adèle, 16-year-old daughter of French Creole Marcel Falgout, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1831.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois and Chauvin families. 

1

Oldest son François Régis le jeune, called Régis, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1832, married Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Roger, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in September 1857.  Their twin sons François Hermogène and François Théogène were born in Lafourche Parish in May 1858 but François Hermogène died the following January.  During the War of 1861-65, Régis, called Régiste in the Confederate service record, served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia.  He and most of his regiment were captured at Labadieville, not far from his home, in late October 1862.  The Federals paroled him in early November, and he returned home.  Régis and his family were living near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, by 1864.

2

Marcellin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1836, married Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Narcisse Robichaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1858.  Their son Désiré Ernest was born near Raceland in March 1859, and George le jeune near Lockport in June 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Marcellin served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Marcellin enlisted at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in October 1861, so he was not a conscript.  In late 1861, he was on extra duty as a nurse at a Confederate hospital in the New Orleans area and returned to his unit early the next year.  Marcellin survived the bloodbath at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 but was absent sick at the hospital in Jackson, Mississippi, later that spring.  He returned to his unit that summer and was detailed with the provost marshal late that year.  In November 1863, when the 18th Regiment Infantry became part of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jacket Battalion Louisiana Infantry, Marcellin served in Company F of the new regiment.  He was detailed as an officers' cook in the spring of 1864 and survived the war. 

3

Louis Clodomir, called Clodomir, born in Lafourche Interior Parish, in December 1838, married Saidonis or Sidlonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin Trahan, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1860.  Their son Félicien was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in c1861 but died at age 4 years, 9 months, near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, in June 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Clodomir served in Company F of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Clodomir did not survive his service.  At age 24, he was mortally wounded at Vicksburg in late June 1863, less than a week before the Confederates surrendered the Mississippi River bastion to Union General Ulysses S. Grant.  When Clodomir's son Félicien died near Lockport in June 1866, the family line probably died with him. 

4

George, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1841, married Aspasie, daughter of French Creole Holter Bouvier, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1861; Aspasie's mother was a Theriot.  They settled near Raceland.  George remarried to Anglo American Théothice or Théotiste Knight in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in June 1867.  Their son Ernisse Alexandre was baptized at the Lockport church, age unrecorded, in June 1870. 

5

Gustave or Octave, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1845, died at age 10 in July 1855. 

6

Joseph, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1847, died at age 9 in October 1858. 

7

Youngest son Augustin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1850. 

Descendants of Jean Baptiste Eugène PART (1814-?; Pierre dit La Forest; Pierre, fils, Pierre III)

Jean Baptiste Eugène, called Eugène, fourth and youngest son of François Régis Part and Constance Bourgeois, born in St. James Parish in April 1814, married Marie Adèle, 14-year-old daughter of French Creole Joseph Estivennes, Stiven, or Stivens, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1834; Marie's mothers was a Boudreaux.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family. 

1

Older son Étienne Elphége, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1837, may have been the Étienne Parr who served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Étienne enlisted at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in October 1861, so he was not a conscript.  He survived the bloodbath at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 but was captured on lower Bayou Teche in April 1863.  The federals sent him to New Orleans to be exchanged, and there his Confederate service record ends, so one wonders if he survived the war. 

2

Younger son Jean Baptiste Douradou, called Douradou, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, Douradou served in Company I of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  During the fall of 1862, Douradou was left at the hospital at Mississippi Springs, Mississippi, while his unit went on to Vicksburg.  Douradou's Confederate service record goes no farther, so one wonders if he survived his hospital stay. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

A non-Acadian, probably an Anglo Creole with a name similar to the Acadians Parts, lived on the western prairies during the late colonial and early antebellum periods: 

Thomas Parr, also called Part, married Hélène Colas or Collet, also called Élisabeth Parr, and settled in the Attakapas District by the mid-1780s.  Their son Thomas, fils married Marie, daughter of Acadian Paul Melançon, and settled on the lower Vermilion River in the early 1800s.  Their two daughters married into the Bourg and Sonnier families.  Thomas, fils's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in March 1815.  He and his wife had no sons, so his family line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

CONCLUSION

Parts (pronounced PAR) settled "late" in Acadia, but they were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Five orphan siblings, including four brothers, all born on Rivière St.-Jean, came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in 1765.  They settled with relatives at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on what became known as the Acadian Coast.  Twenty years later, a widow and a wife named Apart came to Louisiana from France and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Meanwhile, three of the four brothers on the Acadian Coast settled in St. James, Ascension, and Iberville parishes.  During the early antebellum period, some of their descendants moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, creating a second center of family settlement.  During the antebellum period, some of the Lafourche Parts moved down bayou as far as Raceland and Lockport in Lafourche Parish and over into Terrebonne Parish.  By the 1850s, the Parts in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley rivaled in numbers their cousins on the Acadian Coast.  The town of Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in northwestern Assumption Parish probably was named for the Acadian ancestors of these Lafourche valley Parts.  No Acadian Parts lived west of the Atchafalaya Basin before the War of 1861-65. 

According to local church records, no French Aparts or Parts lived in Louisiana during the colonial period.  An Anglo Creole named Parr, whose name sometimes was spelled Part, settled in the Attakapas District on the lower Vermilion River by the mid-1780s, but no family line came of it.  Most, if not all, of the Parts of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of Pierre dit La Forest of Port-Royal and Île Royale. ...

At least eight Parts served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, and at least one of them died in Confederate service.  Clodomir Part, a 24-year-old husband and father serving in the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, was mortally wounded at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in late June 1863. ...

The families' names also are spelled Apar, Appart, Eparte, Hapart, Paré, Par, Parr, Parre, Pars.

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 708-10, 1273, 1636n9, 2565; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:123, 162; Hall, 26th LA Infantry, 195, 198, 199; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 323, 346; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 189; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 33, 81-82; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 17-18; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 90-91; White, DGFA-1, 808, 1268-70; White, DGFA-1 English, 269-70.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Brigitte APART 01 Nov 1785 Asp born & baptized 11 Nov 1727, Grand-Pré; daughter of Jean-Michel APART & Élisabeth HÉBERT; moved to Cobeguit; married, age 20, Antoine, son of Jean-Baptiste BOUDREAUX & his first wife Cécile CORPORON, 24 Jul 1747, Grand-Pré; moved to Île St.-Jean 1751; at La Traverse, Île St.-Jean, Aug 1752, age 25, with husband, son, & infirm brother Alexis, age 27; deported from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo, France, aboard one of the Five Ships 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 23 Jan 1759, called Brigite HAPART, age 32; at Trigavou, France, 1759-72; at St.-Malo 1772; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Brigite HAPART, widow Antoine BOUDREAU, with 4 unnamed sons & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 60[sic], widow, head of family; received from Spanish on arrival 1 each of hatchet & knife, 2 of axe, shovel, & hoe; not in the Valenzuéla census of 1788 with her sons
François PART 02 1765 StJ born c1753, Rivière St.-Jean; son of Pierre PART, fils & Angélique GODIN; brother of Marie, Joseph, Olivier, & Pierre III; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 12; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, called François PARRE orphan, age 12, with Bellony MIRE; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, called François PART, "b.l.," or brother-in-law, age 16, with family of Bénoni MIRE; married, age 23, Anne-Marie, called Anne, daughter of Michel BERGERON & Marie DUGAS of Rivière St.-Jean, & widow of Pierre HÉBERT, 7 Aug 1775, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 26[sic], with wife Anne age 27, daughter Rozallie age 6, & orphan Izidorre DAMOUR [LOUVIERE, probably Anne's nephew] age 13; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 5 whites, 0 slaves, 2 qts. rice, 6 qts. corn; died [buried] St.-Jacques 22 Feb 1795, age 41
Joseph PART 03 1765 StJ born c1738, Rivière St.-Jean; son of Pierre PART, fils & Angélique GODIN; brother of François, Marie, Olivier, & Pierre III; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 27; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Joseph PARRE, age 28, with brother Pierre age 16, & sister Marie age 15, 0 slaves, 5 arpents next to brother Pierre, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 guns; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 102 next to brother Pierre, left [east] bank, age 28[sic], listed singly so probably still a bachelor; died [buried] Convent, St. James Parish, 3 Sep 1811, age 80[sic]; never married
Marie PART 04 1765 StJ born c1751, Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Pierre PART, fils & Angélique GODIN; sister of François, Joseph, Olivier, & Pierre III; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 14; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, called Marie PARRE, age 15, with brothers Joseph & Pierre
Marie-Anne PART 05 Dec 1785 StJ, Asp born c1750, probably Île Royale; daughter of Eustache PART & his first wife Anastasie GODIN dit BELLEFONTAINE; married, age 23, Jean, son of Christophe DELAUNE & Marguerite CAISSIE [ROGER], 18 Feb 1773, Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in First Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Oct 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Marie-Anne, with husband, 1 unnamed son, & 1 unnamed orphan; sailed to LA on La Caroline, age 34; on list of Acadians at St.-Jacques, 1788, unnamed, with husband & 3 unnamed others, 7 1/2 barrels corn; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Mariana, age 45, with husband, 3 daughters, & engagé Pedro L'ARTAU; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Marianne, age 46, with husband, 3 daughters, & engagé Pierre LARTEAU; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Marianne, no surname given, age 48, with husband, 1 son, & 2 daughters
Olivier PART 06 1765 StJ born 1746, Rivière St.-Jean; son of Pierre PART, fils & Angelique GODIN; brother of François, Joseph, Marie, & Pierre III; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 19; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Olivier & Ollivier PARRE, age 20, listed singly so probably a bachelor, with 0 slaves, 5 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 105, left [east] bank, called Ollivier, age 23, listed singly so a bachelor; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 30, with family of brother Pierre; married, age 40, Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste DUPUIS & Anne RICHARD, 15 Jan 1786, St.-Gabriel
Pierre PART III 07 1765 StJ born c1749, Rivière St.-Jean; son of Pierre PART, fils & Angélique GODIN; brother of François, Joseph, Marie, & Olivier; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 16; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Pierre & Pedro PARRE, age 16, with brother Joseph & sister Marie, 3 arpents next to brother Joseph, & 1 gun; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 103 next to brother Joseph, left [east] bank, age 21, listed singly so a bachelor; married, age 21, Marguerite, daughter of Jacques MELANÇON & Marguerite BROUSSARD, c1770, probably St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 28, with wife Margueritte age 30, sons Francois age 4, Joseph age 3, Francois DAMOUR [LOUVIERE, probably an orphan & nephew of Marguerite] age probably 17, his widowed mother-in-law age 57, & brother Ollivier age 30; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 7 whites, 1 black, 5 qts. rice, 30 qts. corn; died [buried] Convent, St. James Parish, 4 Oct 1826, age 67[sic]

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 40 (pl. 10L), calls her veuve BOUDROT, & lists her with 5 children; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2425-26, her husband's profile in the LA section, calls her Brigitte APART, gives her parents' names, details her marriage, calls her husband Antoine BOUDREAUX, says he was born in 1717 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says they were from Pigiguit, calls his mother Cécile CORPORON, says she & her family were at La Traverse, Île St.-Jean, in 1751, at St.-Malo in 1772, at Châtellerault in 1775, & says their children were Jean-Baptiste [BOUDREAUX], born in 1748, Francois-Xavier [BOUDREAUX] in 1759, Charles-Michel [BOUDREAUX] in 1760, Marie-Madeleine [BOUDREAUX] in 1762, Joseph [BOUDREAUX] in 1763, Étienne [BOUDREAUX] in 1765, Marguerite-Josèphe [BOUDREAUX] in 1767, Brigitte-Anne [BOUDREAUX] in 1770, & Jean-Pierre [BOUDREAUX] in 1771, but gives no birthplaces; White, DGFA-1, 200, her husband's profile, calls her Brigitte APART, gives her parents' names, details her marriage, calls her husband Antoine BOUDROT, gives her husband's parents' names, says his mother was Cécile CORPORON, that he was born in c1717 but gives no birthplace, that he was age 35 on Île St.-Jean in 1752, age 43 when they landed at St.-Malo in 1759, age 46 at Trigavou in 1762, age 56 at St.-Malo in 1772, & died 29 Apr 1776, buried next day, St.-Jacques de Nantes; BRDR, 1a(rev.):29, 166 (SGA-2, 79), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Brigitte APPART, gives her parents' names, calls her father Michel APPART, & says her godparents were Pierre RICHARD & Marie BABIN, wife of René RICHARD; BRDR, 1a(rev.):166 (SGA-3, 44a), her marriage record, calls her Brigitte APAR, age ca 20, residant de Cobecuit, calls her husband Antoine BOUDROT, age ca 30, of the parish of Ste. Famille [Pigiguit], gives her & his parents' names, calls her father Michel APAR, says both mothers were deceased at the time of the wedding, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Jean BOUDROT, who made his mark, Michel HÉBERT, who made his mark, Jean BOUDROT, fils, who made his mark, & Germain HÉBERT, who made his mark, & says the groomed signed & the bride made her mark on the marriage document; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 189, shows that in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, she & her husband, age 43, survived the crossing but that the only child with them on the voyage, son Jean-Baptiste, age 11, died in the hospital at St.-Malo 15 Feb 1759, only a few weeks after they disembarked; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 90-91, Family No. 117, calls her Brigitte APART, details her birth/baptism, gives her parents' names, calls her father Michel APART, details her marriage, calls her husband Antoine BOUDROT, says he was born in c1717 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says his mother was Cécile CORPORON, that he was a ploughman, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of son Jean-Baptiste BOUDROT, born 1 Jun 1748, St.-Charles-des-Mines, died age 11, 15 Feb 1759, at the hospital in St.-Malo, son François-Xavier BOUDROT, born & baptized 6 Mar 1760, Trigavou, godson of Zacharie BOUDROT & Marie GUILLOT, son Charles-Michel BOUDROT, born & baptized 23 Oct 1761, Trigavou, godson of Charles DAIGLE & Françoise BOURG, daughter Marie-Madeleine BOUDROT, born & baptized 2 Oct 1763, Trigavou, goddaughter of Ambroise GUILLOT & Anne BRAUD, son Joseph BOUDROT, born & baptized 22 Feb 1765, Trigavou, godson of Pierre BOUDROT & Anne LEBLANC, son Étienne BOUDROT, born & baptized 29 Dec 1766, Trigavou, godson of Charles HÉBERT & Marguerite GUILLOT, daughter Marguerite-Josèph BOUDROT, born & baptized 17 Apr 1768, Trigavou, goddaughter of Alexis BRAUD & Anne VINCENT, daughter Brigide-Anne BOUDROT, born & baptized 24 Feb 1771, Trigavou, goddaughter of Xavier BOUDROT & Marie-Josèphe GUILLOT, died age 17 mos. 12 Jul 1772, buried next day, Trigavou, & son Jean-Pierre BOUDROT, born & baptized 22 Dec 1772, Trigavou, godson of François-Xavier BOUDROT [his brother] & Françoise BOURG, says that in 1752, she, her husband, & son Jean-Baptiste BOUDROT "were residents of La Traverse on Isle St.-Jean," that "After the surrender of Isle St.-Jean, they were transported to St.-Malo where they disembarked on January 23, 1759 from one of the "Five ships,'" & the family resided at Trigavou from 1759-72; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 17, Family No. 31, calls her Brigitte PART, says she was born in 1727 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, details her marriage, calls her husband Antoine BOUDROT, says he was born in 1717 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says his mother was Louise SAULNIER, "his [father's] second wife," that Antoine died age 58 & was buried 30 Apr 1776, St.-Jacques, Nantes, says son Francois-Xavier BOUDROT, born in c1759, was a seaman, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as their voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 72-73, calls her Veuve BOUDREAUX, age 60, on the embarkation list, Brigida PART, widow BOUDREAU, on the debarkation list, & Widow BOUDROT [Brigitte PART], age 60, on the complete listing, says she was in the 28th Family aboard L'Amitié with 5 children, details her marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, calls her husband Antoine BOUDROT, says they married in 1747 but gives no place of marriage, that he died in 1776 but gives no place of burial, says son Étienne [BOUDROT] was born 29 Dec 1766, daughter Marguerite-Joseph [BOUDROT] was born 17 Apr 1768, & son Charles-Michel [BOUDROT] was born 23 Oct 1761, but gives no birthplaces, & lists the implements the Spanish gave her after she reached LA.  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:162; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 47; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505.

According to Robichaux's studies of the Acadians in France, she & her husband had at least 9 children, 1 born probably at Minas, the other 8 in France.  She lost her oldest son, Jean-Baptiste BOUDROT, from the rigors of the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59; he was only 11 years old.  She & her husband may have had other children in Acadia between their marriage in 1747 and 1752, when the family was counted at La Traverse, Île St.-Jean, but only Jean-Baptiste was alive in 1752.  She lost her youngest daughter, Brigitte-Anne BOUDROT, at age 17 mos. at Trigavou in Jul 1772.  Her youngest child, son Jean-Pierre BOUDROT, born at Trigavou in Dec 1772, must have died in Poitou when he was very young; he is not listed with the rest of his family in the Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, Dec 1775, when he would have been only 3 years old.  So 6 of her children survived childhood.  She took 5 of them to LA.  Her oldest surviving son, Francois-Xavier BOUDROT, had married at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in May 1785 & took an earlier ship, Le Beaumont, to LA, with his bride.  He settled at Baton Rouge, not Ascension, so may have lost touch with his family.  In Jan 1788, her children were counted in the Valenzuéla census without her, so she probably had died by then, in her early 60s.  

She evidently was not kin to the PARTs who came to LA. 

02.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him François PART, & lists him with 4 siblings; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2565, says he was not their sibling; BRDR, 2:73, 579-80 (SJA-1, 55), his marriage record, calls him François PART of Rivière St. Jean, calls his wife Anne-Marie BERGERON, "widow of Pierre HÉBERT," gives his but not her parents' names, calls his mother Angélique GODET, says his father was deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Pierre LAMBERT, Maturin HÉBER, Charles SAVOIT, & Antoine ZIGELER; BRDR, 2:579 (SJA-4, 1a), his death/burial record, calls him Francisco PART, married, but does not give his parents' names, nor his wife's name, nor his age at the time of his burial.

How was he the brother-in-law of Joachim dit Bénoni MIRE?  Was Joachim dit Benoni's first wife François's sister?  If so, which sister? 

03.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Joseph PART; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2565, says he was born in 1741; BRDR, 3:680 (SMI-1, 10a; SMI-8, 10), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph PART, age 80, nat. River St. John, Acadia, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.    See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 167, 176.

His estimated birth year is taken from the Cabanocé census of 1766, not the census of 1769, Arsenault, or his burial record.  Why did he not marry?

04.  Wall of Names, 23, calls her Marie PART.  

What happened to her in LA?

05.  Wall of Names, 46 (pl. 12R), calls her Marie PARS, & lists her with her husband & 2 children; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 104, 346, her marriage record, calls her Marie-Anne PART d'Acadie, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says her mother & his father were deceased at the time of the wedding, & gives no witnesses to her marriage; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 33, Family No. 67; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 54, Family No. 101; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 66-67, calls her Marianne PARS, sa [Jean DE LAUNE's] femme, age 34, on the embarkation list, does not include her on the debarkation list, calls her Marianne PART, his [Jean DELAUNE's] wife, age 34, on the complete listing, says she was in the 4th Family aboard L'Amitié with her husband & 2 children, &, calling her Marie-Anne PART, details her marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, & says they married in 1773 but gives no place of marriage.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 497, 528; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 55, 83, 116.  

As the debarkation list of L'Amitié & the embarkation/debarkation lists of La Caroline reveal, she & her family sailed to LA on the later ship, not the earlier one.  

06.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Olivier PART; BRDR, 2:270, 580 (SGA-14, 7), his marriage record, calls him Olivier PART, calls his wife Maria DE PUIS, gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of Acadia" & hers "of Lafourche," but gives no witnesses to his marriage. 

07.  Wall of Names, 23, calls him Pierre PART; BRDR, 4:441 (SMI-4, 69), his death/burial record, calls him Pierre PART, [age] 67, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.    

Is he the namesake of the town of Pierre Part in northwestern Assumption Parish (home of Troy Landry, the famous 'gator hunter on the History Channel's popular "Swamp People"), or was the town named after Pierre III's father or grandfather?

[top of page PART/APART]

Copyright (c) 2007-17  Steven A. Cormier