APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

DAVID

[dah-VEED]

ACADIA

David is a common surname in France and can be found in other European countries, including England and Spain.  A number of French David families settled in Acadia:  

Jacques dit Pontif, son of Jacques David and Marie Gaundry, born at Québec in c1670, was recorded at Beaupré in 1681.  He became a chirurgien des troupes, or army surgeon, and was stationed in Acadia, where he became chirurgien major of the Port-Royal garrison.  In November 1703, at Port-Royal, he married Jeanne, daughter of Jacques de Saint-Étienne de La Tour and a descendant of governor Charles La Tour.  They had two children, a son and a daughter, but neither seems to have married and created families of their own.  Jacques dit Pontif died probably at Annapolis Royal in July 1712, in his early 40s.

~

Denis David, probably no kin to Jacques dit Pontif, married Dorate Boudrot on Île St.-Jean, now Prince Edward Island, probably in the early 1750s.  They had two sons, both born on the island:  Jean-Baptiste, born in c1755; and Michel in c1757.  No member of this family made it to Louisiana.

~

Louis David, born in c1731, probably no kin to the other Davids, married Anna Tran on Île St.-Pierre, off the southern coast of Newfoundland, probably in the early 1760s.  They had five children, three sons and two daughters, all born between 1765 and 1774, but none of them made it to Louisiana.

~

Jacques David, probably no kin to the other Davids, was a soldier in the troupes de la marine at Louisbourg, the French fortress on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia.  He married Marie Lambert.  They had a son, Jean-Baptiste, born at Louisbourg in c1750.  No member of this family made it to Louisiana.

~

William, or Guillaume, son of Nicolas David and Marguerite Nougenan of Kilcony, Ireland, married Catherine Forestal at Louisbourg in April 1755.  There is no record of their children.  This family did not settle in Louisiana either.

~

Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean David and Jeanne Bell, born at Château-Richer, Québec in c1693 and probably no kin to the other Acadian Davids, married Marguerite, daughter of Acadians François Lapierre and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré in March 1715.  They lived at Annapolis Royal in 1716-17 but settled at Minas in 1718.  Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite had 10 children, seven daughters and three sons, all born at Grand-Pré.  Two of their daughters married into the Richard and Dugas families.  All three of Jean-Baptiste's sons created their own families: 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in c1717, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Landry and Claire LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in November 1745.  Their son Jean-Baptiste III was born at Grand-Pré in May 1748.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, it was this branch of the family that made it to Louisiana.  

Alexandre, born in August 1823, married Marguerite Thériot in c1750 probably at Minas.

Youngest son Pierre, born in c1726, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Belliveau of Annapolis Royal, in c1752.  

[For more of this family in pre-dispersal Acadia, see Book Three]

~

Jean-Pierre David dit Saint-Michel, born in the parish of St.-Nazaire, Nantes, France, in c1699 or 1700, probably no kin to the other Davids of greater Acadia, became a master blacksmith.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Monmellian dit Saint-Germain and Hélène Juineau of Haute-Ville, Québec, probably at Québec in c1717, and settled at Louisbourg, Île Royale, where he worked his trade.  There, he was addressed as Sr. David.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1743, Marie-Madeleine gave the blacksmith 13 children, nine sons and four daughters, most, if not all of them, born at Louisbourg.  After the British seized Louisbourg in June 1745, Jean-Pierre and his family, along with 1,900 other inhabitants of the French citadel and the surrounding area, were deported to Rochefort, France.  Son Étienne-Michel, having married and settled in peninsula Nova Scotia, was not among the members of his family deported to France; he remained in greater Acadia.  Jean-Pierre and his family returned to Louisbourg in 1749 after the French resumed control of Île Royale.  Marie-Madeleine died at the fortress in the spring of 1755, on the eve of the Acadian Grand Dérangement.  After the second fall of Louisbourg, in July 1758, Jean-Pierre and his family were deported to La Rochelle, France, where, in his late 50s, he died at a local hospital soon after reaching the port and was buried in the hospital cemetery. 

Second son Étienne-Michel, born at Louisbourg in c1720, married Geneviève, 18-year-old daughter of Michel Hébert and Marguerite Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1744.  The recording priest described him as "age ca 20[sic], resident of Louisbourg."  How a young man from island citadel hooked up with a girl from the Minas Basin is anyone's guess.  Four of their children were born at Grand-Pré:  Anne in November1744; Michel-Luc or -Lin in September1746, who probably died young; Joseph in November 1748; and Paul in c1754.  

Jean-Pierre's seventh son Louis, born at Louisbourg in c1732, evidently followed his widowed father and siblings to La Rochelle, France, in 1758-59.  Louis married fellow Acadian Anne, also called Jeanne, Trahan in c1762 perhaps in the French port.  Between 1765 and 1779, Jeanne gave Louis five children, two daughters and three sons.  They evidently returned to North America in the late 1760s or 1770s and settled on Île St.-Pierre off the southern coast of Newfoundland. 

[For more of this family in pre-dispersal Acadia, see Books Three and Four]

~

Joseph David, perhaps an Acadian, and his Acadian wife Anastasie Doiron were living at Môle St.-Nicolas, the new naval base on the north shore of French St.-Domingue, when their son Benoit was born there in May 1777.  They did not go to Louisiana. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the families' travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Étienne-Michel David dit Saint-Michel, age 46, reached New Orleans in October 1766, only a week after the first contingent of Maryland Acadians reached the city in late September.  With him was wife Geneviève Hébert, age 40, and eight children--Anne, age 22, Joseph, age 18, Paul, age 12, Marie, age 10, Marie-Madeleine, age 9, Jean-Baptiste, age 6, Claude, age 5, and Angélique, age 1.  Evidently, Étienne-Michel was considered to be a man of substance from the moment he arrived in the colony.  According to a Spanish report, he "did not ask for any farming land.  He has always been a blacksmith in a city and dwells on the King's property."  

Descendants of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel (c1720-?)

Étienne-Michel, called Michel, dit Saint-Michel, the second son of his family's Acadian progenitor Jean-Pierre David dit Saint-Michel and his wife Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, Monmellian dit Saint-Germain, who settled at Louisbourg, Île Royale, was born probably at Louisbourg in c1720.  He married Geneviève, daughter of Michel Hébert and Marguerite Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1744 and became a master blacksmith like his father.  Étienne-Michel and his family were deported to Maryland in 1755 and were sent to Snow Hill, on the Eastern Shore.  Following other Acadian exiles from Maryland, they came to Louisiana on their own in October 1766.  Interestingly, the family was still at New Orleans in July 1767, receiving food supplies from the Spanish, but Étienne-Michel moved his family to the Acadian Coast settlement of St.-Jacques in the early 1770s.  Spanish officials counted him, Geneviève, and their unmarried children on the left, or east, bank of the river at St.-Jacques in January 1777 and again in March 1779.  The latter census reveals that, although Étienne-Michel may have been a blacksmith like his father, he also had become a successful farmer; in 1779, he owned 10 quarts of rice and 4 quarts of corn ( a quart of that day weighed 160 pounds!)  Their daughters married into the Chauffe, Jousson, and Oubre families.  Only half of their six sons created families of their own, and two of those lines died out early.  In the 1820s, one of Étienne-Michel's grandsons moved to the old Attakapas District and settled near St. Martinville; a decade later, a second grandson followed.  This western branch of the family thrived, but the one that remained in St. James Parish did not.  By 1840, no male descendants of Étienne-Michel David remained on the river.  

1

Oldest son Michel-Luc or -Lin, born at Grand-Pré in September 1746, probably died young either at Grand-Pré or in Maryland before July 1763.  

2

Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in November1748, married Agathe Pens at either St.-Jacques or New Orleans in the early 1770s.  Joseph, described as a "native of Acadia" and "master blacksmith," died at New Orleans in January 1773; the priest who recorded Joseph's burial said that he died at age "26 yr.," but he was only 24.  A daughter was born posthumously in April 1773.  Joseph and Agathe may have had no sons, so this line of the family, except perhaps for its blood, died with him.  

3

Paul, born at Grand-Pré in c1754, married Marie-Pélagie, called Pélagie, daughter of André Oubre and Marie-Élisabeth Bonvillain of St.-Charles des Allemands on the Upper German Coast, at St.-Jacques in February 1775; Marie-Pélagie's brother was the husband of Paul's sister.  Their son Henri was baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in June 1780, and Paul, fils in June 1793.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Clairaut, LeRoy, and Rome families.  Paul remarried to Marguerite, daughter of David Rome and Marie Barbe of St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Lower German Coast, at St.-Jacques in July 1794.  Their son David was born at St.-Jacques in April 1795, Alexis in October 1798 but died at age 13 in March 1812, Paul, fils in c1799, Eugène in February 1800, a second Paul, fils in June 1802 but died at age 13 1/2 in January 1816, a son, name and age unrecorded, died in December 1805, Ulgère was born in November 1806, and Jean Baptiste in October 1809 but died at age 2 in September 1811.  Their daughter married into the Rodrigue family.  Paul, père died in St. James Parish in October 1815; the priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was "age about 58 yrs." when he died.  Two of his sons settled on the western prairies.  

3a

Paul, fils, by his father's second wife, married Renée or Iréné Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Vincent and Céleste Labauve, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1821.  They moved to St. Martin Parish later in the decade. 

3b

Eugène, by his father's second wife, married Marie Caroline, daughter of André Oubre and his Acadian wife Rosalie Vincent of St. James Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1839.  They settled in St. Martin Parish near his older brother Paul, fils.

4

Jean-Baptiste, born in Maryland in c1759, married Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Achée and Marie Dumont of Île St.-Jean, at St.-Jacques in October 1788.  Their son Jean-Louis was born at St.-Jacques in August 1790, Michel in January 1791, an unnamed son, "recently born," died in October 1799, Jean-Baptiste-Claude, called Claude, was born in March 1802 but died at age 1 in March 1803, and Joseph was born in October 1804 but died at age 2 in November 1806.  Their daughter married into the Comeaux family.  Jean died near Convent, St. James Parish, in June 1810; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was 45 years old when he died, but he was closer to 51.  Only one of Jean's five sons seems to have married, and he fathered no sons of his own, so this family line probably did not survive. 

Michel married Marie Louise, daughter of French Creole Louis Denis and Marie Boucher and widow of Joseph LaRose, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1816.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux family.  Michel remarried to Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Joseph Wikiam of Baltimore, Maryland, and his Acadian wife Rosalie Hébert, at the Convent church in Marcy 1821.  Michel died near Convent in August 1823; he was only 32 years old.  He evidently fathered no sons, so this family line, except for its blood, may have died with him. 

5

Claude, born probably at Snow Hill, Maryland, in c1761, was still alive in January 1777 but probably died young.  

6

Youngest son Pierre, born at New Orleans in March 1770, was still alive in January 1777 but also probably died young.  

Other DAVIDs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Davids on the river with Acadian lines of the family there:

Louis David died near Convent, St. James Parish, in 1815.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was 25 years old when he died, but he did not bother to list his parents' names or mention a wife and children.  

Marguerite David gave birth to son Casimir near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1822.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Marguerite's son David was born near Convent in February 1828.  Again, the priest failed to give the boy's father's name.  Casimir, called a LeBlanc, "died ... at Isaac LeBlanc's Place" near Convent in September 1843; the priest who recorded his burial, and who gave his mother's but not his father's name, said that Casimire, as he called him, died at "age 22," so this was him.  Which Isaac LeBlanc was this? 

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

The first Acadian Davids to settle on the western prairies probably were not kin to the Acadian Davids on the river, but, like the St.-Jacques Davids, they, too, had come to Louisiana from Maryland:  

Jean-Baptiste David III, his wife Marie Kidder or Ritter, and their son Jean-Baptiste IV, came to the colony in the 1770s or 1780s and settled in the Opelousas District:  

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste DAVID IV (c1774-c1823; Jean-Baptiste, Jean-Baptiste, fils)

Jean-Baptiste IV, or Baptiste, fils, son of Jean-Baptiste David III and Marie Kidder, was born in Maryland in c1774.  He may have been his father's only son.  The exact date of the family's arrival in Louisiana is not known.  What is known is that they settled in the Opelousas District, and Jean-Baptiste IV married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Savoie and Louise Bourg, at Opelousas in May 1798--the first appearance of Baptiste's family in South Louisiana church records.  Their daughters married into the Chachere, Dupré, Foux or Fux, and Rulong families.  Baptiste, fils served as treasurer of the Opelousas church in the 1810s.  His estate record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1823, and his first succession record was filed there the following August; he would have been in his late 40s that year; another succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1833.  All of Jean-Baptiste IV's son created families of their.  Most of them remained in St. Landry Parish, but a younger one settled in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes.  

1

Oldest son Gilbert, born at Opelousas in April 1799, married Caroline, daughter of German Creole Jean Taylor or Teller and Marie Ritter and widow of Lasty Lagrand and Éloi Andrus, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1839.  Their son Michel Théojeune was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 4 months, in May 1843.  Their daughter married into the Ledoux family.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 8 slaves--5 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 2--on Gilbert David's farm.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 10 slaves--4 males and 6 females, all blacks except for 1 mulatto, ages 62 years to 5 months, living in 2 houses--on Gilbert David's farm not far from his nephew Eugène. 

Théogène David's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1862.  If this was Michel Théojeune, he would have been only 19 years old that year.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

2

Hippolyte, born at Opelousas in March 1803, married Céleste or Célestine Josèphe, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Victor Richard and Marie Louise Richard, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1833.  Their son Eugène was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1834, Hippolyte, fils in October 1836, Joseph in February 1844, Baptiste, Jr. in July 1849, Rodolphe in May 1857, and Numa near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1860.  Their daughter married into the Daigle (German Canadian, not Acadian) family. 

2a

Hippolyte, fils married Spanish Creole Virginie Segura at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1856, and remarried to Elisa, daughter of Théophile Landvalo and Élise Gameter, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1867.

2b

In July 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 10 slaves--6 males and 4 females, 7 blacks and 3  mulattoes, ranging in age from 24 years to four months, living in 2 houses--on Eugène David's farm not far from his uncle Gilbert.  Eugène married Octavie, 20-year-old daughter of Alexandre Baptiste Fontenot and Hyacinthe Joubert, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1861.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Eugène served as a second lieutenant in Company B of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  He survived the war. 

3

Jean Baptiste V, or Baptiste III, born in St. Landry Parish in May 1807, married Marguerite Elmire, called Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadian Agricole Breaux and his Creole wife Scholastique Picou, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1832.  They settled probably near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Jules was born in March 1840, Lucius B. in July 1844, Joseph Amer in October 1848, and Octave in October 1850.  Their daughters married into the McCormick and Richard families.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 18 slaves--8 males and 10 females, 13 blacks and 5 mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 2--on Baptiste David's farm.  Jean Baptiste died at Prairie Mamou, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in November 1855; he was only 48 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse later that month.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 2 slaves--a 33-year-old black female, and an 18-year-old black female --on Marguerite David's farm; this probably was Baptiste's widow Marguerite Breaux's slaves. 

During the War of 1861-65, Jules, along with younger brother Lucius B., served in Company F of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Jules did not join the company until March 1862; his enlistment papers said he was a clerk.  Soon after he joined the regiment in Virginia, he fell ill and reported to a general hospital.  He rejoined his regiment in time for the Maryland campaign of September 1862 and was wounded and captured at Sharpsburg on September 17.  The federals sent him to a general hospital in Frederick until he was well enough to travel to Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, where he also spent time in a general hospital.  He was exchanged at Aikens Landing, Virginia, on the James River, in November.  He was granted a furlough and returned to Louisiana, too disabled to return to his unit.  He signed his end-of-war parole at Washington, Louisiana, in June 1865.  Jules "of CP, Plaquemine Brûlé," married cousin Marie Laperle, called Laperle, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Breaux and Madeleine Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1869.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, where he died in September 1892, age 52. 

During the War of 1861-65, Lucius B., along with older brother Jules, served in Company F of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry--another of Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Lucius, who also was a clerk, enlisted in June 1861, nine months before his brother did.  He served continuously with his regiment through its many marches, campaigns, and battles from 1861 to the fall of 1864.  He was wounded in action at Cedar Creek, Virginia, in October 1864 but did not fall into enemy hands.  Evidently he, too, was too disabled to remain with his unit and was sent back home to recuperate.  He signed his end-of-war parole at Washington, Louisiana, in June 1865.  A notation in a record kept at Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans declares that Lucius was a "Good soldier."  Lucius married Agnès, daughter of Jean Barousse and Caroline Fontenot, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in July 1869. 

4

Arvillien, called Arville, Ervillien, Hervillien, Ives, and Ive, born in St. Landry Parish in February 1813, married Elisa, Elise, or Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Guidry and Victoire Semere, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1834.  Their son Homere was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 8 months, in December 1839, and Treville was born in c1845 but died near Breaux Bridge, age 4, in March 1849.  One wonders if they had a son named Ives.  Their daughters married into the Champagne, Durio, and Gillard families.  Arvillien died in St. Martin Parish in December 1847; the St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that "Ervillien" died "at age 36 yrs.," but he was only 34.  A daughter was born posthumously near Breaux Bridge the following February.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 2 slaves--a 50-year-old black males, and a 32-year-old black male--on Zelie David's farm; one wonders if these were Arvillien's widow Lise Guidry's slaves.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 12 slaves--4 males and 8 females, all black, ages 63 to 2, living in 2 houses--on Widow David's farm, between Lullin Guidry and the Widow Louis Guidry; these probably were Lise Guidry's slaves.   

In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, all black, ages 42, 16, and 10--on Ives David's farm.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 6 slaves--1 male and 5 females, all black, ages 60 to 3--on Ive David's farm.  Was this a son of Arvillien and Lise?  If so, was he married?

During the War of 1861-65, Homere served in Company B of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.  Homere enlisted at Camp Moore in October 1861.  He served with his unit through late February 1862, when his Confederate service record ends.  Did he survive the war? 

5

François or Françisque, perhaps the youngest son, married fellow Acadian Selima Pierre Comeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1842.  One wonders if this family line survived. 

~

During the 1820s, an Acadian David from St. James Parish, probably no kin to the St. Landry Davids, moved to St. Martin Parish and added another vigorous line to the western branch of the family.  His younger brother joined him on Bayou Teche by the late 1830s:

Descendants of Paul DAVID, fils (c1799-1849; Jean dit Saint-Michel, Étienne-Michel)

Paul, fils, third son of Paul David, père and his second wife Marguerite Rome and a grandson of Étienne-Michel David dit Saint-Michel of St.-Jacques, born at St.-Jacques in c1799, married Renée or Iréné Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Vincent and Céleste Labauve, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1821.  They moved to St. Martin Parish later in the decade.  Their daughters married into the Labauve, LeBlanc, Leming, and Louvière families.  Paul, fils died in St. Martin Parish in March 1849; he was only 50 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May. 

1

Oldest son Paul III, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in December 1821, married Zulma or Zulmée, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Broussard and Céleste Comeaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in November 1845, and sanctified the marriage at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, the following January.  Their son Jules was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1846, Louis Hippolyte Duclise in May 1850, Simon in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1852, Pierre in Lafayette Parish in September 1855, Pierre D. in c1857 but died at age 2 in February 1859, Ignace was born in September 1859, and Gustave T. Beauregard in March 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Paul may have served as a sergeant in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local-defense unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought local Jayhawkers. 

1a

Jules married Arcade, daughter of Louis Albert Aube or Aulie and his Acadian wife Julienne Trahan, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1869; Arcade's mother was a Trahan.  Their son Alcibiade was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1870. 

1b

Louis Hippolyte Duclise married Félicia, daughter of Manuel Domingue and , at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1869; the marriage was not recorded civilly until April 1870. 

2

Théodule, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1823, may have married German Creole Marie Schexnayder in the early 1850s.  Their son Charles was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in October 1856 but died at age 4 1/2 in June 1861, and Célestin was born in October 1858. 

3

Paul Hilaire, called Hilaire, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in June 1824, married Joséphine, 20-year-old daughter of Louis Langlinais and his Acadian wife Aspasie Boudreaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1844.  Their son Julien Hilaire was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but not in Iberia Parish, in March 1845, Louis Hilaire in February 1849, Jean Baptiste near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in August 1858, and Victor in July 1860. 

Julien Hilaire married Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadians Aurelien Hébert and Azema Boudreaux, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1869.  Their son Hilaire le jeune was born near Youngsville in January 1870. 

4

Raphaël Lucien or Lucien Raphaël, born in St. Martin Parish in December 1833, died in September 1845.  He was only 11 years old. 

5

Youngest son Charles Ovide was born in St. Martin Parish in December 1839. 

Descendants of Eugène DAVID (1800-?; Jean dit Saint-Michel, Étienne-Michel)

Eugène, fourth son of Paul David, père and his second wife Marguerite Rome and another grandson of Étienne-Michel David dit Saint-Michel of St.-Jacques, born at at St.-Jacques in February 1800, married, in his late 30s, Marie Caroline, called Caroline, daughter of André Oubre and his Acadian wife Rosalie Vincent of St. James Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1839. 

1

Oldest son Calixte was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1841.

2

Alexandre Clebert was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1843.

3

Louis, born probably in St. Martin Parish in c1851, died at age 8 in February 1859. 

4

Eugène Omer was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1855. 

5

Joseph Albert, called Albert, born in St. Martin Parish in March 1858, died at age 4 1/2 in August 1862.

~

Other DAVIDs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link many Davids in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there.  One suspects that some of the Davids who lived on the prairies during the immediate post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned by Davids or whose ancestor bore the given name David:

Solomon David married Clarisse Pereau probably in St. Landry Parish by the late 1830s.  

Lezima or Zelima Josèphe David married French Creole Firmin Fontenot in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1841, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1844.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Amelie David married Paulin Walchin at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1843.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  One wonders if Amelie was Émelie, daughter of Acadian Baptiste David, fils.  If so, this would have been her second marriage. 

Valérien Dominique David married French Creole Céline Frugé in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1848.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, so one wonders if Valérien Dominique was Acadian. 

Marie Eliza David married Jean Baptiste Angers in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in November 1849, and died in St. Martin Parish, age 22, in August 1850.  Neither the parish clerk who recorded her marriage nor the St. Martinville priest who recorded her burial gave her parents' names, so one wonders if she was Acadian. 

Eulalie David married Guillaume Mathieu probably in the 1840s.  Their daughter married into the Trahan family at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in November 1869. 

Aureline David married French Creole Marcel Fontenot in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1853.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, so one wonders if Aureline was Acadian. 

Aurelien David married French Creole Estelle Soileau in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1856.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, so one wonders if Aurelien was Acadian.  Their son Ozémé was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in April 1859, and Joseph in July 1862.  Their daughter married into the Fontenot family. 

Émilie David married Valcour Labaune, perhaps Labauve, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in April 1857.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, so one wonders if Émilie was Acadian.

Jean David married Presile or Prezille, also called Marguerite, Manceaux and settled near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, by the late 1850s.  Their son Eugène was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1863, and Eris near Rayne, then in St. Landry but now in St. Landry Parish, in May 1869. 

Eugènie David married Acadian François Savoie and settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the early 1860s. 

Hippolyte David married Élise Sandvall and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Prosper David married Lucia Fontenot and settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Louis David married Félicianne ____ and settled near Iota, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Neuville or Neville, son of H. David and Adélaïde Primeaux, married Carmelite, also called Azelima, daughter of Doris[sic] C. Broussard, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in February 1866.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's father was deceased.  One wonders what the groom's father's given name might have been. 

Antoine Théophile, called Théophile, David married Anastasie Broussard.  Their son Jules was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in April 1866 but died at age 1 1/2 in January 1868, and Albert was born in August 1867. 

Clark David married Céleste De Ville in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.

Marie David married Telesphore Jak at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1867.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Edmond David married Arsène Thomas at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1867.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Oskard, probably Oscar, was born near Breaux Bridge in July 1869. 

Marie Philomène, called Philomène, David married Louis Valsin, son of Acadian François dit Micheau Bernard and widower of Anne Hélène Broussard and Cécila Boutte, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in March 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.

Ordalie David married Delauney, son of Acadian Benjamin Louvière, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in March 1868.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.

Oneal David died in St. Landry Parish in June 1868.  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Oneal died "at age 15 yrs." 

Basile David married Céleste Bell.  Their son Joseph Alcée was born near Iota, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in October 1868, and Basile Gabriel near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, in July 1870. 

Marie Carmelite, daughter of Jo David and Marie ____, married Théogène, son of John LeBlanc and Clarisse ____, at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1868. 

Solin David married Héloise ____.  Their son Alexandre was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in September 1870. 

Hilaire David married Baptiste[sic] ____.  Their son Onésime was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in October 1870. 

Edmond David married Lizzie Jones in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.

Albert David married Célestine Guillaumin.  Their son Yves was baptized at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, "at age 5 mths.," in December 1870. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

David is a common surname in France and other European countries, so there were a number of David families in South Louisiana who were not Acadian.  French immigrants bearing the name appeared in the colony as early as the 1730s:  

Laurent, son of Guillaume David and Pérrine Riaut of Erdeven, Brittany, France, married Jeanne-Françoise Dauphin at New Orleans in February 1732, and remarried to Marie-Francoise Manne in February 1733.  Laurent was a master mason and probably remained in the city.  

Pérrine Michel, wife of Jean Bar, died at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast in October 1751.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names or her age at time of her death.  

Jean-Baptiste David, husband of Marie-Anne Augerer or Orgeron, was serving as a gunner in New Orleans in the 1750s.  Their son Pierre-Baptiste was born in the city in August 1752, and Jean-Baptiste, fils in January 1754.  Considering the nature of his profession, Jean-Baptiste, père probably remained in the city.  His wife Marie died a widow at New Orleans in June 1799, age 65.  The priest who recorded her burial said that she had been "laudably engaged for many years in the instruction of young girls in the Christian religion and good morals," so she may have been a widow for some time.  

Maturin David married Marie-Jeanne Lamalthy at Natchitoches in March 1768. 

Michel, son of Michel David and Madeleine Chelet of Nantes, France, was 36 years old when he enlisted in the Spanish army in Louisiana.  He died at Fort Plaquemines "down the river" from New Orleans in August 1802 and was buried in the fort's cemetery.

.

A non-Acadian David lived in New Orleans during the middle colonial period before moving upriver to Pointe Coupée, where he created a large family: 

Descendants of Étienne DAVID (?-1771)

Étienne David, a master joiner, married Marguerite Lebleu, sometimes called LeBlanc.  He was plying his craft in New Orleans as early as 1745, when his daughter Marguerite was born in the city (she died at Pointe Coupée in October 1758, only 13 years old).  In the early 1750s, Étienne moved his family to Pointe Coupée, a French-Creole community across the river from Baton Rouge.  More children were born to them there.  Étienne was described as a "resident" of New Orleans in 1770, so he and Marguerite must have moved back to the city.  Étienne died at False River, Pointe Coupée, in February 1771; the priest who recorded Étienne's burial did not bother to say how old he was at the time of his death.  A daughter married into the Legros family.  Étienne had at least five sons, most, if not all, of whom settled at Pointe Coupée.  One of his grandsons settled on the western prairies during the early antebellum period. 

1

Oldest son Étienne, fils, born probably at New Orleans in c1741, died at Pointe Coupée in October 1787, in his late 40s.  One wonders if he married and had sons of his own.   

2

Louis, born at New Orleans in December 1749, married Marie-Louise, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Pourciau and widow of Pierre Ledoux, at Point Coupée in c1787, and remarried to French Creole Marie-Thérèse Olinde, widow of Louis Londrey and the sister of younger brother Francois's second wife, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in c1808.  Their son Étienne le jeune was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, age 2 months, in March 1810. 

Étienne le jeune married French Creole Octavine, also called Irma, Gremillion in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1830s.  Their son Étienne, fils was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, age 1, in June 1839, and Louis was born in September 1845.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted a single slave--a 30-year-old black male--on Elttien David's farm next to Thurston Gremillion.  Étienne le jeune died in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1854; the priest who recorded his burial said that Étienne died at age "42 years," but he was 44.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted a single slave--a 38-year-old black male--on Widow Étienne David's farm; this probably was the same slave who had been counted on the farm a decade before. 

During the War of 1861-65, Étienne, fils may have served in the Pointe Coupee Battalion Louisiana Artillery, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Georgia.  If so, he enlisted in either Company B or C of the battalion at New Orleans in June 1861 and served with his battery until it was captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863.  The Federals paroled him with other members of his unit, and he went home.  Even after his company was exchanged, he remained at home.  Étienne, fils may have married cousin Melina David civilly.  Their son Joseph Mandari was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1870. 

3

François-Étienne, born at Pointe Coupée in December 1753, married Marie, daughter of French Creole Louis Marionneau, probably at Pointe Coupée in the mid-1770s.  Their son François, fils was baptized at Pointe Coupée, age unrecorded, in August 1776 but died the following November, Louis le jeune was born in c1777, a second François, fils was born in August 1778, and Zenon in December 1787.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, Bonaventure, Delage, and Robillard families.  Marie died from complications of childbirth in October 1789, and François-Étienne remarried to Madeleine, daughter of French Creole Henry Petersel dit Olinde, at Pointe Coupée in c1793.  Their son Alexis was born at Pointe Coupée in October 1794, Paulin was baptized at Pointe Coupée, age 10 months, in May 1800, and Pierre le jeune was born in October 1801. 

3a

Louis le jeune, by his father's first wife, married Eméranthe, daughter of French Creole Dominique Saison, at Pointe Coupée in February 1800.  Their son Louis, fils was born at Pointe Coupee in July 1804, and Hippolyte was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, age unrecorded, in February 1812.  Louis le jeune died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1845; he was 68 years old.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 10 slaves--5 males and 5 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 1--on Amarinthe David's farm; these probably were the slaves of Louis le jeune's widow, Eméranthe Saison

Louis, fils may have married cousin Pauline David in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1820s.  Their son Louis III died in Pointe Coupee Parish 23 days after his birth in October 1825, and twins Gustave and Octave were born in April 1841.  

During the War of 1861-65, Gustave may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.

Hippolyte married French Creole Clementine Jarreau.  Their son Austide was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1844.

3b

François, fils, by his father's first wife, married Charlotte, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Saison, at Pointe Coupée in May 1800.  Their infant son, name unrecorded, died at Pointe Coupée in February 1802, and François III was born in April 1803.  Their daughter married into the Gueho family. 

François III married Octavine, daughter of French Creole Béloni Major, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1825.  Their son Jacques Amédée was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1842 but died at age 3 1/2 in August 1846, and Léonce was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, age 8 months, in May 1848.

3c

Alexis, by his father's first wife, may have married French Creole Céline Bisette in Pointe Coupee Parish.  They had a son named Alexis, fils.  Alexis, père died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1866; the priest who recorded his burial said that Alexis died at "age ca. 70 years"; he was 71. 

Alexis, fils married cousin Octavie or Octavine, daughter of French Creole Alexis Bisette, in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish by the early 1840s, and sanctified the marriage at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in October 1842.  Their son Savinien was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1842, Auguste or Augustin in January 1845, Albert in September 1853, and a second Albert posthumously in January 1856.  Alexis, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in 1855; the priest who recorded his burial did not bother to give Alexis's age at the time of his death. 

During the War of 1861-65, Savinien, called Savinur in the Confederate records, may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  If this was him, he enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, but his service record says nothing more.  Savinien may have married first cousin Julie David at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in April 1867; if so, they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Augustin died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1865; the priest who recorded his burial said that "Augustine" died at "age 18 years," but he was 20.  He probably did not marry.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

3d

Paulin, by his father's second wife, married French Creole Séraphine Goudreau in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 8 months, in June 1839.  Did the family line survive?

4

Simon, born at Pointe Coupée in October 1761, married Pélagie, daughter of French Creole Louis Marionneau and probably a sister of brother François's first wife, at Pointe Coupée in August 1784.  Their son Simon, fils, was born at Pointe Coupée in c1790, David in May 1791, Pierre-Simon in December 1794, and Hippolyte was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, age unrecorded, in February 1812.  Simon, père died in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1819; the priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was 50 years old when he died, but he was closer to 57.  His oldest son moved to the western prairies in the early 1800s.

4a

Simon, fils married Julie, daughter of French Creole Alexis Picard, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1811.  By the early 1820s, Simon, fils had moved his family from the river to the old Attakapas District, west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  They settled on Bayou Tortue, between present-day St. Martinville and Broussard, establishing a western branch of this family line and considerably complicating David genealogy there.  Their son Hortaire died at his parents' home on Bayou Tortue "at age about 4 years" in July 1823, and Théophile was born in St. Martin Parish in March 1822.  They also had a son named Auguste or Augustin Terville, called Terville.  Their daughter married into the Fuselier family.  Simon, fils died at his home on Bayou Tortue in March 1826; he was only 36 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse a few days later.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 10 slaves--3 males and 7 females, all mulatto, ranging in age from 32 years to 8 months, living in 2 houses--on Widow Simon David's farm; these may have been the slaves of Simon, fils's widow, Julie Picard

Théophile married Marie Erma or Irma, called Irma, daughter of Spanish Creole François Segura, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1840.  Their son François Théophile was born near New Iberia in November 1841, Ludgar in April 1847, Lucien in January 1849, and Auguste le jeune in December 1854.  Their daughters married into the Delcambre and Nores families. 

During the War of 1861-65, François Théophile, by his first wife, served in the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in South Louisiana, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, and in Company E of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jacket Battalion Louisiana Infantry, which fought in Louisiana.  He enlisted in September 1861 and was captured at Franklin, Louisiana, in April 1863 during the first Bayou Teche campaign.  After the Federals released him, he rejoined his unit.  François Théophile may have married Susie Foreman.  Their son Abraham was born near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in August 1868, and Omer in March 1870. 

Auguste or Augustin Terville married Euphémie L., daughter of French Creole Louis Langlinais, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in May 1846; Euphémie's mother was a Boudreaux.  Their son Auguste was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1847, Henri in September 1852, Alcide in Lafayette Parish in October 1857, and Jules in November 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, A. T., as he was called in the Confederate records, served as a sergeant in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local-defense unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought area Jayhawkers.  Son Auguste may have served as a private in the same unit. 

4b

Pierre Simon died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1849; he was 54 years old.  He probably was the Pierre Simon David whose son Louis died in Pointe Coupee Parish at age 9 in October 1835, and whose child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at age 11 days in November 1835.  If so, who was Pierre Simon's wife?  The Pointe Coupee Parish church records give us no clue. 

5

Hubert, born at Pointe Coupée in November 1764, married French Creole Marie Recuron and remarried to Victoire, daughter of French Creole Pierre Perrault, at Pointe Coupée in c1792.  Their son Hubert, fils was born at Pointe Coupée in March 1793, a son, name and age unrecorded, died in March 1794, and Joseph was born in July 1801. 

6

Youngest son Pierre, born at New Orleans in March 1770, may have married cousin Aspasie David in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1810s.  Their son Pierre, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 5, in September 1823.  They also had a son named Gustave.  Their daughter married into the Collins family.  Aspasie died a widow near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1865; she was 72 years old. 

Gustave married Marie Adeline, called Adeline, daughter of French Creole Rosémond Sicard, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1843.  Their son Pierre Gustave was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1845, and Joseph Orphis in October 1852.

.

As a result of many civil marriages and consistently shoddy record keeping by Pointe Coupee Parish priests, area church records make it difficult to link an amazing number of Davids with Étienne and his descendants:

Lasty David married Marie Manon, called Manon, Guérin by c1802.  Their son Joseph died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 18, in August 1820; he probably did not marry.  Lasty and Manon also had a son named Jules Lasty, who married Hélène, also called Melina and Melance, daughter of Acadian Joseph Isidore Labauve, first in a civil ceremony, and then sanctified the marriage at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in August 1853.  Their son Guillaume Pigault was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1855, Joseph Félix in November 1859, and Camille near Lakeland in December 1861.  Their daughter married into the Goudeau family.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted a single slave--a 60-year-old black female--on the Widow Lasty David's farm; this probably was Manon Guérin's slave.  During the War of 1861-65, Jules Lasty, called Jules L. in Confederate records, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, a front-line unit raised in Pointe Coupee Parish that fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 and was detailed for "special service" at New Iberia in the summer of 1863.  He survived the war and was paroled with the remaining members of his company at Shreveport in June 1865.  Jules L. died near Lakeland in October 1866; he was only 35 years old. 

Marcellin David died in Pointe Coupee Parish in April 1823.  He was only 29 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give his parents' names.  Did Marcellin marry?

Gilbert, also called Julius, David married Lise Delage or Delaye in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1820s.  Their son Jules or Julien was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1828, and Gilbert, fils was baptized at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, age 3 years, 24 days, in July 1839.  Gilbert, père died in Pointe Coupee Parish in December 1844; he was only 35 years old.  Julien married Véronique Malvina, daughter of French Creole Gustave Gremillion, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1870. 

Pierre François David married Pérrine David in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish before 1830.  Their son François or Francis was born probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in c1830 but died accidentally at False River, age 18, in December 1848, and Augustin was born in May 1838.

Marcellin David married Pélagie Olinde in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1830s.  Their son Savinien was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in March 1834, Michel in February 1841, and Alcide in July 1844.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, all black, ages 40, 22, and 5--on "Marceline" David's farm; this was probably Marcellin.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 2 slaves--a 60-year-old black male, and a 35-year-old black female--on Marcilin David's farm.  One wonders if these slaves were his.  Marcellin may have died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1863; if so, he would have been 50 years old; the priest who recorded his burial called him Marcellin, Sr., so he may have had a son named Marcellin, fils.  Marcellin David, perhaps Marcellin, fils, married Mélasie St. Romain.  Their son Joseph Félicien was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1860, and Victorin in March 1864 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1866.  Savinien may have married Virginie Pourciau and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the late 1850s.  Michel may have married Clara St. Romain in the late 1850s or early 1860s.  During the War of 1861, Savinien, called Savinur in Confederate records, may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  If this was him, he enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, but his service record says nothing more.  Brother Michel may have served in the same company.  If so, he also enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, was reported sick soon after his enlistment, went AWOL in early 1863, and was captured in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1863, when his unit was in the Opelousas area, so he probably was still absent without leave.  The federals sent him to New Orleans, where he was supposedly paroled, but another federal record insists that he was sent to City Point, Virginia, in July and was paroled there.  His Confederate service record ends with the notation in his company rolls that he was absent without leave "to late August 1863."  One wonders if he returned to his unit.  A Michel David served in the Pointe Coupee Battalion Louisiana Artillery, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Georgia.  This Michel enlisted at Newland in September 1862 and was with his unit through late August 1864, when the record falls silent.  If either of these Confederates was the Michel David married to Clara St. Romain, he died by April 1867, in his late 20s, when his wife remarried to another David at Lakeland.  Marcellin, fils may have served in the same company as his brothers.  If so, he, too, enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, was reported sick soon after his enlistment, went AWOL in early 1863, and was captured at Berwick Bay in March 1863.  He also was reported AWOL again "to late August 1863."  After that, his service record is silent. 

Jean Baptiste David married Eugénie Guidroz in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1830s.  Their son Troisville was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1837.  Jean Baptiste died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 25, in September 1838.  The recording priest, who failed to mention Jean Baptiste's parents, noted that he left "a wife and 2 children." 

Jules, also called Eugène, David married Amelina, Emelina, Evelina, or Melina Lejeune (a French Creole, not an Acadian) in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish by the 1830s.  Their son Evariste was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1839 but died age 4 1/2 years in September 1843. 

Alexis David married Pauline Lapointe in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Their son Gustave was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in December 1840. 

Marcellin David married Marie Céline, called Céline or Celanie, David.  They settled at False River and then at Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish.  Their son Octave was born in August 1843 or 1845, Jean Troisville in October 1844, and Joseph in March 1863.  They also had a son named Louis.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, all black, ages 40, 22, and 5--on "Marceline" David's farm.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 2 slaves--a 60-year-old black male, and a 35-year-old black female--on Marcilin David's farm.  One wonders if these slaves were his.  Marcellin may have died near Lakeland in September 1863; if so, he would have been 50 years old; the priest who recorded his burial called him Marcellin, Sr., so he may have had a son named Marcellin, fils, who may have married Mélasie St. Romain civilly.  Their son Joseph Félicien was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1860, and Victorin in March 1864 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1866.  During the War of 1861, Marcellin, fils may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  If so, he enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, was reported sick soon after his enlistment, was absent without leave in early 1863, captured at Berwick Bay in March 1863, paroled, and sent back through the lines.  Company rolls reported him AWOL again "to late August 1863."  After that, his service record is silent.  Octave married Marie Aspasie, daughter of Sergeat Guérin, at the Lakeland church in February 1866.  Their son François Onésiphore was born near Lakeland in November 1866, and Joseph Alcide in November 1869.  Louis married Marie Lucile, another daughter of Sergeat Guérin, at the Lakeland church in October 1870. 

Léon David married Marthe, Mirthe, or Myrdee Guillerot, Guitterot, or Guillaume probably in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish by the mid-1840s, and sanctified the marriage at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1866.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Léonce was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1851.  Their daughter married a Bisette cousin. 

Delphine David, wife of N. Roux, died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age 20, in May 1845.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give Delphine's parents' names. 

Joseph David died in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1845.  He was only 36 years old.  The priest who recorded Joseph's burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

Paulin David died in Pointe Coupee Parish at "age 35 yrs." in August 1845.  The priest who recorded Paulin's burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  Was he the Paulin David who married Azéline LeMay?

Octave David died in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1845.  He was only 10 years old.  The priest who recorded Octave's burial did not bother to give his parents' names. 

Justin David died in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1847.  He was only 15 years old.  The priest who recorded Justin's burial did not give his parents' names. 

Pierre David married Adèle Patin.  Their son Bernard was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in January 1850, and Alfred in June 1852.  Bernard may have married Clara St. Romain, widow of Michel David, at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in April 1867; the priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Joseph, son of François David, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in June 1850.  He was only 12 years old.  The priest who recorded Joseph's burial did not give his mother's names. 

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 6 slaves--4 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 60 to 15--on Constance David's farm.   The same census taker counted a single slave--a 30-year-old black female--on Mary David's farm. 

In October 1850, the federal census taker in Avoyelles Parish counted 4 slaves--3 males and a female, all black, ranging in age from 33 years to 3 months--on J. Bte. David's farm.  One wonders if Jean Baptiste was kin to the many Davids of nearby Pointe Coupee Parish.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Avoyelles Parish counted 14 slaves--5 males and 9 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ages 40 years to 8 months--on Widow J. B. David's farm. 

Julie David, wife of Onil Pourciau, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1851.  She was only 45 years old.  One wonders who were her parents. 

Gustave David of False River died in Pointe Coupee Parish in December 1852.  He was only 22 years old.  The priest who recorded Gustave's burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

Savinien David married _____ David.  Their son Omer was born in c1853 but died at age 4 in September 1857.  Savinien's wife died in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1853, perhaps from giving birth to their son; she was only 24 years old.  The priest who recorded her burial did not bother to give her first name, much less her parents' names.  Savinien may have remarried to first cousin Julie David in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish in the 1850s, and sanctified the marriage at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in April 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Savinien, fils was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in September 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Savinien, called Savinur in Confederate records, may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  If this was him, he enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, but his service record says nothing more. 

Paulin, called Paul, David married Henriette Goudeau, Goudraux, Goudreau, or Guidro.  Their son Anatase was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in March 1853, Séverin in October 1857, and Laurent near Lakeland in October 1859.  During the War of 1861-65, Paul may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 and was captured in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1863, when his unit was in the Opelousas area, so he probably was absent without leave.  His service record says that he was still absent without leave in late August 1863 but says nothing more, so one wonders if he survived the war. 

Jules David, fils married Claire or Clara Pourciau.  Their son Clément died in Pointe Coupee Parish, age unrecorded, in July 1854, Joseph Marie Moïse was born near Lakeland in October 1862, Angelbert in September 1864, and Gilbert in February 1868.  During the War of 1861-65, Jules, Jr., as he was called in Confederate records, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862, but his service record says nothing more, so one wonders if he survived the war. 

Alexandre David married Euphrasie Bonaventure, also called Lemai, and settled in Pointe Coupee Parish by the mid-1850s.  Their son Alexandre, fils was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in August 1859, and Omer near Lakeland in November 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Alexandre served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 (his second son was born the two months later) and remained with his unit until he was captured on Bayou Teche in April 1863.  The federals sent him to New Orleans for exchange, after which he was absent without leave.  One wonders if he returned to his unit. 

Élisabeth David, wife of Gustave Pourciau, died "at the 'isle,'" Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1855.  She was only 20 years old.  One wonders who were her parents. 

Clarisse David, widow of A. Gueho, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1857.  She was only 45 years old.  One wonders who were her parents. 

Evariste David married Emma Gremillion.  Their son Onésiphore was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in September 1857, Lucien near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in December 1859, Joseph in March 1862 but died at age 6 in August 1868, Théodule Ernest was born in September 1864, and Hermogène in July 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, Evariste may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.

Jean Vincent David married Julia David.  Their son Adonis Vincent was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1859. 

Villeneuve David married Aspasie David.  Their son Villeneuve, fils was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in October 1859 but died at age 3 in December 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Villeneuve may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  If this was him, he enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 and was captured in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1863, when his unit was in the Opelousas area, so he probably was absent without leave by then.  The Federals sent him to New Orleans, where he was supposedly paroled, but another Federal record insists that he was sent to City Point, Virginia, in July and was paroled there.  His Confederate service record ends with the notation in his company rolls that he was absent without leave "to late August 1863."   One wonders if he returned to his unit, and if he survived the war.  Another Villeneuve David served in the Pointe Coupee Battalion Louisiana Artillery, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Georgia.  This Villeneuve enlisted at Newland in September 1862 and joined his unit in Mississippi.  He was captured near Franklin, Tennessee, in December 1864, during General Hood's campaign against Nashville.  The Federals sent him to Nashville and then to Louisville, Kentucky, before holding him at the prisoner-of-war compound at Camp Douglas, Illinois.  His compiled service record ends there, so one wonders if this Villeneuve survived the war and returned home to his family in Pointe Coupee. 

Emelina David, wife of Maximilien Bisette, died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1860.  She was only 25 years old. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted a single slave--a 55-year-old black female--in Virginie David's household. 

Alee David married J. B. Major at the Lakeland church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1861.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Jean François David died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1861.  He was 60 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Jean François's parents' names or mention a wife. 

Delphine David, wife of Octave St. Romain, died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in February 1863.  She was only 25 years old. 

Béloni David died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in June 1863; he was only 27 years old.  During the War of 1861-65, Béloni served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 but did not remain long with his unit.  Company rolls for January to August 1863 report him absent without leave.  One wonders why he left his unit and if his death was war-related. 

Gustave David married Julie Bisette.  Their son Alcide was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1864 but died the following June, and Joseph was born in March 1868.  During the War of 1861-65, Gustave may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.

Another Gustave David married Eugelia or Julie Major.  Their son Jean Alexandre was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in December 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Gustave may have served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.

Alexis David, fils married Marie David and settled near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

Troiville or Trosil David married Madeleine Jarraux or Jarreau.  Their son Athamas was born near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1865.  Which Troiville, or Troisville, was this--the son of Jean Baptiste or of Marcellin?  During the War of 1861-65, Troville, as Confederate records called him, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish, which fought in Louisiana and contained over a dozen fellow Davids, many of them his cousins.  He enlisted at New Roads in September 1862 and was captured in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1863, when his unit was in the Opelousas area, so he probably was absent without leave by then.  The Federals sent him to the prisoner of war camp at Natchez, Mississippi, and then on to New Orleans, where he was supposedly paroled, but another Federal record insists that he was sent to City Point, Virginia, in July and was paroled there.  His Confederate service record ends with the notation in his company rolls that he was absent without leave "to late August 1863."   One wonders if he returned to his unit.  He did survive the war. 

Adolphe David died near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, "age ca. 35 years," in June 1865.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names or mention a wife.  One wonders if Adolphe's death was war-related. 

Paulin David married Euranie Saizan civilly and settled near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, by the late 1860s. 

~

During the antebellum period, other non-Acadian Davids, some of them Anglo Americans and one of them an Irishman, settled in South Louisiana.  One of them, probably an Anglo American, settled in East Baton Rouge Parish by the early 1830s.  Foreign-French Davids emigrated to the Bayou State during the late antebellum period.  Most of them remained at New Orleans, but one of them established a vigorous line in Assumption Parish.  A few others settled among their Acadian and French-Creole namesakes out on the western prairies:

Joseph, son of François David and Marie Bourriet "of Mobile," married Margarita, daughter of Spanish Creole Santiage Llanares, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1821.  

Adrien, fils, son of Adrien David, père and Marguerite Guiot, married Eugénie, daughter of Jacques Horsler; Eugénie's mother was a Chiasson.  Their son Adrien III was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1822.  One wonders if the Adriens were descendants of Étienne David of nearby Pointe Coupee Parish.  

Louis Victor, called Victor, David married Eulalie Des Trois Maisons and settled in Lafayette Parish in the 1820s.  Area church records do not reveal Louis Victor's kinship with the other Davids of Louisiana.  His unnamed child, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish a month after its birth in November 1826, Jean was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 9 months, in July 1838, and Aventin or Corantin was born in February 1842.  Their daughters married into the Lepin and Plaisance families.  Corantin married Marguerite, daughter of Acadian Onésime Leger, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1867.  Their son Joseph was born near Church Point in January 1867, so they may have been married civilly, and Jean was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in February 1870. 

John Stephen David married Jeanne Constance Robin Delogny probably in St. James Parish by the 1820s.  Their daughters married into the Roman and Rouselle families in the late 1830s.  

Victor David married _____Robassa probably in St. James Parish by the 1830s.  

Henry David of Ireland died in St. Martin Parish in July 1834.  He was only 40 years old.  

Christian David, a 36-year-old joiner from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Bolivar out of Le Havre, France, in November 1835.  

Joseph Chiavil or Ignace David married Françoise Milie Chatelais, Saucier, Socie, or Socier and settled in St. Landry Parish by the late 1830s.  Their son Octave was baptized at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, age 9 months, in March 1843.  Their daughters married into the Fontenot, Guillory, Marcantel, McCauley, and Saucier families.  Joseph's succession record may have been filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1851.  Octave married Elvina, daughter of French Creole Charles Bertrand, at the Opelousas church in June 1861.  They settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish.  Octave's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1865; he would have been 22 years old that year; one wonders if his death was war-related. 

Victor David, a 46-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Lafayette out of Le Havre in October 1838.

_____ David, age and occupation unrecorded, but he was a male native of France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Bordeaux out of Bordeaux, France, in February 1839.  

Charles David, an 18-year-old clerk from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Sheffield out of Le Havre in December 1839.  

Jacob David, a 37-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Clyde out of Le Havre in May 1840.  On the same ship was 27-year-old Laurent David, occupation unrecorded, probably Jacob's brother.

Théodore David, a 24-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Medford out of Le Havre in October 1843.  

Seth David married Mary Anne King.  Their son Isaac was born near Baton Rouge in June 1846, and Charles in September 1847.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 4 slaves--2 males and 2 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 24 to 1--on Seth David's farm in the parish's Ward 3.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 12 slaves--9 males and 3 females, 9 blacks and 3 mulattoes, ages 46 to 2--on Seth David's farm. 

Juan, probably Jean, David, a 39-year-old planter from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Hope Howes out of Havana, Cuba, in August 1846.  

Louise David, a 25-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Taglioni out of Le Havre in October 1846.  

Joseph David, a 32-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Sea Lion out of Le Havre in March 1849.  

In July 1850, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 3 slaves--all females, 1 black and 2 mulattoes, ages 30, 20, and 7--in J. C. David's household in the First Ward of the parish's Third Municipality. 

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 8 slaves--2 males and 6 females, 5 blacks and 3 mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 to 4--on V. David's farm in the Third Ward of the parish's First Municipality.  This probably was Victor David, who still owned 8 slaves--3 males and 5 females, 3 blacks and 5 mulattoes, ages 45 to 12--on his farm, now in Orleans Parish's Fifth Ward, in June 1860. 

In November 1850, the federal census taker in Rapides Parish counted a single slave--a 25-year-old black female--on Jean David's farm.  in June 1860, the federal census taker in Rapides Parish counted 2 slaves--a 36-year-old black female, and a 14-year-old black female--in John David's household in the town of Pineville, across the river from Alexandria. 

In November 1850, the federal census taker in Jefferson Parish counted 30 slaves--18 males and 12 females, all black, ranging in age from 55 to 2--held by the heirs of Mrs. J. L. or J. S. David at Gretna, across the river from New Orleans, next to J. L. or J. S. David, perhaps fils, who held 5 more slaves--1 male and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 60 to 17. 

In November 1850, the federal census taker in Natchitoches Parish counted a single slave--a 60-year-old black female--on L. Davide's farm. 

In December 1850, the federal census taker in Lafourche Interior Parish counted 5 slaves--4 males and a female, all blacks except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 19 to 2--on Isidore David's farm along Bayou Lafourche. 

Lazarus David, a 25-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Edward Everett out of Le Havre in April 1852.  

Another Joseph David, a 37-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Annowan out of Le Havre in November 1852.  

A large family of Davids, natives of France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Inza out of Bordeaux in November 1852.  The occupation of only one of them--farmer--was recorded.  The members of the extended family were Franz, age 71, Jean, age 47, Caspar, age 43, Marie, age 38(?)[sic], Martin, age 33, Ferd., age 13, Marie, age 9, Jérôme, age 8, another Marie, age 6, and another Jérôme, age 2.

Robert David married Delphine Allain.  Their daughter Marie Angelina married into the Gusman family at Baton Rouge in October 1859. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted a single slave--a 50-year-old black female--in Jos. David's household in New Orleans's Sixth Ward. 

In July 1860, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, 2 blacks and a mulatto, ages 31, 24, and 20--on Alphonse David's farm in the parish's Fifth Ward. 

In September 1860, the federal census taker in Claiborne Parish, near the Arkansas border, counted 2 slaves--a 24-year-old black males, and a 20-year-old black female--on J. A. David's farm in the parish's Fourth Ward. 

Thomas David married Marie David.  Their son John was born near Montegut, Terrebonne Parish, in December 1866. 

Paul David married Adeline ____.  Their son Alexis was born in St. James Parish in October 1870. 

.

A David, probably Anglo American, settled in East Baton Rouge Parish by the mid-1830s:

Descendants of George DAVID (?-)

George David married German Creole Mary Ann Kleinpeter.  They settled near Baton Rouge and raised at least four sons.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 3 slaves--2 males and a female, all black, ages 26, 24, and 5--on George David's farm in the parish's Ward 10, next to George and John Kleinpeter

1

Oldest son John James was born in East Baton Rouge Parish in April 1835.

2

William Scod [probably Scott], was born in East Baton Rouge Parish in January 1839.  During the War of 1861-65, William S., as the Confederate records call him, served in Company B of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Louisiana; he was captured along with the rest of his unit at Port Hudson in July 1863; he most likely was paroled and exchanged; his Confederate service record ends with his capture.  William Scott, called "William J." by the recording priest, married M. Carmelite, daughter of Anglo-American William Brown and widow of William Charles Kleinpeter, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1866; Carmelite's mother was a Daigre; because of who her first husband had been, William and Carmelite had to secure a dispensation for second degree of affinity in order to marry.   

3

Léon Théodore was born in East Baton Rouge Parish in April 1840.  During the War of 1861-65, Léonidas T., as the Confederate records call him, served in Company B of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  His younger brother Dewitt Clinton served in the same regiment.  Léon was an artist when he enlisted in June 1861.  His service record also says that he was a widower at the time, though he was only 21 years old.  He followed his regiment to Virginia, but his service was cut short by an illness or an injury that disabled him.  A Richmond board of doctors granted him a medical discharge in November 1861, and he probably returned home. 

4

Youngest son Dewitt Clinton was born in East Baton Rouge Parish in February 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, DeWitt C., as the Confederate records call him, served with his older brother Léon Théodore in Company B of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry--another of Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Like his brother, Dewitt was an artist when he enlisted in June 1861.  Also like his brother, he received a medical discharge in the fall of 1861. 

.

A Foreign-French David settled on upper Bayou Lafourche by the mid-1830s: 

Descendants of Louis DAVID (?-)

Louis, also called Pierre, son of Barthélémy David and Jeanne Albe of St.-Éloi, France, married Céleste Pélagie, also called Marie, daughter of French Creole Pierre Séraphin Gros, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1835; Céleste's mother was a Naquin.   They settled up bayou in Assumption Parish.  Their daughters married into the Gaudet and LeBlanc families.  One of his younger sons married an Acadian. 

1

Oldest son Honoré Louis, born in Assumption Parish in August 1836, married Adolestine, daughter of French Creole Joseph Larose, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1858.  Their son Joseph Telor was born near Labadieville in November 1858, Félicien Amédée in October 1860, and Louis Oleus in February 1863.  Honoré may have remarried to cousin Rose Gros at the Labadieville church in September 1870. 

2

Louis, fils, born in Assumption Parish in July 1840, married Odilia, daughter of French Creole Eugène Boutary, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1861; Odilia's mother was a Dantin.  Their son Joseph Cyprien was born near Labadieville in September 1869. 

3

Pierre Théodule, born in Assumption Parish in February 1844, died at age 3 1/2 in October 1847.  

4

Trasimond, born probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1840s, married Eulalie, daughter of Acadian Simonette Comeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1866.  Their son Antoine Arthur was born near Labadieville in May 1867. 

5

Youngest son Léon Lusignan was born near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in April 1851. 

~

Davids who lived in South Louisiana during the immediate post-war period were the result of the family's participation in the South's peculiar institution, or they may have had an ancestor with the given name David:

Henriette, affanchie, or freedwoman, daughter of Charles David and Betsy ____, married Mathurin, also an affranchi, son of Théodore and Rose, no surnames given, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1866. 

CONCLUSION

Davids settled in every part of South Louisiana.  The presence of French Creoles, Acadians, Foreign French, Anglo Americans, and even an Irishman, with this surname created a complex and often confusing pattern of settlement in what became the Bayou State.  

David is a fairly common surname in France, so it should be no surprise that members of the family came to Louisiana as early as the 1730s.  One of the earliest arrivals, master joiner Étienne David, was living in New Orleans in the 1740s, but he moved upriver to Pointe Coupée during the following decade and created a vigorous line there. 

Two Acadian families, probably not kin to one another, came to Louisiana from exile in Maryland.  Étienne-Michel David dit Saint-Michel, called Michel, a master blacksmith from Louisbourg and Grand-Pré in Acadia, brought his family to the colony in October 1766.  He came not with an expedition of extended families, as did most of his fellow Louisiana-bound Acadians, but sailed to New Orleans at his own expense.  He and his family lingered in the city for a few years before moving upriver to St.-Jacques, where Michel became a farmer as well as a blacksmith.  Only two of his six sons created families of their own.  One son's descendants remained in St. James Parish, but the line died out during the antebellum period.  Meanwhile, two of Étienne's grandsons moved to St. Martin Parish, where their lines flourished.

During the 1770s or 1780s (the records are unclear), another Acadian David family came to the colony from Maryland.  Jean-Baptiste David III of Grand-Pré, who had been exiled with his family to Pennsylvania in 1755, married a German girl in Maryland and came to Louisiana with only one child, son Jean-Baptiste IV, called Baptiste, fils.  They settled in the Opelousas District, where Baptiste, fils married a fellow Acadian in May 1798.  He fathered a number of sons who settled in several western parishes. 

Meanwhile, in the 1820s, a French-Creole David moved his family from Pointe Coupee Parish to Bayou Tortue in St. Martin Parish.  Another non-Acadian David appeared in Lafayette Parish, and others settled in St. Landry Parish, further complicating the genealogical picture for this family west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  

By the War of 1861-65, Acadian and non-Acadian Davids could be found in nearly every corner of South Louisiana:  in the New Orleans area; on the river above the city in Point Coupee, East Baton Rouge, and Iberville parishes; on the Avoyelles prairie; in St. Martin, St. Landry, Lafayette, and Vermilion parishes on the western prairies; and along Bayou Lafourche.  By then, the center of Acadian family settlement had shifted from the river to the prairies; by 1840, in fact, Acadian Davids had disappeared from the river parishes.  The largest concentration of non-Acadian Davids was still in Pointe Coupee Parish, but a Foreign-Frenchman had established a vigorous line in Assumption Parish, and French-Creole and Foreign-French Davids were still plentiful amidst their Acadian namesakes along the Teche and out on the prairies.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned, some Davids, both Acadian and non-Acadian, lived well on their farms and plantations during the antebellum period.  None of them rose to the ranks of great planters, however.  In 1850, Acadian Baptiste David of Prairie Mamou, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, held 18 slaves; his older brother Gilbert owned eight in St. Landry.  In the same year, the heirs of Mrs. J. L. or J. S. David, probably non-Acadians, held 30 slaves on their plantation near Gretna in Jefferson Parish.  Victor David owned eight slaves in nearby Orleans Parish.  In 1860, Lise Guidry, the widow of Acadian Arvillien David, held 12 slaves on her farm in St. Martin Parish.  Her brother-in-law Gilbert David held 10 slaves on his farm in St. Landry Parish, not far from his 26-year-old nephew Eugène David, who also owned 10 slaves.  In St. Martin Parish, the widow of Simon David, a French Creole, owned 10 slaves.  In Avoyelles Parish, the widow of Jean Baptiste David, probably a French Creole, owned 14 slaves.  Seth David, perhaps an Anglo-American, held 12 slaves in East Baton Rouge Parish.  Victor David of Orleans Parish still owned eight slaves. 

Dozens of Davids, Acadians and non-Acadians, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Over a dozen of them served in a single unit--Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Two sets of brothers, one Acadian, the other French Creole, served with General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.  Confederate service records show that the great majority of the Davids who wore the gray and butternut survived the experience.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Devid, Devis, St. Michel.  [See Book Ten for the Acadian family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Avoyelles, East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, Natchitoches, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, Rapides, St. Landry, & St. Martin parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Avoyelles, Claiborne, East Baton Rouge, Lafayette, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, Rapides, St. Landry, & St. Martin parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1151-52, 1834, 2083, 2188, 2229, 2470-71; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:144, 2:84, 3:73-74; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Burton & Smith, Colonial Natchitoches, 175 n.14; De Ville, Loppinot Papers, 14; <familyheritageresearchcommunity.org/david-dna.html>; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 99-100; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 151; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 6, 7;  <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 47; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 82; White, DGFA-1, 473, 1216; White, DGFA-1 English, 103.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Atakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Angélique DAVID 01 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1765, MD; daughter of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; sister of Anne, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Marie, Marie-Madeleine, & Paul; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 1; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 12, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & otehrs; married, age 22, Henrique, son of André OUBRE & Marie-Élisabeth BONVILLAIN of St.-Charles des Allemands, & brother of brother Paul's wife Marie-Pélagie, 24 Sep 1787, St.-Jacques
Anne DAVID 02 Oct 1766 NO, StJ? born & baptized 2 Nov 1744, Grand-Pré; daughter of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; sister of Angélique, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Marie, Marie-Madeleine, & Paul; exiled to MD 1755, age 11; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, called Ann, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 22; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; not in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, with the rest of her family; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others?; never married?
Claude DAVID 03 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1761, probably MD; son of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT;  brother of Angélique, Anne, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Marie, Marie-Madeleine, & Paul; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 5; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 16, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others
Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel 04 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1720, probably Louisbourg; called Michel; son of Sr. Jean-Pierre DAVID dit Saint-Michel of St.-Nazaire Parish, Nantes, France, & Madeleine MONMELLIAN dit Saint-Germain of Québec; left Île Royale, early 1740s, & moved to Minas; married, age 24, Geneviève, daughter of Michel HÉBERT & Marguerite GAUTREAUX, 20 Jan 1744, Grand-Pré; exiled to MD 1755, age 31; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, called Michel, with wife Geneviève, sons Michel, Joseph, Paul, Jean, Claude, & daughters Ann, Marie, & Madeleine; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 46; in report of Acadians in New Orleans, Jul 1767, with wife Geneviève, sons Jean-Bte., Claude, daughters Anne, Marie, [Marie-]Magdelaine, & Angélique, & notation: "Michel DAVID has arrived in the Colony on the 6th of October 1766 and he did not ask for any farming land.  He has always been a blacksmith in a city and dwells on the King's property.  This family has received the food supplies for the month of July"; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Michel, age 58, with wife Genneviève age 50, sons Jean[-Baptiste] age 18, Claude age 16, Pierre age 6, daughters Angélique age 12, Rozallie age 5, & Marie age 3; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Michel, with 6 whites, 0 slaves, 10 qts. rice, 4 qts. corn
Jean-Baptiste DAVID 05 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1759, probably MD; called Jean; son of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; brother of Angélique, Anne, Claude, Joseph, Marie, Marie-Madeleine, & Paul; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, called Jean, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 7; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Jean, age 18, with parents & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married, age 29, Hélène, daughter of Joseph ACHÉE & Marie DUMONT, 14 Oct 1788, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St. James Parish 13 Jun 1810, age 45[sic]
*Jean-Baptiste DAVID, père 10 17?? Op born & baptized 12 May 1748, Grand-Pré; called Baptiste; son of Jean-Baptiste DAVID & Marguerite LANDRY; exiled to PA 1755, age 7; moved to MD; married Marie KIDDER of Germany, MD; settled Opelousas District
*Jean-Baptiste DAVID, fils 11 17?? Op born c1774, MD; called Baptiste; son of Jean-Baptiste DAVID & Marie KIDDER; settled Opelousas District; married, age 24, Scholastique, daughter of Pierre SAVOIE & Louise BOURG, 29 May 1798, Opelousas; died Opelousas 1823, age 49; succession record dated Aug 1783, St. Landry Parish courthouse
*Joseph DAVID 09 Oct 1766 NO born 7 Nov 1748, baptized next day ondoyé (for necessity) by his father, Grand-Pré; son of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; brother of Angélique, Anne, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Marie, Marie-Madeleine, & Paul; exiled to MD 1755, age 7; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 18; settled New Orleans as a master blacksmith; married Agathe PENS, probably New Orleans; died [buried] New Orleans 30 Jan 1773, age 26[sic]
Marie DAVID 06 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1756, probably MD; daughter of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; sister of Angélique, Anne, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Madeleine, & Paul; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 10; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; married, age 18, Antoine, son of Antoine CHAUFFE & Marguerite SCHINGRE of St.-Charles des Allemands, 7 Jan 1774, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 21, with husband Antoine CHAUF age 26, & son Louis age 1; in St.-Jacques census, unnamed, with husband, 2 other whites, 4 qts. rice, 2 qts. corn
Marie-Madeleine DAVID 07 Oct 1766 NO, StJ born c1757, probably MD; called Madeleine; daughter of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; sister of Angélique, Anne, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Marie, & Paul; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, called Madeleine, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 9; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; married, age 18, Louis-Medisièrre dit Josson, son of Jean JOUSSON & Anne BENOIT of Notre-Dame-de-Sigé, Poitou, France, 12 Sep 1775, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Magdelaine, age 20, with husband Louis JOSOSNE age 36, & orphan boy Louis ____ age 7
Paul DAVID 08 Oct 1766 NO?, StJ born c1754, probably Grand-Pré; son of Étienne-Michel DAVID dit Saint-Michel & Geneviève HÉBERT; brother of Angélique, Anne, Claude, Jean-Baptiste, Joseph, Marie, & Marie-Madeleine; exiled to MD 1755, age 1; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Oct 1766, age 12; not in report on Acadians in New Orleans, July 1767, with parents & siblings; married, age 21, (1)Marie-Pélagie, daughter of André OUBRE & Marie-Élisabeth BONVILLAIN of St.-Charles des Allemands, & sister of sister Angelique's husband Henrique, 21 Feb 1775, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 23, with wife [Marie-]Pélagie OUVRE age 18 & daughter Marie age 1; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, with 3 whites, 0 slaves, 4 qts. rice, 4 qts. corn; married, age 40, (2)Marguerite, daughter of David ROMMEL/ROME & Marie-Barbe SCHANTZ of St.-Jean Baptiste des Allemands, 29 Jul 1794, St.-Jacques

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Angélique DAVID; BRDR, 2:224, 573 (SJA-2, 4), her marriage record, calls her Angela DAVID, calls her husband Anri UBRE, does not give her or his parents' names but says her parents "were from Maryland" & his "were from St. Charles," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Francisco & Maria BURSUA "of this Parish."  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

02.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Anne DAVID; BRDR, 1a(rev.):58 (SGA-3, 28b), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Anne DAVID, gives her parents' names, & says her godparents were Michel HÉBERT & Anne BOURG.

Why is she not in the St.-Jacques census of 1777 with her family?  See De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.  She was her parents' oldest child.  Did she die between 1767 & 1777?  This researcher has found no marriage record for her. 

03.  Wall of Names, 15, calls him Claude DAVID.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

What happened to him in LA?

04.  Wall of Names, 15, calls him Étienne-Michel DAVID; BRDR, 1a(rev.):59, 93 (SGA-3, 25a), his marriage record, calls him Michel DAVID, "age ca 20, resident of Louisbourg," gives his & his wife's parents' names, says she was "age ca 18" at the time of the ceremony, & that the witnesses to his marriage were René HÉBERT (who made his mark), Michel HÉBERT (who made his mark), Antoine ST. GERMAIN (who signed), & René LEBLANC (who signed).  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

His marriage record gives him an estimated birth year of c1724, but the age for him in the St.-Jacques census of 1777, followed here, says he was born in c1720. 

White, DGFA-1, 1215-16, shows that his mother was a native of Québec & was living at Haute-Ville de Québec a year before her marriage to his father, who was a master blacksmith & a native of Nantes.  White, p. 1216, does not give Étienne-Michel's paternal grandparents' names.  His mother's parents were Jean-Baptiste, son of Jacques MONMELLIAN dit Saint Germain and Claudine GUILLET of St.-Sulpice, France, & Hélène, daughter of Jean JUINEAU & Anne VUIDEAU, probably of Québec, who married at Québec on 30 Jan 1690.  Soon after Étienne-Michel's parents' marriage at Québec, they moved to Louisbourg, Île Royale, where his father worked as a master blacksmith & was addressed as Sr.  After the fall of the French fortress in the summer of 1745, Étienne-Michel's family was deported to Rochefort, France, but returned Louisbourg in 1749 after the restoration of Île Royale to France the year before.  Étienne-Michel, meanwhile, had moved to Grand-Pré, where he started a family of his own.  When Étienne-Michel & his family were deported to MD in the fall of 1755, his widowed father & 2 sisters were still at Louisbourg.  In 1758, after Louisbourg fell again & while Étienne-Michel & his family were still in MD, his father & sisters & one of the sister's families were deported to La Rochell, France.  The father died from the rigors of the voyage & was buried at La Rochelle.  See <familyheritageresearchcommunity.org/david-dna.html>.

05.  Wall of Names, 15, calls him Jean-Baptiste DAVID; BRDR, 2:1, 226 (SJA-2, 5), his marriage record, calls him Juan DAVID, calls his wife Elena ACHÉ, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Ambrosio MARTEN & Rosalia MARTEN; BRDR, 3:249 (SMI-1, 5; SMI-8, 5), his death/burial record, calls him Jean DAVID, age 45, "nat. Acadia," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

06.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Marie DAVID; BRDR, 2:183, 226-27 (SJA-1, 44a), her marriage record, calls her Marie DAVID, calls her husband Antoine CHAUFFE "of Parish of St. Charles, Bishopric of Québec," gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were "of St. Charles in Acadia," & that the names of the witnesses to her marriage are illegible.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 18.

07.  Wall of Names, 15, calls her Madeleine DAVID; BRDR, 2:227, 394 (SJA-1, 55a), her marriage record, calls her Marie-Magdelaine DAVID "of Maryland," calls her husband Louis Medisierre JOUSSON dit Jusson, says he signs his name "Louis Nedgiere dit JOUSSON," gives her & his parents' names, says his parents were "of Notre Dame de Sigé, Bishopric of Poitou," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Antoine VILLIER & Pierre de MOULLIN.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 18.

08.  Wall of Names, 15, calls him Paul DAVID; BRDR, 2:227, 575 (SJA-1, 54a), the record of his first marriage, calls him Paul DAVID "of Parish of St.-Charles, Bishopric of Québec," calls his wife Marie-Pélagie HOUWERT "of Parish of St.-Charles aux Allemands," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Jean ROMMEL & Michel DAVID [his father]; BRDR, 2:227, 648 (SJA-2, 25), the record of his second marriage, calls him Pablo DAVID, calls his wife Margarita ROM (ROME), gives his & her parents' names, says his father was "of Lewisburg" & his mother "of Acadia," that her parents were "of St. John the Baptist Parish," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Andrés ROM & Alexis MILLET.  See also De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 15.

His first wife was an OUBRE & sister of his sister Angélique's husband. 

09.  Not in Wall of NamesBRDR, 1a(rev.):58 (SGA-1, 29-30), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Joseph DAVID, gives his parents' names, says he was baptized "ondoyé for necessity by la veille Michel [his father], that his godparents were Antoine ST. GERMAIN (who signed) & Marie-Josèphe LEBLANC, wife of Pierre LANDRY, & that his father also signed the baptismal record; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2470; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 151; NOAR, 3:73, his death/burial record, calls him Joseph DAVID, "native of Acadia, 26 yr., master blacksmith."  See also NOAR, 2:70, the birth/baptismal record of Pierre DAVID, son of Éstienne DAVID & Geneviève HUBERT[sic], in which Joseph DAVID, blacksmith, served as godfather; doubtlessly the older brother of baby Pierre.  

10.  Not in Wall of Names.  Arsenault, Généalogie, 2470, calls him Jean-Baptiste DAVID, gives his birth year, his probable parents' names, calls his wife Marie RITTER, & lists his children as Jean-Baptiste, born in c1774; BRDR, 1a(rev.):58 (SGA-3, 49b), his birth/baptismal record, calls him J. B. DAVID, gives his parents' names, & says his godparents were Alexandre DAVID [uncle] & Madeleine LANDRY [probably an aunt].  

11.  Not in Wall of Names.  Arsenault, Généalogie, 2470, 2471, calls him Jean-Baptiste DAVID, gives his birth year, his parents' names, details his marriage, & lists his children as Gilbert, born in 1799, Caroline in 1800, Hyppolite in 1803, Emérande in 1805, Jean-Baptiste in 1806, & Émilie in 1809; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:219, 702-03 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A. p.81), his marriage record, calls him Baptiste DAVID, calls his wife Scholastique SAVOY, gives his & her parents' names, calls his parents Baptiste DAVID & Marie KIDER, & lists the witnesses to his marriage as Jacob BOGART, Jacob BOHNS, & L. FONTENOT; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:258, his succession record, calls his wife Colastie SAVOYE, lists his minor children as Hypolite, Emerante, Jean Baptiste, Emelienne, Arville, & Azelina, & his major children as Gilbert, & Caroline married to Laurent DUPRÉ, fils.

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