APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

GUILBEAU

[GIL-bo]

ACADIA

Pierre Guilbeau, a farmer, born in France in c1639, reached Acadia by c1668, the year he married Catherine, daughter of Jean Thériot and Perrine Rau at Port-Royal during the English occupation of the colony Pierre died at Port-Royal in December 1703, in his mid-60s.  He and Catherine had seven children, including two sons, both born at Port-Royal--Hugues, born in c1673, who survived childhood but did not marry, and Charles, born in c1678.  Pierre and Catherine's five daughters married into the Blanchard, Dugas, Granger, and Landry families.  

Charles married Anne, daughter of Bernard Bourg and Françoise Brun, at Port-Royal in c1701.  They had nine children, including five sons, all born at Port-Royal, four of whom created families of their own.  Their three daughters married into the Forest, Girouard, and Michel families.  Charles died at Annapolis Royal in March 1751, in his early 70s Anne had died only a few days before, also in her early 70s.

Oldest son Charles, fils, born in February 1703, married first to Marie-Anne, daughter of Alexandre Comeau and Marguerite Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in November 1727.  In January 1740, he remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Breau and Anne Chiasson, at Annapolis Royal.  Charles, fils died at Annapolis Royal in November 1740, in his late 30s.

Pierre, born in April 1704, married Madeleine, daughter of René Forest and Françoise Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1731.  Pierre died during Le Grand Dérangement at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, present-day Québec Province, in April 1758, age 54.

Jean-Baptiste, born in July 1706, died a month after his birth probably at Port-Royal.  

Alexandre, born in January 1708, married first to Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Girouard and Marie Le Borgne de Bélisle, at Annapolis Royal in February 1734.  He remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Dugas and widow of Pierre Aucoin, at St.-Pierre-les-Becquets, present-day Québec Province, in November 1759.  Alexandre died at Sorel, Québec, in May 1776, in his late 60s.

Youngest son Joseph dit L'Officier, born in February 1710, married Madeleine, daughter of Sr. Jacques Michel dit Saint-Michel and Catherine Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1733 (His dit may have come from his service as a lieutenant in the Acadian militia at Restigouche during Le Grand Dérangement.) 

In 1755, the descendants of Pierre Guilbeau, in their fourth and fifth generations, still lived in the Annapolis River valley.  Others may have moved to one of the Maritime islands--Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, or Île Royale, now Cape Breton Island--to escape British authority in Nova Scotia.  And one may have moved to Chignecto. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Two families, five wives, and a widower--nine Guilbeaus in all--came to Louisiana with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in February 1765.  In April 1765, still in New Orleans recuperating from the voyage, Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau signed the Dauterive agreement with seven other leaders of the Broussard party and attempted to exchange his family's Canadian card money for Louisiana funds.  That spring, he and his extended family followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche:

Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau, age 55, came with wife Madeleine Michel, age 53, and three of their children--Félicité or Félice, age 20, François, age 16, and Jean, age 8.  Félice married into the Broussard family.  Joseph dit L'Officier was one of the first Acadians to die in an epidemic that struck the Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  His grandson, year-old Michel Bernard, fils, also died that autumn.  Dozens of Teche Acadians fled to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river to escape the epidemic, but the Guilbeaus remained on Bayou Teche.  Félice died at her home at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in January 1818, a widow, in her early 70s.

Marie Guilbeau, age 31, one of Joseph dit L'Officier's daughters, came with husband Michel Bernard, age 31, and two sons, age 3 and 1.  A third son was born at Attakapas soon after they got there.  Marie died at Attakapas by October 1774, when her husband was listed in census there without a wife.

Joseph dit L'Officier's oldest son Charles, age 29, came with wife Anne Trahan, age 26, and no children.  Their many children were born at Attakapas. 

Anne Guilbeau, age 25, another of Joseph dit L'Officier's daughters, came with husband Louis-Charles Babineau, age 42, and two sons, ages 4 and 1.  They had many more children in Louisiana.  Anne died in St. Martin Parish in May 1813, a widow, in her early 70s.

Rosalie Guilbeau, age 24, another of Joseph dit L'Officier's daughters, came with husband Paul Thibodeau, age 37, a son whose age was unrecorded, and a female Thibodeau cousin.  Rosalie died in St. Martin Parish in March 1816, in her early 70s.  

Marguerite Guilbeau, age 22, yet another of Joseph dit L'Officier's daughters, came with husband Jean Boudrot, age 25, and a 4-year-old son.  She remarried to Simon, son of fellow Acadian René LeBlanc, at Attakapas in c1768 and died at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in March 1814, in her early 70s.

.

The Acadian Guilbeaus of South Louisiana are descended from Joseph dit L'Officier's three sons, Charles, François, and Jean:

Descendants of Charles dit Charlitte GUILBEAU (1736-1809; Pierre, Charles)

Charles dit Charlitte or Charliton, eldest son of Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau and Madeleine Michel, born at Port-Royal in 1736, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755-56.  He married fellow Acadian Anne Trahan probably at Restigouche in c1760 during Le Grand Derangement.  They followed his family to a prison camp in Nova Scotia soon after their marriage and to Louisiana in 1764-65.  After a brief respite at New Orleans, they followed his father and the rest of the Broussard dit Beausoleil party to the Bayou Teche valley, where Anne died in the early 1770s.  Their daughters married into the Cormier and Mire families, and perhaps into the Primeaux family as well.  Charles remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Bourg and widow of Pierre Pitre, at Attakapas in November 1775.  They settled at La Grande Pointe, also called La Pointe, on upper Bayou Teche near present-day Breaux Bridge.  Their daughters married into the Barras, Cormier, and Girard families.  Charles died at his home at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in August 1809; he was 72 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following August.  Both of his sons created families of their own and settled at La Pointe, but his younger son's line died out early.  The older son married twice, and his line was a vigorous one; eight of his sons created families of their own.  Many of his descendants served Louisiana and the Southern Confederacy during the War Between the States, some at the cost of their lives. 

1

Older son Jean-Charles, called Charles, fils, from his father's first wife, born at Attakapas in December 1771, married Félicité or Félice, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Dugas, probably at Attakapas in the late 1780s or early 1790s.  Their son Jean-Charles, fils was born at Attakapas in September 1796 but died at age 18 months in February 1798, Alexandre was born in January 1798, and a second Jean-Charles, fils in February 1800.  Their daughter married into the Begnaud family.  Jean Charles remarried to Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Dupuis of St.-Jacques, at Atakapas in July 1801.  Their son Michel was born at La Pointe in November 1802, Godefroi in September 1806, Édouard in November 1808, Charles le jeune in October 1812, Edmond in January 1815, Pierre in December 1816, and Élisée in May 1819.  Their daughters married into the Babineaux, Dupuis, and Theriot families.  Jean Charles, père died at his home at La Pointe in July 1820; he was only 48 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month.  Eight of his sons created families of their own; seven of the lines survived. 

1a

Alexandre, by his father's first wife, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Poirier of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1816.  They settled at La Pointe, at L'île des Cypres, today's Lake Martin, and at Prairie Michaud.  Their son Alexandre, fils was born at La Pointe in April 1819 but died at his parents' home on Prairie Michaud at age 1 1/2 in August 1820.  Their daughter married into the Cormier family.  Alexandre, père died "at his home on Bayou Teche," St. Martin Parish, in October 1828; he was only 30 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in July 1829.  Evidently he and his wife had no sons who created families of their own.  

1b

Jean Charles, fils, by his father's first wife, married Céleste, 15-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Cormier, père, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1821.  Their son Charles le jeune, perhaps Jean Charles III, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, age "about 3 mths.," in January 1823.  Jean Charles, fils died from being struck by lightning at L'île des Cypres in December 1824; he was only 24 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May 1825.  A son Pierre may have been born posthumously and baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 3 months, in June 1825. 

Jean Charles III may have married Marie Denise, daughter of fellow Acadian Jérôme Gautreaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1842, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1844; the parish clerk and the priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Jean Charles, fils, who would have been Jean Charles IV, was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1847, and Adam near Grand Coteau in March 1850.

1c

Michel, by his father's second wife, married Clémence, also called Sylvanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Potier of Bayou Teche, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1825.  Their son Valéry Marie was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1826, Auguste in April 1828, and Charles le jeune in November 1829.  Their daughter married into the Arceneaux and Bulliard families.  Michel's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in August 1865; he would have been 63 years old that year. 

Auguste married Marie Sidalise, daughter of French Creole André Lasseigne, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1851.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 25 to 4, living in 1 house--on August Guilbeau's farm near Widow Charles Potier, Widow Ed. Bulliard, and Valry Guilbeau.  During the War of 1861, Auguste, despite his advanced age, may have served in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry with younger brother Charles le jeune.  Auguste remarried to Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Treville Thibodeaux, at the St. Martinville church in May 1864.

In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 6 slaves--3 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 4--on Valière Guilbeau's farm next to Charles Potier.  Was this Valéry Marie?  Valéry Marie married Marie Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvestre Broussard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1854.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 7 slaves--3 males and 4 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ages 35 to 1--on Valry Guilbeau's farm near August Guilbeau and next to Charles M. Guilbeau

Charles le jeune married French Creole Noemie Calais at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1859; Noemie's mother was a Broussard.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 2 slaves--a 12-year-old black males, and a 10-year-old black male--on Charles M. Guilbeau's farm next to Valry Guilbeau.  During the War of 1861, Charles le jeune served as a sergeant in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  After the Orleans Guard Battalion disbanded in June 1862, Charles le jeune served as a sergeant and second lieutenant in Company A of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which fought in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. 

1d

Édouard, by his father's second wife, married Madeleine, minor daughter of German Creole Armand Wiltz, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1830; Madeleine's mother was a Melançon.  Their son Sylvanie Angèle was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1832.  Their daughter married into the Begnaud family.  Édouard died in St. Martin Parish in September 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Édouard died "at age 34 yrs.," but he was 38; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in January 1850.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 5 slaves--4 males and 1 female, all black, ranging in age from 24 to 4--on Madeleine Guilbeau's farm next to Nezaire Wiltz; these may have been Édouard's widow, Madeleine Wiltz's, slaves. 

1e

Godefroi, by his father's second wife, married Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadian David Babineaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1833.  Their son Godefroi, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1835 but died at age 9 months in August 1836, a second Godefroi, fils died 11 days after his birth in December 1837, and Joseph was born in December 1840 but may have died at age 13 1/2 in November 1854.  Their daughter married into the Ledoux family.  Godefroi, père's last will was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in September 1833, soon after he married and years before he died.  Godefroi died in St. Martin Parish in January 1850; the St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that "Godefroy" died "at age 35 or 38 yrs.," but he was 43; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month.  His line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

1f

Charles le jeune, by his father's second wife, married cousin Adélaïde, also called Emélaïde, daughter of David Guilbeau, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1833.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Jean Charles le jeune was born in October 1835 but died at age 14 in January 1850, Charles Joseph Sosthène, called Joseph Sosthène and Sosthène, was born in August 1837, Julien Charles, called Julien C., in July 1839, and David le jeune in February 1844.  Their daughters married into the Castille, Hayes, and Patin families.  Charles le jeune's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November 1855; he would have been 43 years old that year. 

Joseph Sosthène married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadian Placide Isaac Thibodeaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1856.  During the War of 1861, Joseph Sosthène, called Sosthène in Confederate records, served in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  Joseph Sosthène died at Jackson, Mississippi, probably in 1862, so he probably was mortally wounded at Shiloh.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in August 1862.  According to an illustrated history of Louisiana during the War Between the States, "Sosthene Guilbeau disappeared during the war and was never heard of again by his family."  If this was the case, his succession record must have been a pro-forma document. 

During the War of 1861, Julien C. served with older brother Sosthène in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion.  Julien C. also was wounded at Shiloh, but not mortally.  After the Orleans Guard Battalion was disbanded in June 1862, Julien C. may have served briefly in Company A of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry before joining Company K of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry later in the war.  Julien C. married fellow Acadian Azélie or Azélia Guidry in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in December 1865.  Their son was born near Breaux Bridge in December 1868.  Julien farmed in the Cecilia area, north of Breaux Bridge, died there in April 1901, age 61, and was buried in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Cecilia. 

1g

Pierre, by his father's second wife, married Marie Roseline, called Roseline, Roselia, and Azélina, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dupuis, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1835.  Their son Pierre, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1842, Jean Charles le jeune in August 1845, Euphémon in December 1850, and Olidon in September 1854.  By the mid-1850s, they had moved to near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, but may have returned to St. Martin Parish.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a 26-year-old black male--on Pierre Guilbeau's farm.  Was this him? 

Pierre, fils married Marie Azéma, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard LeBlanc, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1865; strangely, the marriage was not recorded civilly in Lafayette Parish until June 1867.  Their son Sylvère Antoine was born near Youngsville in June 1866, Pierre III in March 1868, and Clomere in September 1870. 

Jean Charles le jeune may have died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in October 1867.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jhon, as he called him, died "at age 22 yrs."  Did he marry? 

1h

Élisée, by his father's second wife, married Marie Elmire, called Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Cormier, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1843.  Their son Émile was born in St. Martin Parish in December 1843, Édouard Laisere in January 1849, Césaire in May 1853, Joseph in September 1858, and Joseph Charles Edgard in January 1865.  Their daughter married into the Melançon family.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, 4 blacks and 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 15 to 1--on Elizé Guilbeau's farm. 

During the War of 1861, Émile, with two Guilbeau first cousins, served in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  Émile also may have served in Companies A and C of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, also raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in South Louisiana, and in Company A of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, which also fought in Louisiana.  Émile married Alida, daughter of fellow Acadian Théogène Melançon, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1866.  Émile's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in February 1868; he would have been 25 years old that year. 

2

Younger son Amand, by his father's second wife, born at Attakapas in May 1778, married Marguerite, another daughter of Jean Dugas, at Attakapas in February 1804.  They settled at La Pointe.  Their son Alexandre le jeune was born posthumously at La Pointe in 1807 but died at his maternal grandfather's home at Anse La Butte on the upper Vermilion, age 18 months, in January 1809.  Their daughter married into the Huval family.  Amand died at his home at La Pointe in December 1806; he was only 25 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in April 1812.  His line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive.  

Descendants of François GUILBEAU (1749-1822; Pierre, Charles)

François, second son of Joseph Guilbeau dit L'Officier and Madeleine Michel, born at Port-Royal in October1749, followed his family into exile on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in 1755-56 and to a prison camp in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  He followed his parents to Louisiana in 1764-65 and settled with them on Bayou Teche.  He married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Broussard, at Attakapas in July 1772.  They settled at La Pointe and then at Carencro, at the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Their daughters married into the Achée, Babin, Bienvenu, Breaux, Broussard, Hébert, Janise, and Savoie families.  François died at his home at La Pointe in September 1822; he was 72 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, the following November.  Three of his five sons created families of their own, but one of the lines died out.

1

Oldest son François-Louis, baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in May 1776, died in February 1795.  He was only 19 years old and did not marry.  

2

Joseph le jeune, born at Attakapas in April 1777, married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Hébert, at Attakapas in August 1798.  Joseph le jeune filed a succession record at the St. Martinville courthouse in February 1810 probably after his wife died.  He remarried to Marie Clothilde, called Clothilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Landry and widow of Athanase Trahan and Jean Templet, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1826.  Their son François le jeune was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1828.  Their daughter married into the Talley family.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 3 slaves--all females, all black, ages 35, 15, and 12--on Joseph Gilbeau's farm.  Joseph le jeune died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1851; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died "at age 79 yrs.," but he was "only" 74; his succession record may have been filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in February 1858. 

3

David, born at Attakapas in July 1785, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Duhon of Vermilion, at Attakapas in May 1807.  They settled at La Pointe.  Their daughters married into the Barras, Breaux, Guilbeau, and Patin families and perhaps into the Guidry family as well.  David was struck by lightning and killed "on the road to the village at the bridge at Bayou Tortue near L'île des Chenes" in June 1815; he was only 30 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in June 1820.  He and his wife had no sons, at least none who appear in local church records.  

4

Édouard or Éloi, born at Attakapas in September 1792, died at age 4 1/2 in February 1797.  

5

Youngest son Julien, baptized at Attakapas, age 6 months, in June 1795, married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvestre LeBlanc, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1833.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Jules or Julien, fils was born in October 1841 but died at age 4 months in March 1842.  They also had another son named Jules.  Their daughters married into the Hardy and Hébert families.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 2 slaves--a 60-year-old black female, and a 17-year-old black male--on Julien Gilbeau's farm.  Julien, père died near Breaux Bridge in May 1865; he was 70 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse that month. 

During the War of 1861, Jules may have served with three of his Guilbeau cousins in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862, and, in fact, may have been wounded in the battle.  Jules married Félicie, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Babin, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1865.  Their son Alexandre was born near Breaux Bridge in April 1867 but may have died the following October. 

Descendants of Jean GUILBEAU (c1756-1831; Pierre, Charles)

Jean, third and youngest son of Joseph Guilbeau dit L'Officier and Madeleine Michel, born probably at Restigouche in c1756 during Le Grand Derangement, followed his family to a prison camp in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, on to Louisiana in 1764-65, and to Bayou Teche in early 1765.  He married Marie-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian Salvator Mouton, at Attakapas in July 1783, and remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Arceneaux, at Attakapas in May 1788.  They settled at Carencro near his older brother François.  Their daughters married into the Guidry, Hébert, and Smith families.  Jean, père died a widower probably at Carencro, Lafayette Parish, in March 1831; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was 78 years old when he died, but he probably was closer to 75.  Six of his 10 sons created families of their own and settled in several southwestern parishes.  Many of his descendants served Louisiana and the Southern Confederacy during the War of 1861, some at the cost of their lives. 

1

A child, by his father's first wife, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died at Attakapas 12 days after its birth in August 1784.  

2

Hilaire, by his father's second wife, born at Attakapas in June 1791, probably died young.  

3

Jean, fils, by his father's second wife, born probably at Attakapas in c1792, married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, Mélite, and Émelie, 16-year-old daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Baptiste Castille, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1821; the marriage was recorded in both Lafayette and St. Landry parishes; according to one of his marriage records, Jean, fils owned 270 cattle, 42 horses, and 2 slaves on 7 1/2 x 40 arpents "at Bayou des Cannes at a place called the passage of the Indians."  Their son Jean Onésime, called Onésime, was born near Grand Coteau in April 1822, and Adolphe in April 1824.  Their daughter married into the Petetin family.  A succession record for Jean, fils was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in August 1825; it was not post-mortem.  He died in Lafayette Parish in July 1827; he was only 36 years old; a post-mortem succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1828. 

3a

Onésime married cousin Azélie or Azelia, called Zélie, daughter of Spanish Creole Zenon Castille, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1841; Azélie's mother was a Thibodeaux.  Their son Arthur Onésime was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, posthumously in October 1846.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Onésime died near Grand Coteau in September 1846; he was only 24 years old; his succession record was filed at  the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1848. 

During the War of 1861, Arthur served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local-defense unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought Jayhawkers late in the war.  Arthur married Félicianne, daughter of Lafayette Foreman, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1866; Félicianne's mother was a Duhon

3b

Adolphe married cousin Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Thibodeaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in April 1844, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, the following June; Eugènie's mother, also, was a Castille.  They settled near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish.  Their son Antoine or Antonin was born in February 1845 but died at age 1 in May 1846, Joseph was born in July 1846, and Jean Clairmand in November 1851.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 27 to 2--on Adolphe Guilbeau's farm.  Adolphe died probably near Breaux Bridge in November 1852; the St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Adolphe died "at age 29 yrs.," but he was 28; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in September 1853. 

4

Alexandre, by his father's second wife, born probably at Attakapas in c1794, married Marguerite Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Bernard of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, September 1818.  Their son Alexandre, fils, also called Alexandre J., was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1819, Sosthène in August 1824, Adrien in November 1828, Joseph in March 1831 but died at age 12 in October 1843, and Louis was born posthumously in March 1838.  They also had a son named Jean le jeune.  Their daughters married into the Bernard, Broussard, Guilbeau, and Smith families.  Alexandre died in Lafayette Parish in November 1837; he was only 43 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1844.  

4a

Alexandre, fils married fellow Acadian Françoise Savoie at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1844.  Their son Aurelien was born near Grand Coteau in August 1845 but died at age 2 1/2 in November 1847, and Alexandre Ozémé was born in November 1860 but died at age 8 months in July 1861.  Their daughter married into the Cormier family.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 3 slaves--a 30-year-old black female and 2 15-year-old black males--on Alex. Guilbeau's farm in the parish's Western District next to Sosthe Guilbeau

4b

Sosthène married Marie Onesia, called Onesia, daughter of fellow Acadian François Bernard of Lafayette Parish, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1849.  Their son Honoré was born near Grand Coteau in October 1852 but died at age 2 in November 1854, François Omer, called Omer, was born in December 1854 but died at age 10 in October 1865, Jean Horace was born in March 1857, and Joseph Lucien in April 1870.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 2 slaves--an 18-year-old black female, and a 12-year-old black male--on Sosthe Guilbeau's farm in the parish's Western District next to Alex. Guilbeau.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, 3 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ages 24 to 3, living in 1 house--on Sosthène Guilbeaux's farm between Valéry Guilbeau and Mrs. Ozémé Guilbeau.  Was this him? 

4c

Jean le jeune married Evelina, another daughter of François Bernard, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1859.  Their son Jean Édouard was born near Grand Coteau in October 1859 but died the following January, Louis St. Clair in April 1861 but died at age 1 in May 1862, Joseph Adam was born in January 1863, and François Armand in January 1869.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 2 slaves--a 23-year-old black male, and a 16-year-old black female--on Jean Guilbeau's farm between Azélie Bernard and Louis Guilbeau.  During the War of 1861, Jean le jeune, called John in Confederate records, served in Company D of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Mary Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana; he probably was a conscript.  He also served in Company D of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which fought in Louisiana.   

4d

In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 2 slaves--a 19-year-old black males, and a 12-year-old black female--on Louis Guilbeau's farm next to Jean Guilbeau.  Louis married cousin Alice, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1866; Alice's mother was a Guilbeau.  Their son Louis Alexandre was born near Grand Coteau in January 1868. 

5

François-Placide, called Placide, from his father's second wife, baptized at Attakapas, age 2 months, in May 1795, served in Captain Francis Connagh's Company Militia during the War of 1812.  According to his pension record, Placide enlisted on 3 January 1815, when he was not quite 17, probably in response to General Andrew Jackson's call for South Louisiana militia units to reinforce the garrison at New Orleans, and served until the following March, two months after the Battle of New Orleans, which was fought on January 8, probably before Placide's company had reached the city.  Placide married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Anaclet Cormier, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1819.  Their son Placide Durel or Placide, fils was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in November 1819, Valéry in April 1826, Jean le jeune in April 1828, Alphonse in June 1830, Honoré Placide was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 5 months, in October 1832, Edmond was born near Grand Coteau in April 1834, and Félix in July 1839 but died at age 1 in November 1840.  They also had a son named Adolphe.  Their daughters married into the Bernard, Broussard, and Guidry families.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 49 slaves on Placide Guilbeau's plantation in the parish's Western District.  A decade later, in June 1860, he owned 86 slaves, living in 20 houses, on his Lafayette Parish plantation; he had become a "great planter"; in fact, only two other planters in the parish, one of them former governor Alexandre Mouton, held more slaves than Placide Guilbeau.  Placide, père died near Grand Coteau in November 1865; he was 70 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in August 1866.  Seven of his sons created families of their own.  A younger son, Honoré Placide, became a physician. 

5a

Placide, fils married Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1841.  Their son Joseph Ermar or Armas, called Armas, was born near Grand Coteau in July 1843, Jean Edgar, called Edgar, in September 1845, Placide Cleber or Kleber, called Cleber, in December 1849 but died at age 11 1/2 in August 1861, Albert was born in March 1852 but died at age 9 months in January 1853, Joseph Tilus was born in January 1854, Joseph Martin in February 1855, and Joseph Wilfride or Willis, called Willis, in September 1858 but died the following May.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 10 slaves--6 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 3--on Placide Guilbeau, Jr.'s farm.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 17 slaves--8 males and 9 females, 10 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ages 50 years to 11 months, living in 4 houses--on Placide Guilbeau's farm; this probably was Placide, fils; his 50-year-old black female slave was recorded as an "idiot."  During the War of 1861, Placide, fils served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local-defense unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought area Jayhawkers late in the war. 

During the War of 1861, Joseph Armas, called J. Armas in Confederate records, served as a sergeant in Company K of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Armas married Louise, daughter of Henry Rees, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1869. 

Edgar married Fanelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Arvillien Bernard, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1869.  They settled probably near Carencro. 

5b

Jean le jeune married Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Louis Bernard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1848.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died near Grand Coteau, age 1 month, in August 1849, and Oscalie was born near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, in February 1856.  Their daughter married into the Bulliard family.  Jean le jeune died near Grand Coteau in May 1856; he was only 28 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in November 1860.  In June 1860, the census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 8 slaves--on Mrs. John Guilbeaux's farm between Placide Guilbeau, père's large plantation and Lucien A. Guilbeau's farm; these probably were the slaves of Jean, fils's widow, Aspasie Bernard

5c

Valéry married Marie Corine, called Corine, another daughter of Auguste Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1849.  Their son Félix was born near Grand Coteau in October 1850, Adelmar in January 1853, and Jean Benjamin in September 1860.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 6 slaves--3 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 4--on Valière Guilbeau's farm.  Was this him?  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 12 slaves--7 males and 5 females, 10 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ages 40 to 2, living in 3 houses--on Valéry Guilbeau's farm next to Sosthène Guilbeau.  Was this him?

5d

Alphonse married Ophelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Valérien Dugas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1855.  They lived near Grand Coteau and then near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Joseph Arista was born in December 1856,  Alphonse Chapman in November 1858, Honoré Galbert in March 1860, and Armand died at age 17 months in October 1865.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 12 slaves--5 males and 7 female, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 33 years to 6 months--on Alphonse Guilbeau's farm.  During the War of 1861, Alphonse, with older brother Placide, fils, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps.  Alphonse remarried to Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1866.  Their son Alexis Onésime was born near Grand Coteau in June 1867, and Octave Placide in October 1868. 

5e

Edmond married Emethilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Ursin Bernard, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1855.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Joseph Alonzo had been born in June 1854, Joseph Camille was born in June 1858, Joseph Ernest in June 1859, Joseph Edmond in December 1861, and Seymour in c1862 but died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, age 4, in October 1866.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 4 slaves--3 males and 1 female, all black, ranging in age from 23 to 2--on Edmond Guilbeau's farm next to Ursin Bernard.  Edmond may have remarried to fellow Acadian Ernestille Broussard.  Their son Joseph Roland was born near Breaux Bridge in February 1870. 

5f

Honoré Placide, a physician, married Anne Elizabeth, daughter of Anglo American John Thomas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1855; Anne's mother was a Guidry.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Arthur John was born in May 1856, Braxton died at age 18 months in April 1864, and Frank Thomas was born in December 1867.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 11 slaves--4 males and 7 females, all black, ranging in age from 28 years to 8 months, living in 2 houses--on Dr. H. P. Guilbeau's farm. 

5g

Adolphe married Alsina, Alzina, or Azina, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Gerasin Bernard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1861.  Their son Joseph Adalbert was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in January 1862, three months before his father enlisted, Joseph Édouard in April 1864, not long after his father returned to his unit after being exchanged, and Massena Berchmans in May 1868.  During the War of 861, Adolphe served as a private, fifth sergeant, and second lieutenant in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought, and was captured, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

6

Cyprien-Onésime, called Onésime, by his father's second wife, born probably at Carencro in October 1796, died at his parents' home at Carencro in September 1814.  He was not quite 18 years old and did not marry.  

7

François le jeune, by his father's second wife, born at Attakapas in September 1798, may have married Louise Marguerite Mortier in St. Martin Parish in the 1810s.  Their daughter married into the Doremus family.  Was he the François Guilbeau who died in St. Martin Parish in January 1850?  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that François died "at age 68 or 70 yrs.," but this François would have been in his early 50s. 

8

A son, name unrecorded, by his father's second wife, died at Attakapas 8 days after his birth in May 1801. 

9

François Adrien, called Adrien, by his father's second wife, born at Attakapas in October 1802, married Catherine Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of French Creole André Neraut, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1823.  Their son Jean Adrien, also called Adrien, fils, was born near Grand Coteau in September 1824, Joseph Osémé, also called Osémé Alexandre, in September 1826, François Lucien le jeune, called Lucien le jeune and Lucien A., in October 1828, Alexandre A. in June 1830, and André Ulger or Ulger Adrien, in May 1838.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Roy (French Canadian, not Acadian) families.  Adrien died near Grand Coteau in October 1838; he was only 36 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in January 1843.  

9a

Adrien, fils married fellow Acadian Clara Potier at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1843.  Their son Louis Omir was born near Grand Coteau in October 1846, and Jean Oscar in September 1848 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1850.  Their daughters married into the Durio and Thibodeaux families.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 8 slaves--4 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 1--on Adrien Guilbeau's farm.  Adrien died near Grand Coteau in April 1855; he was only 30 years old; his succession records were filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in June 1855, and at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in August 1860. 

9b

Osémé Alexandre married first cousin Clementine, daughter of his uncle Alexandre Guilbeau, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1844.  Their son André Auger was born near Grand Coteau in February 1851.  Their daughters married into the Clark and Guidroz families.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 38 slaves on Ozémé Guilbeau's plantation in the parish's Western District, next to Marcelite Guilbeau's farm and near Alex. Guilbeau.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 7 more slaves--3 males and 4 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 40 to 4--on Ozémé Guilbeau's farm.  Osémé died near Grand Coteau in February 1858; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Ozémé Alexandre died "at age 31 yrs."; his succession record, calling him Ozémé A. and naming his wife, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in March.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 3 slaves--2 females and 1 male, 2 blacks and 1 mulatto, ages 19, 16, and 13, living in 2 houses--on Mrs. Ozémé Guilbeau's farm next to Sosthène Guilbeaux.  One wonders what happened to many of Osémé's slaves. 

9c

Lucien le jeune married cousin Alexandrine, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Guidry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1853; Alexandrine's mother was a Guilbeau.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son André Numa was born in June 1854, François Lucien, fils in August 1859, and Louis Armand in May 1863.  Their daughter may have married into the Jackson family.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, 3 mulattoes and 1 black, ages 37, 31, and 17--on Lucien A. Guilbeau's farm between Mrs. John Guilbeaux and Augustin Guidry.  During the War of 1861, Lucien A. served in Company A of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana, and in Company D of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which also fought in Louisiana.  Lucien was mortally wounded in the Battle of Mansfield, Louisiana, in April 1864; he was 35 years old.  His family retrieved his remains from the battlefield and buried them in the Carencro church cemetery.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1867. 

9d

Alexandre A. married Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Guidry and widow of Hippolyte Cormier, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1853.  They settled near Arnaudville.  Their son Jean Amilcar was born in December 1854, Charles Alfred in March 1857, Augustin in February 1861, François Adras in May 1864, and Joseph Arthur in June 1869.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 3 slaves--all males, all black, ages 40, 20, and 18, living in 1 house--on Alen Guilbeaux's farm near Mrs. Ozémé Guilbeau.  Was this him?

9e

Ulger Adrien married Coralie, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Comeaux, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1856.  They settled near Arnaudville.  Their son Joseph Gonzalve was born in October 1859, Alexandre Habid was baptized at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, age unrecorded, in November 1863, and Joseph Pabelot or Pableau was born in November 1869 but died the following February. 

10

Youngest son François Lucien, called Lucien, by his father's second wife, born near Carencro, then in St. Martin Parish, in May 1810, married Marie Edwige, called Edwige, daughter of Michel Mayer, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1839.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died near Grand Coteau, age 2, in December 1842, Jean Jacques Lucien, called J. J. Lucius and Lucius, was born in March 1847, and François Lucien Edgard in December 1849 but died at age 1 in December 1850.  Their daughters married into the Smith family and perhaps into the Jackson family as well.  Lucien died near Grand Coteau in June 1850; he was only 40 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1854. 

J. J. Lucius married Mary or Marie Anne, daughter of Anglo American Benjamin A. Smith, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1869.  Their son Joseph Édouard was born near Grand Coteau in December 1869. 

~

By 1791, a Guilbeau, perhaps a grandson of Joseph dit L'Officier, had come to Louisiana probably from France and settled among his relatives at Attakapas:  

Descendants of Joseph GUILBEAU (c1765-1822; Pierre, Charles, Joseph dit L'Officier?)

Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Guilbeau and Anne-Charlotte St.-Étienne de Latour, a descendant of Acadian Governor Charles Latour and perhaps a grandson of Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau, was born on Île Miquelon in c1765.  The British deported his family to France in late 1778, during the American Revolution, when Joseph, fils was in his early teens.  He came of age at La Rochelle, France, and from there went to Louisiana on his own probably in 1785, though his name appears on none of the Seven Ships passenger rolls.  From New Orleans, he went to the Attakapas District to be near his kinsmen and married Pélagie, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Richard of Assumption, at Attakapas in July 1791.  They settled on Bayou Tortue near present-day Lafayette.  After the death of his wife, Joseph filed a succession record at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in June 1814, and remarried to Julie, daughter of French Creole Étienne Vallot of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1817; Joseph III was 52 years old at the time of the wedding.  They settled at Au Pont la Villeboeuf.  Joseph died "a sudden death" in Lafayette Parish in August 1822; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 54 years old when he died, but he probably was a few years older; his first post-mortem succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in September 1822, and others at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in October 1822 and October 1825, the last one concerning monies owed by Joseph's estate to his daughter Julie's tutor, Ozanne Guilbeau.  Sadly, little Julie died the following July, only 8 years old.  None of Joseph, fils's children by either of his wives seems to have created families of their own.  

Joseph III, by his father's first wife, born at Bayou Tortue in September 1806, may have died young.  

Other GUILBEAUs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link many Guilbeaus in the western parishes with known lines of the family there.  The priests at Grand Coteau were especially negligent in their recordkeeping.  One suspects that some of the Guilbeaus who lived on the western prairies during the post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned by Acadian Guilbeaus:

Célestin Guilbeau married French Creole Marguerite Guillory probably in St. Landry Parish by the 1830s.  

Valéry Guilbeau married Thelside Guilleau probably in St. Landry Parish by the 1830s.  Their son Valéry, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1837. 

Uranie Guilbeau married fellow Acadian Edmond Babineaux at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1844.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marguerite Guilbeau married fellow Acadian Émilien François Bernard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1849, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Pierre, also called Pierre C., Guilbeau died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in May 1849.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Pierre died "at age 23 yrs."  Pierre C.'s succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse later that month. 

In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 17 slaves--4 males and 13 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 years to 6 months--on Marcelite Guilbeau's farm in the parish's Western District, next to Ozémé Guilbeau.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 25 slaves--12 males and 13 females, 18 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ages 50 to 1, living in 5 houses--on Marcelite Guilbeau's plantation.  Was she the Marcellite, daughter of Adrien Guilbeau, who married Joseph LeBlanc in April 1847?  If so, she became a widow soon after her marriage, and she was Ozémé's sister. 

Ozémé Guilbeau died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Ozémé died "at age 59 yrs." but said nothing of Ozémé's parents or even a wife.  So how was Ozémé related to the other Guilbeaus of the area? 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--an 18-year-old mulatto male--on ____ Guilbeau's farm. 

Joseph Guilbeau died in St. Martin Parish in August 1861.  He was only 3 years old.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names. 

Numa Guilbeau died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in February 1863.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said Numa died "at age 18 yrs."   One wonders if Numa's death was war-related. 

Venance Guilbeau married Amelaïde Aloue and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the early 1860s. 

Valière Guilbeau died in St. Martin Parish in April 1865.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Valière died "at age 64 yrs." but did not mention a wife. 

Omer Guilbeau died probably in St. Martin Parish in October 1867.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in July 1868. 

Numa Guilbeau died in Lafayette Parish in November 1867.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said Numa died "at age 12 yrs." 

Amelie, daughter of Silvie Guilbeau, married William, son of Guilbot Guilbot, probably Guilbeau, and Peggie ___, both deceased, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869.  Were Silvie and Guilbot Acadians? 

Moyse "of Charleston," son of Charles Guilbeau and Julie ____, married Emérande, daughter of Jean Wiltz, deceased, and Mélite ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869.  Were Charles and Moyse Acadians? 

Émilien Guilbeau married Louisa ____.  Their son Émilien, fils was born near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, in July 1870.  Was Émilien Acadian? 

LOUISIANA: RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Another Port-Royal Guilbeau came to the colony from Halifax in 1765, but he did not settle on the western prairies.  He settled, instead, at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  Although he married, or perhaps remarried, in Louisiana, he did not create another family line there:

Joseph GUILBEAU (1730-1770s; Pierre, Charles)

Joseph, son of Charles Guilbeau, fils and Marie-Anne Comeau and nephew of Joseph dit L'Officier, was born at Port-Royal in December 1730.   He was a 34-year-old bachelor, or perhaps a widower without children, when he came to Louisiana in 1765.  One Acadian historian/genealogist suggests that he was the Joseph Gilboa who was counted at Eastchester, New York, with a wife and two children in August 1756 and listed under the heading "... names of the head of the French Neutral families, number of their Children returned from Georgia and distributed through the counties of Westchester and Orange."  If this was him, then he and his family evidently moved from New York to Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  After he reached Louisiana, Joseph did not follow his Guilbeau kinsmen to Bayou Teche but settled on what became the Acadian Coast.  Spanish officials counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques in April 1766; there was no one else in his household, so one wonders what happened to his family.  He married, or perhaps remarried to, fellow Acadian Catherine Comeaux, widow of ____ Lafaye, at Cabanocé in October 1767.  They probably had no children.  Joseph died by March 1779, when his wife was listed in a St.-Jacques census as a widow

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

A Guilbeau came to Louisiana from France during the late colonial period and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  One wonders if he, like the other Guilbeaus of Louisiana, was a descendant of Pierre and Charles of Port-Royal

Jean-Baptiste, son of François Guilbeau and Thérèse Boisdeque of Lorient, Brittany, France, married Marie-Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of French Creole Louis-François Le Tollierec of Plelo, France, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in August 1798.  Adélaïde had come to Louisiana from France in 1785 aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships; her mother was an Acadian LeBlanc who had married her father in France.  One wonders if Jean-Baptiste himself was a descendant of an Acadian who remained in France.  Jean-Baptiste and Adélaïde's daughter married a Foreign-French Dufour and settled in Ascension Parish, where she died in October 1822, age 22.  Adélaïde died a widow in Ascension Parish in August 1849, age 65.  She and Jean-Baptiste probably had no sons, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

~

During the antebellum period, immigrants from France, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, came to New Orleans.  Some of them had surnames similar to the Guilbeaus of the western prairies:

____ Gilboa, a 53-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Louisiana out of Matamoros, Mexico, in April 1835. 

François Guilbeau, a 22-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Criterion out of Le Havre, France, in August 1836.  He was on his way to Mexico. 

In July 1850, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted a single slave--a 35-year-old black female--in Lewis Gilbeau's household in the First Ward of the parish's Third Municipality. 

Louis Guillebot, a a 27-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Old England out of Le Havre in October 1852.  Also aboard the vessel was Marie Guillebot, age 21, probably his wife.  They were on their way to Missouri. 

François Guilbeau of France married Nanette Gandras or Gondras, perhaps Gondron.  Their son Charles was born near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in November 1853.  The family was still there a year later. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in Jefferson Parish counted 4 slaves--2 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 38 to 21--in Michel Guilbau's household in the parish's Jefferson City. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 3 slaves--all males, all black, ages 40, 34, and 21--in M. Gilbo's household in New Orleans city's Tenth Ward. 

.

Guilbeaus who lived on the western prairies during the immediate post-war period evidently were owned, and freed, by Acadian members of the family:

Sidonise Guilbeau, free woman of color, married Louis Clavel, free man of color, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Emma Guilbeau, freedwoman, married Désiré Henry, freedman, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in August 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

CONCLUSION

Guilbeaus settled early in Acadia, and they were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Almost all of them came to the colony from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765, most of them with the party led by Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil.  Joseph Guilbeau dit L'Officier of Port-Royal, who signed the Dauterive Agreement with Joseph dit Beausoleil and six other leaders of the party, came to Louisiana not only with his wife and three unmarried children but also with a married son and three married daughters--an extended family of his own.  They followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche, and, even after Joseph dit L'Officier died in the mysterious epidemic that killed dozens of his fellow Acadians that summer and fall, there they stayed.  Joseph dit L'Officier's three sons married and created families of their own.  

Another member of the family who came to Louisiana in 1765 did not go to the Attakapas District with the Broussards.  A younger Joseph Guilbeau, nephew of Joseph dit L'Officier, settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river instead.  The younger Joseph was either a widower or a single man in his mid-30s when he reached the colony.  He married, or perhaps remarried to, a fellow Acadian at Cabanocé, but he and his wife had no children.  

In 1791, yet another Joseph Guilbeau, this one much younger than the other two, settled on the western prairies.  This Joseph, who came to Louisiana on his own probably from France, was a native of faraway Île Miquelon and perhaps a grandson of Joseph dit L'Officier.  His line of the family also did not survive.  

Non-Acadian Guilbeaus came to Louisiana from France, but none of them produced large families.  Jean-Baptiste Guilbeau of Lorient, France, came to Louisiana in the late colonial period, married, and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  He and his French-Creole wife, who had come to Louisiana from France and whose mother was an Acadian LeBlanc, had at least one daughter who married and settled in Ascension Parish, but Jean-Baptiste does not seem to have fathered any sons.  One wonders if Jean-Baptiste was descended from an Acadian Guilbeau who had remained in France.  Foreign Frenchmen with similar-sounding surnames came to New Orleans during the antebellum period, but few of them stayed.  One of them, François, married and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and fathered at least one son.  The overwhelming majority of the Guilbeaus of South Louisiana, however, spring from Acadian Joseph dit L'Officier of Port-Royal and his three sons.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, some Guilbeaus lived comfortably on their farms and plantations on the western prairies.  One of them, in fact, became a "great planter."  In 1850, Placide Guilbeau, père of Lafayette Parish owned 49 slaves on his western-district plantation--one short of qualifying him as a "great planter."  His son Placide, fils held 10 slaves.  Cousin Osémé Guilbeau owned 45 slaves on two holdings in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes.  Marcelite Guilbeau held 17 slaves on her Lafayette Parish farm.  But most of the slave-holding Guilbeaus in the western parishes owned less than 10 slaves apiece that year.  A decade later, in 1860, Placide Guilbeau, père owned 86 slaves, living in 20 houses, on his Lafayette Parish plantation; only two other planters, one of them a former governor, owned more slaves in the parish that year.  Placide's son Placide, fils held 17 slaves, son Alphonse 12 slaves, and son Honoré Placide, a physician, 11 slaves.  Cousin Marcelite Guilbeau held 25 slaves on her plantation in 1860.

Nearly three dozen Guilbeaus served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861, half a dozen of them in the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which fought gallantly and lost heavily at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  At least two members of the family died in Confederate service.  Joseph Sosthène, called Sosthène, Guilbeau of La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, served in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Infantry with his younger brother Julien Charles.  Most of the battalion, as its name implies, hailed from the New Orleans area, but Company D, called the DeClouet Guards, was raised in St. Martin and St. Mary parishes.  Sosthène was 24 and married when he enlisted; Julien C. was 22 and single.  Their company was attached to the Orleans Guard Battalion at New Orleans in March 1862 for 90 days service and promptly sent to reinforce General Pierre G. T. Beauregard's command at Corinth, Mississippi.  In April 1862, the battalion was heavily engaged in the Battle of Shiloh in nearby Tennessee.  Both of the Guilbeau brothers were wounded in the fight, Sosthène mortally.  He died at Jackson, Mississippi, a few weeks later and was probably buried there.  Cousin Lucien A. Guilbeau of Carencro, Lafayette Parish, was in his early 30s, married, a father, and the owner of three slaves when he enlisted in Company A of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, raised in nearby St. Martin Parish in April 1862.  Lucien joined the company at Camp Pratt, near New Iberia, in September; judging by his marriage status, his age, and the time of his enlistment, he probably was one of the many area conscripts compelled into Confederate service by the power of law.  He marched and fought with his unit in South Louisiana for the year that it remained in existence; Confederate records are silent about Lucien's service during the rest of 1862 and most of 1863.  He was assigned to Company D of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry when his depleted battalion was consolidated with another unit full of his fellow Cadiens in November 1863.  Son Louis Armand had been born the previous May, eight months after his father's enlistment, while Lucien's unit marched and fought not far from home.  In the first weeks of 1864, Lucien went on 15-day furlough, "no reason given."  It would be the last time he saw his family.  During the Red River Campaign, Lucien fell mortally wounded at the Battle of Mansfield in April 1864; he was 35 years old.  His division commander and Carencro neighbor, General Alfred Mouton, also 35, was killed in the same battle.

During the war, Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valleys and burned and pillaged many farms and plantations, some of them no doubt owned by Guilbeaus.  Thanks to these Federal incursions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area where Guilbeaus lived, adding to the family's misery.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Gilbaux, Gilbeau, Guilbau, Guilbaud, Guilbaut, Guilbeaud, Guilbeault, Guilbeaux, Guileaut, Guillebau, Guillebaut, Guillebeau, Guillebeaut, Guillebeaux, Guillerben, Guillerbo.   They are one of the few Louisiana Acadian families with "eau" at the end of their surname who tend not to use an "x". 

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette, Orleans, St. Landry, & St. Martin parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Jefferson, Lafayette, Orleans, St. Landry, & St. Martin parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 595-99, 1643-46, 2237, 2502-04; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:239, 257, 3:137; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 7; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 173; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vol. 3; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 26, 30, 252, 260; Menn, Large Slaveholders of LA, 1860, 260-61; Moneyhon & Roberts, Portraits of Conflict, 88, 325, source of quote about Sosthène Guilbeau; "United States, War of 1812 Index to Pension Application Files, 1812-1910," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8CG-65J : accessed 06 Oct 2012), Placide Guilbeau; White, DGFA-1, 780-82; White, DGFA-1 English, 159; Katy Guilbeau Hohmann, family historian.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Atakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne GUILBEAU 01 Feb 1765 Atk born 24 Mar 1739, Port-Royal; daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; sister of Charles, Félicité, François, Jean, Marguerite, Marie, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 16, but passengers, including her father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; married, age 23, Charles, son of Clément BABINEAUX & Renée dite Renoche BOURG, & widower of Marguerite DOUCET, 5 Feb 1760, Restigouche; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 1 child; arrived LA 1765, age 25, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue under Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, unnamed, probably the woman in the household of Carlos BABINAU; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, no age given, with husband, 3 sons & a daughter; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 36[sic], with husband, 3 sons, & 1 daughter; in Attakapas census, 1774, called Widow BABINO, with 6 unnamed children, 0 slaves, 33 cattle, 10 horses & mules, 40 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Anne GUILLEBEAUT Widow BABINAUT, age 36[sic], head of family number 25, with sons Dominique [BABINEAUX] age 15, [Julien-]Joseph [BABINEAUX] age 12, Thédore [BABINEAUX] age 10, David [BABINEAUX] age 3, daughters Scolastique [BABINEAUX] age 7, Marie [BABINEAUX] age 2, 0 slaves, 40 cattle, 7 horses, 20 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1781, called Veuve BERBINOT, with 6 unnamed individuals, 92 animals, & 22 arpents; in Opelousas census, 1788, Carancro, called Anne GUILLEBAU, with 10 arpents; died "at the residence of Pierre DUPUY," St. Martin Parish, age 72[sic], a widow, buried 15 May 1813 "in the parish cemetery"; one of the author's paternal ancestors~~
Charles GUILBEAU 02 Feb 1765 Atk born 27 Nov 1736, Port-Royal; son of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; brother of Anne, Félicité, François, Jean, Marguerite, Marie, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 19, but passengers, including his father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; married, age 24, (1)Anne TRAHAN, c1760, probably Restigouche; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 29, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, called Carlos GUILBEAU, with 1 unnamed woman, 1 unnamed man, & 1 unnamed boy in his household; in Attakapas census, 1769, called Charles GUILLIEBEAU, age 30 [sic], with unnamed wife [Anne], no children, 3 oxen, 3 cows, 3 suckling calves or yearlings, 3 horses, 1 pig; took oath of allegiance to Spanish monarch 9 Dec 1769 & made his mark, called Charles GUILLIEBEAU; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 32[sic], with unnamed wife [Anne] age 23, 1 unnamed girl [Ludivine?] age 1, 0 slaves, 15(?)[sic] cattle, 5 horses, 12 arpents without title; in Attakapas census, 1774, called Charles GUILBAU, with no wife, 3 unnamed children, 0 slaves, 26 cattle, 10 horses & mules, 30 pigs, 0 sheep; married, age 36, (2)Marguerite, daughter of Charles BOURG & Anne BOUDREAUX, & widow of Pierre PITRE, 20 Nov 1775, Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1781, called Charles GUILBAUD, with 7 unnamed individuals, 96 animals, & 22 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Chs GUILLEBEAU, with 6 unnamed free individuals, & 1 male slave; in Opelousas census, 1788, Carancro, called Chs. GUILLEBAU, with 10 arpents; on Atakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Carlo GUILLERBO; died "at his residence" "at La Pointe on Bayou Tesche," St. Martin Parish, 11 Apr 1809, age 72, buried next day; succession record dated 29 Aug 1809, St. Martin Parish courthouse
Félicité GUILBEAU 03 Feb 1765 Atk born 30 Oct 1745, Port-Royal; called Félice; daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; sister of Anne, Charles, François, Jean, Marguerite, Marie, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 10, but passengers, including her father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 20, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue lef by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; married, age 20, Sylvain, son of Alexandre BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil & Marguerite THIBODEAUX of Petitcoudiac, c1765, probably Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, with husband, no children, & nephew Joseph BROUSSARD; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 27(?)[sic], with husband & 1 son; in Attakapas census, 1774, unnamed, with husband & 3 children; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 28[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 3 daughters; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 8 unnamed others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 9 unnamed others; died "at her home" at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, 3 Jan 1818, "age about 70[sic] years," a widow, buried next day; succession record dated 28 Jan 1818, St. Martin Parish courthouse
François GUILBEAU 04 Feb 1765 Atk born 14 Oct 1749, Port-Royal; son of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; brother of Anne, Charles, Félicité, Jean, Marguerite, Marie, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 6, but passengers, including his father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 16, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, perhaps the unnamed man in the household of brother Charles; in Attakapas census, 1769, called François GUILLIEBEAU, age 19, with widowed mother & brother; took oath of allegiance to Spanish monarch 9 Dec 1769 & made his mark, called François GUILLIEBEAU; in Attakapas census, 1771, called François GUILLEBAU, age 19[sic], with no wife or children, brother Jean age 15, 0 slaves, 12 cattle, (number obliterated)[sic] horses, 12 arpents without title; married, age 23, Madeleine, daughter of Jean BROUSSARD & Anne LEBLANC, 18 Jul 1772, Attakapas; on Attakapas militia list, Jan 1773, called François GUILLEBEAU; in Attakapas census, 1774, called François GUILBAU, with unnamed wife [Madeleine], 1 unnamed child, 0 slaves, 25 cattle, 5 horses & mules, 12 pigs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1777, called François GUILEAUT, age 25[sic], head of family number 21, with wife Magdeleine age 23, son François age 2, daughters Lindrine age 7, Hamilie age 3, & Marguerite age 1, 0 slaves, 40 cattle, 6 horses, 20 hogs, 0 sheep; in Attakapas census, 1781, called François GUILBAUD, with 6 unnamed individuals, 50 animals, & 17 arpents; in Attakapas census, 1785, called F. GUILLEBEAU, with 6 unnamed free individuals, & 0 slaves; in Opelousas census, 1788, Carancro, called Fois. GUILLEBAU, with 10 arpents; on Attakapas militia list, Aug 1789, called Francisco GUILLERBEN; died "at his home at La pointe," St. Martin Parish, 16 Sep 1822, "at age about 72 yrs.," buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Jean GUILBEAU 05 Feb 1765 Atk born c1756, probably Restigouche; son of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU &  Madeleine MICHEL; brother of Anne, Charles, Félicité, François, Marguerite, Marie, & Rosalie; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 9, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, perhaps the unnamed boy in the household of brother Charles; in Attakapas census, 1769, called Jean GUILLIEBEAU, age 13, with widowed mother & brother; in Attakapas census, 1771, called Jean GUILLEBAU, age 15, with brother François; in Attakapas census, 1774, unnamed, probably the "child" with Widow GUILLEBAU; in Attakapas census, 1777, age 19[sic], with widowed mother; in Attakapas census, 1781, called Jean GUILBAUD, with 2 unnamed individuals, 50 animals, & 10 arpents; married, age 27, (1)Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Salvator MOUTON & Anne BASTARACHE of Chignecto, 9 Jul 1783, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Attakapas census, 1785, called Jn GUILLEBEAU, with 2 unnamed free individuals; married, age 32, (2)Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Pierre ARCENEAUX & Anne BERGERON of St.-Jacques, 25 May 1788, Attakapas; in Opelousas census, 1788, Carancro, called Jn. GUILLEBAU, with 10 arpents; died probably Carencro, Lafayette Parish, 4 Mar 1831, age 78[sic], a widower
Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU 06 Feb 1765 Atk born 7 Feb 1710, baptized 27 Mar1710, Port-Royal; son of Charles GUILBEAU & Anne BOURG; married, age 23, Madeleine, daughter of Sr. Jacques MICHEL dit Saint-Michel & Catherine COMEAUX, 2 Jan 1733, Port-Royal; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 45, but passengers seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; at Nipisiguit 1761; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, with unnamed wife & 6 unnamed children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 55, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; signed DAUTERIVE agreement in New Orleans, 4 Apr 1765, with 7 other leaders of the BROUSSARD party; on list of Acadians who exchanged card money in New Orleans, Apr 1765, called Joseph GUILLEBEAU; died perhaps "of extreme fatigue and heat" Attakapas 31 Aug 1765, age 55, buried the next day; one of the author's paternal ancestors~~
Joseph GUILBEAU 07 1765 StJ born 2 Dec 1730, Port-Royal; son of Charles GUILBEAU, fils and his first wife Marie-Anne COMEAUX; nephew of Joseph dit L'Officier; exiled to GA 1755, age 24; moved to NY by Aug 1756, age 25?; on list of Acadians in Westchester County, NY, Aug 1756, with unnamed wife & 2 unnamed children?; moved to Nova Scotia?; arrived LA 1765, age 34; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Joseph GUILBAUD & Joseph GILLEBAUT, age 35, listed singly, with 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; married, age 36, Catherine COMEAUX, widow of _____ LAFAYE, 2 Oct 1767, Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 98, left [east] bank, called Joseph GUILBEAU, age 38, with wife Catherine age 41, & no children; died before March 1779, when his wife was listed in the St.-Jacques census as a widow
*Joseph GUILBEAU 11 1785? Atk born c1765, Île Miquelon; son of Joseph GUILBEAU & Anne-Charlotte ST.-ÉTIENNE de LA TOUR; grandson of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU?; at La Rochelle, France, 1770s; may have arrived LA 1785, age 20; married, age 26, (1)Pélagie, daughter of Joseph RICHARD & Anne BLANCHARD of Assumption, 4 Jan 1791, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; succession record filed St. Martin Parish courthouse 25 Jun 1814; married, age 52, (2)Julie, daughter of Étienne VALLOT & Elizabeth SMITH of La Pointe, 5 Jul 1817, St. Martinville; died "a sudden death," Lafayette Parish, age 54[sic], buried 12 Aug 1822 "in the parish cemetery"; succession records filed 3 Sep 1822, St. Martin Parish courthouse, & 2 Oct 1822 & 12 Oct 1825, Lafayette Parish courthouse
Marguerite GUILBEAU 08 Feb 1765 Atk born 8 Aug 1743, Port-Royal; daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU &  Madeleine MICHEL; sister of Anne, Charles, Félicité, François, Jean, Marie, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 12, but passengers, including her father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; married (1) Jean, son of probably Michel BOUDREAUX & Marie-Anne LEBLANC, late 1750s, perhaps MA; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & no children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 22, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, unnamed, probably the woman in the household of Juan BOUDREAU; married, age 25, (2)Simon, son of René LEBLANC & Anne THERIOT of Grand-Pré, & widower of Catherine THIBODEAUX, c1768, probably Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Attakapas census, 1771, unnamed, age 25[sic], with husband, 1 son, 2 stepsons, & 1 stepdaughter; in Attakapas census, 1774, unnamed, with husband & 5 children; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 9 others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 10 others; died "in the morning ... at her home" at La Pointe, 13 Mar 1814, age 68[sic], buried same day "in the parish cemetery"; one of the author's paternal ancestors~~
Marie GUILBEAU 09 Feb 1765 Atk born 2 Dec 1733, Port-Royal; daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; sister of Anne, Charles, Félicité, François, Jean, Marguerite, & Rosalie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age 22, but passengers, including her father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; married, age 27, Michel, son of Jean-Baptiste BERNARD & Cécile GAUDET of Chignecto, 25 Jan 1761, Restigouche; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 1 unnamed child; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 31, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1766, District of the Pointe, unnamed, probably the woman in the household of Miguel BERNARDO; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, with husband, 3 sons, a daughter, & Marie MARQUIS; in Attakapas census, 1771, age 36[sic], with husband, 3 sons, & 1 daughter; died by Oct 1774, when her husband is listed in the Attakapas census without a wife
Rosalie GUILBEAU 10 Feb 1765 Atk born 19 May 1741, Port-Royal; daughter of  Joseph dit L'Officier GUILBEAU & Madeleine MICHEL; sister of Anne, Charles, Félicité, François, Jean, Marguerite, & Marie; exiled to NC aboard Pembroke Dec 1755, age14, but passengers, including her father, seized the vessel, took it to Baie St.-Marie & then in Jan 1756 to lower Rivière St.-Jean, found refuge at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, upper Rivière St.-Jean, winter of 1756, & then went to Restigouche, summer of 1756; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 22, Paul, son of Claude THIBODEAUX & Élisabeth/Isabelle COMEAUX of Port-Royal, c1763, probably Halifax; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 24, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; in Attakapas census, 1769, unnamed, no age given, with husband & 2 sons; in Attakapas census, 1771, unnamed, age 27[sic], with husband & 1 unnamed daughter; in Attakapas census, 1774, unnamed, with husband & 4 unnamed children; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Rosalie GUILBEAUT, age 33[sic], with husband, 2 sons, & 2 daughters; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 7 unnamed others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 8 unnamed others; died "at her home," St. Martin Parish, 11 Mar 1816, age 72[sic], a widow, buried next day "in the parish cemetery"; succession record dated 29 Jul 1816, St. Martin Parish courthouse

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 10, calls her Anne GUILBEAU; Hebert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:461 (SM Ch.: v.4, #827), her death/burial record, calls her Anne GUILBEAUX, native of Acadie, widow of Louis BABINEAU, says she "died at the residence of Pierre DUPUY at age 72 yrs.," that she was "buried ... in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 19, 37; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth Century Louisianians, 280; De Ville, Attakapas Census, 1771, 14; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 9.  

02.  Wall of Names, 18, calls him Charles GUILBEAU, & lists him with wife Anne & son Jean-Charles; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2502, the LA section, calls him Charles GUILBEAUX, & says he was born in 1736 but gives no birthplace; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:99, 377 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol. 1 #51), the record of his second marriage, calls him Charles GUILBEAUX, "widr. of Anne TRAHAN, native of Port Roiale en (Port Royal in) Acadie," says his wife was "native of St. Jean in Acadie, wid. of Pierre PITRE with no children," gives his & her parents' names, says her parents were "of Isle St. Jean, Acadia," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Silvain SAUNIER, Joseph HÉBERT, Lange BOURCQ, & Francois GUILLEBAU [his brother]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:343, his death/burial record, says he was buried on 12 Apr 1809; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:343 (SM Ct. Hse.: Succ. #43), his death/burial record, calls him Charles GUILBEAUX, "of Acadia, living at La Pointe on Bayou Tesche," says he died "at his residence," but does not give his parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:342-43 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ. #43), his succession record, calls him Charles GUILBEAUX, "wid. is Marguerite BOURG," says he was buried in Mar 1809, but does not give his parents' names  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 7, 19, 37; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 14. 

Why does Wall of Names include son Jean-Charles in their listing when, according to Arsenault, the boy was not born until 1771?  For confirmation of this, see Jean-Charles's baptismal record in Hébert, Southwest LA Records, 1-A:380 (SM Ch.: v.1, p.24 & SM Ch.: Folio A-1, p. 16), which says he was born on 15 Dec 1771, nearly 7 years after his parents came to LA.   So who was the boy in Charles's household in 1766?  Was there an earlier son for this couple named Jean-Charles?  Or was this a younger brother? 

03.  Wall of Names, 18, calls her Félicité GUILBEAU; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:462 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1153), her death/burial record, called her Félice GUILBEAUX, "native of Acadie, wid. of Silvain BROUSSARD, inhabitant of la pointe," says she died "at age about 70 years at her home," & was buried next day, but does not give her parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:462 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ. #286), her succession record, calls her Félice GUILBEAUX wid. of Sylvain BROUSSARD, but does not give her parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 17, 37; De Ville, Attakapas Census, 1771, 14; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 9; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 281.   

04.  Wall of Names, 18, calls him François GUILBEAU; BRDR, 2:163, 346 (PCP-2, part 2, 140), one of his marriage records, calls him François GUILBAU, calls his wife Magdelene BROUSSARD, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Augustin GREVENBERG & Gerald de VERBOIS; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:140, 379 (SM Ch.: v.1, p.27), another of his marriage records, calls him François GUILLEBAUT, calls his wife Magdeleine BROUSSARD, gives his & his wife's parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were ____ BORDA, ____ de VERBOIS, ____ BERARD, Augustin GREVEMBER, Francois GREVEMBER, ____ DURIEN, & Joseph LANDRY; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:141, 379 (SM Ch.: Folio A-1, p.19), yet another of his marriage records, calls him François GUILBAU "of Attakapas," calls his wife Magdelene BROUSSARD "of Attakapas," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were ____ BERARD, Augustin GREVEMBER, Francois GREVEMBER, ____ DURIEU, & Joseph LANDRY; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:450 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1539), his death/burial record, calls him François GUILBEAUX, "native of Acadie," says he died "at age about 72 yrs. at his home at La pointe," & that he was buried "in the parish cemetery," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:450 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ.#461), his succession record, calls him François GUILBEAUX m. Magdeleine BROUSSARD, but does not give his parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 19. 

Although Attakapas had its own church, or at least its own priest, as early as 1765, evidently there were times in the early years of the parish when there was no pastor at the post on Bayou Teche.  Priests from Pointe Coupee would cross the upper Atchafalaya Basin and minister to the settlers in the Opelousas District, which did not get its own priest until 1776, and in the Attakapas District when there was no priest residing there.  This is why François's marriage was recorded in the Pointe-Coupée as well as the Attakapas marriage registers.  

05.  Wall of Names, 18, calls him Jean GUILBEAU; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:379-80, 588 (SM Ch.: v.2, !116), the record of his first marriage, calls him Jean GUILBAUD, says he was a "minor son," gives his father's but not his mother's name, says his father was "of Acadie," gives his wife's parents' names & says they were "of Acadie," says she was a "minor daughter," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Charles MOUTON, her tutor, Jean-Charles BOUDRO, Joseph BABINO, Jean MOUTON [probably dit Chapeau, her brother], & Charles COMEAUX; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:18, 380 (SM Ch.: v.4, #14), a record of his second marriage, calls him Jean GUILLBAUT, calls his wife Marie & also Marie-Jeanne ARSENAUX, gives his & her parents' names, says her parents were "of Acadia," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Charles GUILBAUX [his brother], ____ DE LA HOUSSAYE, & Louis ARSENAUX; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:19, 380 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-vol.6, #46), another record of his second marriage, calls him Jean GUILBEAU, native of Acadie, says he was a "maj. son," calls his wife Marie-Jeanne ARCENAUX, "native of St. Jacques sur le fleuve," gives his & her  parents' names, says his father was deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Francois & Charlitte GUILBEAU [his brothers], Louis & Pierre ARCENAUX, & Alexandre Chevalier DECLOUET; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 3:300 (Laf. Ch.: v.2, p.106), his death/burial record, calls him Jean GUILBEAUX, m.d.Marie ARCENEAUX, says he died "at age 78 yrs.," but does not give his parents' names or mention his first wife.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 19; De Ville, Attakapas Census, 1771, 16; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 280; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 9.  

His birth year is based on the ages given in the Attakapas censuses of 1769 & 1771.

Most of the GUILBEAUs of South LA are descended from him & his 2 wives.  He fathered 10 sons, 6 of whom created families of their own.  

06.  Wall of Names, 18, calls him Joseph GUILBEAU dit L'Officier; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:382 (SM Ch.: v.1, p.11), his death/burial record, called him Joseph dit l'Officier GUILBEAUX, but does not include any parents' names nor mentions a wife.  See also <thecajuns.com/cardmoney.htm>; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 33.  

What was the origin of Joseph's unusual dit

For his participation in the Pembroke affair of 1755, the only instance in which Acadian exiles seized a British vessel during Le Grand Dérangement, see the article entitled "Pembroke Passenger List Reconstructed" by Paul Delaney in <acadian-home.org>.  

For the possible circumstances of Joseph dit L'Officier's death, see the footnote for fellow Attakapas Acadian Alexandre BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil.

Arsenault, Généalogie, 2502, calls him Joseph GUILBEAU, & says he remarried to Catherine COMEAUX, born in 1728, in 1769, but his wife Madeleine MICHEL was still very much alive then:  she was called Magdeleine, Widow GUILBEAUT, in the Attakapas census of 1777, so this Joseph did not remarry.  Catherine COMEAUX was Madeleine MICHEL's mother.  Another, younger Joseph GUILBEAU married a Catherine COMEAUX at Cabanocé in Oct 1767.  See Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 424.  So Arsenault is confused as well as confusing.  

07.  Wall of Names, 18 (pl. 3R), calls him Joseph GUILBEAU 2, & either lists him singly or with the family of Joseph GUILBEAU dit L'Officier; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171, & Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 424, his marriage record, calls him Josephe GUILLEBEAUX & Joseph GUILLEBEAU & calls his wife Catherine COMMEAUX, but gives no witnesses to his marriage.   See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 167, 176.  

There is some mystery surrounding this fellow.  Wall of Names seems to be including him in the family of Joseph GUILBEAU dit L'Officier.  Is this a mistake in indentation or line spacing?  If this Joseph GUILBEAU did come to LA with his older namesake, was he also a member of the BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil party from Halifax?  Then there is this:  Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 252, a census of Acadians prisoners at Halifax in Aug 1763, lists 2 Joseph GUILBAUs, one with a wife & no children, the other with a wife & 6 children (obviously dit L'Officier).  On p. 260, Jehn speculates that the Joseph GUILBAU with a wife & no children at Halifax is "Possibly Joseph GUILBEAU, navigator, s/o Joseph/Madeleine MICHEL, m. 1763 to Charlotte LATOUR, d/o Charles/Marguerite RICHARD.  Five children born between 1765-1773.  At Miquelon 1766."  That is, he may have been Joseph dit L'Officier's older, married, as-yet-childless, son in 1763.  If Jehn is correct, then the Joseph GUILBEAU at Cabanocé in Apr 1766 could not have been the son of Joseph dit L'Officier; one was in LA, the other on Île Miquelon, in 1766. 

But who was the fellow at Cabanocé, & how was he kin to Joseph dit L'Officier?  Jehn, p. 26, offers a solution by listing a Joseph GILBOA with an unnamed wife & 2 unnamed children at Eastchester, Westchester County, NY, under the heading "... names of the heads of the French Neutral families, numbers of their Children returned from Georgia and distributed through the counties of Westchester and Orange," dated 26 Aug 1756.  Jehn, p. 30, speculates that this Joseph GUILBEAU was the one who was "age 35, apparently a widower, at St. James, La., 1766."  However, family historian Katy Guilbeau Hohmann, via email, informed the author that Stephen A. White places the Joseph GUILBEAU of St.-Jacques in GA in 1763.  Acadians who left GA in 1756 for Acadia did not return to the southern colony.  Katy Guilbeau Hohmann goes on to say that the Joseph GUILBEAU of Cabanocé/St.-Jacques was a son of Charles GUILBEAU & Marie COMEAU of Port-Royal, so Joseph of Cabanocé was a nephew of Joseph dit L'Officier. 

Arsenault, Généalogie, 2502, LA section, using marriage records found in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:381-82 (SM Ch.: v.4, #48; SM Ch.: Marriage Investigation: Folio C, #6), complicates the matter further by listing a Joseph GUILBEAU, born in 1765, son of Joseph GUILBEAU & Anne-Charlotte de SAINT-ÉTIENNE de LATOUR of Port-Royal, who married Pélagie RICHARD, daughter of Joseph RICHARD & Anne BLANCHARD, at Attakapas on 4 Jan 1791.  Joseph & Pélagie had a son named Joseph, fils in 1806.  The marriage record cited above states clearly that the Joseph GUILBEAU who married Pélagie RICHARD was "of Miquelon, bt. in Island of St. Pierre et Miquelon."  This could not have been Joseph of Cabanocé, who was born at Port-Royal in Dec 1730.  

Are there three Joseph GUILBEAUs who belong on this listing--Joseph dit L'Officier, Joseph 2 at Cabanocé, & the Joseph who married at Attakapas in 1791?  The most likely scenario, following Jehn's speculations & the Attakapas church record, demands that a third Joseph GUILBEAU be added to this listing:  In 1764, still at Halifax, Joseph GUILBEAU & his wife Anne-Charlotte de SAINT-ÉTIENNE de LATOUR chose to go to Île Miquelon instead of LA.  Their son Joseph, fils was born & baptized on Miquelon, came of age there and in France, where Acadians from Miquelon, including Joseph, père and his family, were transported in the late 1770s, & made his way to LA on his own by Jan 1791, when he married fellow Acadian Pélagie RICHARD at Attakapas.  Joseph, fils, perhaps III, does not appear in Wall of Names because he did not come to LA like the typical Acadian, in a large expedition or with an extended family.  The Joseph GUILBEAU at Cabanocé is a cousin who came to the colony in 1765 and chose to settle on the river, not on the Teche.  

08.  Wall of Names, 12, 18, calls her Marguerite GUILBEAU; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:464 (SM Ch.: v.4, #883), her death/burial record, calls her Marguerite GUILBEAUX, "native of Acadie, spouse of Simon LEBLANC, inhabitant of La Pointe," says she died "in the morning at age 68 yrs. at her home," & that she was "buried ... in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names.  

Her son Jean-Charles dit Donat by first wife Jean BOUDROT may have been born at Boston, MA, in c1761.  If so, how would she have gotten from Restigouche to Boston in the late 1750s.  Was she separated from her family at Annapolis Royal in 1755 & deported to the New-English colony? 

Lee Crockett, GUILBEAU family genealogist, followed here, believes that the 2 Marguerite GUILBEAUs who are listed separately in Wall of Names are the same woman who married first Jean BOUDREAUX & then Simon LEBLANC.  See the baptismal record of Louis BOUDREAUX, dated 13 Jun 1802, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B: 85 (SM Ch.: v.5, #484), for the basis of this assertion.  The record says that Louis's paternal grandparents were Jean BOUDROT & Marguerite GUILLBAUT, & that his father was Jean Charles BOUDREAUX dit Donat, "son of" Simon LEBLANC.  That is to say, Jean Charles BOUDREAUX was the stepson of Simon LEBLANC, which means that Marguerite GUILBEAU married first to Jean BOUDREAUX & then to Simon LEBLANC.  Good work, Lee!

09.  Wall of Names, 11, calls her Marie GUILBEAU.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 18, 37.

10.  Wall of Names, 25, calls her Rosalie GUILBEAU; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2502, says she was born in 1741; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:465 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1032), her death/burial record, calls her Rosalie GUILBEAUX, "native of Acadie, wid. of Paul THIBAUDOT," says she died at her home at age 72 & was buried "in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:465 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ. #240), her succession record, calls her Rosalie GUILBEAUX m. Paul THIBODEAU, but does not give her parents' names.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 19, 37; De Ville, Attakapas Post Census, 1771, 14; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 32-33.

11.  Not in Wall of Names.  Arsenault, Généalogie, 2502, the LA section, calls him Joseph GUILBEAUX, says he was born in 1765 but gives no birthplace, says his parents were Joseph [GUILBEAU] & Anne-Charlotte de ÉTIENNE de LATOUR of Port-Royal, details his marriage to Pélagie RICHARD, including her parents' names, lists their child as Joseph, born in 1806, but gives no birthplace, & says nothing of a second marriage; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:381-82, 665 (SM Ch.: v.4, #48), one of the records of his first marriage, calls him Joseph GUILBEAU, calls his wife Pélagie RICHARD "of the Mississippi River," gives his & her parents' names, calls his parents Joseph GUILBEAU & Ana Charlotte DE LA TOURRE, says both fathers were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were David BABINEAUX, Jean-Charles GUILBEAU, Anaclet BROUSSARD, Félix LOPES, & Luis ST. MAIRE; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:381-82, 665 (SM Ch.: Marriage Investigation: Folio C, #6), another record of his first marriage, calls him Joseph GUILBAU "of Miquelon, bt. in Island of St. Pierre et Miquelon," calls his wife Pélagie RICHARD "of the Mississippi River, bt. in parish of Assumption of LaFourche," says she was 22 yrs. old, gives his & her parents' names, calls his parents Joseph [GUILBEAUX] & Anne-Charlotte DE LA TORRE de ST. ÉTIENNE (ÉTIENNE De LA TOUR), says her father was deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean-Charles GUILBEAU, of this parish, David BABINAUX, & Charles PRECHANT, now married to Anne BLANCHARD [her stepfather]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:462 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ.#158), a succession record filed after the death of his wife, calls him Joseph GUILBEAUX; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:462, 936 (SM Ch.: v.6, #46), the record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph GUILBEAU, "inhabitant of this parish, native of Acadie," calls his wife Julie VALLOT, gives his & her parents' names, says both of his parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, that her father was "inhabitant at la pointe," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Joseph Fortune PENNE, François LAPAUJADE, Paul HECAUD, & Auguste BORNE; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:453 (Laf. Ch.: v.1, p.1), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph GUILBEAUX, "a native of Acadie, married a second time to Julie VALLOT of St. Martin Parish," says he "died a sudden death at about age 54 yrs., that he was buried "in the parish cemetery," but does not give his parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:452 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ.#451), his first succession record, calls him Joseph GUILBEAUX m. Julie VALLOT, but does not give his parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:452 (Laf. Ct.Hse.: Succ.#26), his second succession record, calls him Joseph GUILBEAUX, "wid. is Julie VALLOT, remarried to Jean Baptiste GIROIR in April 1823," says "A minor heir, Julie GUILBEAU, is their child," that "This folio also includes a document dated 3 Oct. 1822 from St. Martin Parish - Inventory of Succession of dec. Joseph GUILBEAU m. to Julie VALOT," that "Another document dated 12 Oct. 1825 from Lafayette Parish deals with monies due Ozanne GUILBEAU, the tutor of Julie GUILBEAU, money which is due her," & that "Petition for Tutorship" is dated 10 Nov 1823.  

See note 07., above, for a detailed analysis of why he belongs on this listing.  Note especially Jehn's speculation that this Joseph's father was a son of Joseph dit L'Officier.  His marriage & burial records remove any doubt that he was an Acadian immigrant.  The big question is:  When did he get to LA, & from where?  He was born on Miquelon in c1765, but Acadians from that island were transported to France by the French & British in the 1770s.  Church records in Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 173, show the family at La Rochelle, France, in 1779-82, when Joseph would have been in his teens.  Some of the Acadians returned to the island in the 1780s, but many of them remained in France.  The name Joseph GUILBEAU appears on none of the 7 Ships passenger lists; he may still have come in that large expedition, but the extant records just do not show it.  He would have been about 20 years old in 1785 & could have joined the hand full of 7 Ships Acadians who chose to settle in the Attakapas District, where he knew he had many relatives.  

Note his mother's surname.  This makes Joseph a direct descendant of 17th-century Acadian Governor Charles LA TOUR.  

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