APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

GODIN/GAUDIN

[GO-danh]

FRANCE and ACADIA

Maurice Godin, cavalier de Givet, in the province of Namur, present-day Belgium, married Huguette Pampelune of the principality of Sedan, France, in c1560.  Their son Vorle, who worked as a teinturier, or dyer, at Châtillon-sur-Seine in Burgundy, married Brigitte Gouzier of Bar-sur-Seine, Champagne, in c1595.  Vorle's son Claude, who became a carpenter at Châtillon-sur-Seine, married Marie Bardin of Savolles, Champagne, before July 1624, when daughter Jeanne was baptized at St.-Vorle de Châtillon-sur-Seine.  

Claude's son Pierre, born at Châtillon-sur-Seine in May 1630, emigrated to New France in his early 20s.  Like his father, Pierre dit Châtillon was a master carpenter.  He was hired at La Flèche, in the Loire valley, in late May 1653, reached Québec that September, and married Jeanne, daughter of Louis Rousseliere, at Montréal in October 1654.  Pierre and Jeanne left Montréal in 1664, lived at Charlesbourg near Québec, where they were counted in 1666, then at Québec, returned to Montréal in the 1670s, and went to Chignecto in Acadia probably with the sieur de La Vallière, the seigneur of Beaubassin, between June 1676 and June 1677 "to continue the construction work already under way."  Pierre and his family lived with Roger Caissie at Chignecto while Pierre plied his trade.  The family also owned land in the Port-Royal valley.  Pierre died probably at Chignecto in the mid-1680s, in his mid-50s (he signed a deposition in the prosecution of Jean Campagna for witchcraft at Beaubassin in 1685, but only Jeanne, called "widow of Godin," and three of their children, appear in the Acadian census of 1686).  Pierre dit Châtillon and Jeanne had nine children, including four sons, three of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Magdelaine dit La Douceur, Fortin dit LaGrandeur, Nepveu, Henry, and Martin families.  Nearly all of these daughters settled in the St. Lawrence valley.  The one exception was youngest daughter Anne dit Châtillon, born at Montréal in January 1672, who married Pierre, son of Pierre Martin and his Mi'kmaq wife Anne Ouestnorouest dit Petitous, probably at Port-Royal in c1686.  During the early 1700s, Pierre and Anne moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, probably to escape British authority in Nova Scotia.  Anne died at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on the island in February 1742; she was 70 years old.  

Pierre dit Châtillon's oldest son Laurent dit Châtillon dit Beauséjour, born at Montréal in August 1655, married first to Anne, daughter of François Guérin and Anne Blanchard, probably at Chignecto in c1677.  He settled for a while at Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, (the future site of French Fort Beauséjour took its name from the ridge on which he lived) and at Port-Royal, where he was counted with wife Anne in 1686, but returned to the St. Lawrence valley.  He lived at St.-Pierre-du-Sud, St.-François-du-Sud, now Montmagny, and St.-Antoine-de-Tilly, where his wife died in January 1718, and again at Montréal.  Laurent and Anne had 13 children, including three sons who married into the Pellerin dit Caudebec, Roy, and Verdon families.  Their daughters married into the Marchand (Marcheguay) dit Poitiers, Mercier dit Caudebec, Carrière dit Carcassone, Gareau dit Lagarde, Rainville, Berthelet dit Le Savoyard, and Quévillon families.  Laurent remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Mathieu Brunet dit Lestang and Marie Blanchard and widow of Antoine Pilon, at Pointe-Claire, near Montréal, in June 1719.  They had no children.  Laurent died at Rivière-des-Prairies, Canada, in May 1737 in his mid-80s.  All of his married sons and most of his married daughters settled in the St. Lawrence valley.  One of his daughters, Marie dit Châtillon, wife of Louis Marchand dit Poitiers, married at Port-Royal in November 1705 but moved to Port-Toulouse, Île-Royale, now Cape Breton Island, where she died in the 1730s.  

Pierre dit Châtillon's third son Pierre dit Châtillon dit Desrochers, born at Québec in March 1667, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Cochon, at Château-Richer, Québec, in July 1689.  They had only three children, two daughters and a son, Jean-Baptiste, who died at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly, Québec, in February 1723, age 18, before he could create a family of his own.  Their daughters married into the Genest dit Labarre and Croteau families.  Pierre dit Châtillon dit Desrochers died at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly in April 1739, age 72.  Though Pierre dit Châtillon dit Desrochers lived in greater Acadia as a child, none of his daughters settled there.  They both remained at St.-Antoine-de-Tilly.

Pierre dit Châtillon's fourth and youngest son Jean, born at Montréal in October 1669, may not have survived childhood.  

~

The only branch of the Godin family in New France affected by the Acadian Grand Dérangement was that of Pierre dit Châtillon's second son, Gabriel dit Châtillon.  And members from only Gabriel's family emigrated to Louisiana. 

Gabriel dit Châtillon, later sieur de Bellefontaine, born at Montréal in July 1661, married Andrée-Angélique, daughter of Robert Jasne, Jeanne, or Joannes, at Québec in July 1690.  Gabriel lived at Charlebourg, Québec, when he was young and was counted at Port-Royal in the late 1680s.  After his marriage, however, he and his wife settled on Rivière St.-Jean  in present-day New Brunswick, where French authorities had granted Gabriel a seigneurie.  He and Andrée-Angélique had 12 children on Rivière St.-Jean, including eight sons who created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Saindon, Dugas, and Part families.  Gabriel died on Rivière St.-Jean before August 1730, in his late 60s.  

Oldest son Louis dit Bellefontaine, born in c1693, married a woman in c1736 whose name has been lost to history.  Louis died at St.-François-du-Lac, Québec, in February 1749, age 57.

Joseph dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour, born in c1695, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, on Rivière St.-Jean in c1726.  This was the beginning of an important connection between the two families.  Joseph served as a major of the local militia during King George's War in the late 1740s.  He died at Cherbourg, France, in December 1776, age 81.  

Jacques-Philippe dit Bellefeuille, born in c1697, married Anne-Marie, another daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1730.  Jacques-Philippe died at Gentilly, Québec, in February 1763, in his mid-60s.

Pierre-Joseph dit Châtillon dit Préville, born in the late 1690s or early 1700s, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of delegate, judge, and notary Alexandre Bourg dit Bellehumeur and Marguerite Melanson, at Grand-Pré in August 1730.  Pierre-Joseph died in January 1745, before Le Grand Dérangement.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Lincour, born probably in the early 1700s, married Anastasie, another daughter of Alexandre Bourg dit Bellehumeur and Marguerite Melanson, in c1729, probably at Minas.  Jean-Baptiste died during Le Grand Dérangement, perhaps at Halifax, where British authorities counted his wife and four children in August 1763 and called her a widow.

Charles dit Bellefontaine dit Boisjoli, born in c1708, married Marie, daughter of Charles Melanson, fils, at Annapolis Royal in August 1735.  British authorities counted him and his family also in the prison at Halifax in August 1763.

René dit Jean-René dit Valcour, born in the late 1700s or early 1710s, married first to Françoise Dugas in c1734, and then to Françoise, yet another daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743.  

Youngest son Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine, born in c1715, married first, in c1739, to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Marguerite, yet another daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1740.  

In 1755, descendants of Gabriel dit Châtillon Godin, sieur de Bellefontaine, could be found in Canada, but most of them were still living on Rivière St.-Jean. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Godins settled early in Acadia, and they were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them--a male and two females, all cousins--reached New Orleans in February 1765 with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  They followed the Broussards across the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where they helped create La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche:

Marie-Charlotte, age unrecorded, daughter of Gabriel Godin dit Châtillon, came to Louisiana with husband Jean Dugas, age 53, and six children, ages 25 to 6.  

Anselme-Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine, age unrecorded, came to Louisiana without a wife or children.  

Marie-Madeleine, age 27, daughter of René dit Jean-René Godin dit Valcour, came to Louisiana with husband Ambroise Martin dit Barnabé, age 31, and a daughter, age 4.  Marie-Madeleine was pregnant when she left Halifax in late 1764.  Daughter Élisabeth Martin dit Barnabé was born either aboard one of the ships her family took to New Orleans or soon after they reached the colony.  

Tragedy soon struck members of the family.  In mid-July, only a few weeks after she had reached the Teche valley, Marie-Charlotte Godin was one of the first to die in an epidemic that killed dozens of her fellow Teche Valley Acadians that summer and fall.  In early September, not quite six months after he settled at Attakapas, Anselme-Joseph Godin suffered the same fate. 

 Marie-Madeleine Godin enjoyed a happier fate.  She survived the epidemic and, with her husband and daughters, escaped to Cabanocé on the river that fall.  Spanish authorities were still counting them at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques in March 1779. 

Acadian Godins probably did not return to the western prairies, at least not during the late colonial and antebellum periods.  

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Most of the Acadian Godins who reached Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 did not follow the Broussards to Bayou Teche.  These Godins probably were members of an extended family led by Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean, brother-in-law of one of the Godin family heads.  Others may have come with Surgeon Philippe St.-Julien de Lachaussée, widower of Françoise Godin dit Lincour.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before:

Bonaventure Godin dit Bellefontaine, age 50, came with second wife Marguerite Bergeron dit d'Amboise, age 42, and four children--Théotiste, age 16, Marie, age 14, Bonaventure, fils, age 12, and Michel, age 9.  They had no more children in Louisiana.  Théotiste married Gilles, son of fellow Acadian Joseph LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques in February 1781 and died two years later, age 34, probably from the rigors of childbirth.  Marie married late, to first cousin Mathurin, son of Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit D'Ambroise, probably at St.-Jacques in the 1780s.  Bonaventure, père's two sons created families of their own at St.-Jacques.  

Marie-Anne, called Anne, Bergeron, age 36, widow of Alexandre Godin dit Lincour, came with four children--Marie-Anne, age 14, Victor, age 13, Pierre-Paul, called Paul, age 9, and Marie-Louise or -Françoise, age 6.  Daughter Marie-Anne married three times, first to Antoine, son of French Creole Jacques Dupré dit Terrebonne, at nearby Ascension in 1770, then to Jean, son of French Creole Pierre Villeneuve of Gasony, France, at New Orleans in February 1783, and finally to Joseph, son of fellow Acadian Amand Melançon, at St.-Jacques in February 1790.  She died at Ascension in August 1791; she was only 39 years old.  Victor may not have married.  Pierre-Paul created a family of his own and settled at New Orleans.  Marie-Louise, called Marie-Francoise by the priest who recorded her burial, died in New Orleans in January 1773 in her late teens.  

Barthélémy Godin dit Bellefontaine, age 30, came with his wife Marie-Claire Martin, age 31.  Their children were born at St.-Jacques.  

Barthélemy's younger brothers Jacques dit Bellefontaine, age 25, and Jean-Baptiste dit Bellefontaine, age 19, came to Louisiana without wives or children.  Jacques may not have married, but Jean-Baptiste married twice.  

Joseph Godin dit Lincour, age 25, came with younger brother, Charles dit Lincour, age 15.  They brought no wives or children with them but married at St.-Jacques.  Joseph remained on the river, but Charles moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Théotiste dite Sally Thibodeau, age 25, widow of Bonaventure Godin, came with daughter Marie-Anne-Barbe Godin, age 4.  Théotiste remarried to fellow Acadian Firmin Landry, a widower, probably at St.-Jacques c1769, and they settled in the Attakapas District, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where Marie-Anne-Barbe married twice, first to René, son of fellow Acadian Firmin Broussard and widower of Madeleine Landry, in January 1779, and then to Noble, son of Irish American John Wilkins, in October 1800.  Marie-Anne-Barbe died at Attakapas in May 1801, only 40 years old.  

Marie-Josèphe Godin dit Lincour, age 21, sister of Charles and Joseph dit Lincour, came with husband Pierre Arceneau, age 30, and two sons, age 3 and 1.  She remarried to Basile, son of fellow Acadian Joseph Prejean of Chepoudy, probably at Cabanocé in c1768 and followed him to the Attakapas District, where she died in St. Martin Parish in September 1815, in her early 70s.  

Jean Godin dit Bellefontaine, age 18, came to Louisiana without a wife or children and probably never married.  

Most of the Acadian Godin/Gaudins who created families in South Louisiana settled on the Acadian Coast, which included St.-Jacques and Ascension.  Two of them settled at New Orleans.  One of them moved all the way down into the Terrebonne country by the 1820s: 

Descendants of Barthélemy GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine (c1735-1771; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Barthélémy dit Bellefontaine, eldest son of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron dit d'Amboise, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1735, married Marie-Claire, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Martin dit Barnabé of Port-Royal, in c1760 and came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue with her and his brothers in 1765.  He and Marie-Claire settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where their children were born.  Barthélémy died at St.-Jacques in July 1771; he was only 36 years old.  His family line probably did not survive. 

1

Older son Louis, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1767, married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Louvière of Rivière St.-Jean, at St.-Jacques in March 1791.  Their daughters married into the Blouin, Grabert, and Hébert families.  Did Louis father any sons? 

2

Younger son Barthélémy, fils, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1769, likely died young. 

Jacques GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine (c1740-; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Jacques dit Bellefontaine, son of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron dit d'Amboise, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1740, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue with his brothers in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  He may not have married.  

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine (c1746-1811?; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Jean-Baptiste dit Bellefontaine, youngest son of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron dit d'Amboise, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1746, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue with his brothers in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexander Melançon, in c1768.  Their daughters married into the Charpiot and LeBlanc families.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Élisabeth or Isabelle Fontenot, widow of David Marx, at St.-Jacques in July 1778.  One of their daughters was baptized at New Orleans in March 1787, so the family may have been living there in the late 1780s.  Jean-Baptiste may have died in St. James Parish in April 1811; the priests who recorded his burial in two separate Convent church records noted that he was either 40 or 80 years old when he died, but he would have been 65.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, by his father's first wife, born probably at St.-Jacques in the early 1770s, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Foret, at St.-Jacques in May 1791.  Their son Jean Raphael, called Raphael, was born at St.-Jacques in November 1797, Gabriel in February 1800, Eugène in January 1802, and Simon in September 1806.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, D'Eperon, Dessarper, and Gautreaux families.  

1a

Raphaël married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Hébert, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1826.  Their son Désiré was born in St. James Parish in c1829 but died at age 2 in October 1831, Joseph Elphége was born in May 1832 but died at age 2 in February 1835, Simon le jeune was born in December 1837, Constant in December 1842 but died at age 2 in December 1844, and Joseph Eugène was born in January 1845 but died at age 9 months the following October.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Part, and Rouillet families.  In September1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 8 slaves--4 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 70 to 5--on Raphael Gaudin's farm in the parish's eastern district.  Raphael died in St. James Parish in September 1855; he was 58 years old.  In June 1860, the census taker in St. James Parish counted 4 slaves--1 male and 3 females, ranging in age from 40 to 9--on the Widow Raphael Gaudin's farm in the parish's Left Bank District 4.  

Simon le jeune married Hélène Justina, called Justina, daughter of fellow Acadian François Bourgeois, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in November 1855.  Their son Simon, fils was born in St. James Parish in October 1858 but died at age 3 in August 1861, Joseph Adam was born in February 1864 but died at age 6 months the following August, and Jean Oreste was born near Convent in June 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Simon served as a sergeant in Company A of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  

1b

Simon died in St. James Parish in March 1821.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was 40 years old when he died, but, unless it was a different Simon Gaudin, he was only 15.  

1c

Eugène died in St. James Parish in October 1835.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Eugène was 30 years old when he died, but he was 33.  Did he marry?  

1d

Gabriel married Azelie, daughter of Eugène Senette and widow of Jean Berez, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in November 1836.  Their daughter married into the Carraine family.

2

Théotique, a twin, by his first wife, baptized at St.-Jacques in July 1774, age unrecorded, probably did not survive childhood.  

3

Youngest son Lucas, called Luc, by his father's second wife, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1784, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadian Marin Landry, at St.-Jacques in April 1802.  Their son Paul Vasseur, called Vasseur, was born in St. James Parish in November 1809, Amédée in October 1811, and Jean Baptiste in February 1823.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Blouin, Gourdain, LeBlanc (French Canadian, not Acadian), and Melançon families.  Luc died in St. James Parish in March 1830; he was only 46 years old.  

Paul Vasseur married Rosalie Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Richard, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in April 1831.  Their son Paul Vasseur, fils was born in St. James Parish in July 1835.  Paul Vasseur, père died in St. James Parish in February 1837; he was only 26 years old.  

Descendants of Joseph GODIN/GAUDIN dit Lincour (c1740-c1771; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Joseph, elder son of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1740, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his younger brother Charles and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married fellow Acadian Marie Forest in April 1766.  They had no children.  Joseph remarried to Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Landry, probably at Cabanocé in c1768.  Joseph died at St.-Jacques or nearby Ascension in c1771; he was only 31 years old.  He and Geneviève had only one son, but that son had many sons of his own who perpetuated this line of the family.  No branch of the Godin/Gaudin family, in fact, was so prolific.  Many of them married cousins.  

Édouard dit Lincour, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1768, because of the early death of his father was raised by his uncle Charles dit Lincour, whose only son died young.  Edouard married Marie-Madeleine, sometimes called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Landry and widow of Baptiste Landry, at Ascension, on the river above St.-Jacques, in June 1796.  Their son Alexis Séraphin, called Séraphin, erroneously called Geneviève by the priest who recorded his baptism, was born at Ascension in July 1797, François de Sales in January 1801, Casimir in March 1803, Valery Didier in May 1807, and Leufroi Paulin, called Paulin, in June 1812.  Their daughters married into the Henry, Lavergne, and Richard families.  When Édouard's uncle Charles moved to Terrebonne Parish in the 1820s, Édouard and his family remained in Ascension Parish.  Édouard dit Lincour died in Ascension Parish in March 1840; he was 72 years old.  

Séraphin married Marie Clémence or Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvain LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1817.  Their son Cyril was born in Ascension Parish in March 1818, Alexis in November 1820, Sylvanie in July 1825, Pierre Octave in June 1827 but died at age 5 months the following November, Joseph Émile was born in September 1830 but died at age 1 in October 1831, Édouard Adrien was born in October 1832, and Augustin in May 1837.  Their daughters married into the Garcia and LeBlanc families.  Séraphin died in Ascension Parish in August 1852; he was 55 years old.  

Cyril married Marie Amelina, called Amelina, yet another daughter of Amand Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1837.  Their son Richard Osémé was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age 4 months, in May 1838 but died at age 6 in August 1844, Eusèbe Théodule, called Théodule, was born in August 1839, Louis Numa, called Numa, in August 1841, Cyril, fils, perhaps also called Cyrille Amand, in October 1842, Joseph Gustave in September 1844 but died at age 9 months in June 1845, a newborn infant, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died in October 1845, and Léon or Léonce was born in January 1847 but died the following April.  Cyril died in Ascension Parish in October 1847; he was only 29 years old.  

Théodule married Marie Aurela, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Lanoux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1860.  

Numa married Adèle, daughter of Firmin Desnoyer, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1860; Adele's mother was a LeBlanc.  Their son Louis Numa, fils was born in Ascension Parish in January 1861, and Félix Amand in May 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Numa served as a sergeant in Company E of the 29th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Ascension Parish which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He was wounded during the final days of the Siege of Vicksburg, spent time in a federal hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and took the oath of allegiance to the U.S. government in late July 1863.  In the eyes of his fellow Confederates, he was now a traitor.  Numa died in Ascension Parish in December 1868; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Numa died at "age 27 years."  Considering his wound, one wonders if his death was war-related. 

Cyril, fils, called Cyrille Amand by the recording priest, may have married Utulma, perhaps another daughter of Firmin Desnoyer, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1870. 

Édouard Adrien died in Ascension Parish in July 1852.  He was only 20 years old and probably did not marry.  

Augustin died in Ascension Parish in September 1861.  He was only 24 years old and probably did not marry.  

François de Sales married cousin Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Simon Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1822; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son François, fils died in Ascension Parish in April 1823 a day after his birth, Onésime Wilfred was born in April 1827 but died at age 2 in February 1829, Joseph Lucien was born January 1831, Jean Casimir in March 1836, Ambroise in April 1838, Hilaire in January 1842, and Simon Valentin in February 1845.  They also had a son named Tiburse.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  

Tiburse married Cléonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Evariste LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1860.  Their son Tiburse, fils was born in Ascension Parish in April 1861, Joseph Lucien in June 1862, Evariste in October 1865, and Louis Eveque near Gonzales in August 1869.  During the War Between the States, Tiburse served in Company D of the 14th Regiment Confederate States Cavalry, which fought in Mississippi and Alabama.  

Casimir married Françoise Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1827.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois and Rizan families.  Casimir died in Ascension Parish in July 1833; he was only 30 years old.  Did he father any sons?    

Valéry Didier married cousin Marie Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1829; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish in December 1829 "several months" after his birth, and Vincent Albert, called Albert, born in January 1831, died the following October.  Valery died in Ascension Parish in June 1833; he was only 26 years old.   His family line probably died with him.  

Paulin married Marie Célesie, called Célesie, another daughter of Amand Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1834.  Their son Cyril Paulin was born in Ascension Parish in September 1838, François Vileor, called Vileor, in July 1840, Louis in August 1842, Antoine Léonard, called Léonard, in January 1848 but died at age 4 in July 1852, Étienne Omer, called Omer, was born in December 1850 but died at age 13 in April 1863, and José Guetin René, called René, was born in October 1852 but died at age 10 in July 1862.  Their daughters married into the Bertrand (French Creole or Foreign French, not Acadian) and Rizan families.  

Cyril Paulin married Rosella or Rosellain, daughter of fellow Acadian Lessin LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in December 1859.  Their son Joseph Albert was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in February 1867.  

Louis married Josephine, daughter of Spanish Creole Antoine Gomez, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1864.  Their son Joseph Ernest, called Ernest, was born near Gonzales in August 1866 but died at age 3 in September 1869, and Joseph was born in February 1869.  

During the War of 1861-65, Vileor served in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi.  Vileor married cousin Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Valentin Gautreaux, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in December 1865; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near Gonzales.  Vileor died at Allemania Plantation, Iberville Parish, in April 1920; he was 79 years old.  

Jean GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine (c1747-?; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Jean dit Bellefontaine, son of René dit Jean-René Godin dit Valcour and his second wife Françoise Bergeron dit d'Ambroise, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1747, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  He may not have married.  

Descendants of Bonaventure GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine, fils (c1753-1818; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Bonaventure, fils, elder son of Bonaventure Godin dit Bellefontaine, père and his second wife Marguerite Bergeron dit d'Amboise and brother of Michel, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1753, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his parents and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Broussard of St. Martin Parish, probably in the mid-1780s.  One of their daughters was baptized at New Orleans in February 1802, so the family was living in the city then.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Bourgeois, Dugas, and LeBlanc families.  Bonventure died in St. James Parish in October 1818; the Convent priest who recorded his burial said that Bonaventure was 70 years old when he died, but he was "only" 65.

1

Oldest son Bonaventure III, born at St.-Jacques in January 1787, married Renée, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Paul Arceneaux, at St.-Jacques in August 1806.  A son, name unrecorded, died in St. James Parish at age 6 months in April 1809, and Joachim was born in St. James Parish in December 1812.  Bonaventure III died in St. James Parish in August 1814; he was only 27 years old.  

Joachim married Célestine, daughter of French Creole Charleville Blouin, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1834; Célestine's mother was a Part.  Their son Charles was born near Convent in November 1839.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 10 slaves--4 males and 6 females, all black, ranging in age from 36 to 2--on Joachim Gaudin's farm in the parish's eastern district.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 7 slaves--2 males and 5 females, 1 black and 6 mulattoes, ranging in age from 40 to 3, some of them fugitives, living in 3 houses--on Célestine Gaudin's farm in the parish's Left Bank District 2; this was probably Joachim's widow, Célestine Blouin.  

Charles married German Creole Alphonsine Oubre probably in St. James Parish in the early 1860s.  Their son Charles Adrien was born near Convent in September 1869. 

2

Rosémond, born at St.-Jacques in November 1788, died at age 22 in January 1811.  He probably did not marry.  

3

Michel-Bernard, born at St.-Jacques in April 1794, married Scholastique, called Colastie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Hébert, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in September 1816.  Their son Joseph Michel was born in St. James Parish in June 1817, Jean Baptiste Félix, called Félix, in May 1823 but died at age 2 in July 1825, Eugène was born in November 1824, Victor in March 1828, Joseph Flagille, called Flagille, in January 1831, and Michel Léon, called Léon, in July 1840.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Babin, Lafor, Lanoux, Legendre, Louviere, Melançon, and Rouilett families.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 3 slaves--all males and all black, ages 40, 35, and 25--on Michel Gaudin's farm in the parish's eastern district.  Michel Bernard died in St. James Parish in August 1867; he was 73 years old.  

3a

Eugène married Adèle Estival, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Estival Bourgeois, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1845.  Their son Michel Alfred was born in Ascension Parish in July 1852, Fulgence in January 1859, and Arthur in April 1863.  Their daughters married into the Melançon family, two of them to the same fellow.  Eugène died near Convent in October 1869; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Eugène died at "age ca. 43 years"; he was 44.

3b

Flagille married fellow Acadian Ernestine Boudreaux at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1856, and remarried to Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadian Trasimond Braud, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in December 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for second and third degrees of consanguinity in order to marry; Elmire's mother was Phelonise Gaudin.  Flagille and Elmire's child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died near Convent at age 18 months in April 1869. 

3c

During the War of 1861-65, Léon served in Company D of the 14th Regiment Confederate States Cavalry, which fought in Mississippi and Alabama.  Léon married Osile or Ozile, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcellin Boudreaux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1865.  They lived near the boundary between St. James and Ascension parishes.  Their son Hilaire Ludger was born in January 1866, Michel Flagille in November 1867, and Joseph Reynaud in February 1868.  

4

Youngest son Valentin, born at St.-Jacques in c1797 and baptized at the St.-Jacques church, age 9, in April 1806, married Anne Séraphine, called Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Grégoire Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in December 1816.  Their son Valentin Godefroi, called Godefroi, was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1826, Charles Émile in March 1828, Joseph Florian, called Florian, in April 1832 but died at age 3 in March 1835, and Georges Aristide, called Aristide, was baptized at the Convent church, St. James Parish, age 10 months, in January 1837.  Their daughters married into the Caillouet, Gaudet, Guidry, Oubre, and Usé families.  In September1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 16 slaves--8 male and 8 females, all black, ranging in age from 52 to 6--on Valentin Gaudin's farm in the parish's eastern district.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 17 slaves--9 males and 8 females, 7 blacks and 10 mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 to 2, in 4 houses--on Valentin Gaudin's farm in the parish's Left Bank District 2.  Valentin died in St. James Parish in November 1863; he was 67 years old.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

4a

Godefroi married Josephine, daughter of fellow Acadian Célestin Bourgeois, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1847, and remarried to Victorine, daughter of French Creole Joseph Caillouet and widow of V. Falgout, at the Convent church in February 1851.  Their son Lucien Valentin was born in St. James Parish in January 1860.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 6 slaves--5 males and 1 female, all mulattoes, living in 2 houses--on Godfroy Gaudin's farm in the parish's Left Bank District 2.  

4b

Georges Aristide married Rosa or Rosalie Françoise, daughter of Foreign Frenchman François Courfbert or Courflert De La Neuville, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in November 1859; Rosa's mother was a Theriot.  Their son George Thomas was born near Convent in December 1867, and Louis Aristide in January 1870. 

Descendants of Michel GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine (c1756-1798; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Michel, younger son of Bonaventure Godin dit Bellefontaine, père and his second wife Marguerite Bergeron dit d'Amboise, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1753, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his parents and siblings.  He followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Françoise, daughter of French Creole Louis Barbe, at St.-Jacques in October 1787.  In the 1790s, the family moved to New Orleans, where Michel died in October 1798; the priest who recorded his burial called him Pedro, or Pierre, a native of Acadia and resident of the Acadian Coast, which included St.-Jacques; the priest also said that "Pedro" was 40 years old when he died, but he was 42.  One of Michel's daughters was baptized at New Orleans at age 15 months in January 1799, and another daughter, age 12, was buried there in September of that year, so his widow probably remained in the city.  Their daughters married into the Badie and Dugas families.  Their sons settled in Ascension Parish and became major planters along the river.  

1

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at St.-Jacques in July 1790, married Rosalie Athanaise, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Dugas, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, just upriver from St. James, in October 1809.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in Ascension Parish in August 1810, Michel Adélard in February 1818, Jérôme Sylvère or Silvany, called Silvany, in August 1824, Joseph or Jean Michel Léon, called Michel Léon or Léon, in August 1830, and Laurent Édouard, also called Édouard E., in August 1833.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Bujole, Denoux, Hébert, and Landry families.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 51 slaves--37 males and 14 females, ranging in age from to 70 to 4--on one of Mrs. J. B. Gaudin's plantations, and 25 more slaves--13 males and 12 females, ranging in age from 60 to infancy--on a second plantation of hers in the parish, so Jean Baptiste, père had died by then.  

1a

Jean Baptiste, fils died in Ascension Parish in September 1828.  He was only 18 years old and probably did not marry.  

1b

Silvany married cousin Marguerite Emma Lisa or Lise Marguerite Emma, called Elise and Lise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Nicolas Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1846; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Collin was born in Ascension Parish in April 1854, and Evalthur Crescent in June 1868.  Their daughter married an Hébert first cousin.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 7 slaves--3 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 4--on Silvani Gaudin's farm in the parish's First Ward.  

1c

Léon married cousin Amelina, daughter of French Creole Jean Denoux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1852; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry; Amelina's mother was a Babin.  Their son Antoine Michel, called Michel, was born in Ascension Parish in June 1856 but died at age 9 in September 1866, and Bernard was born in August 1858.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 3 slaves--a 21-year-old female and 2 males, age 2 and 5, all black, living in 1 house--on Léon Gaudin's farm in the parish's First Ward.  

1d

Laurent Edward married Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadian Treville Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1856.  Their son Joseph Édoude was born in Ascension Parish in September 1857, Thomas in December 1858 but died at age 10 months in October 1859, Ovide Éloi was born in August 1861, Lorence Oscar, called Oscar, in January 1863 but died at age 1 in January 1864, Jean Baptiste was born in July 1864, and Louis Christian or Cristin in March 1867 but died at age 2 in August 1869. 

2

Younger son Édouard, born at St.-Jacques in May 1792, married Marie Lise, called Lise, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Michel Gaudet, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1820.  Their son Michel was born in Ascension Parish in January 1823, and Jean Baptiste Elphége, called Elphége, in January 1825.  They also had a son named Édouard, fils.  Their daughters married into the Dugas, Ilsley, and Mollere families.  Édouard, père remarried to Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Hébert and widow of Pierre Lalande, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1837.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 54 slaves--25 males and 29 females, ranging in age from 70 to infancy--on Édouard Gaudin, Sr.'s plantation  next to Elphage Gaudin.  In 1860, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 88 slaves--51 males and 37 females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 7, living in 24 houses--on Edward Gaudin's plantation in the parish's Fourth Ward.  

Édouard, fils married Adèle, daughter of French Creole Baptiste Mollere, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1844; Adele's brother was the husband of one of Édouard, fils's sisters.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 8 slaves--3 males and 5 females, ranging in age from 40 to 2--on E. Gaudan, Jr.'s farm.  Edouard, fils remarried to Cécilia, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1856.  

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted 3 slaves--all females, ages 50, 30, and 10--on Elphage Gaudin's farm next to Édouard Gaudin, Sr.  Elphége married Frances or Francisca Isley.  Their son Benjamin died in Ascension Parish a day after his birth in June 1867, and Michel Edward was born in April 1870.  

Victor GODIN/GAUDIN (c1753-?; Gabriel dit Châtillon, Jean-Baptiste dit Lincour?)

Victor, elder son of Alexandre Godin dit Lincour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1753, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  Victor probably did not marry.  

Descendants of Pierre-Paul GODIN/GAUDIN (c1757-?; Gabriel dit Châtillon, Jean-Baptiste dit Lincour?)

Pierre-Paul, called Paul, younger son of Alexandre Godin dit Lincour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, born in c1757 during Le Grand Dérangement, came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 with his widowed mother and siblings.  He followed them to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Félicité, daughter of French Creole Jacques Lepine of St.-Charles des Allemands on the German Coast.  They settled at New Orleans. 

Guillaume was born at New Orleans in October 1795.  

~

A Godin wife came with her family from Maryland in 1766 and settled among her cousins at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, at least for a while:

Susanne Godin, age 29, came with husband Vincent Landry, age 39, and their infant son, Charles-Caliste Landry.  They had more children in the colony and moved from St.-Jacques to the upper Bayou Lafourche valley by the mid-1790s.

Other GAUDINs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Acadian Coast Gaudins with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Ursin Gaudin died in St. James Parish in November 1832.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not record any parent's names or mention a wife, said that Ursin was 30 years old when he died. 

Maximilien Gaudin died near Convent in September 1834.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not record any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Maximilien was 30 years old when he died. 

Orter Gaudin died in Ascension Parish in January 1844.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Orter was 20 years old when he died.  Did he marry? 

Raphaël Gaudin married German Creole Félicie Oubre probably in St. James Parish in the late 1850s or early 1860s.   

Victor Gaudin died near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Victor died at "age 35 years."  Did he marry? 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

A Gaudin family from the Acadian Coast moved to Terrebonne Parish during the early antebellum period, but the line did not survive:

Descendants of Charles GODIN/GAUDIN dit LINCOUR (c1751-c1828; Gabriel dit Châtillon)

Charles, younger son of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg and brother of Joseph, born on Rivière St.-Jean in c1751, came to Louisiana in 1765 with his older brother Joseph and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married fellow Acadian Marie-Josèphe Babin in 1769 or 1770.  One of their daughters was baptized at New Orleans in October 1786, so the family may have been living there in the mid-1780s.  They were living near Ascension, on the river above St.-Jacques, later in the decade.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Dupré, Landry, LeBlanc, and Watkins families.  Charles and Marie-Josèphe left the river in the early 1800s and settled in Terrebonne Parish, where his succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in October 1828; Charles would have been in his late 70s.  He and his wife had many daughters but only one son, who died young, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive.  Charles raised his older brother Joseph's only son, Édouard, after Joseph died in his early 30s, but Édouard remained on the river.  The husband of Charles's daughter Fideli, Caleb B. Watkins, served as the first sheriff of Terrebonne Parish in the 1820s.  

Paul, born at Ascension in March 1789, died at age 5 1/2 in September 1794.  

~

A Gaudin who may have been related to the Godin/Gaudins on the river settled on upper Bayou Lafourche during the late antebellum period: 

François, son of Joseph Gaudin and Antoinette Hissot or Tissol, married Joséphine, daughter of Acadian Auguste Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1858.  Their son Augustin Félix was born in Assumption Parish in August 1861, and Jules Joseph near Attakapas Canal, Assumption Parish, in December 1866.  François remarried to Joséphine, daughter of Acadian Valéry LeBlanc and widow of Joseph Garot, at the Plattenville church in May 1867. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Non-Acadian Gaudin/Godins lived in South Louisiana as early as the 1720s.  One, St.-Jacques Godin, may have been a Canadian cousin of the Gaudin/Godins of the Acadian Coast:

Michel Gaudin, "surnamed La Forge" (Gaudin was a dit), was serving as a captain of marine in the company of D'Artaguette at New Orleans when he died in the city at age 26 in February 1726.  

Louis, son of Pierre Godin, master tailor, and Gilberte Ronau of Valet, Nantes, France, married Jeanne-Élisabeth, daughter of master roofer Mathieu Combe of La Rochelle, France, at New Orleans in November 1728.  

Michel, son of François Godin and Marie Toulouse of St.-François Parish, Montréal, married Madeleine Delorier, widow of Acadian Joseph Comeaux, at St.-Jacques in January 1775.  Michel may have been a cousin of the Acadian Godins of St.-Jacques.  His son Michel, fils was baptized at St.-Jacques in May 1779.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois (Acadian) and Cousseau or Cussot families.  

David Gaudin married Anne Buch probably was at Pointe Coupée in the 1780s or 1790s.  Their daughter Marie-Anne was baptized at the Pointe Coupée church in April 1793.

~

During the antebellum period, French-Creole and Foreign-French Gaudins and Godins lived at New Orleans or close to the city as well as in communities where Acadians settled, especially St. Landry Parish:

The succession record of Pierre Gaudin was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in January 1835.  The parish clerk who recorded the succession did not mention a wife. 

Ernest Godin married Acadian Marguerite Lejeune, widow of ____ Lebleu, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1839.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.

Joseph Gaudin married Émelie Frugé and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the early 1840s. 

In November 1842, the first convent for a new order of nuns, the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family, "a religious order for Negro women," opened on St. Bernard Street in New Orleans.  One of the New Orleans women who supported the creation of the new order was Miss Juliet Gaudin, "a native of Cuba, but a resident of the city from girlhood."  One wonders if she was of Acadian ancestry. 

Diego, or Jacques, Gaudin married Marie Brown.  Their son Joseph François Arthur was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1845.  

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted a single slave--a 48-year-old black female--in Pélagie Goden's household in the 5th Ward of the 1st Municipality.  

In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted a single slave--a 35-year-old black female--on Ph. Godin's farm.  

In June1860, the federal census taker in Jefferson Parish counted 2 slaves--both female and both black, age 26 and 2--in Chas. Gaudin's household in Jefferson City.  The same census taker counted 2 more slaves--both male, age 20 and 10, both black--in J. Gaudin's household next door.  

In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 95 slaves--60 males and 35 females, 91 blacks and 4 mulattoes, ranging in age from 90 to 1, living in 30 houses--on Édoird Gaudin's plantation.  

Alcée Gaudin married Spanish Creole Roselia Segura and settled near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche by the mid-1860s. 

CONCLUSION

Descendants of Gabriel dit Châtillon Godin of Rivière St.-Jean were among the earliest Acadians who found refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them arrived in February 1765 with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax.  They followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where they hoped to create La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche.  Then tragedy struck.  Two of them died in an epidemic that devastated the Teche community that summer and fall.  The lone survivor in the family retreated to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where more of her kinsmen from Halifax had settled that year.  The family did not return to the western prairies but remained on the river in what became St. James and Ascension parishes.  Only one line of the family settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, and it died out early, so the great majority, if not all, of the Acadian Godin/Gaudins remained on the river.  

Non-Acadian Godin/Gaudins came to the colony as early as the 1720s.  One of them, from St.-Francois Parish, Montréal, may have been a Canadian cousin of the Acadian Godins at St.-Jacques; he, too, settled there.  Most of the non-Acadian Godin/Gaudins remained at New Orleans, though a few moved out to the prairies of present-day St. Landry and Lafayette parishes.  These French Creoles, in fact, were the only Godin/Gaudins who settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  In the early 1800s, Foreign-French Godins emigrated to Louisiana but probably remained at New Orleans.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned, some of the Acadian Godin/Gaudins participated fully in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  Two owned enough slaves to qualify as planters, and one came close.  Valentin Gaudin of St. James Parish held 16 slaves in 1850 and 17  in 1860.  Two of his cousins, in fact, qualified as great planters.  In 1850, Jean-Baptiste Gaudin of St. James Parish held 51 slaves on one plantation and 25 on another.  Michel Gaudin owned 54 slaves in St. James Parish in 1850 and 88 a decade later.  But most of their cousins owned few or no slaves on their small holdings in St. James and Ascension parishes.  One of their non-Acadian namesakes on the western prairie, Edoird Gaudin, worked 95 slaves on his plantation in St. Landry Parish on the eve of the War of 1861.  

Over a dozen Gaudins served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, and at least one of them died in Confederate service.  Émile Gaudin of St. James Parish enlisted in Company A of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry as soon as the unit was organized.  Émile was mortally wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  He fell into enemy hands on the battlefield, and they sent him to a general hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, where he died the following June. 

The war took a heavy toll on the Gaudins' economic status.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This no doubt included the Gaudin holdings in St. James and Ascension parishes.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantation and farm houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  ...

In Louisiana, the Acadian family's name evolved from Godin to Gaudin.  During the late colonial period, some family members used their ancestors' dit names Bellefontaine and Lincour as their surnames.  The family's name also is spelled Gaudain, Gaudens, Gaudon, Godain, Gode, Godein, Goden, Godon.  Some church records confuse this family with their fellow Acadians, the Gaudets.  

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, Orleans, St. James, & St. Landry parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, Jefferson, St. James, & St. Landry parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 579, 1632-43, 2494-96; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 397; Brasseaux, ed., Quest for the Promised Land, 129n172; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 149; NOAR, vols. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 3, 4, 8; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 363, 623-24, 1011; White, DGFA-1, 740-50; White, DGFA-1 English, 153-54, source of quote about Pierre dit Châtillon; Stephen A. White, "Acadians on the St. John River 1755-1760," <acadian-home.org>.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anselme-Joseph GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 09 Feb 1765 Atk called Joseph; arrived LA Feb 1765 with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; died [buried] Attakapas 2 Sep 1765
Barthélemy GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 01 1765 StJ born c1735, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour & Marie-Anne BERGERON dit d'Amboise; brother of Jacques dit Bellefontaine & Jean-Baptiste dit Bellefontaine; married, age 25, Marie-Claire, daughter of Jean-Baptiste MARTIN & Marie BRUN, c1760; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, called Berthélemy BELLEFONTENE, age 28, with wife & 1 child; arrived LA 1765, age 30; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Barthélemy & Bartholome BELLEFONTAINE, age 31, with wife Marie, no children, 0 slaves, 5 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; in Cabanoce census, 1769, occupying lot number 104, left [east] bank, called Barthélemy GODAIN dit Belfontaine, age 32, with wife Marie age 34, sons Louis age 2 & Barthélemy age 7 mos.; died St. Jacques 26 Jul 1771, age 36
Bonaventure GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine, père 02 1765 StJ born c1715, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Gabriel GODIN dit Châtillon & Andrée-Angélique JEANNE; brother of Marie-Charlotte; married, age 24,(1)__________, c1739, probably Rivière St.-Jean; married, age 25, (2)Marguerite, daughter of Barthélémy BERGERON dit d'Amboise & Marguerite DUGAS, c1740, probably Rivière St.-Jean; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, called Bonnavantier GAUDEN, with unnamed wife & 7 children; arrived LA 1765, age 50; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Buenaventura BELLEFONTAINE, age 51, with wife Marguerite age 43, sons Bonaventure age 13, Michel age 10, daughters Théotiste age 17, & Marie age 15, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 1 cattle, 0 sheep, 2 hogs, 1 gun; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 12, right [west] bank, called Bonnaventure GODAIN, age 46[sic], with wife Margueritte age 46, sons Bonnaventure age 14, Michel age 12, daughters Théotiste age 19, Marie age 17, & nephew Jean-Baptiste BERGERON age 13, 6 arpents, 0 slaves, 6 cattle, 1 horse, 0 pigs, 34 sheep, 1 musket; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Bonnavanture GAUDIN age 56, with wife Marguerite age 57, sons Bonnavanture age 20, Michel age 18, daughters Théotiste age 26, & Marie age 22; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Bonnaventure GAUDIN, with 6 whites, 4 slaves, 20 qts. rice, 50 qts. corn; died probably St.-Jacques before 2 May 1786
Bonaventure GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine, fils 03 1765 StJ, NO, StJ born c1753, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Bonaventure GODIN dit Bellefontaine & his second wife Marguerite BERGERON dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean; brother of Marie dit Bellefontaine, Michel dit Bellefontaine, & Théotiste dit Bellefontaine; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 12; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 13, with parents & siblings; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Bonnaventure, age 14[sic], with parents, siblings, & BERGERON cousin; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, age 20[sic], with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married Marie, daughter of Timothée-Athanase BROUSSARD & Anne-Marie BOURGEOIS of Attakapas & granddaughter of Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil, probably mid-1780s, St.-Jacques; resident of New Orleans, 1802; may have been visited at St.-Jacques by French consul Pierre Clément, baron de Laussat, mid-Nov 1803; died [buried] Convent 20 Oct 1818, age 70[sic]
Charles GODIN/GAUDIN dit Lincour 04 1765 StJ, Asc, Lf born c1751, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Jean-Baptiste GODIN dit Lincour & Anastasie BOURG; brother of Joseph dit Lincour & Marie-Josèphe dit Lincour; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 14; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 63, "fallow land," right [west] bank, called Charles LINCOUR, no age given, listed singly so probably a bachelor; married, age 18 or 19, Marie-Josèphe BABIN, 1769 or 1770, Cabanocé or Ascension; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Charles LINCOURT, age 19, head of family number 30, with wife Marie age 19, no children, & 6 arpents next to brother Joseph; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Charles LINCOUR, age 24, head of family number 28, with wife Marie age 25, son Siril age 1, daughter Isabel age 3, sister-in-law Margueritte BABIN age 24, nephews Edouart LINCOUR age 6, Rosalie LINCOUR age 10, 5 arpents, 1 slave, 14 cattle, 3 horses, 0 sheep, 8 swine, 2 arms; in JUDICE's Company, Acadian Coast Militia, Aug 1779, called Charles LINCOUR, 3rd Sous-Caporau, also in VERRET's Company, Acadian Coast Militia, 1779, called Charles LINCOUR, 3rd Sous-Caporaux; succession inventory filed Terrebonne Parish courthouse, 20 Oct 1828
Jacques GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 05 1765 StJ born c1740, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour & Marie-Anne BERGERON dit d'Amboise; brother of Barthélemy dit Bellefontaine & Jean-Baptiste dit Bellefontaine; arrived LA 1765, age 25; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Santhiago & Jacques BELLEFONTAINE, age 26, listed singly so probably a bachelor, with 0 slaves, 4 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; assisted in the escape of BREAU brothers Alexis & Honoré from the Cabanocé commandant, Apr 1768; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 11, right [west] bank, called Jacques GODAIN, age 27[sic], listed singly so probably still a bachelor, with 6 arpents, 0 slaves, 3 cattle, 0 horses, 0 pigs, 18 sheep, 1 musket; never married?
Jean GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 06 1765 StJ born c1747, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of René dit Jean-René GODIN dit Valcour & his second wife Françoise BERGERGON dit d'Amboise; half-brother of Marie-Madeleine dit Bellefontaine; arrived LA 1765, age 18; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Jean & Juan BELLEFONTAINE, no age given, with 1 slave in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Jean GAUDIN, age 30, with family of sister Magdelaine & brother-in-law Ambroises MARTIN
Jean-Baptiste GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 07 1765 StJ born c1746, probably Rivière St.-Jean; called Baptiste; son of Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour & Marie-Anne BERGERON dit d'Amboise; brother of Barthélemy dit Bellefontaine & Jacques dit Bellefontaine; arrived LA 1765, age 19; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Baptista & Baptiste BELLEFONTAINE, age 20, listed singly, with 0 slaves, 4 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; married, age 22, (1)Madeleine, daughter of probably Alexandre MELANÇON & his second wife Osite HÉBERT, c1768, probably Cabanocé; in Cabanocé, 1769, occupying lot number 111, left [east] bank, called Baptiste GODAIN, age 24, with wife Magdelaine age 19, & no children; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Jean-Baptiste GAUDINS, age 28[sic], no wife listed, with son Jean-Baptiste age 7, daughters Marguerite age 5, [Louise-]Francoise age 2, & Rozallie age 8; married, age 32, (2)Élisabeth FONTENOT, widow of David MARX, 27 Jul 1778, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Baptiste GAUDIN, with 9 unnamed whites, 3 slaves, 60 qts. rice, 40 qts. corn; died [buried] St. James Parish 26 Apr 1811, age 40[sic] or 80[sic]
Jean-Baptiste GODIN/GAUDIN 08 17?? StJ died [buried] St.-Jacques 15 Sep 1777
Joseph GODIN/GAUDIN dit Lincour 11 1765 StJ born c1740, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Jean-Baptiste GODIN dit Lincour & Anastasie BOURG; brother of Charles dit Lincour & Marie-Josèphe dit Lincour; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 25; married, age 26, (1)Marie FORET, 10 Apr 1766, Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1766, left [east] bank, JUDICE's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Joseph BELLEFONTAINE[sic], age 26, with wife Marie 18, no children, 0 slaves, 5 arpents, 0 cattle, 0 sheep, 0 hogs, 1 gun; married (2)Geneviève, daughter of Alexandre LANDRY & Marie-Marguerite BLANCHARD, c1768, probably Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 66, right [west] bank, called Joseph LINCOURT, age 29, with wife Genevieve age 25, & daughter Rozalie age 2; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Joseph LINCOURT, age 27, head of family number 31, with no wife so probably a widower, son Edouard age 6 mos., daughter Rosalie age 3, sister-in-law widow BABIN, no age given, & 6 arpents next to brother Charles; died either St.-Jacques or Ascension c1771, age 31
Marie GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 12 1765 StJ born c1751, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Bonaventure GODIN dit Bellefontaine & his second wife Marguerite BERGERON dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean; sister of Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine, fils, Michel dit Bellefontaine, & Théotiste dit Bellefontaine; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 14; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 15, with parents & siblings; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 17, with parents, siblings, & BERGERON cousin; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, age 22[sic], with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married first cousin Mathurin, son of Jean-Baptiste BERGERON dit d'Amboise & Marguerite BERNARD, 1780s, probably St.-Jacques; died [buried] St. James Parish 4 Sep 1815, age 50[sic]
Marie-Anne GODIN/GAUDIN 13 1765 StJ, NO, Asc born c1752, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Alexandre GODIN dit Lincour & Anne BERGERON; sister of Marie-Louise, Pierre-Paul, & Victor; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 13; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Marie, age 17, with widowed mother & siblings; married, age 18, (1)Antoine-Alexandre dit Terrebonne, son of Jacques-Jacques DUPRÉ dit Terrbonne & Marie-Anne BIENVENUE of Illinois & Cannes Brûlé, 1770, St.-Jacques; married, age 31, (2)Jean, son of Pierre VILLENEUVE & Marie LIBRE of Gasony, France, 27 Feb 1783, New Orleans; married, age 38, (3)Joseph, son of Amand MELANÇON & Anne BABIN, 10 Feb 1790, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; died [buried] Ascension 13 Aug 1791, age 39
Marie-Anne-Barbe GODIN/GAUDIN 14 1765 StJ, Atk born c1761, Halifax; called Barbe or Barbara & Marie-Anne; daughter of Bonaventure GODIN & Théotiste THIBODEAUX; arrived LA 1765, age 4; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 5, with widowed mother & family of Jean-Baptiste BERGERON; moved to Attakapas District; in Attakapas census, 1769, called Barbe, age 8, with stepfather, mother, & 4 stepsiblings; in Attakapas census, 1771, unnamed, with mother, stepfather, & stepsiblings; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Barbe GAUDIN, age 18, with mother, stepfather Firmin LANDRY, & stepsiblings; married, age 18, (1)René, son of Firmin BROUSSARD & Françoise THIBODEAUX, & widower of Madeleine LANDRY, 9 Jan 1779, Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 4 others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 4 others; married, age 39, (2)Noble of Ireland, son of John WILKINS & Eugénie SMILEY, Lutherans, 26 Oct 1800, Attakapas; died [buried] Attakapas 8 May 1801, age 40
Marie-Charlotte GODIN/GAUDIN 15 Feb 1765 Atk born probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Gabriel GODIN dit Châtillon & Andrée-Angélique JEANNE; sister of Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine; married Jean, son of Abraham DUGAS dit Grivois & Marie-Madeleine LEBLANC of Port-Royal, c1734; settled Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 8 unnamed children; arrived LA Feb 1765 with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; died Attakapas 17 Jul 1765, buried the next day, less than 2 months before her husband died
Marie-Josèphe GODIN/GAUDIN dit Lincour 16 1765 StJ, Asc, Atk born c1744, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Jean-Baptiste GODIN dit Lincour & Anastasie BOURG; sister of Charles dit Lincour & Joseph dit Lincour; married, age 16, (1)Pierre, son of Jean-Baptiste ARCENEAUX & Anne CYR of Chignecto, c1760; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 1 child?; arrived LA 1765, age 21; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, called Marie LICOURT, age 22, with husband & 2 sons; married, age 24, (2)Basile, son of Joseph PRÉJEAN & Marie-Louise COMEAUX of Chepoudy, c1768, probably Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Marie LINCOURT, age 25, with husband & 2 ARCENEAUX sons; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Marie LINCOUR, age 32, with husband, 2 ARCENAUX sons, 1 PRÉJEAN son, & 2 PRÉJEAN daughters; moved to Atakapas District; died "at the home of Alexandre FRERE on Bayou Teych," St. Martin Parish , 16 May 1815, age 76[sic], buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Marie-Louise GODIN/GAUDIN 17 1765 StJ, NO? born c1760; daughter of Alexandre GODIN dit Lincour & Anne BERGERON; sister of Marie, Pierre-Paul, & Victor; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 5; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Marie-Louiza, age 9, with widowed mother & siblings; died 12 Jan 1773, buried next day New Orleans, age 15[sic]?
Marie-Madeleine GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 18 Feb 1765 Atk, StJ born c1738, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of René dit Jean-René GODIN dit Valcour & his first wife Françoise DUGAS; half-sister of Jean dit Bellefontaine; married, age 21, Ambroise dit Barnabé, son of Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé & his first wife Anne CYR of Chignecto, c1759; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with husband & 6 unnamed children; arrived LA Feb 1765, age 27, with party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil; moved to Cabanocé fall 1765 probably to escape an epidemic; in Cabanocé census, 1766, probably the woman in the household of Ambrosio BERNABE; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Magdelaine GAUDIN, age 39, with husband, 1 son, 4 daughters, & brother Jean; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 7 others
Michel GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 19 1765 StJ, NO born c1756; son of Bonaventure GODIN dit Bellefontaine & his second wife Marguerite BERGERON dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean; brother of Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine, fils, Marie dit Bellefontaine, & Théotiste dit Bellefontaine; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 9; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 10, with parents & siblings; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 12, with parents, siblings, & BERGERON cousin; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank], age 18, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Michel GAUDIN, with 5 whites, 0 slaves, 12 qts. rice, 10 qts. corn; married Françoise, daughter of Louis BARBE & Charlotte FALGOUT, 28 Oct 1787, St.-Jacques; died [buried] New Orleans 8 Oct 1798, age 40[sic]
Pierre-Paul GODIN/GAUDIN 20 1765 StJ, NO born c1757; called Paul; son of Alexandre GODIN dit Lincour & Anne BERGERON; brother of Marie, Marie-Louise, & Victor; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 8; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 12, with widowed mother & siblings; married Félicité, daughter of Jacques LEPINE & Marguerite ASTIE of St.-Charles des Allemands; moved to New Orleans
Susanne GODIN/GAUDIN 22 Sep 1766 NO, StJ, Asc born c1737, probably Minas; daughter of Pierre-Joseph GODIN dit Châtillon dit Préville & Marie-Josèphe BOURG; married, age 28, Vincent, son of Joseph  LANDRY & his first wife Marguerite FORET, & her step-brother, 13 Oct 1765, Oxford?, MD; arrived LA 1766, age 29; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, called Suzanne GODON, with husband & 1 son; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Suzanne GODON, age 32, with husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, & orphan Brigitte TRAHOU [TRAHAN, whose mother was a LANDRY]; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Suzanne GAUDON, age 32, with husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, & orphan Birgitte TRAHAN; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Suzanne GODON, age 40, with husband, 2 sons, 5 daughters, & sister Wife of SIRAXE age 27; died [buried] Ascension 13 Feb 1784, age 46
Théotiste GODIN/GAUDIN dit Bellefontaine 23 1765 StJ born c1749, probably Rivière St.-Jean; daughter of Bonaventure GODIN dit Bellefontaine & his second wife Marguerite BERGERON dit d'Amboise of Rivière St.-Jean; sister of Bonaventure dit Bellefontaine, fils, Marie dit Bellefontaine, & Michel dit Bellefontaine; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 16; in Cabanocé census, 1766, right [west] bank, age 17, with parents & siblings; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 19, with parents, siblings, & BERGERON cousin; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, age 26, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married, age 32, Gilles, son of Joseph LEBLANC & Isabelle GAUDET, 12 Feb 1781, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St.-Jacques 1 May 1783, age 34
Victor GODIN/GAUDIN 24 1765 StJ born c1753, probably Rivière St.-Jean; son of Alexandre GODIN dit Lincour & Anne BERGERON; brother of Marie, Marie-Louise, & Pierre-Paul; on list of Acadian prisoners at Halifax, Aug 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1765, age 12; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, age 16, with widowed mother & siblings

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Barthélemy GODIN dit Bellefontaine.

02.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Bonaventure GODIN dit Bellefontaine; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2494; White, DGFA-1, 748.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 163; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 443.

03.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Bonaventure GODIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2494, agrees with the age given in the Cabanocé census of 1766; BRDR, 3:348, his death/burial record.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 163; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 443.

His wife's name & her parents' names are from the baptismal record of daughter Hortense, dated 9 Feb 1802, in NOAR, 7:147 (SLC, B14, 181), which calls him "resident of this city" & his wife "native of this city."  Timothée-Athanase BROUSSARD & his wife Anne-Marie BOURGEOIS came to LA in Feb 1765 with the party from Halifax via St.-Domingue led by his father, Acadian resistance leader Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil.  Marie BROUSSARD may have been born in New Orleans soon after her parents reached LA.  Or she may be the Marie BROUSSARD born in c1767.  

For the possible 1803 visit, see Laussat, Memoirs, 65; Book Five. 

04.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Charles GODIN dit Lincour, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1640, the Rivière St.-Jean section, calls him Charles GODIN dit Lincour, says he was born in 1736, that his parents were Jean [GODIN dit] Bellefontaine & Françoise DUGAS, & that he settled in LA: Arsenault, Généalogie, 2495, the LA section, calls him Charles GODIN dit Lincour, says he was born in 1746 but gives no birthplace, says his parents were Jean [GODIN dit] Bellefontaine dit Lincour & Françoise DUGAS, calls his wife Marie-Josèphe BABIN, says they were married in c1772 but gives no place of marriage, says he was occupying lot number 63 on the west side of the Mississippi at St.-Jacques in 1769, & lists his children as Élizabeth, born in 1774, Charles in 1775, Marie-Constance in 1776, Marguerite-Josèphe in 1779, Madeleine in 1782, & François in 1784, but gives no birthplaces; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:232 (Houma Ct.Hse.: Succ. #18), his succession inventory, calls him Charles GAUDIN m. d.Marie Joseph BABIN, but does not give his parents' names.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 252; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 3.  

According to White, DGFA-1, 488, Françoise DUGAS was the first wife of René dit Jean-René GODIN dit Valcour, & one of René's older brothers was Jean-Baptiste GODIN dit Lincour, who married to Anastasie BOURG, not Françoise DUGAS.  Needless to say, White, not Arsenault, is followed here. 

Why wasn't he counted in the Cabanocé census of 1766?

05.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Jacques GODIN dit Bellefontaine, & lists him singly.

For his assisting the escape of the BREAU brothers from Spanish authorities, see Brasseaux, ed., Quest for the Promised Land, 128, note 172.  Commandant JUDICE, in a 25 Apr 1768 report to Gov. ULLOA, calls GODIN "a man named Jacques BELFONTAINE."  

06.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Jean GODIN dit Bellefontaine, & lists him singly.  Arsenault, Genealogie, 2495, says he was born in 1751, but the St.-Jacques census of 1777 says otherwise.  See De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

07.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Baptiste GODIN dit Bellefontaine; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2495, says he was born in 1746 & that he married in c1768; BRDR, 3:349 (SMI-1, 9; SMI-8, 8), perhaps his death/burial record, calls him Jean Baptiste GAUDIN, age 40 in the first register, age 80 in the second register, & does not give his parents' or his wives' names.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 168, 177; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 11.

Arsenault says that he & Madeleine MELANÇON were married in c1768, which is after he reached LA, & the Cabanoce/St.-Jacques censuses of 1769 & 1777 indicate clearly that their children were born in LA, the oldest one in c1769.  If they were born in LA, why are they listed in Wall of Names among the Acadians who emigrated to LA?  For the sake of consistency, they are not included separately on this list.  

08.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Jean-Baptiste GODIN, & lists him with son Jean-Baptiste and daughters Rosalie, Marguerite, and Francoise, whom the St.-Jacques census of 1777 says belonged to Baptiste GODIN dit Bellefontaine, who seems to be another person.  See De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 11.  For the burial record of a Jean-Baptiste GAUDIN, which unfortunately does not give his parents' names, a wife's name, or his age, see BRDR, 2:311.  I am assuming this is him.  I am also assuming that, since Wall of Names lists both a Baptiste GODIN dit Bellefontaine and a Jean-Baptiste GODIN separately, there were two Jean-Baptiste GAUDIN/GODINs at St.-Jacques in the 1770s.

09.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine.  His burial record in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:44 (SM Ch.: v.1, p.12; SM Ch.: Slave Funeral Register v.1, #19-B), calls him Anselme-Joseph BELLEFONTAINE & Joseph BELLEFONTAINE in 2 separate entries, but neither entry gives his parents' names, a wife's name, or his age.  

11.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him either Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine, & lists him with Marie FOREST as though they were married when they reached LA, or Joseph GODIN dit Lincour, & lists him with wife Geneviève LANDRY & daughter Rosalie.  

This confusion as to who he really was comes from a compelling primary source:  NOAR, 5:143, 245 (SLC, M5, 75), his daughter Rosalie's marriage record, calls her Rosalaia LINCOURT, native of St. James Parish, Cabanhocé, says her parents were Josef LINCOURT, deceased, & Maria LAFFORET, deceased, gives her husband's parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Andres CHILOC, Pablo GODIN, both of this parish.  

Here is the complication:  Wall of Names, 17, seems to be saying that there were 3 Joseph GODINs at Cabanoce/St.-Jacques in the late 1760s:  Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine, who came to LA as a single man; Joseph GODIN dit Bellefontaine, husband of Marie FORET; & Joseph GODIN dit Lincour, husband of Geneviève  LANDRY.  The latter Joseph GODIN was obviously Rosalie's father since she called herself LINCOURT at the time of her wedding, but, according to the editors of Wall of Names, Joseph dit Lincour's wife when he reached LA was Geneviève LANDRY, & they place Rosalie with this couple on the Wall of Names.  So why does Rosalie's marriage record clearly say that her mother was Maria LAFFORET, that is, Marie FORET, & not Geneviève LANDRY?  In Apr 1766, a Joseph GODIN, no dit given, married Marie FORRET at Cabanoce.  See Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 424.  I assumed that the Joseph GODIN at Cabanocé in Apr 1766 had to be Joseph dit Bellefontaine, who was counted in the Apr 1766 census as Joseph BELLEFONTAINE with his wife Marie FOREST & no children,  See Bourgeois, p. 168.  Since Joseph dit Lincourt did not appear in the 1766 Cabanocé census & was not counted at Cabanocé until 1769 under the name Joseph LINCOURT, I assumed that he did not reach the settlement with his wife Geneviève & daughter Rosalie until Sep 1766 with the Acadians from MD.  See Bourgeois, p. 175.  So what is the deal here?  Did Joseph dit Lincour, despite what Wall of Names says, marry both Marie FORET & Geneviève LANDRY?  GAUDIN/GODIN family historian Elaine Boston thinks so, & Rosalie LINCOURT's marriage record is the compelling piece of primary evidence on which she bases her assertion.  

This would mean that the Joseph BELLEFONTAINE at Cabanocé in Apr 1766 was not Joseph dit Bellefontaine but Joseph dit Lincour.  If there was only 1 Joseph GAUDIN/GODIN at Cabanocé in the late 1760s, not 2 or even 3, then he would have arrived in 1765 in order to marry Marie FORET in Apr 1766; again, remember that the Acadians who came from MD in 1766 did not reach New Orleans until Sep.  This would mean that Rosalie was not in utero when she reached LA because her parents were married there.  Moreover, I have searched the lists of Acadians in MD made by British colonial officials in Jul 1763, looking for a Joseph GAUDIN/GODIN/LINCOUR & found no one with that name, nor have I found a Geneviève LANDRY in MD, which further weakens my assertion that Joseph dit Lincour and his wife Geneviève LANDRY came to Cabanoce from MD in Sep 1766.  See Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 150-58.  The presence of only a single Joseph GODIN at Cabanocé in the late 1760s hangs on the assertion in her marriage record that Rosalie's mother was Marie FORET.  Sacramental records are very closely kept by the Roman Catholic Church & tend to be more reliable than censuses & prisoner lists, so I must conclude that Elaine Boston is correct:  Rosalie GAUDIN/GODIN/LINCOURT 's mother was Marie FORET, the first wife of her father, Joseph GAUDIN/GODIN dit Lincour, that he & Marie reached Cabanocé probably from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765 perhaps even in separate expeditions, & that Rosalie was born in LA after her parents' marriage at Cabanocé in Apr 1766, so she should be removed from this listing.  If Joseph & Marie had been married in exile, all that the "wedding" at Cabanocé in Apr 1766 would have been was a civil sanction of the union; it was conducted not by a priest but by one of the co-commandants of the district, either Nicolas VERRET or Louis JUDICE.  Marie FORET most likely died soon after giving birth to Rosalie, or perhaps as a result of the birth.  Joseph would have remarried to Geneviève LANDRY in 1768 or 1769; note that son Edouard was born at Cabanocé or Ascension in the spring of 1770; the censuses at Cabanocé in 1769 & at Ascension in 1770 make it clear that Edouard's mother was Geneviève, not Marie, & that Geneviève died not long after his birth.  See Bourgeois, p. 175; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 3.  Thus, I am compelled to ignore the listings in Wall of Names, 17, with its plethora of Joseph GODINs & conclude that there was only 1 Joseph GODIN at Cabanocé in the late 1760s.

Joseph's purported death date comes from family historian Elaine Boston, who says that Joseph's brother Charles dit Lincour was named as tutor of Joseph's 2 children in 1771.  He certainly had died by Apr 1777, when Rosalie LINCOUR, age 10, & Edouart LINCOUR, age 6, were counted in the Ascension census with their uncle Charles LINCOUR & his family.  See Robichaux, p. 12.  One wonders what could have killed Joseph at such a young age.  How tragic for his 2 children, who lost their mothers when they were infants & their father not long afterwards.

The identity of Joseph dit Lincour's parents also comes from the research of Elaine Boston.  

Despite his age at the time--23--I am assuming that he was among the 4 "children" counted with his widowed mother, Nastazie BOURQUE, at Halifax in Aug 1763.  See Jehn, p. 252. 

12.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Marie GODIN dit Bellefontaine; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2494, her father's profile in the LA section, calls her Marie [GODIN dit Bellefontaine], says she was born in 1751 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, lists her siblings as Théotiste, born in 1749, Bonaventure, born in 1753, & Michel, born in 1756, but gives no birthplaces, & says the family was at St.-Jacques in 1766 & occupying lot number 12 on the west bank of the Mississippi at St.-Jacques in 1769; BRDR, 3:350 (SJA-4, 41), probably her death/burial record, calls her Marie GAUDIN, age about 50 yrs. wid. of Mathurin BERGERON, but does not give her parents' names.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 163; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 443.

The birth year given in Arsenault pretty much agrees with the ages given for her in the Cabanoce censuses of 1766 & 1769, though the second census would give her an estimated birth year of c1752.  The St.-Jacques census of 1777, on the other hand, would have her born in c1755.  So why was her death/burial record so far off?  

For evidence that she was the Marie GAUDIN married to Mathurin BERGERON, her first cousin, see the footnote to his profile.  

13.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Marie GODIN; BRDR, 2:267, 312-13 (SJA-1, 12), the record of her first marriage, dated simply 1770, calls her Maria-Anne GODIN, calls her husband Antoine-Alexandre DUPRÉ dit TERREBONE, gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were A. DUPRÉ [probably his brother André], & Marie GAUDIN, & adds, "(name of groom & parents missing, information furnished from other sources)"; NOAR, 3:143, 296 (SLC, M4, 146), the record of her second marriage, calls her Marie-Anne GODIN, "widow of Antonio DUPRÉ," calls her husband Juan VILLANUEVA, gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were "natives of St. John River, Diocese of Québec," his were "natives of Gasony, Diocese of Dos in France," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Andrés SELOC & Pedro Pol GODEIN [her brother]; BRDR, 2:312, 536 (ASC-2, 31), the record of her third marriage, calls her Mariana GODIN, "widow of VILLENEUVE," calls her husband Joseph MELANCON, gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Charles GODIN & Joseph BABIN; BRDR, 2:312, her death/burial record.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 445.

Her first husband's brothers moved to the Opelousas District, where they became prominent cattlemen, & to the Lafouche/Terrebonne valley, but Antoine & Marie-Anne remained in the New Orleans area.  His family was Canadian.  See West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 68-69.

14.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Anne-Barbe GODIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2496; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 9:433, 443 (NI Ch.: OA Folio #7), a copy of her second marriage record, calls her Marie-Anne GAUDENS, "wid. of René BROUSSARD ... Catholic, of Acadie," calls her husband Nobles WILKINS, "an Irishman," gives her & his parents' names, calls his parents John WILKINS & Eugénie O. Jens SMILEY, says her father was deceased at the time of the wedding & that his parents were Lutherans, but give no witnesses to her marriage; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:316 (SM Ch.: v.4, #231-A), her death/burial record, calls her Marie-Anne GAUDIN, wid. of René BROUSSARD, of Halifax, m.(2) to Noble WILKINS of Ireland, gives her parents' names & says they were of Acadia.  See also Arceneaux, D. J., Attakapas Post in 1769, 22.

15.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Marie-Charlotte GODIN; White, DGFA-1, 748, calls her Marie-Charlotte [GODIN], does not give her birth place or birth date, gives her parents' names, lists her siblings, gives her husband's parents' names, says they married in c1734 but gives no place of marriage, & says she died at St.-Martinville on 17 Jul 1765 & was buried the next day but does not say where, & does not give her age at the time of her death.  

16.  Wall of Names, 9, calls her Marie LINCOUR; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2571; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:422 (SM Ch.: v.4, #990), her death/burial record, calls her Marie Josèphe GAUDET[sic], "native of Acadie, spouse of Basile PREJEAN," says she died at "age 76 years," details her place of death, but does not give her parents' names.

There was no Marie-Josèphe GAUDET born in Acadia, & Basile PREJEAN's wife was Marie-Josèphe GODIN dit Lincour, so that is her burial record at St. Martinville in Sep 1815.  

17.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Marie-Louise GODIN; NOAR, 3:140 (SLC, F1, 15), perhaps her death/burial record, calls her Marie-Francoise GAUDAIN, native of Acadia, 15 yr., but does not give her parents' names.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 445.

18.  Wall of Names, 22, calls her Marie-Madeleine GODIN dit Bellefontaine.  

19.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Michel GODIN dit Bellefontaine; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2494; BRDR, 2:59, 309 (SJA-2, 4), his marriage record, calls him Miguel GODE but places the record in the GAUDET family section, gives his parents' names & her father's name, says his parents were "of Acadia" & her father "of this parish," & t hat the witnesses to his marriage were Benchamen LEBLANC & Maria CROESET "of this Parish"; NOAR, 6:136 (SLC, F4, 60), his death/burial record, calls him Pedro[sic] GODIN, "native of Acadia, resident of the Acadian Coast [in this province], 40 yrs., spouse of Francisca BARBE, also resident of the Acadian Coast."  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 163; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 443.

The burial record cited above is his & not that of cousin Pierre GODIN because on the same page of NOAR as Michel's burial record is the baptismal record of daughter Melania, dated 22 Jan 1799 (SLC, B14, 78).  Her parents were Miguel GODIN, Acadian, & Francisca BARBET, of St. Charles Parish, & her paternal grandparents were Bonaventura GODIN & Margarita BERGERON, so there is no doubt she was a daughter of Michel.  Melania was 15 mos. old at the time of her baptism, which means she was born in late 1797.  Note the date of "Pedro" GODIN's burial--8 Oct 1798.  The St. Louis Cathedral priest must have gotten Michel's name wrong when he recorded his burial.  

20.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Pierre-Paul GODIN.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 445. 

For evidence of his marriage, see the birth/baptismal records of son Guillaume, dated 14 Oct 1795, & daughter Eloise, dated 25 Jul 1798, in NOAR, 6:133 (SLC, B14, 4; SLC, B14, 77).  The priest who recorded the baptism of son Guillaume calls him Pablo, or Paul.  He is also called "native of Acadia" & "native of St. John River in Canada [New Brunswick]."  

22.  Wall of Names, 21, calls her Susanne GODIN; BRDR, 2:449 (ASC-1, 191c), her death/burial record, calls her Susana LANDRY, "age 46 years & spouse of Vicente LANDRY," but does not give her parents' names. 

For her marriage & the unusual relationship with her husband Vincent, see Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 147, 248, 255.  She & Vincent came to LA with her mother & half-siblings, who, thru his father, also were Vincent's half-siblings!   

23.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Théostiste GODIN dit Bellefontaine; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2494.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 163; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 443.

24.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Victor GODIN.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 445.

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