MABILE

Pronunciation:  mah-beel

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  SIMONEAUX

Comments:

 

MAHIER

Pronunciation:  MAH-hee-aye

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GUILLOT, HENRY

Comments:

 

MAITRE

Pronunciation:  MAY-truh

Origin:  Swiss Immigrant

Arrived in Louisiana:  1840s, early 1850s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Joseph MATIRE

Settled:  Lafayette Parish

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  Joseph MAITRE of Berne, Switzerland, married Marie Carmelite DOMINGUE, daughter of Pierre DOMINGUE and Marie Josephine HERNANDEZ, 16 Aug 1851, in Vermilionville, now Lafayette.  Joseph served in Company K, 2nd Regiment Reserves during the War Between the States.

Sources:  Hebert, D., Southwest LA Records, 5:170, 376.

 

MALBROUGH

Pronunciation:  mawl-brew

Origin:  German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  October 1769

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Nicolas MARCOFF

Settled:  St. James, Assumption, Lafourche, Terrebonne parishes

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, BABIN, BERGERON, BOUDREAUX, COMEAUX, DAIGLE, DUHON, HÉBERT, LANDRY, LEBLANC, MARTIN, ROBICHAUX, THIBODEAUX

Comments:   Nicolas MARCOFF, born in Germany in c1707, married Christine-Marie ORY in Berks County, Pennsylvania, in August 1753.  Christine-Marie had been born in Germany in the early 1720s.  They and their sons Jean-George, born in the early 1750s, Joseph in c1759, François in c1761, and Jean-Augustin in 1768, and their two daughters, were living in Maryland when they decided to migrate to Louisiana with seven other German families and seven Acadian families.  On 5 January 1769, they left Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the English schooner Britannia, heading for New Orleans.  Unfortunately, their ship missed the entrance to the Mississippi River, got lost in the Gulf of Mexico, landed on the Texas coast, and the passengers and crew were held by the Spanish at La Bahìa, Texas, for several months, suspected of being spies or smugglers.  After the Spanish released them, they traveled overland to Natchitoches Post, Louisiana, arriving there on 24 October 1769.  Moving on, they reached New Orleans via river transportation on 9 November 1769.  They settled in present-day St. James Parish on what was called the Acadian Coast and in Assumption, Lafourche, and Terrebonne parishes in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley.  During the late colonial period, the family's name evolved into the French-sounding MALBROUGH.  

The family's name also is spelled Malbraux, Malbro, Malbrou, Malbroux, Malbru, Marhober.

Sources:  BRDR, 2:512-13; <thecajuns.com>, Glenn R. Conrad, "German Settlers in Louisiana"; <canaryislanders.org/chad/gen/chadgenealogy/index3.htm>; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 140-42.

 

MALLET

Pronunciation:  mah-LET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD, DUGAS, HEBERT, LEJEUNE, RIVET, THERIOT

Comments:  This family's name sometimes is spelled MAILLET, MAYE, MAYER, & MAYET.  

 

MANGER

Pronunciation:  monh-JHAY, MAIN-jer

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GUIDRY

Comments:

 

MANUEL

Pronunciation:  MAN-yuhl, MAN-you-ell

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, RICHARD, ROBICHAUX

Comments:

 

MARCANTEL

Pronunciation:  MAR-can-tell

Origin:  French Creole from Pistoia, Tuscany, via Duchy of Savoy

Arrived in Louisiana:  1752

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  François MARQUANTEL

Settled:  Pointe Coupée; Opelousas District, present-day St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  DOUCET, RICHARD, ROY, TRAHAN

Comments:  According to David Marcantel, a descendant of François MARCANTEL, contrary to what early records might imply, MARCANTEL is not Italian but French.  François, "Sergeant in Mr. François ARTAUD's Company," married Anne, daughter of Jean RONDOT, deceased, and Marie COLON, on 7 May 1754 at Pointe Coupée.  The marriage record calls François's parents Mathieu MARQUANTEL and Marie FRANÇOIS of St.-Pierre Parish, Pistoia, Tuscany.  Although Tuscany today is in Italy, the surnames MARQUANTEL, also rendered MARQUENTELLE and MARCANTEL, and FRANÇOIS, are French.  (David adds that his ancestor came to Louisiana from the Duchy of Savoy, which today lies mostly in France.)  François remarried to Marie-Josèphe RICHAUME of Natchez, widow of Noël SOILEAU, at Pointe Coupée in August 1765, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Pérrine LACOUR, widow of French Creole Joseph ROY dit Châtellerault, at Opelousas in June 1779.  In January 1774, François was one of seven residents who testified before Opelousas District commandant Gabriel FUSELIER de la Claire, urging construction of a church for the district, which was accomplished in 1776.  François first succession record, which called him a widower, was filed at what became the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in October 1780, and another succession record was filed in 1792. 

Son François-Nicolas, by his first wife, was born at Pointe Coupée in January 1758. 

Sources:  Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 189; BRDR, 1b:117 (PCP-1, 140; PCP-2, 101); Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vol. 1-A; David Marcantel of Jennings, LA. 

 

MARCEAUX

Pronunciation:  mar-SOH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MARCEL

Pronunciation:  mar-SELL

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, GUIDRY

Comments:

 

MARCHAND

Pronunciation:  MAR-shand

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERNARD

Comments:

 

MARIN

Pronunciation:  mah-REEN, mah-RANH, mah-RIN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BABIN, PITRE, ROY

Comments:

 

MARKS

Pronunciation:  MARKS

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  RICHARD, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MARQUIS

Pronunciation:  mar-KEY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  COMEAUX

Comments:

 

MARRIONNEAUX

Pronunciation:  MARE-ee-oh-no

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BRASSEAUX, COMEAUX, DAVID, DUPUY, GUILLOT, LEGER, ORILLION

Comments:

 

MARS

Pronunciation:  MARS

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DOIRON, GAUTREAUX

Comments:

 

MARSON

Pronunciation:  MAR-sun, mar-SONH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

MARTIN

Pronunciation:  mar-TANH, MART-in

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MARTINEZ

Pronunciation:  mar-TEE-nez, MART-in-ez

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

MATHERNE

Pronunciation:  mah-TERN

Origin:  Alsatian/German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  probably 1721

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Johann Adam Materne

Settled:  Lower German Coast, St. Charles Parish; St. James Parish; St. Martin & Lafayette parishes; Assumption & Lafourche parishes

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, BOURGEOIS, MARTIN

Comments:  Johann Adam MATERNE of Rosenheim, Upper Alsace, and wife Regina KOENIG came to Louisiana probably in 1721 with other German families recruited for the John Law concession on the Arkansas River, then part of French Louisiana.  When that venture failed, the MATERNEs and other German families resettled at St.-Charles des Allemands, the Lower German Coast, on the river above New Orleans.  ...

Sources:  West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 146-47, 194. 

 

MATHIAS

Pronunciation:  muh-THY-us

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABINEAUX

Comments:

 

MATTE

Pronunciation:  MOTT

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LEJEUNE, RICHARD

Comments:

 

MAURICE

Pronunciation:  maw-REES

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MAURIN/MORIN

Pronunciation:  maw-RANH, moh-RANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AROSTEGUY, DUGAS, GRANGER, HÉBERT, LEGER, SAVOIE, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MAXENT

Pronunciation:  MAX-onh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX

Comments:

 

MAYARD

Pronunciation:  MAH-yard

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MAYER

Pronunciation:  mah-YARE, MAY-yer

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS 

Comments:

 

MAYEUX

Pronunciation:  MAH-you

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HEBERT

Comments:

 

MAZEROLLE

Pronunciation:  MAZ-uh-roll

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MCBRIDE

Pronunciation:  mack-BRIDE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  MOUTON

Comments:

 

MCCAULAY

Pronunciation:  muh-CAW-lay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN

Comments:

 

MCCRORY

Pronunciation:  muh-crohr-ree

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

MCGEE

Pronunciation:  muh-GEE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  RICHARD, SAVOIE

Comments:

 

MEAUX

Pronunciation:  MOH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BROUSSARD, CORMIER, HÉBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

MECHE

Pronunciation:  MESH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  SAVOY

Comments:

 

MELANÇON

Pronunciation:  muh-LONH-sonh, mell-ohn-sohh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MENARD

Pronunciation:  may-nar, meh-NARD

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  November 1785

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Louis MENARD

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, MELANÇON, RICHARD

Comments:

 

MENDOZA

Pronunciation:  men-DOE-zuh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN

Comments:

 

MICHEL

Pronunciation:  mee-SHELL

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MIGOTT

Pronunciation:  MIH-gut

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

MIGUEZ

Pronunciation:  MEE-gez

Origin:  Spanish Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LABAUVE, LANDRY, VINCENT

Comments:

 

MILLER

Pronunciation:  MILL-er, mee-LUH

Origin:  Alsatian/German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  October 1769

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jacob MILLER

Settled:  Upper German Coast, now St. John the Baptist Parish; Opelousas District, now St. Landry & Evangeline parishes; Manchac, now Iberville Parish

Acadian connection:  BOUTIN, BROUSSARD, CORMIER

Comments:  Jacob MILLER, born probably in Alsace in c1739 , married Anne-Marie THEIGEN, born also in Alsace in c1739 (they are the author's maternal ancestors).  They were living in Maryland, perhaps in Frederick County, during the late 1760s, with three daughters--Marie-Barbe, called Barbe, born in c1763; Catherine in c1765; and Anne-Marie, called Marie, in c1766--and a son--Jacob, fils, born in c1767--when they decided to migrate to Louisiana with seven other German Catholic families and six Acadian families.  In early January 1769, they left Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the English schooner Britannia, heading for New Orleans.  Unfortunately, their ship missed the entrance to the Mississippi River, got lost in the Gulf of Mexico, landed on the Texas coast, and the passengers and crew were held by the Spanish at La Bahía, Texas, for several months, suspected of being spies or smugglers.  After the Spanish released them, they traveled overland via El Camino Real de Los Tejas to Natchitoches Post, Louisiana, arriving there in late October 1769.  Spanish officials ordered them to New Orleans, which they reached via river transportation on November 9.  They were then ordered upriver to Fort San Gabriel, on Bayou Manchac, with the other German families from Maryland, but Jacob and his family settled, instead, at St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Upper German Coast, though there is evidence the family may have lived for a time up at Natchez.  No matter, they did not remain in either of those communities.  In the early or mid-1770s, they crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District, where daughter Marie-Anne was baptized in November 1777 and Marie-Thérèse in August 1782. 

Jean-Frederick, called Frederick, born in Louisiana, married Victoire, daughter of daughter of German Creoles André MAYER & Marie-Anne STELLY of the Upper German Coast, at Opelousas in April 1790. 

Jacob, fils, born in Maryland, married Ignès, brother Frederick's wife's sister, at Opelousas in May 1791, and remarried to Catherine, daughter of Americus ADAM and Catherine KLEINPETER of Manchac, probably at Manchac, in November 1795.  Jacob, fils remained on the river, the only one of his father's sons to do so. 

Isabelle, born in Louisiana, married Jacques, son of Charles BROUSSARD and his first wife Frenchwoman Bonne-Jacqueline-François CASTEL of Manchac, at Opelousas in July 1791; Jacques was a native of Cherbourg, and may have come to Louisiana in July 1785 aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships from France.  He either followed or found his family at Manchac before going to Opelousas.  Perhaps to be near Jacques's family, or perhaps as a young widow following her brother, Isabelle also moved to Manchac, where she died in August 1795, age 22. 

Marie-Barbe, born in Maryland, married Jean-George, fils, son of Jean-George STELLY and Christine EDELMEYER of St. John the Baptist Parish, at Opelousas in October 1791, and remarried to Joseph, son of Nicolas FROZARD and Rosalie TIENARD of Rennes, France, at Opelousas in October 1795. 

Marie-Anne, born in Louisiana, married Pierre, son of Michel CORMIER and his second wife Catherine STELLY (sister of Marie-Barbe's husband Jean-George, fils) of Prairie des Femmes, in August 1795 at Opelousas; sadly, Marie-Anne died a year later, at age 19, before she bore Pierre any children.  (Michel and Pierre CORMIER are the author's paternal ancestors.) 

Jean, also called John, born in Louisiana, married another MAYER sister, Marie-Françoise, at Opelousas in January 1796, and remarried to Marie Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Paul BOUTIN of Baltimore, Maryland, and his German Creole wife Anne Spesse TELLER of Pennsylvania, at Opelousas in April 1816. 

Catherine, born in Maryland, died at Opelousas in June 1796, in her early 30s; she evidently did not marry. 

Marie-Thérèse, born in Louisiana, married Jean, son of Jean Cristoval FALE, FALL, or FAUL and Isabelle ___ of Velle, Germany, at Opelousas in February 1802. 

Family patriarch Jacob, père, was buried at Opelousas in December 1807, in his early 70s.  Widow Anne Marie's succession record, likely postmortem, was filed at Opelousas courthouse in June 1824, so she would have lived into her 80s; the succession names only Jacob as her husband, so she evidently did not remarry. 

Sources:  BRDR, vols. 2, 3; Glenn R. Conrad, "German Settlers in Louisiana," <thecajuns.com>; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 140-42.

 

MINVIELLE

Pronunciation:  men-veel

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:  

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX

Comments:

 

MIRE

Pronunciation:  MEER

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MOÏSE

Pronunciation:  moh-EEZ

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MOLAISON

Pronunciation:  MOH-lay-zonh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

MOLLERE

Pronunciation:  moh-LAIR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD, BOURGEOIS, BREAUX., LANDRY

Comments:

 

MONTÉ/MONTET

Pronunciation:  mahn-TAY, mon-TET

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  December 1785

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre-Vincent, Jean-Baptiste-Guillaume, and Pierre-Paul MONTET

Settled:  Assumption Parish; Attakapas District, now St. Martin & Lafayette parishes; St. James Parish

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BOUDREAUX, BOURG, BOURGEOIS, BROUSSARD, DUHON, GAUTREAUX, MICHEL, PITRE, TRAHAN, VINCENT

Comments:  Guillaume MONTET, also called MONTÉ, born at Périgord, France, in January 1737, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Acadians Joseph VINCENT & Marguerite BODART of Minas, at Liverpool, England, in c1763.  Marie had been born at Rivière-aux-Canards in April 1746 and had followed her family into exile in Virginia in 1755 and to England in 1756.  Her father had died at Liverpool in September 1756, soon after their arrival.  Guillaume was not an Acadian but a Frenchman who may have been a privateer captured by the Royal Navy during the Seven Years' War and held as a prisoner in England.  In May 1763, he followed Marie-Josèphe, her widowed mother, and other repatriated Acadian exiles to France and landed at Morlaix.  In November 1765, from Morlaix, they settled on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany with other exiles from England.  Oldest son Pierre-Vincent had been born in St.-Martin Parish, Morlaix, in January 1764, but their other children were born on the island:  Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, near Le Palais in November 1765, Joseph-Adam near Bangor in July 1767, Marie-Élisabeth in September 1769 but died in August 1771, Jean-Baptiste-Guillaume was born in November 1771, Marguerite in January 1774, Pierre-Paul in June 1776, and Jeanne-Marie in April 1779 but died in April 1780.  Marie-Josèphe died near Bangor in June 1779, perhaps from complications of childbirth, and Guillaume died there in November 1781.

When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in the France a chance for a new life in their Louisiana colony, the MONTET orphans--six of them, Joseph-Adam, age 16, Jean-Baptiste, age 13, Pierre-Paul, age 7, Françoise, age 19, and Marguerite, age 10, led by oldest brother Pierre-Vincent, age 22--agreed to go there.  Although their father was a Frenchman, being the children of an Acadian mother gave these orphans a place in the Acadian community, which in turn made them eligible to accompany their Acadian kinsmen to Louisiana.  Their maternal uncle Pierre VINCENT, in fact, crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  The MONTETs crossed on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which left Nantes in October 1785 and reached New Orleans in December.  Although their uncle Pierre, still a bachelor, had gone to Attakapas, the MONTETs followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph-Adam died at Lafourche in September 1786, age 19, before he could marry.  Pierre-Vincent married Anne-Félicité, called Félicité, daughter of Acadians Jean-Baptiste AUCOIN and Jeanne-Anne THERIOT, at Lafourche in March 1788; Félicité also was a native of France.  Pierre-Vincent died in Assumption Parish in December 1810, age 46.  Françoise married Joseph-Benoît, son of Acadians Charles GAUTREAUX and his second wife Marie-Madeleine MELANÇON, at New Orleans in May 1789 and settled with him on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph-Benoît also was a native of Belle-Île-en-Mer.  Françoise died probably from complications of childbirth by November 1790, when Joseph-Benoît remarried at Lafourche. 

The other MONTET siblings moved on the western prairies, where their VINCENT uncle had gone, and they, too, like Pierre and Françoise, took Acadian spouses:  Jean-Baptiste-Guillaume married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Charles DUHON and Marie-Josèphe PREJEAN, at Attakapas in January 1796, and remarried to Marie, daughter of Lucien BOURG and Marie-Élisabeth TRAHAN, at Attakapas in August 1803.  Marguerite married Paul, fils, son of Paul TRAHAN and Marie HUGON, at Attakapas in November 1796.  Pierre-Paul married Adélaïde, daughter of François DUHON and his first wife Élisabeth LANDRY, at Attakapas in September 1801, and, at age 45, remarried to Polone, daughter of Augustin BROUSSARD and Anne LANDRY and a widow, in Lafayette Parish in May 1825. 

During the antebellum period, Pierre-Vincent's children and grandchildren settled in Assumption and St. James parishes.  Jean-Baptiste-Guillaume's and Pierre-Paul's descendants settled in what became St. Martin and Lafayette parishes. 

Sources:  BRDR, vols. 2, 3; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 330-31, 571; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile, 1785, 108-09; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B; NOAR, vol. 4; White, DGFA-1, 161, 1579. 

 

MONTERO

Pronunciation:  mawn-TEAR-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  RIVET

Comments:

 

MOREAU

Pronunciation:  MAW-roh, muh-ROH

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole? 

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1777

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  François MOREAU, fils

Settled:  Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, present-day St. James Parish; Attakapas District, now St. Martin & Lafayette parishes; Opelousas District, now St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, MARTIN

Comments:  François, fils, son of François MOREAU and Marie-Jeanne LAPOINTE, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Acadian Ambroise BREAUX and widow of Honoré MELANÇON, at St.-Jacques on the river in June 1770.  Spanish officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at St.-Jacques in January 1777.  They moved to the Atakapas District, now St. Martin Parish, and were counted there in May 1777.  Marie-Josèphe died at Atakapas in December 1787, age 55.  Their son François MOREAU, fils married Pélagie, daughter of Acadian Joseph MARTIN, at Opelousas in May 1792. 

Sources:  BRDR, 2:556; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 8; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 11; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:582.

Second Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  August 1785

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Gabriel MOREAU

Settled:  Ascension

Acadian connection:  LANDRY, TRAHAN

Comments:  Gabriel MOREAU, a 61-year-old day laborer, his wife Marie TRAHAN, age 54, their 24-year-old son Maximin, a printer, and 18-year-old daughter Anne, arrived in New Orleans aboard La Bergère, one of the Seven Ships from France, in August 1785.  Anne married Jean-Athanase LANDRY on 22 January 1787 at Ascension.  

Sources:  BRDR, 2:556; Wall of Names, 30.

Third Family:

Origin:  French Creole ... Mobile, Alabama

Arrived in Louisiana:  before 1792

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Joseph-Valentin MOREAU

Settled:  Opelousas District, present-day St. Landry & Evangeline parishes

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  Joseph-Valentin MOREAU, called Valentin, of Mobile, Alabama, and his wife Marie-Jeanne LAFLEUR, settled in the Opelousas area in the late 1700s.  Their son Célestin married Adelaide GODEAUX of Pointe Coupée, on 23 January 1792 at Opelousas.  Their daughter Louise married Simon FONTENOT on 31 January 1792 at Opelousas.

Source:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:581-83.

Fourth Family:

Origin:   French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1799

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre MOREAU

Settled:  Atakapas District, now St. Martin & Lafayette parishes

Acadian connection:  BABIN, BERGERON, BREAUX, CHIASSON, MARTIN, ROY

Comments:  Pierre MOREAU, son of Francois MOREAU and Francoise LACOSTE of Bordeaux, France, married at Atakapas Post, now St. Martinville, 22 October 1799, Anne BABIN, daughter of Ignace BABIN and Marguerite BREAUX, natives of Acadia who settled at Manchac on the Mississippi.

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:26.

 

MORENO

Pronunciation:  moh-REE-noh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

MORNHINVEG

Pronunciation:  MOR-nin-veg

Origin:  German Immigrant

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1842

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Christian "Chretien" Mornhinweg

Settled:  St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  Christian, born c1812 in Wuerttemburg, Germany, son of Joseph MORNHINWEG and Dorothée ZINSER, came to Louisiana by 1842, settling in St. Landry Parish.  Christian was a tailor by trade.  In February 1842, in Opelousas, he married Julie, a native of France, daughter of Michel BENARD and Marie-Anne DEUTOUR.  Christian and Julie had six children, four sons and two daughters.  Their second son, Christian François, Jr., born at Opelousas in March 1845, served in Company K, 29th (Thomas's) Louisiana Infantry during the War Between the States.  The family's name evolved from MORNHINWEG to MORNHINVEG over the decades.

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 4:364; Francine Ross, family genealogist

 

MORVANT

Pronunciation:  MORE-vonh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:  Lafourche Parish; Côte Gelée, Lafayette Parish

Acadian connection:  BABIN, BENOIT, BERNARD, BOUDREAUX, BREAUX, DAIGLE, GRANGER, GUIDRY, GUILLOT, HÉBERT, LANDRY, MIRE, ROBICHAUX, ROGER, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

MOUILLE

Pronunciation:  MOO-yay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CORMIER

Comments:  What up, Moose?

 

MOULARD

Pronunciation:  moo-YARD

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURQUE

Comments:

 

MOUTON

Pronunciation:  MOO-tonh

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  1740s?

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:  German Coast, Mississippi River above New Orleans, present-day St. John the Baptist Parish

Source:  BRDR, 1b:53

Second Family:

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

Comments:  Although not all of the MOUTONs of South Louisiana were Acadians, they are listed here as Acadian.

 

MUNSON

Pronunciation:  MUN-sun

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

NAQUIN

Pronunciation:  NAH-kanh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

NAVARRE

Pronunication:  nah-VAR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BENOIT, BOUDREAUX, GAUTREAUX, GUILLOT, HÉBERT, NAQUIN

Comments:

 

NEE

Pronunication:  NAY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BENOIT

Comments:

 

NERAUT

Pronunication:  neh-RAWT

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GUILBEAU, PREJEAN

Comments:

 

NEWCHURCH

Pronunication:  guess!

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

NEZAT

Pronunciation:  neh-ZOT, neh-ZAH

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre NEZAT of Lairac or Layrac, on the Garonne, France

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, CHIASSON

Comments:

Source:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:12.

 

NOËL

Pronunciation:  NO-ul, no-EL

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, DUGAS, RIVET

Comments:

 

NORMAND

Pronunciation:  NAHR-mund

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BLANCHARD

Comments:

 

NOTT -- see KNOTT

 

NUNEZ

Pronunciation:  NOO-nyez, NOO-nez

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

OLDHAM

Pronunciation:  OLD-um

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN

Comments:

 

OLINDE

Pronunciation: oh-LIND

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, DAVID, MARTIN

Comments:

 

OLIVIER

Pronunciation: oh-LIV-ee-ay

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

Comments:  Although OLIVIER is an Acadian name, most of the OLIVIERs in Louisiana are French Creoles.

 

ONCALE

Pronunciation:      OWN-cal

Origin:  Galician/Spanish Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  c1778

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Luis JUNCAL

Settled:  Bayou Lafourche valley (Ascension, Assumption, Lafourche parishes)

Acadian connection:  CLEMENT, DUGAS, GUILLOT, NAQUIN

Comments:  "The Louisiana progenitor was Luis JUNCAL, b. 1754 Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain, d. 1799 Louisiana.  He came to LA with Galvez and the Isleños, though not an Isleño nor a Malagueno. He was likely a soldier. ...  His sons were born to his Acadian DUGAS wife [Marie-Rose, daughter of Alexis DUGAS and his second wife Marguerite MOÏSE, whom he married at Ascension, now Donaldsonville, in September 1786 and who died at Assumption in April 1795].  His Isleño wife [Ysabel SANCHEZ, to whom he remarried in Jan 1796 at Ascension] only had daughters.  Hence, his modern surnamed descendants (either spelling) are all of Acadian descent.  The original Spanish surname was JUNCAL, pronounced Hun-cal with a soft “h” and rhymes with uncle (Galicia was an ethnically Celtic province of Spain).  Modern Cajuns usually pronounce this as Zhun-cal, also rhymes with uncle.  Some of his descendants changed (or had changed) the surname spelling to ONCALE, often pronounced Own-cal, also rhymes with uncle."  The surname also is spelled Ancale, Ocale, Orcale. 

Source:  Mike Talbot, descendant (quote)

 

ORCUTT

Pronunciation: AR-cut, OAR-cut

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  

Comments:

 

ORDONEAUX

Pronunciation:  ARD-eh-noh

Origin:  Foreign French

Arrived in Louisiana:  by December 1825

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Étienne ORDRONEAU

Settled:  Assumption, Lafourche, & Terrebonne parishes

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD, BOUDREAUX, FORET

Comments:  Étienne, fils, son of Étienne ORDRONEAU and Françoise OLIVE of Jersey, Department of Loire Inferieure, France, married Marie Aimée, also called Anne, daughter of Acadian Joachim BLANCHARD, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1825.  Their son Jean Guillaume was born in Assumption Parish in January 1828, Sylvanie in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1830, Eugène in December 1836, and Alfred in December 1839.  They also had a son named Étienne III.  Their daughters married into the BLANCHARD and FORET families.  Daughter Adèle gave birth to son Maximin Cyprien near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in June 1851; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.  Sylvanie, while a resident of Terrebonne Parish, married Malvina Célestina, daughter of Acadian Napoléon LEBLANC of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1858.  Alfred married Élodie, daughter of Jean Baptiste CALAHAN, at the Houma church in March 1861.  Étienne III married Hortense, daughter of Acadian Baptiste BOUDREAUX and widow of John GARDNER, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1869. 

During the late 1800s or early 1900s, some of Étienne's descendants left the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley and settled on the southwestern prairies.  Norman ORDONEAUX of Lake Arthur served in the Louisiana state legislature during the late 1900s.  ...

The family's name evolved into Ordoneaux and also is spelled Ordeneaux. 

Sources:  BRDR, vols. 4, 5(rev.), 7; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

 

ORDOGNE

Pronunciation:  ar-DOAN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX

Comments:

 

ORILLION

Pronunciation:  oh-RILL-ee-onh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

ORTEGO

Pronunciation:  AR-teh-goh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GRANGER, PITRE

Comments:

 

ORY

Pronunciation:  OAR-ee

Origin:  German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  October 1769

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Nicolas ORY

Settled:  Opelousas District, now St. Landry & Evangeline parishes; St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, now Iberville Parish; Ascension Parish

Acadian connection:  RICHARD, TRAHAN

Comments:  Nicolas ORY, a German, born in c1703, his wife Anna Christine, called Christine, STRASBERG, also a German, born in c1729, five daughters, and two sons, Mathieu, born in c1749, and Jean Baptiste in c1757, left Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the English schooner Britannia in early January 1769 with seven other German Catholic families and seven Acadian families, heading for New Orleans.  Their ship missed the entrance to the Mississippi, got lost in the Gulf of Mexico, landed on the Texas coast, and the passengers and crew were held by the Spanish at Goliad, Texas, for several months, suspected of being spies or smugglers.  After the Spanish released the Britannia passengers, the ORYs traveled with their fellow passengers overland to Natchitoches Post, Louisiana, arriving there on 24 October 1769.  Spanish officials ordered them and the other Germans to New Orleans, which they reached on 9 November 1769.  They were then sent to Fort San Gabriel, on the river above the city.  Jean-Baptiste married a fellow German immigrant, Marie-Eve, called Eve, OFFMAN, who died by October 1797, when he remarried to Barbara, daughter of Francois TIRCUIT and Barbara BOURGEOIS, French Creoles, on 24 October 1797 at Ascension, near San Gabriel.  Jean-Baptiste's daughter Marie, by his first wife, remarried to a RICHARD at Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1814. 

Sources:  BRDR, 2:572, 3:735; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:605-06; Glenn R. Conrad, "German Settlers in Louisiana," <thecajuns.com>; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 140-42.

 

OUBRE

Pronunciation:  OOB

Origin:  Belgian-German Immigrant

Arrived in Louisiana:  September 1721

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Joannes Jacob/Jean-George HUBER

Settled:  St.-Charles des Allemands, present-day St. Charles Parish; St.-Jacques de Cabanocé, present-day St. James Parish; Attakapas District, present-day St. Martin Parish

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD, BOURG/BOURQUE, BOURGEOIS, BROUSSARD, DAVID, GAUDET, GAUDIN, GUÉDRY/GUIDRY, HÉBERT, LAMBERT, LANDRY, LEBLANC, LOUVIÈRE, MARTIN, MOUTON, PART, RICHARD, THERIOT, VINCENT

Comments:  Joannes Jacob, called Jacob and also Jacques and Jean-George, HUBER and Anne-Barbe SCHAUFFINE of Louvain, Belgium, came to Louisiana with a child aboard Le St.-André, which reached New Biloxi, then the capital of French Louisiana, in September 1721.  The couple were engagés contracted to the Law concession, to be established at Arkansas.  However, with hundreds of other Germans, they were forced to wait at Biloxi for transportation to their concession.  In the January 1722, they, along with 350 other German engagés, were sent, instead, to the Demeuves concession 30 miles above New Orleans.  The community was called Côte des Allemands, or the German Coast, and, after years of struggle became the breadbasket of the colony.  That September, a storm surge destroyed the family's home in one of the German villages, and they moved to Commandant-General Bienville's plantation at New Orleans.  Son Christofe married Anne-Barbe RAUCHEN or RAUSCHE before April 1732, when their daughter Marie was baptized at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast.  Their son André was born not long afterwards.  Anne-Barbe died in November 1746 at Des Allemands.  In January 1747, Christofe, described by historian Reinhart Kondert as "one of the most enterprising and successful of all of the German immigrants," remarried to Catherine, daughter of Joseph BENISH and Madeleine SEILER of Burken, probably in Germany, and widow of Jacob FOLTZ, at the St.-Charles church.  Christofe's father Jacob was a witness to the marriage.  Jean-Christofe, probably one of Christofe's sons, married Marie-Josephe ST. YVE at St.-Charles.  They had at least one son, Pierre-Antoine, born in July 1754 at Des Allemands.  Christofe, père's son André married, around age 22, Marie-Élisabeth, daughter of Jacques BONVILLAIN and Catherine SCHOFF of New Orleans, in April 1754 at St.-Charles.  Christofe's first succession auction took place at the Des Allemands church in April 1762, so he had died by then.  His second succession auction, in which son André purchased his father's four-arpent farm for 2,600 livres, occurred at St.-Charles church the following November.  By the early 1770s, André had moved his family upriver to St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands, present-day Edgard, St. John the Baptist Parish, then called the Upper German Coast, where his son Pierre was born in September 1772.  The family name in Pierre's baptismal record is spelled OUVRE, a gallicized version of HUBER.  By 1774, André had moved his family even farther upriver to Cabahannocer, present-day St. James Parish, then called the Lower Acadian Coast.  André's son André-Joseph, called Joseph, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Acadians Jean-Baptiste HÉBERT and Claire ROBICHAUX, in September 1774 at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, and they eventually moved to the Attakapas District, now St. Martin Parish.  André's daughter Marie-Pélagie married Paul, son of Acadians Étienne-Michel DAVID and Geneviève HÉBERT, in February 1775 at St.-Jacques.  André is listed in the census of 1777 at St.-Jacques as living on the east side of the Mississippi and is called Andrée OUVRE.  Living with his family was a 20-year-old Acadian engagé, Basil DEROCHE.  Another of André's daughters, Françoise, born in c1762, married Paul, son of Acadians Ambroise MARTIN dit Barnabé and his second wife Madeleine dite Émilienne COMEAUX, in January 1779 at St.-Jacques.  One of the witnesses to this marriage was Henrie or Henrique HOUWER, another of André's son, who married Angélique, sister of his brother-in-law Paul DAVID, in September 1787 at St.-Jacques.  André's son Pierre married Félicité, daughter of François PERTUIS and Angela LEPIN of "Osalcanza," in January 1792 at St.-Jacques.  Their son André, born at Cabahannocer in March 1794, married Rosalie, daughter of Acadians Charles VINCENT and Céleste LABAUVE, in February 1816 at St.-Jacques.  By the late 1820s, the couple had moved to St. Martin Parish to add to the line of OUBREs already there.  Meanwhile, a Christophe OUBRE was buried at the Post des Attakapas, now St. Martinville, in April 1794, age 50.  He probably was a brother of André OUBRE, père of Cabahannocer, perhaps Jean-Christofe. 

Before it evolved into OUBRE, this family's name sometimes appeared as Houbert, Houver, Hubert, Hufer, and Huwer.  It also is spelled Roub, Uber, Ubre.  Typical of many Germans who came to the colony in 1721, this family is one of the oldest in Louisiana with a continuous line of descent.  

Sources:  BRDR, 2:573-75, 3:672; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 14; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:606, 2-C:598; Kondert, D'Arensbourg, 46-48, 50-51 (quotation from 51); NOAR, 1:17, 130-31, 218, 2:32, 151-52, 3:229; Oubre, Vacherie, 32, 40.  

 

OZELET

Pronunciation:  onz-eh-LAY

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PANVIL

Pronunciation:  PAWH-vill

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, BENOIT

Comments:

 

PAQUETTE

Pronunciation:  paw-KET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LEBLANC

Comments:

 

PARENT

Pronunciation:  pah-ronh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HEBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

PART

Pronunciation:  PAR

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PATIN

Pronunciation:  PAH-tanh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN, ARCENAUX, BERNARD, BERGERON, BROUSSARD, CORMIER, POTIER, RICHARD, SIMONEAUX

Comments:

 

PECK

Pronunciation:  PECK 

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  SAVOIE

Comments:

 

PECOT

Pronunciation:  PEE-koh

Origin:  Foreign French

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Acadia:

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1805

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  François, Jacques, Charles PECOT

Settled:  ?

Comments:  François PECOT, husband of Rosalie PRÉJEAN, came to Louisiana with his four children, sons Jacques and Charles, and daughters Louise and Marie Anne, from Mirebalais, St.-Domingue, now Haiti, by 1805.  They settled in the Atakapas District, now St. Martin Parish, and eventually moved down the Teche valley to St. Mary Parish.

SourcesWall of Names, 23.

 

PELEGRIN

Pronunciation:  PELL-eh-granh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD

Comments:

 

PELLERIN

Pronunciation:  PELL-eh-ranh

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana

Settled:

Acadian connection:

Second Family:

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

Comments:  Although not all of the PELLERINs of South Louisiana were Acadian, this family is listed as Acadian in this study.

 

PELLETIER/PELTIER

Pronunciation:  pell-eh-TEER, PELL-uh-tee-ay, PELL-tee-ay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, MELANCON

Comments:

 

PELOQUIN

Pronunciation:  pell-eh-CANH, PELL-eh-kin

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1802

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jean-Baptiste-Félix PELOQUIN

Settled:  Opelousas District, present-day St. Landry & Calcasieu parishes

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:  Jean-Baptiste-Félix, called Félix, PELOQUIN, native of Sorel, on the St. Lawrence River between Trois-Rivières and Montréal in Canada, married Marie BIENVENU, also called DELILE or DELILLE, of Kaskaskia, Illinois.  The earliest reference to the family in South Louisiana church records shows Jean-Baptiste PELOQUIN witnessing a marriage at Opelousas in September 1802; this likely was Jean-Baptiste-Félix.  Daughter Marie Louise, born in St. Landry Parish, married Pierre Antoine, called Antoine, son of Jacques DESHOTELS and Félicité FONTENOT of Pointe Coupée, at Opelousas in October 1815; the marriage record reveals the birthplaces of the bride's parents and says the family was resident of Calcasieu, then the western portion of St. Landry Parish.  Marie Louise, called a Felisque in the civil record, remarried to Godfroy, son of Pierre MANUEL and Geneviève ALBERT, at Opelousas in April 1825.  Daughter Céleste Félice, also born in St. Landry Parish, married Paul, son of Jean Marie AGOSTINO & Brigitte ____, at Opelousas in May 1818; Paul was a native of Corsica and also a resident of Calcasieu.  Céleste remarried to Joseph, fils, son of Joseph HÉBERT, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1838.  Daughter Constance Félice married Alexis, son of Michel JANIS and Marianne BENOIT, probably in St. Landry Parish in the 1810s.  Daughter Angèle, born in Calcasieu, married Joseph, son of François DOIS and Marguerite SIMOLIANO of Trieste, then in Italy, at Opelousas in July 1819. 

Most, if not all, of the PELOQUINs of South Louisiana descend from Félix and Marie's son Antoine Félix, who married Sydalise, daughter of Augustin FRUGÉ and Eloise MARCANTEL, at Opelousas in July 1828.  Antoine, like his wife Sydalise, was a native of St. Landry Parish.  Their son Antoine Félix, fils was born probably in Calcasieu in August 1829, Jean Baptiste in January 1833, Drosin in February 1835, Cesaire in May 1837, Octave in June 1839, and Paul was baptized in May 1843.  Evidently son Antoine, fils married Marie DESMARETS.  Their son Antoine Dejean was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1854.  Antoine Félix and Sydalise's daughter Eugènie, born in June 1831, married Joseph, son of Antoine COURVILLE and Adélaïde DELAFOSSE, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1850.  Son Drosin married Eloise MARCANTEL.  Their son Mathus was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1856.  Son Cesaire married Joséphine COMBER, widow of Théodore PERRODIN, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1861.  Meanwhile, Félix and Marie's son Jean Baptiste Félix, fils, called Félix, fils, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles LACASE and Marguerite ARDOIN, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1829.  Their son, name unrecorded, died at age eight months the following September.  Church records reveal no more children for this couple. 

The family's name also is spelled Pelaquin, Pelequin, Pelloquin, Pellotin, Peloquen, Perroquin, and in early St. Landry Parish church records members of the family were called Felix and variations of the name, such as Felice and Felisque, their father's dit

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:72, 236, 2-A:3-4, 293-94, 360-61, 523-25, 745, 2-B:3, 287, 289, 291, 299, 354, 376, 514, 640, 740, 2-C:148, 196, 220, 320-24, 351, 420-21, 437, 439, 462, 489, 522-23, 563, 608, 3:512-13, 4:390, 5:137, 442, 6:474, 7:363, 8:397, 9:316. 

 

PENISSON

Pronunciation:  pen-eh-SONH, PIN-eh-son

Origin:  French Creole or Foreign French

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1806

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Etienne Benjamin PENISSON

Settled:  Bayou Boeuf area, Lafourche Parish; St. Mary Parish

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX, BOURG, GAUTREAUX, HENRY, LANDRY, TRAHAN

Comments: Étienne-Benjamin, son of Étienne PENISSON and Anne PAYOTE of Nantes, France, born on 7 June 1777 at La Plaine, France, married, age 29, Rosalie Marie, daughter of Maturin TRAHAN and Marie BLANCHARD, on 6 October 1806, at Assumption, now Plattenville, Assumption Parish.  They settled in the Bayou Boeuf area and had at least 10 children, including two sons who served in Company B, 26th Louisiana Infantry, during the War of 1861-65.  Étienne-Benjamin died on 24 May 1856 at Bayou Boeuf, age 78.  

In the 1870s, the spelling of the family named changed to Pennison.  

Sources:  BRDR, 3:684, 4:445, 5(rev.):481, 6:513, 7:403, 8:463-64.  Gilbert S. Pennison, Jr., descendant.

 

PENN

Pronunciation:  PIN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HEBERT

Comments:

 

PERIOU

Pronunciation:  PEAR-ee-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CORMIER

Comments:

 

PERRAULT

Pronunciation:  peh-ROW, per-RAWLT

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DAVID, LANDRY, LEBLANC, LEJEUNE

Comments:

 

PERRET

Pronunciation:  peh-RET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABINEAUX

Comments:

 

PERRIN

Pronunciation:  PEAR-in, peh-RANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN

Comments:

 

PERRODIN

Pronunciation:  peh-roh-DANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERNARD, HEBERT

Comments:

 

PERRY

Pronunciation:  PEAR-ee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABINEAUX, LABAUVE, LANDRY, ROGER, SIMON

Comments:

 

PERTUIT

Pronunciation:  per-TOO-ee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  MICHEL

Comments:

 

PETIT

Pronunciation:  peh-TEE, peh-TEET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BROUSSARD, LAMBERT

Comments:

 

PICARD

Pronunciation:  pee-KARD

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, DAVID, LEJEUNE, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

PICHOFF

Pronunciation:  pih-SHOFF

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, CROCHET, HÉBERT, LEBLANC, NAQUIN, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

PICOU

Pronunciation:  PEE-koo

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, BLANCHARD, BOURGEOIS, BUJOLE

Comments:

 

PINEL/PINET

Pronunciation:  pih-NELL, pih-NET

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PITRE

Pronunciation:  PEET, pee-tree

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PLAISANCE

Pronunciation:  PLAY-zonce

First Family:

Origin:  Isleño--Canary Islander

Arrived in Louisiana:  1779

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Juan, Gaspar, Pedro Francisco Manuel, and Juan Manuel PLACENCIA

Settled:  Valenzuéla, present-day Assumption Parish; St. Martin Parish

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, CORMIER, DUGAS, GUIDRY, LEBLANC, MIRE, PRIMEAUX, SIMONEAUX

Comments:  Juan and Gaspar de PLACENCIA, probably brothers, and their families left Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands aboard the packet boat Juan Nepomuceno on 9 December 1778, and reached New Orleans probably in late spring 1779.  Pedro Francisco Manuel and Juan Manuel PLACENCIA, probably brothers and kinsmen perhaps of Juan and Gaspar, left the same port with their families aboard the frigate La Santa Faz on 17 February 1779.  They reached New Orleans by summer.  After a brief stay in the city to recover from the long voyage, the Isleños from these ships and three others that arrived in 1778-1779 were sent to one of four new settlements in South Louisiana:  Galveztown on the Amite River in present-day Ascension Parish, Barataria in present-day Jefferson Parish, San Bernardo below New Orleans in present-day St. Bernard Parish, and Valenzuéla along the upper Bayou Lafourche in what is now Assumption Parish.  

Francisco, son of Gaspar PLACENCIA and Melchora BARROSO, was 13 when he left the Canary Islands for Louisiana.  He married Françoise-Apollonie, daughter of French Creole François SIMONEAUX and Acadian Marie-Osite-Anne CORPORON, at Assumption in October 1793.  Francisco's brother Baltasar, who was only 2 when he left the Canary Islands, also married an Acadian girl, Henriette, daughter of Joseph BREAUX and Marie-Madeleine MELANÇON, in present-day St. James Parish on the Mississippi in January 1806, but they settled at Assumption.  Meanwhile, father Gaspar died at Assumption in August 1813; he was 80 years old.  Francisco's son Antoine married a fellow Isleño, Maria Antonia ALBARADO, at Assumption in February 1821.  Francisco's son Alexis married an Acadian, Joséphine GUIDRY, at Ascension in March 1837.  Francisco, called Francois now, died at Assumption in June 1842 in his 70s.  His son Gabriel married another Acadian girl, Léonelle LEBLANC, at Assumption in April 1846.

By 1817, Baltasar and Henriette had moved from the crowded Lafourche valley to St. Martin Parish, west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  One of their sons, Antoine, married Élise PRIMEAUX at Vermilionville, now Lafayette, in June 1830.  Another son, Jean, married Marie Carmegille, daughter of Joseph MIRE and Émilie GUILBEAU, at Vermilionville in August 1830, so a western branch of the family set down roots.  

Eventually, the family's surname evolved into the more French-sounding PLAISANCE, members of which can be found in large numbers in South Louisiana today.  The family is especially numerous in the Bayou Lafourche valley, where their ancestors first settled.  

Second Family:

Origin:  probably Spanish Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  before 1784

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Juan Bautista PLASENCIA

Settled:  Natchitoches Post; St.-Gabriel, present-day Iberville Parish

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  A Jean-Baptiste PLASENCIA "of Natchitoches" died in the Mississippi River community of St.-Gabriel, above New Orleans, in April 1784.  His burial record does not reveal his parents' names.  None of the Isleños PLACENCIAs had a son named Juan Bautista, so he may have been a Spaniard.  

Third Family:

Origin:  Foreign French

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1847

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Prosper PLAISANCE

Settled:  St. James Parish

Acadian connection:  GUIDRY

Comments:  Prosper PLAISANCE, son of Joseph PLAISANCE and Jeanne MISTEYREAU of LaGironde, Bordeaux, France, married Adèle GUIDRY, daughter of Donat GUIDRY, at Convent in St. James Parish in January 1845.  Prosper's sister Ida married Auguste GUIDRY, Adele's cousin, at Convent in May 1846. 

Sources:  BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6; Din, Canary Islanders of LA, 225, 229, & passim; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C; Marlene Gonzales, descendant.

 

POCHÉ/PORCHÉ

Pronunciation:  PO-shay, po-SHAY, poor-SHAY, POOR-shay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BABIN, BERGERON, BOURGEOIS, HÉBERT, HENRY, LANDRY, LEBLANC, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

POIRIER

Pronunciation:  PWAH-ree-ay

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

POMIER

Pronunciation:  POH-mee-ay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, MARTIN

Comments:

 

PONTIFF

Pronunciation:  pon-TEEF, PON-tiff

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX, HÉBERT, LEBLANC, LEJEUNE, RICHARD

Comments:

 

PORCHE -- see POCHE

 

POTIER

Pronunciation:  POH-tee-ay

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

POURCIAU

Pronunciation:  POOR-see-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

POURSINE

Pronunciation:  POOR-seen

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

PRATHER

Pronunciation:  PRAY-ther

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BRASSEAUX

Comments:

 

PRÉJEAN

Pronunciation:  PRAY-jzhon

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PREVOST/PROVOST

Pronunciation:  PREE-voh, PREE-vost, PRO-voh, PRO-vost

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BUJOLE, DUBOIS, HÉBERT, LANDRY, LEBLANC, PELLERIN

Comments:

 

PREWETT

Pronunciation:  PROO-it

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BRASSEAUX, LANDRY

Comments:

 

PRIMEAUX

Pronunciation:  PREE-moh

Origin:  French Canadian 

Arrived in Louisiana:  October 1769

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre PRIMEAUX

Settled:  Opelousas & Attakapas districts, present-day St. Landry & Lafayette parishes

Acadian connection:  BRASSEAUX, BROUSSARD, DUGAS, HÉBERT, MIRE, TRAHAN, VINCENT

Comments:  Pierre, son of Claude PRIMEAUX and Angélique BAVIN or BABEU, born in Canada in c1739, ended up in Maryland probably during the Acadian Grand Dérangement.  He married Susanne, daughter of French Canadian Jacques PLANTE of Maryland and Anne SPENCER, probably at Baltimore during the 1760s.  They left Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the English schooner Britannia in early January 1769 with eight German Catholic families and six Acadian families, heading for New Orleans.  Their ship missed the entrance to the Mississippi, got lost in the Gulf of Mexico, landed on the Texas coast, and the Spanish held the passengers and crew at La Bahia, Texas, for several months, suspecting them of being spies or smugglers.  After the Spanish released the Britannia passengers, Pierre and Susanne traveled with their fellow passengers overland to Natchitoches Post, Louisiana, arriving there on in late October 1769.  They refused to settle at Natchitoches and chose to go to the Opelousas District instead, where their children were born.  Pierre died at Opelousas in August 1790, age 51.  Susanne took their children to the lower Vermilion River in the Attakapas District and remarried. 

Although they appear on the Acadian Memorial's Wall of Names in St. Martinville, Pierre and Susanne were not Acadians; they were Canadians who came to Louisiana with Acadian families aboard the ship Britannia.  A PLANTE descendant notes that Susanne's parents died in Louisiana, so perhaps she and Pierre were going there to be near them, or perhaps her family followed her to the Mississippi valley. 

Sources:  De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 27; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 140-42; Pam Lynn, descendant. 

 

PRINCE

Pronunciation:  PRONZ, PRINZ

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

PRINGLE

Pronunciation:  PREEN-gull

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  RIVET

Comments:

 

PROSPER

Pronunciation:  PROS-pur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LAVERGNE

Comments:

 

PROVOST --  see PREVOST

 

PRUDHOMME

Pronunciation:  proo-DOHM, prood-OHM

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  1726

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jean-Philippe-Pierre PRUDHOMME

Settled:  Natchitoches Post; Cane River area along Red River; Bayou Pierre area in "Neutral Ground" northwest of Natchitoches

Comments:  Jean-Philippe-Pierre PRUDHOMME was a native of St. Romans, Dauphine, southeastern France.  His wife was Marie-Catherine MEILLIER of Paris.  Their descendants became some of the richest planters in the antebellum Red River valley.  A grandson of Jean-Philippe-Pierre, Jean-Pierre-Emmanuel PRUDHOMME (1762-1845), pioneered the raising of cotton on a large scale in Louisiana.  

Second Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1766

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre-Michel PRUDHOMME

Settled:  German Coast, now St. John the Baptist Parish; Opelousas Post area, now St. Landry Parish; Bayous Plaquemine Brulé & Mallet, now Acadia Parish

Comments:  Pierre-Michel, called Michel, PRUDHOMME, a native of Strasbourg, Alsace, northeastern France, lived on the German Coast in present-day St. John the Baptist Parish before moving to the Opelousas District in the mid-1770s.  He was not related to the PRUDHOMMEs of the Natchitoches area.  After his first wife, Catherine ANDEYMISTRE, died, he remarried to Marie SNAIDER.  In 1796, about the time that the Poste des Opelousas was moved to the site of the present city, originally called La Pointe à Mr. TESSON, Michel donated nearly 100 acres of land and the cypress lumber on it for the new St. Landry Catholic Church, which today calls itself "the second largest Catholic Church in the South."  

Acadian connection:  LEJEUNE, SONNIER

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:38, 653; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 121-22.

 

PUJOL

Pronunciation:  POO-jhole, PYOO-jhole

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  RICHARD, ROY, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

PULASKI

Pronunciation:  pyoo-LAH-skee, pyoo-LASS-kee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  COMEAUX

Comments:

 

QUEBEDEAUX

Pronunciation:  KWIH-beh-doh, KIH-beh-doh

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  from Illinois by 1776

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Charles QUEBEDEAU

Settled:  Pointe-Coupée; Opelousas District, present-day St. Landry and Evangeline parishes; St. Martin Parish

Acadian connection:  LANDRY, SAVOIE, TRAHAN

Comments:  Charles, son of Joseph QUEBEDEAU and Marie LEST of Illinois, married Marie-Catherine, called Catherine, daughter of Guillaume RECURON of Albin, Diocese of Belley, Dauphiné, France, and Marie-Anne DERUIS, at Pointe-Coupée in October 1776; Marie-Catherine had been born at Pointe-Coupée in January 1762, so she was only 14 years old at the time of her marriage.  They settled at Fausse Rivière.  Son Toussaint was baptized at Pointe-Coupée, age 4 months, in March 1783, and François was born in September 1784.  They also had sons named Nicolas and Zenon.  Their daughters married into the ANGELO, ARDOIN, HERNANDEZ, PROVOST, and STELLY families.  Charles moved his family to the Opelousas District by the early 1790s and settled on Prairie des Femmes, south of present-day Opelousas.  Nicolas married Marguerite, daughter of Acadian Firmin LANDRY of Fausse Pointe in the Atakapas District, and settled at Île-aux-Cannes and on the lower Vermilion River.  Their son François le jeune was born in July 1804, Joachim in June 1806, and Denis in October 1808.  François l'aîné married Céleste or Célestine, daughter of French Creole Henri LAGRANGE, probably in St. Landry Parish in the early 1810s.  Their son Francois, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1818.  A daughter married into the SAVOIE family.  Toussaint married Marie Barbe, daughter of French Creole Joseph FROZARD, in St. Landry Parish in May 1813.  Zenon married Emeranthe, daughter of German Creole André MARKS, in St. Landry Parish in June 1817. 

Members of the family were living at Anse QUEBEDEAUX, near Church Point, present-day Acadia Parish, in the 1860s. 

Sources:  BRDR, 1b:154-55, 2:610-11, 617; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 8. 

 

QUINTERO

Pronunciation:  kin-TEH-ro

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, GRANGER, LEBLANC, LEJEUNE

Comments:

 

RACCA

Pronunciation:  RAH-kah

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  TRAHAN

Comments:

 

RACHAL/RACHEL

Pronunciation:  rah-SHAHL, ray-SHELL

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

RAFFRAY

Pronunciation:  RAFF-ray

Origin:  French Creole ... St.-Malo, Brittany

Arrived in Louisiana:  December 1785

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jean RAFFRAY

Settled:  Bayou des Écores, now West Feliciana Parish; West Baton Rouge Parish

Acadian connection:  LANDRY, LAVERGNE

Comments:  Jean RAFFRAY, son of Étienne RAFFRAY and Francoise-Louise SAUNEUF of St.-Malo, France, was was born in c1764 in St.-Malo.  In 1785, he was a master cooper on the ship La Ville d'Archangel when the vessel took a load of Acadians from France to New Orleans in 1785.  The ship left St.-Malo on August 12 and reached New Orleans on  December 3.  Three weeks later, on December 22, Jean married a passenger on La Ville d'Archangel, Marie-Madeleine, daughter of René LANDRY, at New Orleans.  He and his bride and her family settled in the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, now Thompson Creek, present-day West Feliciana Parish, on the river north of Baton Rouge.  By the late 1790s, Marie-Madeleine had died, and Jean had moved downriver to the Baton Rouge area and remarried to another Acadian, Marguerite, daughter of Pierre LAVERGNE and widow of Joseph TRAHAN, as revealed in the baptismal record of son Jean, fils, also called Jean-Rosalie, baptized at Baton Rouge at age 4 in July 1801.  The RAFFRAYs remained in the Baton Rouge area, settling in present-day West Baton Rouge Parish.  Jean Rosalie married Marguerite Emerite, called Emerite, daughter of Canary Islander André MARTIN or MARTINEZ, at Baton Rouge in February 1819.  Two of their sons, twins Francis and Xavier RAFFRAY, born in September 1833 probably in West Baton Rouge Parish, served in Company A of the Miles's Legion Louisiana Regiment Infantry during the War Between the States. 

The family's name also is spelled Biafre, Rafferay, Raffery, Raffrey, Rafre, Raphrey.  

Sources:  Booth, LA Confed. Soldiers, 3(2):235; BRDR, 2:613, 3:717, 5(rev.):501; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 104 (which calls him Juan BIAFRE??[sic]; NOAR, 4:258; Lonnie Raffray, descendant.

 

RAMOUIN

Pronunciation:  RAM-oo-anh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN

Comments:

 

RAULIN

Pronunciation:  RAW-lin

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD, DUHON

Comments:

 

RAYON

Pronunciation:  RAY-yonh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

REAUX

Pronunciation:  ROW

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BRASSEAUX, GRANGER, LACHAUSSÉE, MIRE

Comments:

 

REED

Pronunciation:  REED

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LEJEUNE

Comments:

 

REINE

Pronunciation:  wren

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS, COMEAUX

Comments:

 

RENAUD/REYNAUD

Pronunciation:  reh-NOH, ray-NOH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  PITRE

Comments:

 

RENTROP

Pronunciation:  REN-trop

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERTRAND, BOURQUE

Comments:

 

RICHARD

Pronunciation:  REE-shard

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:  Pointe Coupée

Source:  BRDR, 1b:157ff.

Second Family:

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

RICHE

Pronunciation:  REESH, ree-SHAY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX

Comments:

 

RIDER

Pronunciation:  RYE-der

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  JEANSONNE

Comments:

 

RINGUET

Pronunciation:  ring-GET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS, MELANCON, THERIOT

Comments:

 

RIVAS

Pronunciation:  RHEE-vahs

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN

Comments:

 

RIVET

Pronunciation:  rih-VET

First Family:

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

Second Family:

Origin:  Foreign French

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1826

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jacques Cesar RIVET

Settled:  Assumption Parish

Acadian connection:  PITRE

Comments:  Jacques Cesar RIVET, Caboteur en Pirogue, son of Guillaume RIVET and Marie-Anne ORENT of Toulon, France, married Melanie PITRE, daughter of Jean Baptiste PITRE & Marie Anne BOUDREAUX, 3 Apr 1826, in Assumption Catholic Church, Plattenville.  

Source:  BRDR, 4:479.

Third Family:

Origin:  Foreign French

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1832

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Pierre RIVETTE

Settled:  Lafourche Parish

Acadian connection:  ROBICHAUX

Comments:  Pierre RIVETTE, son of Michel RIVETTE and Jeanne LEBEAUPAIN of St. Nicolas Parish, Nantes, France, married Marie Scholastique MAILLET (born 17 December 1803), daughter of Joseph MAILLET and Marie HÉBERT of Lafourche Parish, 1 December 1832, St. Joseph Catholic Church, Thibodaux.  

Source:  Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:376-77, 451, 2:316, 3:433.

 

RIVERO

Pronunciation:  rih-VER-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  SIMONEAUX

Comments:

 

RIVIÈRE

Pronunciation:  rih-VEAR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN, GUILLOT, RIVET

Comments:

 

ROBEAU

Pronunciation:  RO-bo

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

ROBERT

Pronunciation:  Ro-BEAR, ROB-urt

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY, ORILLION

Comments:

 

ROBICHAUX

Pronunication:  ROH-bih-sho

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

ROBIN

Pronunciation:  row-BANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, BOUDREAUX, GUILLOT, HÉBERT, MOUTON

Comments:

 

ROCHE

Pronunciation:  row-SHAY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  FORET

Comments:

 

RODDY

Pronunciation:  ROD-ee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

RODRIGUE

Pronunciation:  rod-REEGK

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, BERTRAND, BOUDREAUX, DAVID, GUIDRY, MARTIN, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

RODRIGUES/RODRIGUEZ

Pronunciation:  rod-REE-gez

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DOIRON

Comments:

 

ROGER

Pronunication:  row-JHAY

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

ROMAGOSA

Pronunciation:  row-muh-GO-suh, rom-uh-GO-suh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

ROMAIN

Pronunciation:  row-MANE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN

Comments:

 

ROMAN

Pronunciation:  ROW-mun

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DAIGLE

Comments:

 

ROME

Pronunciation:  ROAM

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DAVID, MARTIN, SAVOIE

Comments:

 

ROMERO

Pronunciation:  row-MARE-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LEBLANC

Comments:

 

ROSSI

Pronunciation:  RAW-see

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS, PITRE

Comments:

 

ROTH

ronunciation:  roe

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, HÉBERT, LANDRY, ORILLION

Comments:

 

ROUGEAU

Pronunication:  ROO-zhoh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, LEBLANC, PITRE

Comments:

 

ROUILLET

Pronunication:  roo-eh-LAY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GAUDIN

Comments:

 

ROUSSEAU

Pronunciation:  roo-SO, ROO-so

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:   BOUDREAUX, BROUSSARD, FORET, GAUTREAUX, LANDRY, LEBLANC, MARTIN, MOUTON, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

ROUSSEL

Pronunciation:  roo-SELL

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BREAUX, GRAVOIS

Comments:

 

ROUSTAN

Pronunciation:  roo-STAN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LEJEUNE

Comments:

 

ROY

Pronunciation:  ROY

First Family:

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  c1743

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Joseph ROY dit Châtellerault

Settled:  Pointe Coupée; Opelousas Post area, present-day St. Landry & Evangeline parishes

Comments:  Joseph ROY dit Châttelrault, son of Emond ROY and Marie-Anne JANVIER, a native of St. Anne Parish, Québec, Canada, married Madeleine PERTHUIS, probably in Québec, then Pérrine LACOUR at Pointe Coupée, 30 January 1744.  A voyageur, he worked in Détroit then in Kaskaskia, Illinois, before moving to Louisiana, where he remarried.  He died by 1762.  Joseph dit Châttelrault and Pérrine's son, Joseph-Noel, who married Anne BORDELON in Pointe Coupée, 14 May 1770, moved from Pointe Coupée to the Grand Prairie area of Opelousas Post in the late 1700s, where their six sons began a large line of the ROYs in the St. Landry area.

Sources:  BRDR, 1b:97, 166-67, 2:655; West, Altas of LA Surnames, 132.

Second Family:

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

Third Family:

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1771

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Joseph-Marie ROY

Settled:  Pointe Coupée; Avoyelles

Comments:  Joseph-Marie ROY, son of Jean ROY and Angelique LACASSE of St. Villier, Canada, married first to Catherine GUEHO of Pointe Coupée, 29 January 1771, and second to Julie BIZETTE of Pointe Coupée, 22 June 1776.  In the 1790s, he and his family, including four sons, moved from Pointe Coupée northwest into the Avoyelles prairies.  Son Joseph, fils, born 18 July 1781 in Pointe Coupée, who married Marie BORDELON of Avoyelles c1800, produced a large line of ROYs in the Avoyelles area.  

Sources:  BRDR, 2:655; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 132-33.

Fourth Family:

Origin:  ?

Arrived in Louisiana:  1780s, 1790s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Augustin ROY, Étienne ROY

Settled:  Ouachita River Valley, northeastern Louisiana

Source:  West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 189n.

Additional comments:  Although many of the Louisiana ROYs were French Canadians, the family is listed here as Acadian.

 

ROYER

Pronuncation:  ROY-yay, roy-YAY

Origin:  French Canadian via Détroit & Kaskaskia, Illinois

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1777 & by 1794

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Louis ROYER?, Augustin ROYER

Settled:  La Prairie Basse, near Carencro, present-day Lafayette Parish

Acadian connection:  CORMIER, LANDRY, LEGER

Comments:  Augustin, fils, son of Augustin ROYER and Angélique PEPIN-LACHANCE of St. Jean, Île d'Orleans, Québec, married Dorothée, daughter of Jean-Baptiste DESGAGNIERE and Marie-Louise HULIN, in November 1765 at Kaskaskia, Illinois (they are also listed in church records as from Détroit).  Their son, Augustin III (often called Auguste in church records), was born at Kaskaskia in February 1771 and, probably after he came of age, moved to the lower Mississippi valley.  In October 1794, at age 23, Augustin III married Marie-Victoire, called Victoire, daughter of Michel CORMIER, père and his second wife Catherine STELLY of Prairie des Femmes, south of present-day Opelousas.  Augustin and Victoire settled near Carencro at the northern edge of the Attakapas District, where they raised a large family--daughters Victorie (born in 1795; married Samuel CARUTHERS in February 1816), Angèle (born in 1797), Marie Felonise (born in 1799, married Louis Valière LE BLANC in October 1818), Émilie (born in 1806), Marguerite (born in 1803, married Célestin CORMIER in May 1822), Marcellite (born in 1809, married Joseph TRAHAN in July 1826), and sons Augustin IV (born in 1811, married Caroline BOURG in September 1831), Victorin (born in 1813, married Marcellite BENOIT in February 1835), Samuel, sometimes called James (born in 1815, married Clémence or Clementine BENOIT in April 1836), and Onésime (born in 1817, married Christine RYAN in January 1837).  Augustin III died in January 1818 "at his home at La Prairie Basse," near Carencro, and was buried in the parish cemetery the next day; he was only 48 years old. 

Another ROYER, Louis, married Madeleine LANDRY and fathered two daughters, twins Marguerite and Marie, who were baptized at Opelousas in May 1777; however, the author has found no son from this union in the church records of the Opelousas area.  The ROYERs of South Louisiana, then, are likely descended from Augustin of Illinois.

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:211, 692-94, 1-B:638-39, 2-A:830-33, 2-B:823, 2-C:676, 3:572-73; Jerry Royer, descendant.

 

RYBISKI

Pronuncation:  ruh-BIZ-kee

Origin:  Polish Immigrant

Arrived in Louisiana:  1837

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Antoine Thomas RYBISKI

Settled:  New Orleans; Donaldsonville/White Castle area, Ascension Parish; St. James Parish

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  Antoine Thomas RYBISKI arrived in New Orleans from his native Poland in 1837.  He later settled in the Donaldsonville/White Castle area and "established a large sugar cane and pirique tobacco plantation....  His establishment was called 'Pape Vert.'  He also had a boat refurbishing business and," claims a descendant, erroneously, "was the largest slave owner in St. James Parish prior to the War Between the States."  A. T.'s son Pierre Caesar, called Caesar, fought throughout the War the Between the States in the Donaldsonville Artillery and surrendered with Lee's army at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia.  After the War, many of A. T. RYBISKI's former slaves settled in the Hahnville area of St. Charles Parish and retained the name "Robiski."  No record has been found of a RYBISKI intermarrying with an Acadian neighbor before the war.  In October 1866, however, A. T.'s son Bélisaire H. married Marie Cécile Lise, daughter of Acadian Ursin GAUDET, at the church in Donaldsonville. 

SourceBRDR, 10:227, 511; Menn, Large Slaveholders of LA, 1860, 120-24, 351-58, which does not list A. T. RYBISKI in either St. James or Ascension Parish; John Rybisky, descendant.

 

SAIZAN

Pronuncation:  SAY-zan

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

SANCHEZ

Pronuncation:  SAN-chez

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GUILLOT

Comments:

 

SANDOZ

Pronuncation:  SAN-doze

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

SARVANT

Pronuncation:  SAR-vanh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HEBERT

Comments:

 

SAUCIER

Pronuncation:  SAW-see-ay

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  1699

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jean-Baptiste SAUCIER

Settled:  Fort Maurepas, near present-day Biloxi, MS; Old Mobile, AL; New Orleans; Fort de Chartres, IL

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN

Comments:  Jean-Baptiste SAUCIER, son of Louis SAUCIER and Marguerite GAILLARD of St.-Eustache, Paris, France, was born at Sillery, Québec, in December 1674.  He served with Iberville in the Hudson Bay during King William's War in the 1690s and was one of Iberville's original Canadian recruits for the Gulf Coast expedition of 1699, which established the Louisiana colony.  Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Gabrielle SAVARIT or SAVARY, called Gabrielle, daughter of Pierre SAVARY and Jeanne FAUTISSE of St.-Denis Parish, Paris, France, at Old Mobile in 1704.  She was 20 years old when she came to Louisiana aboard the Pelican as one of the marriageable maidens of 1704.  Jean-Baptiste was awarded one of the largest plots of land at Old Mobile.  He and Gabrielle had five children, including four sons, all born at Mobile:  Henri, born c1706, Jean-Baptiste, fils, born November 1707, Jacques, born April 1710, and Francois, born c1712.  Jean-Baptiste, père, died c1715 at Mobile.  His widow remarried twice.  She was in New Orleans in 1726, where she was known as Madame SAVARY.  In 1731, SAUCIERs were granted land in New Orleans.  Gabrielle died at New Orleans in 1735.  Son Henri married Barbe LACROIX at Fort de Chartres, in the Illinois country, in November 1732, and died c1761.  Jean-Baptiste, fils, married Marie-Rose GIRARDY at New Orleans in April 1740; he died in June 1746 in Illinois.  Jacques died c1735.  Francois married Jeanne FONTAILLE at Mobile in November 1743, and died in February 1757 at Fort de Chartres, Illinois.    

Source:  <geocities.com/BourbonStreet/9630/saucier.html>.

 

SAVOIE/SAVOY

Pronunciation:  sah-VWAH, sah-VOY

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

SCHEXNAYDER

Pronunciation:  SHEX-ny-der

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS, PART

Comments:

 

SCHLATRE

Pronunciation:  schlay-tur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CLOUATRE, DUPUIS

Comments:

 

SEELY

Pronunciation:  SEE-lee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ORILLION

Comments:

 

SEGHERS

Pronunciation:  SEG-urs

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

SEGUIN

Pronunciation:  say-GWANH, say-GEEN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection: BOURQUE

Comments:

 

SEGURA

Pronunciation:  see-GHU-rah

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BROUSSARD, LANDRY, LEBLANC, PELLERIN

Comments:

 

SELLERS

Pronunciation:  SELL-urs

First Family: 

Origin:  Anglo Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1796

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Matthew SELLERS

Settled:  Attakapas District, present-day Lafayette Parish

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, AUCOIN, BOUDREAUX, BROUSSARD, DUHON, TRAHAN

Comments:  Matthew, son of Matthew SELLERS and Esther NEAL of the Charleston, South Carolina, area married Marie-Renée, called Renée, daughter of Acadians Alexandre AUCOIN and his second wife Élisabeth DUHON, at Attakapas, now St. Martinville, in February 1796, a week after he was baptized Catholic by the Attakapas priest (his godfather was Louis ARCENEAUX, and his godmother was Madeleine BREAUX, widow of Michel CORMIER, père, both from Carencro); Matthew, called Mathieu by his francophone neighbors, was 24 years old at the time of his baptism; his baptismal name was Louis-Mathieu.  Renée and her family had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, in November 1785 and settled in the Attakapas District; she was a native of the parish of St.-Similien, Nantes.  Mathieu and Renée settled on upper Bayou Vermilion, at the northern edge of the district.  Their first child, daughter Marie-Marcelline or Marcellite, was born at Vermilion in October 1796.  Renée gave Mathieu at least 10 sons:  Alexandre was born in April 1799, Louis in January 1802, Achille in April 1806, Pierre Chevalier in May 1809 but died at age 18 in December 1827, Jean Baptiste, called Jean, was born in 1811, Edmond in February 1814, Simon in January 1820 but died at age 4 1/2 in October 1824, and Norbert Félix was born in February 1826 but died at age 9 1/2 in October 1835.  They also had sons named Émile and Mathieu, fils.  Louis married Anastasie BOUDREAUX.  Achille married Adélaïde BROUSSARD in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in September 1823.  Alexandre married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Baptiste DUHON, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1825.  Edmond married Marguerite, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste SIMON, at the Vermilionville church in January 1834; Marguerite's mother was a TRAHAN.  Jean married Manette or Nanette Marguerite, teenage daughter of Robert BADON of St. Tammany Parish, at the Vermilionville church in January 1837.  Mathieu, fils married Marguerite Marcellite, daughter of Jean Baptiste TRAHAN, at the Vermilionville church in December 1838.  Émile married Marcellienne, daughter of François BOUDREAUX, at the Vermilionville church in February 1840.  Mathieu and Renée's daughters married into the TRAHAN and ARCENEAUX families.

The family's name also is spelled Celers, Celeurs, Cellers, Seleurs. 

Does this work for you, Bernard? 

Second Family:

Origin:  Anglo American

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1827

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  John SELLERS

Settled:  St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  none found

Comments:  John SELLERS of North Carolina married fellow Anglo American Mary JOHNSON or JOHNSTON of New York, widow of Pierre, called Peter, BERTEAU, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1827.  John's last will and testament was dated March 1832, and his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1835.  John probably was not kin to Matthew SELLERS of South Carolina. 

Most, if not all, of the SELLERS's of southwest Louisiana come from Matthew. 

Sources:  Hébert, Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4.

 

SEMERE

Pronunciation:  sih-MARE

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

SENETTE

Pronunciation:  SIN-et

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  PELLERIN

Comments:

 

SERRE

Pronunciation:  seh-RAY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON

Comments:

 

SERRETTE

Pronunciation:  seh-RET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DUPUIS

Comments:

 

SEVIN

Pronunciation:  say-vainh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ACHEE, BOURGEOIS, DUGAS, HÉBERT, LEBLANC, SAVOIE

Comments:

 

SHAFFER

Pronunciation:  SHAFF-ur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS

Comments:

 

SICARD

Pronunciation:  Sih-CARD

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  MARTIN

Comments:

 

SILVY

Pronunciation:  SILL-vee

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, BOUDREAUX

Comments:

 

SIMAR

Pronunciation:  SEE-mar

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1725

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Mathurin SIMARD

Settled:  New Orleans

Comments:  Mathurin SIMARD, son of Vincent SIMARD and Anne BRICOU of La Tremblade, Saintogne, France, was a sailor in the Company of the Indies when he married Anne VIGNODE (also listed as BRIGNATTE) on 24 July 1725 in New Orleans.  Their son Pierre was baptized at New Orleans in September 1731.  This family disappears from the church records after 1746, the year that Mathurin and Anne's daughter Marie-Thérèse was baptized at New Orleans.

Sources:  NOAR, 1:240.

Second Family:

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1788

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Louis SIMAR, fils

Settled:  La Pointe Noire, Opelousas District, present-day St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, TRAHAN

Comments:  Louis, fils, son of Louis SIMAR and Madeleine TREMBLE of Bay St. Paul, Canada, married Marie-Rose TRAHAN, daughter of Pierre TRAHAN and Marie-Rose BRASSEAUX, and widow of Jean-Baptiste DUPLECHAIN, in November 1788 in Opelousas.  They settled in the La Pointe Noire area of St. Landry.  ...

This family should not be confused with the SEMERs/SEMEREs of the Grande Pointe area of the Attakapas District, now St. Martin Parish, who were Acadians from Grand-Pré.

(RIP, Kathy, my sweet childhood friend.  Even after all these years, the memory still hurts.)

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:710, 2-A, 856. 

 

SIMON

Pronunciation:  SEE-monh, SIGH-mun

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  November 1785

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Jean-Baptiste SIMON

Settled:  Attakapas District, now Lafayette Parish

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BOUDREAUX, BROUSSARD, CORMIER, GRANGER, HÉBERT, LANDRY, LEGER, TRAHAN, VINCENT

Comments:  Jean-Baptiste, son of René SIMON and Sébastienne MONNIER, was born and baptized at Rennes, Brittany, France, in November 1763; he was called Jean in his baptismal record.  René, son of Mace SIMON and Olive GRARNDJOUAN, and Sébastienne, daughter of Julien MONNIER and Michelle BAZIN, had married at Hédé, north of Rennes, the previous February, so Jean-Baptiste probably was their first child.  In 1785, when he was 21, Jean-Baptiste may have been living and working at the port city of Nantes, or he may have been a crewman aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships that took the Acadians in France to Louisiana. 

One of those Acadians was Élisabeth, daughter of  Jean-Baptiste DUHON and Madeleine VINCENT, and the second wife and widow of Alexandre AUCOIN of Cobeguit, Acadia.  Élisabeth was a native of Rivière-aux-Canards, in the Minas Basin of Acadia.  She had been deported with her family to Virginia in 1755 when she was only 12, followed them to England in 1756, and married Alexandre, son of Alexis AUCOIN and Anne-Marie BOURG and a widower, at Liverpool in October 1759; Élisabeth was only 16 when she married; Alexandre was old enough to be her father.  (Alexandre had married his first wife, Marie TRAHAN of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Grand-Pré, Acadia, in 1753 and settled at Rivière-aux-Canards; they and a daughter, Marie-Josèphe or -Joséphine, had been deported to Virginia in the fall of 1755.  Marie was among the dozens of Acadians who died aboard the transport ships in Virginia while waiting for the colonial authorities to determine their fate; she died in February 1756, only a month before Governor Dinwiddie and the General Assembly sent the surviving Acadians on to England in March.)  Élisabeth DUHON gave Alexandre another daughter, Anne-Marie, at Liverpool in July 1761.  The family was repatriated to France in May 1763, arriving at the port of Morlaix.  Daughter Geneviève was born at Morlaix in June 1765.  Later that year, they followed other Acadians repatriated from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southern coast of Brittany, in hopes of starting a new life there.  They were living at Loquetoe, near Sauzon, in November 1765.  Four more daughters were born to them on the island:  Marie-Madeleine in January 1766, Marie-Félicité in February 1770, Élisabeth-Josèphe in June 1772, and Anne-Augustine in July 1775.  They left the island soon after Anne-Augustine's birth and moved to the port city of Nantes, where another daughter was born to them:  Marie-Renée in November 1778.  Alexandre died at Nantes, age 55, in October 1780.  Alexandre's oldest daughter, Marie-Joséphine, by his first wife, died at Nantes a month after her father passed; she was only 28 years old and evidently had not married.  Élisabeth now was left with seven young daughters ranging in age from 19 to 1 1/2.  In September 1784, a French official found them still at Nantes and placed them on a list of Acadians in France who desired to emigrate to Spanish Louisiana. 

Élisabeth and her seven daughters--their ages now ranging from 24 to 6--boarded the ship L'Amitié, a 400-ton frigate, at Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, in late August 1785; they were family number 71 on the ship's passenger list.  They reached New Orleans 80 days later, in early November; their vessel was the fifth of the Seven Ships to reach Louisiana.   Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, was 17 and her mother's third daughter when she made the voyage.  Also aboard the ship, either as a crewman or a stowaway passenger, was 22-year-old Jean-Baptiste SIMON of Rennes, Brittany.  Jean-Baptiste may have met Madeleine and her family at Nantes before they left for Louisiana and stowed away aboard the ship to be with his beloved Acadienne, he may have signed up as a crewman to be with her, or he may have been a crewman aboard L'Amitié when he first laid eyes on her (after L'Amitié reached Louisiana, Spanish officials, calling him Juan Bautista SIMON, placed him on a list entitled "Names with no reference on the Embarkation list," which hints strongly that Jean-Baptiste was a stowaway).  No matter, by the time they reached Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine were betrothed to one another.  They married at New Orleans in November 1785, only five days after they reached the city.  The Spanish gave the young couple an axe, a shovel, a hatchet, and two hoes to begin their new life in the colony.  If Jean-Baptiste had not been a farmer in France, he soon would become one in Louisiana. 

Most of their fellow passengers chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche, but Jean-Baptiste and Madeline followed her mother to the Attakapas District, where Élisabeth DUHON probably had relatives.  Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine settled on upper Bayou Vermilion at Coulée dite d'Argeau, or Coulee Hargroder, and wasted no time starting a family of their own:  Charles was born in mid-May 1786, six months after their marriage, so he probably was conceived the previous August, either before or soon after L'Amitié left France (strong evidence for Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine having known one another before the ship left Paimboeuf and for Jean-Baptiste's status as a stowaway); Marie-Felonise was born in November 1795, Béloni in October 1797, Marie Eurasie in December 1799, Éloi in March 1802, Isabelle or Élisabeth in July 1804, and Marguerite in May 1807.  Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine also had sons named Jean-Baptiste, fils and Louis.  Jean Baptiste, père's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in January 1823; he would have turned 60 years old that year.  Since this succession record is dated years before his death, it probably was filed at the time because Jean-Baptiste, sadly, was about to become a widower.  Madeleine died two months later, in March 1823; the Vermilionville priest who recorded her burial said that she died at age 50, but she was 55; hers was one of the earliest burials at the new Vermilionville parish church, now the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in present-day Lafayette.  Jean Baptiste did not remarry.  He died in Lafayette Parish in November 1836, age 73.  He probably was buried next to Madeleine beside the Vermilionville church. 

All five of their sons and their four daughters married Acadians and settled in what became Lafayette Parish.  Most of their grandchildren also married Acadians: 

Marie-Felonise married into the HÉBERT family.  Marie-Eurasie married a BROUSSARD.  Élisabeth and Marguerite married BOUDREAUX brothers whose sisters married brothers Béloni and Éloi. 

Charles married Madeleine, called Hélène, daughter of Acadian Jean Baptiste GRANGER and Susanne CORMIER of Côte Gelée, in what was then St. Martin Parish in June 1807.  Joséphine was born on the Vermilion in January 1808 but died the following September, Charles, fils was born in May 1809, Rosémond in May 1811 but died in April 1812, Augustin Treville was born in December 1812, Marie Uranie, called Uranie, in January 1815, Louis Valsin, also called Silvain, in March 1817 but died at age 10 1/2 in January 1828, Françoise Fanelie was born in December 1818, Marguerite in August 1823 but died in October 1824, and Carmelite was born in December 1825.  Uranie and Françoise married MEAUX brothers whose mother was a BROUSSARD.  Charles, fils married Caroline, daughter of Acadian Julien LEGER, in October 1831; Caroline's mother was a DUHON.  Augustin Treville married cousin Arsène, another daughter of Acadian Julien LEGER, in October 1839.  ...

Jean Baptiste, fils married Françoise, daughter of Acadian Jean Baptiste TRAHAN of Liverpool, England, and Vermilion, in St. Martin Parish in November 1810.  Jean Baptiste III was born in March 1812, and Marie Marguerite in November 1813.  Françoise died in May 1816, and Jean Baptiste, fils remarried to Céleste or Célestine, natural daughter of Hélène GRANGER, his sister-in-law (who evidently gave birth to Célestine before she married Jean Baptiste, fils's older brother Charles), in April 1817.  A son, name unrecorded, died at age 6 weeks in January 1818, Joseph Aventin was born in February 1819, Célestine in October 1820, Lessin in December 1822, Euclide in April 1826, Oliva in June 1828, and Norbert was baptized at age 1 1/2 months in October 1830.  Jean Baptiste III married Marie Cidalise, daughter of Acadian Cyrlle LANDRY, in November 1830.  Joseph Aventin married Marie, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean GARRYO, in January 1840.  Lessin married St. Claire, another daughter of Cyrille LANDRY, in January 1840.  Marguerite married a SELLERS.  ...

Louis married Marie Louise, another daughter of Jean Baptiste TRAHAN, in August 1811.  Louis, fils was born in October 1812,  a son, name unrecorded, died at age 9 days in April 1814, Marie Cidalise was born in June 1815, Edmond in October 1817, Édouard in December 1819, Eugène in January 1822, Désiré in February 1824, Eugènie was baptized at age 4 1/2 months in May 1826, and a son, name unrecorded, died at age 30 hours in April 1828.  Louis, fils married cousin Scholastique, yet another daughter of Acadian Julien LEGER.  ...

Béloni married Pélagie, daughter of Acadian Joseph BOUDREAUX of Vermilion, in July 1817.  Béloni, fils was born in January 1819, Alexandre in June 1822, Azéma in December 1826, Clémine in February 1828, and Simon was baptized at age 5 months in July 1830.  Alexandre married Marie Reiné, daughter of Acadian Pierre TRAHAN, in July 1840.  ...

Éloi married Adélaïde, another daughter of Joseph BOUDREAUX, in January 1821.  Adèle was born in September 1822.  Joseph was born in October 1824, Éloi, fils was baptized at age 4 months in July 1826 but died at age 4 1/2 in September 1830, Estelle was baptized at age 2 months in April 1828, and Edmond le jeune was born in September 1829.  Adèle married a VINCENT.  ...

Sources:  BRDR, vol. 1b; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 554; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 83, 84; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3; NOAR, 4:288; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 2-3; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 501; Greg Simon, descendant. 

Arsenault, Généalogie, 2592-93, the LA section, calls him Jean-Baptiste SIMON, & insists, erroneously, that his father René was vraisemblablement son of Pierre SIMON dit Boucher & Marie PINET of Port-Royal, that, in other words, Jean-Baptiste was an Acadian SIMON.  Arsenault, p. 2592, says that René married Sébastienne MONNIER in c1754 but gives no place of marriage & that they were Acadian refugees in France.  However, René & Sébastienne's marriage record, cited in Father Hébert's Southwest LA Records, 1-A:712 (Archives Departemental d'Ille-et-Vilaine, Rennes, France, & taken from descendant Mertie Simon Melançon's SIMON family history), shows that René & Sébastienne were married at Hédé, Brittany, in Feb 1763, the year of Jean-Baptiste's birth, & that René's parents were not Acadian SIMONs.  Arsenault, p. 2593, also says Jean-Baptiste & Madeleine married at St. Martinville, but their marriage record in NOAR, vol. 4, shows clearly that they were wed at New Orleans before they moved on to the Attakapas District. 

 

SIMONEAUX

Pronuncation:  SIM-uh-noh

Origin:  French Creole ... Lorraine

Arrived in Louisiana:  September 1766

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  François, Joseph, René dit Simon, and Alexis SIMONEAU

Settled:  St. James Parish; Assumption Parish; St. Martin Parish; St. Landry Parish

Acadian connection:  BOURG, BREAUX, CORMIER, CORPORON, DAIGLE, HÉBERT, LANDRY, LEBLANC

Comments:  Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault claims that the François SIMONEAU who emigrated to Louisiana was a SIMON from Acadia.  According to Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White, however, François was not an Acadian SIMON, and there is no evidence that François SIMONEAU ever lived in greater Acadia.  He was born in the Lorraine region of France in c1728 and married Marie-Osite-Anne, daughter of Martin CORPORON and his second wife Marie-Josèphe VIGER of Annapolis Royal, probably in Maryland in c1759.  When he got to Maryland is anyone's guess.  In July 1763, British authorities counted François and his family at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore; the British recorder called his wife Anne and listed three sons for the couple:  Joseph, who had been born probably in Maryland in c1760, Jacques, birth date unknown, and René dit Simon, born in Maryland in c1762.  In c1765 the couple, still in Maryland, had a daughter, Marguerite.  

François, Marie-Osite-Anne, and their children were among the first families in Maryland to seek refuge in Louisiana.  They left the British colony in late June 1766 and reached New Orleans via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in October.  Son Jacques did not go to Louisiana with them, so he probably had died before they departed, or he may have died aboard ship on the way to Louisiana.  Another son, Alexis, was born to them on the voyage over, in August 1766.    

The family settled first in the Acadian community of Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, now St. James Parish, on the river above New Orleans, where they were counted in the 1769 census.  François and his family occupied lot number 129 in the settlement, held six arpents of frontage on the left, or east, bank of the Mississippi River, had no slaves and no horses, which was typical of Acadians on the river at that time, but they did have 7 cattle, 18 pigs, and a musket.  At Cabanocé, Marie gave François another son, Maurice, born in early 1769.  In the 1770s, the family drifted upriver to the Acadian community of Ascension, where Marie gave François two more daughters--Marie, born in c1774, and Françoise-Apolline in c1776.  François also acquired a slave at Ascension, who was first counted with the family in 1777.  François died at Ascension in July 1791; he was 63 years old.  

Meanwhile, François's second son René, often called by his dit, Simon, married Isabelle-Luce, daughter of Acadian Alexandre DAIGLE, at Ascension in April 1786.  On the same day, René dit Simon's sister Marguerite married Isabelle-Luce's brother Jean-Baptiste at Ascension.  René dit Simon married twice more, to Élisabeth/Isabelle, daughter of Acadian Honoré BREAUX, at Assumption in February 1793, and to widow Rosalie HÉBERT at Assumption in December 1802.  Five days after his younger brother René dit Simon married for the first time, Joseph married Acadian Madeleine BOURG at Ascension in April 1786.  Their younger sister Marie married Acadian Joseph-François CHIASSON at Ascension in July 1789.  Marie died by January 1797, when her husband remarried.

In the early 1790s, Joseph, René dit Simon, Marguerite, Marie, and their families left Ascension and moved down the valley of Bayou Lafourche into what is now Assumption Parish, where they set down deep roots.  By the early 1800s, a few of their children and grandchildren moved farther down the valley into present-day Lafourche Parish and into the Terrebonne country as well.  In April 1857, Joseph Martin SIMONEAUX, grandson of René dit Simon, married Acadian Seraline DAIGLE at Brashear City, now Morgan City, on the lower Atchafalaya River.  

François's son Alexis married a French Creole, Josete, daughter of Antoine PATIN of Pointe Coupée, in January 1792.  Alexis and Josete probably remained in Pointe Coupée, a French Creole community upriver from Ascension where few Acadians settled.  

François's youngest daughter Françoise-Apolline, called Apolline, born at Ascension, also married a non-Acadian.  In October 1793, at Assumption, she married Francisco PLACENCIA, a native of La Gomera in the Canary Islands.  In subsequent decades, Francisco's Isleño surname was gallicized to PLAISANCE.  This family, too, remained at Assumption.

François's youngest son, Maurice, born at St.-Jacques, married Hélène-Geneviève, daughter of Acadian François LANDRY, at Ascension in February 1800.  He remained at Ascension for a time and then followed his siblings to Assumption.  

Maurice's son Simon, called Simonet to distinguish him from uncle René dit Simon and a cousin also named Simon, was born at Ascension in early 1809.  He was the first SIMONEAUX to leave the Lafourche valley and move west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  In April 1844, he married Acadian Azélie LEBLANC at Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish.  Seven years later, he remarried to Mélanie, daughter of Pierre CORMIER of Carencro in Lafayette Parish (the author's paternal great-great grandfather; Marie Euphémie, Simonet SIMONEAUXs daughter by his first wife, was my great-grandfather Joachim CORMIER's first wife, which means Joachim married his step-niece, who was 16 at the time of their marriage in August 1865; he was 33).  But most of the descendants of François SIMONEAUX remained in the Lafourche Valley, where they can be found in abundance today.

The family's name also is spelled Simonaux, Simoneau, Simoneaud, Simonet, Simonneau, Simonos.  

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 800-02, 2592-93; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vol. 1; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 4, 5, 6, 7; White, DGFA-1, 1469-72; White, DGFA-1 English, 309; Lonnie Raffray, descendant.  

 

SMITH

Pronunciation:  SMITH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURQUE, BRASSEAUX, LEJEUNE, ROBICHAUX, SAVOIE

Comments:

 

SOILEAU

Pronunciation:  SWAH-loh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BENOIT, PITRE, RICHARD

Comments:

 

SONNIER

Pronunciation:  SAHN-yay

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

ST. AMANT

Pronunciation:  SAIN-uh-monh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN

Comments:

 

ST. CYR/CIRE

Pronunciation:  sain-SEAR, SEAR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN, BERGERON, BROUSSARD

Comments:

 

ST. GERMAIN

Pronunciation:  SAIN-jher-MANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ACHEE, BERGERON

Comments:

 

ST. JULIEN

Pronunciation:  SAIN-joo-lee-ANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BROUSSARD, LEBLANC, PELLERIN, RICHARD

Comments:

 

ST. MARTIN

Pronunciation:  SAIN-mar-TANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

ST. PIERRE

Pronunciation:  SAIN-pee-YAIR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  COMEAUX, DOIRON, MARTIN

Comments:

 

STANSBERRY/STANSBURY

Pronunciation:  STANS-berry, STANS-bury

Origin:   

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian Connection:  BERGERON

Comments:

 

STELLY

Pronunciation:  STELL-ee

First Family:

Origin:  German Creole ... Albershausen, Wurtemberg, Germany

Arrived in Louisiana:  1730s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Johann/Jean Georges STAYLI

Settled:  German Coast, Opelousas District

Acadian connection:  BABINEAUX, CORMIER

Sources:  NOAR, vol. 1; Robichaux, German Coast Families, 329-32; Ethel "Jean" Granger Stelly, descendant.

Second Family: 

Origin:  French Canadian  ...  Montréal

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1790s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana: Amable STELLY

Settled:  Assumption Parish

Acadian Connection:  HAMON

Source:  BRDR, 2:352, 681. 

 

STEPHEN

Pronunciation:  STEEV-un

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, BOUDREAUX, BOURGEOIS, BROUSSARD, HÉBERT, LANDRY, PART

Comments:  The name also is spelled Estevan, Esteve, Estivan, Estiven, Estivene, Estivenere, Estivenne, Steven, Stievan, Stieven, Stievin, Stiphen, Stivene, Stivenne, Stivine, but the church records tend to favor Stiven

Source:  Hébert, D., South LA Records; <www.estiven.com>.

 

STILLE

Pronunciation:  STILL

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LEGER

Comments:

 

STOUFLE

Pronunciation:  STOO-ful

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS

Comments:

 

SUAREZ

Pronunciation:  SWAW-rez

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, DOIRON, LANDRY

Comments:

 

SUIRE

Pronunciation:  SWEER

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CLOUÂTRE

Comments:

 

SUTTER

Pronunciation:  SUT-ur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CORMIER

Comments:

 

SYLVESTRE

Pronunciation:  sill-VEST-ter

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN

Comments:

 

TABOR

Pronunciation:  TAY-bur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BENOIT, GAUDIN

Comments:

 

TALBOT

Pronunciation:  TAL-but

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

TASSIN

Pronunciation:  TAH-sanh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, BOURGEOIS

Comments:

 

TATE

Pronunciation:  TATE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  PITRE

Comments:

 

TAUZIN

Pronunciation:  TOE-zanh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BENOIT, BOURGEOIS, GUILLOT

Comments:

 

TAYLOR

Pronunciation:  TAY-ler

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUTIN, BROUSSARD, HENRY, LEGER, PREJEAN, SAVOIE

Comments:

 

TEMPLET

Pronunciation:  tonh-PLAY

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

TERREBONNE

Pronunciation:  TAIR-bawn

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX, BOURGEOIS, DUGAS, GUIDRY, LEBLANC, PITRE, THERIOT

Comments:

 

TERTRON

Pronunciation:  TUR-tronh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BROUSSARD, CORMIER

Comments:

 

THÉRIOT

Pronunciation:  TAY-ree-oh, TAIR-ee-oh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

THIBEAUX

Pronunciation:  TEE-bow

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOUDREAUX, DUPUIS, HÉBERT

Comments:

 

THIBODEAUX

Pronunciation:  TIB-uh-doh

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

TIRCUIT

Pronunciation:  TER-kit

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURGEOIS, MICHEL, PART

Comments:

 

TOFFIER

Pronunciation:  TOE-fee-ay

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

Sources:  Pam Toffier Skinner, descendant

 

TOUCHET

Pronunciation:  TOO-shet

Origin:  Bohemian German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1742

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Hans Jacob TUTZEK

Settled:  First German Coast, present-day St. Charles Parish; L'Île des Cypres, or Cypress Island, Attakapas District, present-day St. Martin Parish; Vermilion River valley, present-day Vermilion Parish

Acadian connection:  COMEAUX, CORMIER, GUIDRY, THIBODEAUX

Comments:  Hans Jacob, also called Jean-Jacob or Jacques, son of Wenseslaus TUTZEK & Dorothea ______ of Prague, Bohemia, present-day Czech Republic, married Barbe ACKERMAN or VAGENSPACHE, at St.-Charles des Allemands, on the Lower German Coast, in January 1742.  Six years later, his wife having died, Jean-Jacob remarried to Anne-Barbe, daughter of German Creoles Jacob FOLTZ and Catherine BENICK, at St.-Charles des Allemands in July 1748.  Jean-Jacob & Anne-Barbe had two sons, Jean-Jacques, called Jacques, born probably at New Orleans in February 1752, and Georges at St.-Charles des Allemands in April 1754.  Jacques married Marie, daughter of Simon GASPARD of St.-Charles des Allemands and Marie LUQUE of Alabama, and moved to the Attakapas District probably in the 1780s, where their four sons were born:  Jacob in September 1792, Michel in February 1795, Frédéric in July 1799, and Joseph in December 1801.  Jacques died at Attakapas in August 1802, age 50.  Jacques's younger brother Georges followed his brother across the Atchafalaya Basin and married Marie-Madeleine, called Lise or Lisette, daughter of Jacques FAUSTIN and François VIEN of Illinois, at Attakapas in January 1785.  Georges and Marie-Madeleine had three sons, all born at Attakapas:  Georges, fils in April 1786, François in October 1789, and Ursin in c1793.  Both brothers and their families settled at L'Île des Cypres, south of present-day Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, near present-day Lake Martin.  

The family's name also was spelled TOUCHEK, TOUTCHEC, TOUTCHECK, TOUTCHEQUE, TUTCHEC, and TUTCHET, and was gallicized into TOUCHET.  

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:760-61, 1-B:705-06, 2-A:921-24; NOAR, 1:252, 2:270-71; Russell James Touchet, Sr., descendant & life-long friend.

 

TOUPS

Pronunciation:  TOOPS

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, BERGERON, BERNARD, BOUDREAUX, BOURGEOIS, DAVID, HÉBERT, PART, PITRE, RIVET, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

TRAHAN

Pronunication:  TRAH-honh in Louisiana, TRAY-han in Texas

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

TREGLE

Pronunciation:  TREG

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DUGAS, GUILLOT

Comments:

 

TRICHE

Pronunciation:  TRISH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LANDRY

Comments:

 

TRIMBLE

Pronunciation:  TRIM-bull

Origin:  ?

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1831

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Robert C. TRIMBLE

Settled:  St. Mary Parish

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:  Robert C. TRIMBLE married Rosalie HEBERT on 1 January 1831 in St. Mary Parish.  Two of their sons, Robert, born at Charenton in September 1831, and Felix Houston, born at New Iberia in November 1838, served in the War Between the States as part of the Lovell Scouts Company Cavalry, later Company I, 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Cavalry.  Felix H. took the oath of allegiance to the U.S. government in May 1862 after being captured in St. Mary Parish by Federal forces, but his older brother Robert, captured by the Yankees in the battle along Bayou Teche the month before, did not take the oath and served honorably.  Recently (November 2007), Robert TRIMBLE's UCV marker was "found on a roadside among a pile of rubble near an abandoned house" near Jeanerette.  Attempts are being made to find the cemetery where he rests so that his marker can be returned to its proper place.  

The family's name sometimes is spelled Tremble and Trim.

Sources:  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 3:330, 640; Jacob Belmer, descendant. 

 

TROSCLAIR

Pronunciation:  troh-sclair, trahs-clair, troe-sclair

Origin:  German Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  early 1720s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Johann Georg TROXLER

Settled:  Lower German Coast, present-day St. Charles Parish; St. James Parish; Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BOUDREAUX, DOIRON, DOUCET, HÉBERT, LANDRY, NAQUIN

Comments:  Johann Georg, called Georg, son of Joannis, called Jost, TROXLER and Barbe FALLERIN of Lichtenberg, Alsace, born in c1698, married Marie Madeleine, daughter of Jean HAUSER of Lautenbourg, at Phalsbourg, Alsace, in August 1720.  They came to Louisiana before 1724 and settled on the German Coast.  Georg was a mason and a farmer and held two slaves by 1727.  He remarried to Marie-Agnès, called Agnès, LAY in the 1730s and died on the German Coast in either October or November 1759, in his early 60s.  His descendants moved upriver to the Acadian Coast and down into the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, where they married Acadians. ...

The family's name also is spelled Stroscler, Strosker, Trocher, Troscler, Trostler, Troucheler, Trousler, and eventually was gallicized into TROSCLAIR. 

Sources:  NOAR, 1:259; Robichaux, German Coast Families, 345-48.

 

TRUXILLO

Pronunciation:  trucks-ill-oh

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BARRILLEAUX, LANDRY

Comments:

 

TUILLIER/TULLIER

Pronunciation:  too-ILL-ee-ay, TOO-lee-aye

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ALLAIN, DAIGLE, TRAHAN

Comments:

 

USÉ

Pronunciation:  yoo-SAY

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

VALLOT

Pronunciation:  VAL-ot, val-OH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GUILBEAU

Comments:

 

VALOIS

Pronunciation:  val-WAH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DUBOIS

Comments:

 

VANNOY

Pronunciation:  va-NOY

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

VASSEUR

Pronunciation:  vah-SORE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  CORMIER, DUHON, RICHARD

Comments:

 

VAVASSEUR

Pronunciation:  vah-vah-SORE

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  ARCENEAUX, MOUTON

Comments:

 

VENABLE

Pronunciation:  VEN-uh-bull

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  SAVOIE

Comments:

 

VERRET

Pronunication:  veh-RET

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BABIN, BOURG, BRASSEAUX, BUJOLE, HÉBERT, LANDRY, ROBICHAUX

Comments:

 

VIATOR

Pronunciation:  VEE-uh-tar, VEYE-uh-tar

Origin:  Spanish Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURQUE, HÉBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

VICKNAIR

Pronunciation:  vick-NAIR

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BOURG, PITRE

Comments:

 

VIDRINE

Pronunciation:  vih-DREEN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, PITRE

Comments:

 

VIGÉ

Pronunciation:  vee-ZHAY

First Family:

Origin:  French Creole

Arrived in Louisiana:  1720s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Louis VIGER

Settled:  New Orleans

Comments:  Louis, son of Denis VIGER and Catherine MOLIER, married Marianne, daughter of Pierre GIRODON and Marie DOVAME, at New Orleans in March 1722.  (New Orleans was founded by Bienville in 1718.  Its church parish, St.-Louis, was established in 1719.  But it did not become the capital of French Louisiana until August 1722.  Louis and Marianne's marriage, then, was among the earliest perfomed in the "city.")  Their son Pierre-Louis was buried at New Orleans in October 1725, age unrecorded.  Son Joseph was born at New Orleans in October 1729, and daughter Joachime-Geneviève, called Geneviève, in March 1732.  Geneviève married first to Jacques HERRIER, a "royal cooper," and then to Pierre-Joseph, son of Pierre-François HANCART and Jeanne-Thérèse DAMBRESSIS of the Parish of Rancee, Diocese of Liege,, at New Orleans in June 1761; Pierre-Joseph was a "soldier in the company of BENOIT" at the time of the marriage.  Evidently Louis's son Joseph did not create a family of hiw own

Sources:  NOAR, vols. 1, 2; Paula Thornton for proper pronunciation

Second Family: 

Origin:  French Canadian

Arrived in Louisiana:  by 1770s

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:  Henry-Charles VIGÉ

Settled:  New Orleans; Opelousas District, St. Landry Parish; St. Gabriel, Plaquemine, Iberville Parish

Comments:  Henry-Charles, called Charles, son of Charles VIGÉ and Marguerite LEFEBVRE, born at Montréal, Canada, in c1732, married Catherine, daughter of Antoine CATOIRE and Marie-Catherine CULERET, date unrecorded.  Their son Henry was born in October 1775 and baptized at the St.-Louis church, New Orleans, in late November.  An Enrique, or Henry, son of Henrique VIGÉ and Marie VIGÉ, born in Gemes, Germany, in c1742, described as a soldier "of the sixth company of the first battalion of the stationary regiment of the province of Louisiana," died at New Orleans in December 1787, age 45.  The priest who recorded the soldier's burial noted that Enrique was still a "bachelor" at the time of his death.  One might assume that a dozen years earlier the soldier had fathered a "natural" son by Catherine CATOIRE, but South Louisiana church records are clear:  Henry Charles, called Charles, VIGÉ the Canadian and Enrique VIGÉ the German-born soldier were two different men. 

Sometime after son Henry's birth, Charles and Catherine left the city and settled in the Opelousas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Charles-Julien was born there in April 1777; Félicité in October 1779; Marie-Louise, called Lise, was baptized at age 5 months in September 1782; Jean-Baptiste-François, called François, was born in April 1784; Pierre-René in July 1787; Marie-Catherine, called Catherine, in September 1788; Luc in October 1792; Céleste in December 1794; Euphrosine was formally baptized in October 1797; and a second Céleste was baptized at age 4 1/2 years in May 1806 but died at age 8 in October 1809.  They also had a daughter named Symphorose.  Henry's oldest daughter Félicité married François of Pointe Coupée, son of Jean FRANCHEBOIS and Louise L'AGEE of Manchac, at Opelousas in September 1796.  Henry's daughter Lise married Augustin, son of French Creoles Pierre DOUCET, fils and Thérèse BRIGNAC, at Opelousas in September 1804.  Charles's oldest daughter Catherine married Charles, son of Acadians François PITRE and Marie THIBODEAUX, at Opelousas in July 1805.  Charles's fourth son Pierre-René married Julie Eleonore, daughter of Acadians Jean Baptiste AUCOIN and Marie FORET of St.-Malo, France, and Bayou des Écores, at Opelousas in January 1810.  Their son Pierre, fils was baptized at age 4 months in April 1812, Jean Baptiste Charles was born in August 1813, Evariste in May 1815, Marie in September 1817, and Constance in September 1819.  Charles's daughter Symphorose married Pierre, fils, son of Acadian Pierre PITRE and his French-Creole wife Marie-Françoise FONTENOT, at Opelousas in June 1813.  Charles, who the Opelousas priest described as "originally from Monreal[sic] in Canada; an old inhabitant of this parish," died in St. Landry Parish in February 1816, "at age about 84 years," and was buried in the parish cemetery The priest noted that Charles "died from the infirmities of age and received all the sacraments."  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in September 1819.  Henry's daughter Marguerite Elise, born on the river, married Joseph Pierre, son of Pierre PITRE and Marie-Françoise FONTENOT and widower of Marguerite JUBERT, at Opelousas in May 1820.  Charles's daughter Euphrosine married Félix, son of Acadian Jean-Baptiste-Pierre, called Pierre, BREAUX of Minas and Maryland and his Creole wife Marguerite DARDENNE of Iberville Parish, at Opelousas in December 1820; Félix was a brother of Euphrosine's oldest brother Henry's wife Marie-Louise.  Henry's daughter Marie Eulalie, born on the river, married Léon, fils, son of Léon LEPAGE and Félicité PICARD of Illinois, at Opelousas in December 1825.  Charles's third son François, at age 41, married Azelie, daughter of Acadian Pierre FORET and his French-Creole wife Françoise FONTENOT, at Opelousas in December 1825; one wonders if this was François's first marriage; the Opelousas priest who recorded his marriage said only that he was a "major son" of his parents.  Daughter Marie Louise Zelima was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1827, Célestine in September 1828, and Sidonie Previne in August 1830.  Meanwhile, Charles's fourth son Pierre-René evidently remarried to Céleste FAVRON.  Their daughter Céleste was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1827, and Zelima in November 1810.  Henry's daughter Marie Adèle, born on the river, married Louis, fils, son of Acadian Louis PITRE and his French-Canadian wife Angélique BERTRAND, at Opelousas in January 1829.  ...

Meanwhile, Charles's oldest son Henry left the prairies and married Marie-Louise, daughter of Pierre BREAUX and Marguerite DARDENNE, at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans in August 1798.  Félicité Célesie, called Célesie, was born at St. Gabriel in April 1804, Henry, fils in January 1806, Marie Eulalie in January 1808, Charles in November 1809, Marie Adèle in December 1811, and Pierre-Jean-Baptiste in December 1815.  They also had a daughter named Marguerite Elise.  Sometime in the late 1810s, perhaps following the death of his father, Henry returned to the old Opelousas District and settled near his kinsmen.  Onésime Fereol was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1818, Marie in Clementine in November 1819, and Félix Adolphe in September 1822.  Henry's oldest daughter Félicité Célesie married Pierre, son of French Canadian Amable BERTRAND and his Acadian wife Anastasie AUCOIN, at Opelousas in July 1819.  Henry died probably in St. Landry Parish before June 1837.  His third son Pierre Jean Baptiste left the prairies and married double cousin Marie Mathelie or Mathise, daughter of Maximilien CATOIRE and his Acadian wife Marie Françoise BREAUX, at St. Gabriel in June 1837.  They remained at St. Gabriel.  Pierre-Jean-Baptiste, fils was born in September 1836, Pierre Ravoli in May 1837, Marie Pacalia in April 1840, Maximilien in March 1843, and Henry III in September 1848.  Henry's youngest son Félix Adolphe, born in St. Landry Parish in 1822, also left the prairies for the river after he came of age.  Older brother Pierre Jean Baptiste was still living at St. Gabriel on the east bank of the river, but Félix Adolphe chose to settle elsewhere.  He married Marie Lesida CHENEVERT in a civil ceremony probably in Iberville Parish in the early 1840s and settled near Plaquemine on the west bank of the river but still in Iberville Parish.  Félix Adolphe, fils was born in April 1842, Marie Lesida in June 1843, Marie Alexandrine in April 1847, and Marie Ophelia in June 1850.  ...

Sources:  BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 5(rev.), 6, 7; Hébert, Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C; NOAR, vols. 3, 4. 

General Comments:  The family's name also is spelled Vieget, Viget, Vigier.

There was a VIGER family in Acadia, none of whose members emigrated to Louisiana.  See Books One & Three.  As South Louisiana church records reveal, the VIGER/VIGÉs of South Louisiana are French Canadian, not Acadian. 

Acadian connection:  AUCOIN, BREAUX, FORET, PITRE, THIBODEAUX

 

VIGNES

Pronunciation:  VEEN

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

Sources:  Jean Vignes

 

VILLANEUVA/VILLENEUVE

Pronunciation:  vill-ah-NOO-vah, vill-ah-NOOVE, vill-nerve

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BABIN, GAUDIN, LANDRY

Comments:

 

VINCENT

Pronunication:  VANH-sonh, VIN-cent

Origin:  Acadian  [see Family History]

 

VIVES

Pronunciation:  VEEVES, vee-VESS

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:   BUJOLE, LANDRY

Comments:

 

VOISIN

Pronunciation:  vwah-SANH

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:   BABIN

Comments:

 

VOORHIES

Pronunciation:  Vore-EES

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  DOUCET, HÉBERT, MOUTON

Comments:

 

WAGUESPACK

Pronunciation:  wag-is-pack

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  GAUDET, GAUTREAUX, THIBODEAUX

Comments:

 

WEBRE

Pronunciation:  WEBB-ur

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERNARD, CORMIER, DAIGLE, HÉBERT, ROGER

Comments:

 

WILTZ

Pronunciation:  WILTZ

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BERGERON, BROUSSARD, LEBLANC, MELANÇON, THERIOT

Comments:

 

WYBLE

Pronunciation:  WIB-uhl

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  LEGER, ROY

Comments:

 

YOUNG

Pronunciation:  YUNG

Origin:  Acadian (LEJEUNE)

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT

Comments:

 

ZERINGUE

Pronunciation:  zeh-RANG

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  HÉBERT, LANDRY

Comments:

 

ZIMMERMAN

Pronunciation:  ZIM-er-mun

Origin:  

Arrived in Louisiana:

Pioneer Ancestor(s) in Louisiana:

Settled:

Acadian connection:  BLANCHARD

Comments:

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Copyright (c) 2001-17  Steven A. Cormier