APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

RENAUD

[reh-NOH]

ACADIA

Renaud is a common surname in France, so it is no surprise that several Renaud families lived in greater Acadia before Le Grand Dérangement, three of them on Île St.-Jean, one of the Maritime islands.  Members of only one of these Acadian Renaud families ended up in Louisiana:

Jean Renaud or Regnault dit Bordenave, born in France in c1652, was at Pentagouët, in present-day Maine, in 1685, a servant of the commandant of that Acadian outpost, Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie, third Baron de Saint-Castin.  Jean married an American Indian woman, probably an Abenaki, whose name has been lost to history.  They had four children, whose names also have been lost.  In 1707, Jean, now in his mid-50s, was still at Pentagöuet, where he witnessed the marriage of Acadian notable Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, fils, to an Abenaki.  No member of this branch of the Renaud family settled in Louisiana.

~

A sieur Renaud married an unidentified woman at Plaisance, Newfoundland, part of greater Acadia, in c1702.  They had two children, a son and a daughter, whose names were not recorded.  Le sieur Renaud was recorded at Plaisance in 1711, the master of eight fishermen.  None of his descendants settled in Louisiana.

~

Brothers Mathurin and André, sons of Mathurin Renaud and Jeanne Raval of Mattes, bishopric of Sainte, France, moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in the 1720s.  Mathurin, born in c1678, married Marie-Anne, daughter of master tailor Jean Favreau and Marie LeGrand of St.-Sauveur, La Rochelle, France, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in June 1722.  Mathurin died on the island in October 1743, in his mid-60s.  He and Marie-Anne evidently had no children. 

Brother André, born in c1692, reached the island in c1726 and married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Mathieu Roger and Simone Servant of La Rochelle, France, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in October 1740; Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault insists that this was André's second marriage.  He and Marie-Jeanne had five children, including Suzanne Marie, born in October 1741, Mathurin le jeune in October 1742, André, fils in October 1744, and Marie in June 1751.   

No member of this family settled in Louisiana.  

~

Louis dit Provençal, born probably in Provençal, France, in c1695, son of Antoine Arnaud dit Renaud and Marie Samson of St.-Martin, Marseille, came to British Nova Scotia by c1718, the year he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Lapierre dit Laroche and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré.  They raised a large family of 16 children, all born at Grand-Pré:  Charles in c1720; Ursule in c1721; Louis in c1722; François in c1723; Marie-Josèphe-Marguerite, called Marguerite, in c1725; Jean-Baptiste in c1726; Laurent-Sylvain in c1731; Alexis in c1732; Jean-Joseph in c1733; Pierre in c1734; Grégoire in c1735; Judith in c1736; Angélique in c1737; Anne in c1739; Louis-Étienne in c1741; and Anselme in c1743.  Some of the family moved to Île St.-Jean probably to escape British authority on the peninsula.  The move proved fatal for Louis, who drowned off Cap-St.-Louis probably in the mid-1740s.  Marie settled on the east side of Rivière-de-Peugiguit, where a French official counted her and five of her children--Ursule, age 30, married to Joseph Poirier; Pierre, age 18; Judith, age 16; Anne, age 13; and Anselme, age 8--in August 1752.  Charles married Catherine Humer probably on Île St.-Jean in c1750.  François married Françoise Comeau, widow of ____ Tompique, and settled at Rivière-des-Blonds, on the south coast of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752; two of the three children counted with them were daughters Théotiste, age 20 months, and Rose, age 5 months.  Marguerite married into the Levron family at Grand-Pré, date unrecorded.  Jean-Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daugher of Nicolas Barrieau and Ursule Gautrot, at Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean in January 1755.  Alexis married Françoise, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret, probably on Île St.-Jean in c1760.  Angélique married into the Boissy family, place and date unrecorded.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana. 

~

In 1724, Jean dit Arnaud, son of Pierre Renaud and Marie-Madeleine Gainné of St.-Louis parish, Rochefort, France, born in c1704, probably not kin to the other Renauds in Acadia, came to Île St.-Jean, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Pothier and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in October 1733.  They settled at Havre-aux-Sauvages and, from 1734 to 1758, had at least 10 children:  Marie, born in December 1734, Rosalie in January 1737, Collette in February 1739, Jean, fils in April 1741, Anne in October 1743, Véronique in c1747, Madeleine-Josèphe in March 1752, Jean-Charles in August 1754 but died at age 3 months the following November, Jacques was born in December 1755, and Marie-Anne in August 1758.  Oldest daughter Marie married Raphaël La Clair at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in January 1754.  It was two of Jean dit Arnaud's other daughters who emigrated to Louisiana. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA: RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Colette Renaud, age 45, widow of René Le Tullier, and three unmarried children, ages 19, 16 and 14, sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November 1785.  They did not follow the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche but chose to go to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  Colette's daughter Marie-Rose Le Tullier, her husband Jean-Baptiste Legendre, and their infant daughter Rose had sailed from France on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July.   They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the Baton Rouge area, hence Colette's going there with her unmarried children. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Véronique Renaud, age 37, Collette's younger sister, also sailed aboard L'Amitié, with husband Jean-François De La Mazière, age 37, and three children, ages 8, 6, and 4.  Véronique was pregnant when the ship left Paimboeuf.  During the crossing, in early October, she gave birth to another daughter, whom she and her husband named Martina, or Martine, in honor of Louisiana's Spanish intendant, Martin Navarro, after they reached New Orleans. Véronique and her family followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the De La Mazières shortened their name to Mazière.  Like the Renauds, the Mazières also failed to create a family line that survived in the Bayou State. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Since Renaud is such a common name in France, it should be no surprise that non-Acadians with the name lived in South Louisiana during the colonial period.  Two of them married Acadians and settled in predominantly Acadian communities, but most remained at New Orleans: 

André Renaud, a Canadian, came to French Louisiana by 1704.  He appeared in the August 1706 census at Fort Louis-de-la-Louisiane at Mobile with a wife and child, likely son François.  Along with other Canadians, André resettled on Île Massacre, now Dauphin Island, at the entrance to Mobile Bay, by 1709. 

Claude, "surnamed Avignon," son of Pierre Renault of Avignon, France, was a sergeant in the company of Dartaguiette when he married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean Grandry or Grandhenry of Metz and widow of Antoine Alard, surnamed Postillon, at New Orleans in May 1730.  Marie-Anne's first husband had died in the Natchez Uprising of 1729.  She seems to have given him no children.  Claude remarried to Élisabeth Ozenne of New Orleans, a widow, at New Orleans in February 1760.  Their daughter Élisabeth-Julie was born at New Orleans in February 1762.

Louis, fils, son of Louis Renault and Geneviève Pertuis of Montréal, married Marguerite, daughter of François Cheval of St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast at Pointe Coupée in May 1750. 

Étienne, son of Lazard Renaud of Arles, Provence, France, married Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Jean-Baptiste Bergeron, at New Orleans in May 1768.  Their son Lazare was baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in August 1769, and Jean-Joseph in December 1782.  They lived in the city until the late 1770s, when they moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They returned to New Orleans by the early 1780s.   

Antoine, son of François Renaud and Marie Berrinel of Bordeaux, France, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Benjamin Pitre, at Lafourche in August 1792.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Antoine remarried to Élisabeth or Isabelle Madeleine, daughter of Acadian Simon Comeaux and widow of François Magnon or Marion, at Assumption on the upper bayou in November 1804. 

Rosa, daughter of Marguerite Renaud, was born at New Orleans in July 1794.  The priest who recorded the girl's baptism did not give the father's name. 

.

A Reynauds/Renaud from the south of France settled in New Orleans during the late colonial period.  Most of his descendants moved to the old Acadian Coast during the antebellum period: 

Descendants of Jean REYNAUD/RENAUD (?-)

Jean, son of Pierre Reynaud and Marie-Marguerite De Becariseu of Marseille, France, married Marie-Charlotte-Eléonore, called Léonore, daughter of Commissioner Joseph Songi or Songy of New Orleans, in the city in September 1784.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Turgeau families at Ascension. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Louis-Melchor, born at New Orleans in July 1785, married French Creole Héloise Bulieux probably at New Orleans.  They had a son named Jean-Vincent.

Jean Vincent married first cousin Marie Céleste, daughter of Acadian Isidore Valery Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1848; Marie Céleste's mother was Jean Vincent's paternal aunt, Félicie Désirée Reynaud, so he and Marie Céleste had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near Jean Vincent's uncle, Martin. 

2

Joseph was born at New Orleans in March 1795. 

3

Joseph-Antoine, called Antoine, was born at New Orleans in June 1791 but died in the city as a "young boy" in November 1795.  

4

Martin, born at New Orleans in November 1801, married Marie Françoise, called Manette, 18-year-old daughter of Louis Malarcher of New Orleans, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in August 1822, and remarried Marie Malvina, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Vives, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1826.  Their son Jean Antoine was born in Ascension Parish in November 1826, Songy died in Ascension Parish at age 6 months in June 1828, Louis Songy, called Songy, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1829, Félix Valéry in Ascension Parish in October 1830 but died at age 8 months in June 1831, Félix David was born in Ascension Parish in October 1832 but died at age 19 months in June 1834, and Louis Félix, called Félix, was born in Ascension Parish in December 1834.  Their daughter married into the Bossier family.  Martin, called Songis Reinaud by the recording priest, died in Ascension Parish in October 1843; he was only 43 years old.  Most of his sons died young or did not marry, but the two who married settled in Ascension and Assumption parishes.

4a

Jean Antoine, by his father's second wife, may have married Catherine Borne in Ascension Parish.  Their son Gaspar died in Ascension Parish, age 5 months, in June 1863. 

4b

Louis Songy, by his father's second wife, served briefly as a second lieutenant in Company F of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Songy resigned his commission in September or October 1861, only a few months after he joined the unit.  He died in Ascension Parish in November 1861; he was only 32 years old.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  He probably did not marry. 

4c

Félix, by his father's second wife, married Adella, daughter of French Creole Jean Colin Bertaud, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1856; Adella's mother was a Melançon.  They settled in Ascension Parish before moving down to Napoleonville in Assumption Parish.  Their son Jean Songy was born in Ascension Parish in October 1858, Eugène in November 1859 but died at age 8 in December 1867, Henri Washington was born in January 1861 but died at age 7 in December 1867, a newborn, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died near Napoleonville in July 1863, Pierre Gaspar was born in November 1867, and Louis Félix in October 1870.

~

During the antebellum period, Renauds and others with similar-sounding names, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, emigrated to New Orleans from France, Germany, England, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin.  Most of them probably remained at New Orleans.  At least one of them settled on the western prairies:

Jacques Reynaud, a 38-year-old cooper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Rebecca out of Port au Prince, Haiti, in March 1822. 

Simon Reynaud, a 14-year-old native of France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Brisk out of Santiago de Cuba in December 1823. 

Joseph Renau, a 38-year-old physician from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Brisk out of Santiago de Cuba in May 1826. 

P. Reynaud, a 27-year-old distiller from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Amazona out of Santiago de Cuba in January 1832. 

Adolph Renaud, a 21-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Olympia out of Le Havre, France, in June 1836. 

Pierre Renaut, a 23-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Olympia out of Le Havre in January 1837. 

_____ Reynaud, age unrecorded, an architect from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship General Foy out of San Sacrificios, Mexico, in February 1839. 

Pierre Raynaud, a 21-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Monument out of Le Havre in April 1839. 

L. P. Reynaud, a 22-year-old mechanic from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Chateaubriand out of Bordeaux, France, in April 1841. 

François Renaud, a 24-year-old farmer from Rans, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Lyon out of Le Havre in March 1843.  He was going to Texas. 

Marie Renaud, a 31-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Taglioni out of Le Havre in October 1844.  On the same vessel was Isaac Renaud, age 13, perhaps her son or brother. 

Adolphe Renaud, a 27-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Taglioni out of Le Havre in October 1845. 

Another François Renaud, a 24-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Leopard out of Bremen, Germany, in November 1845.  He was going to Missouri. 

André Renaud, a 24-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Elizabeth Allen out of Le Havre in May 1846. 

Jules Renault, a 22-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Hannibal out of Le Havre in July 1848.  He, too, was going to Missouri. 

Jean Renaud, a 38-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Espirance out of Le Havre in November 1848. 

Charles Renault, a 31-year-old bookbinder from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Brunswick out of Le Havre in December 1848.

Denis Renaud, a 41-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Hargrave out of Le Havre in February 1849.  Also aboard the ship was Jeanne Renaud, a 49-year-old farmer, perhaps his wife. 

____ Renaud, a 50-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Ferrier out of Bordeaux in June 1849.  Also aboard the ship were Mrs. Renaud, age 41, ____ Renaud, fils, age 13, Miss Renaud, age 11, and another Miss Renaud, age 10, probably his wife and children. 

J. A. Raynaud, a 23-year-old cook from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Carolina out of Marseille, France, in June 1849. 

Jean Renaud, a 25-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Athens out of Le Havre in June 1850. 

Claude F. S. Renaud, a 30-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Pyramid out of Liverpool, England, in June 1850.  He probably was the same Claude François Séraphin, called Séraphin, son of Jean Baptiste Renaud and Françoise Carrey of Daubs, France, who married Azélie or Azélia, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Baptiste Castille, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1865.  Claude F. S. died near Grand Coteau in January 1868; he was only 45 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, the following April. 

Pierre Renault, a 20-year-old farmer from Alsace, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Zanons or Zazons out of Le Havre in December 1851.  He was going to Texas. 

August Renaud, a 21-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Elizabeth Hamilton out of Le Havre in January 1852. 

A Mr. Renaud, a 40-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Falcon out of Aspinwall/San Juan, Puerto Rico, in August 1852. 

.

During the antebellum and post-war periods, Renauds, most of them probably Foreign French, settled throughout South Louisiana: 

Claude Guillaume Renaud, a wholesale merchant, married Marie Dolores Constance Cousio.  Their son Antoine Jean Baptiste Guillaume was born at Baton Rouge in April 1818. 

William, fils, son of William Renaud and Constance Ayeau, married Augustine, daughter of French Creole I. Favrot, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1839. 

Adélaïde, daughter of Manette Renaud, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1841.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded the girl's baptism did not give the father's name. 

Mme. Constance Renaud died near Baton Rouge in August 1844; she was 75 years old.  One wonders if she was Constance Ayeau, mother of William Renaud, fils of Baton Rouge. 

Henri Renaud married Merante Bookvalt and settled in St. Martin Parish by the late 1840s.  Their son Arsène was baptized at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, age unrecorded, in May 1849. 

E. Reneaux, "native of France," died in Ascension Parish in November 1850.  He was 65 years old. 

Stanislas Désiré Renau or Renaux married Christine Françoise Long or Longue.  Their son Caliste Renard was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, age unrecorded, in January 1853. 

Julien Renaud died in St. Martin Parish in September 1854.  He was only 18 years old. 

Célestine, daughter of Espie Renaud and Françoise Damas or Danis, married into the Gradenigo family in St. Landry Parish in May 1860.

E. Renoult, "native of Rouen, France," died in Assumption Parish in May 1860.  He was only 44 years old. 

Henri Renaud died in St. Martin Parish in August 1862.  The priest who recorded Henri's burial did not bother to give his parents' names.  He probably was the Henry Renaud who served briefly in Company C of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Henry enlisted in Company C at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in June 1861, and followed his regiment to Virginia.  He was absent sick at Culpeper, Virginia, later that summer, and at Richmond that autumn.  He was discharged from Confederate service, probably for medical reasons, in early 1862.  He made his way home, where he died that summer, only 19 years old.  One wonders if he was a kinsman of brothers Aristide, fils and Alfred Renaud of the same company. 

Louise Marguerite Renaud married Octave Barios in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in July 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Jean Renaud married Charlotte Ledike and settled near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, on the lower Atchafalaya, by the late 1860s. 

.

A Foreign-French Renaud settled on the western prairies during the late antebellum period:

Descendants of Aristide Prosper or Prosper Aristide RENAUD (?-)

Prosper Aristide or Aristide Prosper Renaud, a merchant, probably widower of Aglae Arnaud, Auvet, or Renaut, remarried to Marie Victoire Élisabeth, daughter of Acadian Joseph Trahan, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1851.  Two of his sons by his first wife settled in St. Martin and St. Landry parishes and served Louisiana in uniform during the War Between the States.  One of them became a "galvanized Yankee," but the other served his state honorably:

1

Older son Aristide, fils, by his father's first wife, born in c1837, married Eliza Bossier or Bonin in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in September 1856.  He worked as a clerk.  Their son Eugène Raoul, called Raoul, was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1857 but died at age 5 in July 1862, and Paul Fernand was born in February 1863.  During the War of 1861, Aristide, fils served in Company C of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Aristide, fils enlisted in St. Martin Parish in March 1862; he was 25 years old.  He joined his company in Virginia and was present for duty until June 1862, when he was absent sick at Lynchburg.  He returned to his unit in July and was present for duty until he was absent sick again that autumn and early winter, this time in Richmond.  He returned to his regiment in January 1863 but was absent sick, once again in Lynchburg, in May and August.  As a result, he missed the Gettysburg Campaign of June and July in which his brother Alfred was captured.  Aristide, fils returned to his regiment in August and was present for duty until he, too, fell into the hands of the enemy, at Darksville, near Winchester, Virginia, in September 1864.  The federals sent him to Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, and then on to the prisoner-of-war compound at Camp Lookout, Maryland, where he remained until he was paroled and exchanged at Coxes Landing, on the James River below Richmond, in February 1865.  He does not appear on the roll of Lee's soldiers who surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse the following April, so one wonders what happened to him after his exchange. 

2

Younger son Alfred, by his father's first wife, married Julie, daughter of French Creole Antoine Perret, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1859.  He worked as a printer.  During the War of 1861, Alfred served in Company C of the 6th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--another of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  His Confederate service was very different from that of his brother Aristide, fils.  Alfred enlisted in Company C at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in June 1861 and followed his regiment to Virginia.  In the spring of 1862, he was detailed as a nurse in an undisclosed hospital, probably in Richmond.  The following July and August, when his regiment was heavily engaged with Lee's army in northern Virginia, Alfred was absent without leave.  He returned to his company, however, and was reported sick that autumn.  Back with his company later that autumn, he was present for duty until he was taken prisoner on the retreat from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in July 1863.  The Federals sent him to Fort McHenry, Maryland, and then to the prisoner-of-war camp at Camp Delaware.  The prisoner-of-war experience was not to his liking; in August he took the oath of allegiance to the United States government and joined the 3rd Regiment Delaware Cavalry, enlisting for the duration of the war.  One wonders if, after the war was over, this "galvanized Yankee," who deserted the Southern cause, had the nerve to return to St. Landry Parish. 

.

A Renaud who settled in St. Martin Parish during the late antebellum period was neither French Creole nor Foreign French but an Afro Creole perhaps once owned by a member of the family:

Jacques Renaud, a couleur libre, or free colored, married Divine Wiltz.  Their son  Jacques, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1846, Victor in October 1852, and Charles in June 1857. 

CONCLUSION

Two Renaud sisters from Île St.-Jean came to Louisiana from France in 1785, the only Acadians with the name to settle in the colony.  The Acadian branch of the family, then, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  Renauds or Reynauds in South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.  One Renaud family in St. Martin Parish was, in fact, couleur libre, or free persons of color. 

The family's name also is spelled Raynaud, Rayneaud, Reinaud, Renau, Renauld, Renault, Renaut, Renaux, Reneaud, Reneaux, Renneau, Renoult, Reyna, Reynaud. Reyneau, Reynouth.  [See also Book Ten]

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 1279-80, 1663, 2137, 2252, 2284; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:451, 454, 456, 2:281-82, 3:247, 249; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:136, 162; Fortier, Louisiana, 1:53; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 26, 317, 364, 377-78; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Higginbotham, Old Mobile, 222, 271, 345, 443, 447; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7; <perso.orange.fr./froux/St_malo_arrivees/Antelope.htm>, Family No. 4;  <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, "Family" No. 58; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family No. 29; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 32-33, 73, 86-87; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 52-53, 129, 147; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 690-92; White, DGFA-1, 1370-71; White, DGFA-1 English, 290.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Colette RENAUD 01 Nov 1785 Asp?, BR born 5 Feb 1739, Havre-St.-Pierre, baptized 6 Feb 1739, St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean; daughter of Jean RENAUD dit Arnaud & Marie-Madeleine POTHIER; sister of Véronique; at Havre-St.-Pierre/Havre-aux-Sauvages, Aug 1752, age 13; deported from Île St.-Jean to France 1758-59, age 19; married, age 23, René LE TULLIER of Roville, bishopric of Constances, lower Normandy, France, c1762, probably Cherbourg, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault, France, to Nantes, France, 7 Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Collette RENAUD, widow TUILLIER, with 2 unnamed sons, & 1 unnamed daughter; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 45, widow, head of family; received from Spanish on arrival 1 each of axe, medium axe, shovel, & knife, 2 hoes
Véronique RENAUD 02 Nov 1785 Asp born c1747, probably Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean; daughter of Jean RENAUD dit Arnaud & Marie-Madeleine POTIER; sister of Colette; at Havre-St.-Pierre/Havre-aux-Sauvages, Aug 1752, age 5; deported from Île St.-Jean to France 1758-59, age 11; married, age 21, Jean-François, called François, DE LA MAZIÈRE, son of perhaps Jean-Baptiste MASSIER dit Ladouceur & Marie POIRIER of Île St.-Jean, c1768, probably Cherbourg, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in First Convoy from Châtellerault, France, to Nantes, France, Oct 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with husband, 1 unnamed son, & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 37; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, called Véronique RENEAUD, age 37[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 2 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 37[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 2 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Veronica RENAU, age 45[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 3 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Véronique BREAU[sic], age 46[sic], with husband, 1 son, & 3 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 50, with husband, 1 son, & 3 daughters

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 39 (pl. 10L), calls her Colette RENNEAU veuve TOULLIER, & lists her with her husband & 3 children; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2137, her father's profile in the Île St.-Jean section, calls her Colette [RENAUD dit Arnaud], says she was born in 1739, gives her parents' names, lists her siblings, including sister Véronique, born in 1747, & says her father settled at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in 1724 & lived at Havre au Sauvage; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 377, her birth/baptismal record, recorded at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, calls her Collette RENAUD, gives her parents' names, & says her godparents were Louis POTIER & Marie-Magdeleine URINEAU; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 72, Family No. 146, calls her Collette RENAUD, details her birth/baptism, gives her parents' names, calling her mother Marie-Magdeleine POITIER, says she married René LE TUILLIER in c1762 but gives no place of marriage, says he was born in c1734 "in the parish of Roville, bishopric of Constances in Lower Normandy," does not give his parents' names, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial record of son Miche-Marin LE TUILLIER, born c1773 but gives no birthplace, died age 2 & buried 20 Nov 1775, St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, &, listing her husband & children Jean-Charles [LE TUILLIER], Augustin [LE TUILLIER], Isidore [LE TUILLIER], Marie-Rose [LE TUILLIER], Adélaïde [LE TUILLIER], & Félicité [LE TUILLIER], details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 129, Family No. 235, calls her Colette RENAUD, says she was born in 1739 on Île St.-Jean, gives her parents' names, calls her mother Marie-Madeleine POITIER, says she married René LETUILLIER in c1762 but gives no place of marriage, says he was born in c1734, gives his birth place, says he died at age 50 & was buried 29 Jan 1784 at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, includes the birth/baptismal, marriage, & death/burial records of son Augustin Bon LETUILLIER, died age 9 & buried 2 Jul 1776, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, & daughter Marie-Rose LETUILLIER, born c1765 "in the Parish of Sainte-Trinité of Cherbourg in Normandy," married Jean-Baptiste LEGENDRE 9 Sep 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, &, listing her husband & children Jean-Charles [LE TUILLIER], Augustin [LE TUILLIER], Isidore [LE TUILLIER], Marie-Rose [LE TUILLIER], Adélaïde [LE TUILLIER], & Félicité [LE TUILLIER], details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 68-68, calls her Colette RENNEAU, veuve TOUILLIER, age 45, on the embakation list, Coleda BAINEAUD, on the debarkation list, & Colette RENAUD, widow LETULLIER, age 45, on the complete listing, says she was in the 11th Family aboard L'Amitié with son Jean-Charles LETULLIER, charpentier/carpenter, age 19, son Isidore LETULLIER, age 14, & daughter Adélaïde LETULLIER, age 16, details her marriage, says she married René LETULLIER in c1762 but gives no place of marriage, gives her but not his parents' names, says he died in 1784 but gives no place of death, that daughter Adélaïde TULLIER married Jean-Marie TRAHAN 13 Feb 1790 but gives no place of marriage, & lists the implements the Spanish gave her after she reached LA.  See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:143. 

Her sister Véronique's family was 2 up from hers on the embarkation list of L'Amitié.  

Did she & her children follow her sister Véronique to upper Bayou Lafourche before moving up to Baton Rouge?  After reaching LA, Colette seems to disappear from the records.  However, her children are well documented.  Daughter Adélaïde TULLIER, called "Adélaïde of Baton Rouge," giving a clue as to where Colette settled, married Jean-Marie TRAHAN in Feb 1790 probably at Baton Rouge (the marriage is recorded in Pointe Coupée because there was no church at Baton Rouge until 1793).  Son Jean-Charles married Flore-Adélaïde DAIGLE in Jul 1790; this marriage also was recorded in Pointe Coupée, so the couple probably resided at Baton Rouge.  Son Isidore married Marie-Louise DAIGLE, his brother's wife's sister, at St.-Gabriel in Sep 1790.  See BRDR, 2:709-10.  St.-Gabriel was just downriver from Baton Rouge, & priest from that settlement also administered the sacraments to Baton Rouge settlers until 1793.  Colette's husband's family, as noted, was from lower Normandy.  The TULLIERs in the Confederate Army, probably descendants of Jean-Charles & Isidore, came from West Baton Rouge Parish, another clue as to where Colette and her children settled.  Note in <thecajuns.com/1785acad.pdf> that a single family from L'Amitié, which the Spanish called La Amistad, settled at Baton Rouge.  This doubtlessly was Colette's family.  

02.  Wall of Names, 39 (pl. 10L), calls her Véronique RENNEAU, & lists her with her husband & 3 children; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2137, her father's profile in the Île St.-Jean section, calls her Véronique [RENAUD dit Arnaud], says she was born in 1747, gives her parents' names, lists her siblings, including sister Colette, born in 1739, & says her father settled at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in 1724 & lived at Havre au Sauvage; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 32-33, Family No. 65, calls her Véronique RENAUD, says she was born in c1749 but gives no birthplace, does not give her parents' names, says she married Jean-François DE LA MAZIÈRE in c1768 but gives no place of marriage, says he was born in c1749 but gives no birthplace, includes the birth/baptismal record of daughter Marguerite DE LA MAZIÈRE, baptized 20 Jul 1775, La Chapelle-Roux, goddaughter of René LE TUILLIER (her maternal uncle by marriage) & Collette RENAUD (her maternal aunt), &, mentioning son Jean-François [DE LA MAZIÈRE], details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 52, Family No. 99, calls her Véronique RENAUD, says she was born in c1749 but gives no birthplace, does not give her parents' names, says she married Jean-François DE LA MAZIÈRE in c1768, "probably at Cherbourg," that he was born in c1749 but gives no birthplace, does not give his parents' names, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of son Jean-Baptiste DE LA MAZIÈRE, baptized 15 Apr 1777, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, daughter Louise-Cécile DE LA MAZIÈRE, baptized 22 Nov 1778, Marguerite DE LA MAZIÈRE, died age 5 & buried 4 Oct 1780, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, daughter Rose-Jeanne DE LA MAZIÈRE, baptized 23 Nov 1781, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, & daughter Marie DE LA MAZIÈRE, baptized 18 Jan 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, died 6 June 1783, probably Chantenay, &, mentioning son Jean-François [DE LA MAZIÈRE], details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 66-67, calls her Véronique RENNEAU, sa [Jean-François DE LA MASIÈRE's] femme, age 37, on the embarkation list, does not include her on the debarkation list, calls her Véronique RENAUD, his [Jean-François DE LA MAZIÈRE's] wife, age 37, on the complete listing, says she was in the 9th Family aboard L'Amitié with her husband & 3 children, &, calling her Véronique RENAUD, says she & her husband married in c1768 but gives no place of marriage, does not give her or his parents' names, & says daughter Rose-Jeanne DE LA MAZIÈRE was baptized in 1781 but gives no place of baptism. See also See also De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:143; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 33, 52, 77, 128, 165; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 509.

Her sister Colette's family was 2 down from hers on the embarkation list of L'Amitié.  

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