APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

DUBOIS

[doo-BWAH, DOO-bwah]

ACADIA

Dubois is a common surname in France, so it is no surprise that a number of Dubois families lived in greater Acadia before Le Grand Dérangement:  

Julien Dubois dit Voyer, born in c1658, married Marie Deschamps at Port-Royal in c1687.  They had two children.  Their son Joseph, born at Port-Royal in c1688, did not live long enough to start a family of his own.  In 1701, Julien dit Voyer, his wife, and two children were living on Rivière-de-l'Ascension in the Minas area.  By 1714, they had moved up to Pigiguit; both of their children were dead by then.  

~

Jean Dubois, probably no kin to Julien, married Marie, daughter of Jean Bourg, at Port-Royal in c1690.  Jean died three years later, before he fathered any children.  Marie remarried to Charles Robichaud dit Cadet, a widower, at Port-Royal in June 1703.

~

François Dubois, a master tailor born at Dinan, Brittany, France, probably no kin to the other Duboiss, married Marguerite, daughter of François Dufaux of Plaisance, Newfoundland, probably at Plaisance in c1710.  They had two children, including a son, François, fils, who did not survive to create a family of his own.  François, père died by 1716, when Marguerite remarried to François Dardy dit Chaufournier.  In January 1733, Marguerite remarried again--her third marriage--to Jean Simonet dit Berry at Louisbourg on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island.

~

Jean Dubois, probably unrelated to the other Duboiss, born in France in c1700, reached Acadia by 1721, the year he married Anne, daughter of Michel Vincent, at Grand-Pré.  They settled at Grand-Pré before moving on the Petitcoudiac.  They had at least eight children.  At least two of them were born at Grand-Pré before the family moved to Petitcoudiac:  Jean-Pierre in February 1722, and Geneviève in December 1723.  Jean's son Honoré, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1739, married Marthe, daughter of Charles Bélanger, at L'Islet, Québec, in May 1764 during Le Grand Dérangement.

~

Didier, a gardener, son of Nicolas Dubois and Marie Primeau of Bénon, La Rochelle, France, born in c1699, married Jeanne, daughter of François Abelin, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in July 1722.  Didier was probably no kin to the other Duboiss of Acadia.  He left no record of having fathered any children.  

~

Alexis-Bertrand, son of Alexis-Guillaume Dubois and Jeanne-Marguerite LaFontaine Gaillard of St.-Malo, France, born in c1744, married Marguerite Lacroix on Île St.-Pierre, an island off the southern coast of Newfoundland, in July 1771.  His relationship to the other Duboiss of greater Acadia is anyone's guess.

~

Jean-Baptiste dit Dumont, son of René Dubois, a carpenter, was born at Montréal between 1683 and 1688.  He married Marie, daughter of Acadian André Simon dit Boucher, at Port-Royal in May 1710.  They moved to Minas, where Jean-Baptiste died at Grand-Pré in November 1713, in his late 20s.  Jean-Baptiste dit Dumont and Marie had two children, including a son, Joseph dit Dumont, born at Port-Royal in March 1712.  Joseph dit Dumont married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vecot, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in February 1739.  Joseph dit Dumont chose as his surname not Dubois but his father's dit, Dumont.  His daughter Hélène, who came to Louisiana in July 1785 aboard one of the Seven Ships from France, called herself a Dumont, not a Dubois.  

~

Joseph Dubois, a seaman, probably not kin to the other Duboiss, born probably in France in c1725, married Anne, daughter of Acadians Louis Michel and Marguerite Forest, in c1756.  They most likely settled at Cap-Sable, where they had at least one child, a daughter.  In the fall of 1758, the British rounded up more Acadians in the Cap-Sable area and sent them to the prison compound at Halifax.  The British did not deport Joseph, Anne, and their daughter to France until the middle of December 1759, so they may have been among the Cap-Sable Acadians who escaped the roundup in the fall of 1758 but turned themselve in to the British the following year.  Daughter Marguerite-Ange, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1757, survived childhood, married in France, and emigrated to Louisiana.  [See also Book Three]

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA: RIVER SETTLEMENTS

The first Acadian Dubois to seek refuge in Louisiana came aboard one of the Seven Ships from France in 1785 and settled briefly on the river above New Orleans:

Marguerite-Ange, age 31, daughter of Joseph Dubois and Anne Michel of Cap-Sable and widow of Jean Daigle, crossed to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  With her was son Jean-Louis Daigle, age 10.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge, where Marguerite-Ange remarried to Charles-Benoît, son of fellow Acadians Joseph Granger and Marguerite Gautrot of Grand-Pré and widower of Marie LeBlanc, in September 1787.  In January 1792, Marguerite-Ange remarried again--her third marriage--to Marin, son of fellow Acadians Honoré Gautreaux and his first wife Marguerite Robichaux and widower of Gertrude Bourg, at Ascension on the Acadian Coast.  By the mid-1790s, they had left the river and moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marguerite-Ange died in Assumption Parish in June 1817, age 60.  

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Another Dubois came from France in 1785 aboard one of the Seven Ships.  His connection to greater Acadia, however, is difficult to establish: 

Jacques-Olivier, age 19, was an unmarried sailor when he came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November 1785.  With him was his mother, Marguerite Vallois, his stepfather Zacharie Boudrot (her fourth husband), and a 15-year-old Boudrot stepbrother.  Within days of his arrival, Jacques-Olivier married a fellow Acadian exile from France at New Orleans:  

Descendants of Jacques-Olivier DUBOIS (1766-?; ?)

Jacques-Olivier, called Jaco or Jacos and Olivier, son of Olivier Dubois and Marguerite Vallois, was born at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France, in January 1766.  His mother may have been a Frenchwoman who was married to Pierre Dubois before she married Jacques's father Olivier, a sailor.  (One wonders if Olivier was an Acadian or a native of France like Marguerite.)  After his father died, his mother, when Jacques-Olivier was in his early teens, remarried again, to Acadian Étienne Térriot at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay near Nantes in November 1780.  She remarried yet again--her fourth marriage--to Acadian Zacharie Boudrot of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1782.  By then, Jacques-Olivier probably had become a sailor like his father, but he did not choose to remain in France.  He followed his mother and new stepfather, along with a younger stepbrother, to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Joseph-François Michel and Anne Daigle, at New Orleans in late November 1785 soon after he reached the colony.  Marie was a native of St.-Servan near St.-Malo and had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, with her widowed mother and a sister, so Jacques may have known her in France, or perhaps they met in New Orleans soon after he reached the city.  They followed their families to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They may have lived for a time in New Orleans, where two of their children were baptized in the early 1790s.  If so, they returned to the upper Lafourche.  Their daughter married into the Pinel family.  Jacques-Olivier fathered eight sons.  His three youngest moved to the western prairies in the 1820s, creating a new center of family settlement, but his older sons remained on Bayou Lafourche.  The Duboiss of South Louisiana who are possibly Acadian are descended from Jacques-Olivier and his many sons. 

1

Oldest son Joseph-Marcellin, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in December 1788, married Marguerite Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Boudreaux and Marie Modeste Trahan and widow of Guillaume Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1810.  Marguerite-Marie, a native of St.-Similien near St.-Malo, France, was five and a half years older than Joseph-Marcellin and had come to Louisiana in 1785 on the first of the Seven Ships.  Their son Prudent Théodule was born in Assumption Parish in April 1812, and Antoine Valéry in October 1816. 

Prudent died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1833.  He was only 21 years old and did not marry.  

2

Louis-André, born probably at Lafourche in c1791, married Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Henry and his second wife Marie Madeleine Bernard and widow of Jean Constant Boudreaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1813.  Ursule, a native of France who had come to Louisina in 1785 aboard one of the Seven Ships, was 16 years older than Louis-André and age 38 when they married. Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Louis-André remarried to Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Thibodeaux and Marie Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1823.  Their son Louis Landry was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1828, Olivier Leufroi in September 1830, a 2-year-old child, perhaps Olivier, died in Assumption Parish in September 1833, Sylvain le jeune was born in c1832, and Zéphirin or Zéphir Théodule in August 1833.  In December 1827, Louis André sold land in Terrebonne Parish to the widow of Governor Henry Schuyler Thibodaux.  Louis André died in Assumption Parish in May 1834; the priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was 46 years old when he died, but he was closer to 43.  

2a

Sylvain le jeune, by his second wife, died in Lafourche Parish in August 1853.  He was only 21 years old and did not marry.  

2b

Zéphir, by his second wife, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Élise Dugas, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1855.  Their son Louis Valfroi was born near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in July 1856 but died the following November.  Zéphir remarried to Adeline, daughter of Édouard Pelletier and Marcelline Berthelot, at the Labadieville church in September 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Zéphir may have served in Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Zéphir remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin Hébert and his Creole wife Baselisse Gros, at the Labadieville church in January 1865.  

3

Joseph-Antoine, called Antoine, born perhaps at Lafourche in September 1792 and baptized at New Orleans the following November, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Aucoin and Perrine Marguerite Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1822.  Their son Zenon Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in March 1826, and Zenon Zedéon in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1836.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Dubois families. 

During the War of 1861-65, the younger Zenon served in Company B of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which included many conscripts from Assumption Parish, including Zenon.  The experience proved fatal.  He died at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in April 1863; he was only 26 years old.  

4

Narcisse-Olivier, called Olivier, born at Assumption in February 1798, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Jean Thibodeaux and Brigide Guérin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1819.  They lived for a time on the western prairies but returned to the Lafourche.  Their son Frédéric was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 8 months, in August 1828, Aurelien Florentin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1831, Ulysse Noël in December 1836, Drosin Zephyr in December 1840, and Jean Baptiste in May 1843.  They also had an older son named Fergus O.  Their daughters married into the Darce, Hébert, and Trahan families. 

4a

Fergus's succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1846; he would have been in his mid-20s.  Judging by the names of his heirs--his father and two sisters--he probably did not marry.  

4b

Aurelien married first cousin Mélasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Dubois and Marie Aucoin, his paternal aunt and uncle, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1853.  Their son Joseph Aurelius was born in Assumption Parish in May 1854, and Sylvère Patrice in March 1857.  During the War of 1861-65, Aurelien served in Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which included many conscripts from Assumption Parish, including Aurelien.  The experience proved fatal.  He died at City Hospital, Vicksburg, Mississippi, in February 1863; he was 31 years old.  

4c

Ulysse married Mathilde, daughter of Romaine LeBoeuf and his Acadian wife Phelonise Hébert of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1861.  They settled near Chacahoula after the War of 1861-65.  

4d

During the War of 1861-65, Jean Baptiste served in Company F of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  While waiting for his unit to be exchanged, Jean Baptiste married Osceana or Otiana, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste LeBlanc and his Creole wife Adèle Peltier of Lafourche Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1863.  

5

Paul was born perhaps at Assumption in February 1800 and baptized at New Orleans the following May.  His succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1846; he would have been 46 years old that year; his succession record was filed at the Houma courthouse in May 1847.  Judging by the names of his heirs--a brother and a niece--he probably did not marry.  

6

Marcellin, born at Assumption in August 1801, followed his brothers to Lafayette Parish and married Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Mire and Émilie Guilbeau, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1825.  They remained in Lafayette Parish.

7

Sylvain Célestin, born at Assumption in September 1805, followed his brothers to Lafayette Parish, where he married Rose Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Élisabeth Landry and widow of Jean Pierre Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1826.  They, too, remained in Lafayette Parish.  

8

Youngest son Hubert Zenon, called Zenon, born in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s, followed his older brothers to Lafayette Parish, where he married Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pierre Landry and Adélaïde Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1827.  They lived in Lafayette Parish before moving to lower Bayou Teche.  

Other DUBOISs in the Lafourche/Terrebonne Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Dubois in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Louis Dubois married Acadian Adèle Guidry.  Their daughter married into the Naquin family in 1861.  

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

In the 1820s, three Dubois brothers from upper Bayou Lafourche settled in Lafayette Parish and created a western branch of the family:

Descendants of Marcellin DUBOIS (1801-; ?, Olivier)

Marcellin, sixth son of Jacques-Olivier Dubois and Marie-Madeleine Michel, born at Assumption in August 1801, married Élise, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Mire and Émilie Guilbeau, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1825.  Their daughters married into the Babineaux, Boudreaux, and Kiggs families.  Marcellin's sons remained in Lafayette Parish.  

1

Oldest son Marcellin, fils, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 4 months, in March 1826, married Alzire, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Don Louis Broussard and Anastasie Landry, at the Vermilionville church in February 1844.  Their son Émilien was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1844, Jean Clerville in August 1846, Louis in August 1849, Hubert in June 1858, and Marcellin III near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in February 1861.  Their daughter married into the Lalonde family.  Marcellin, fils's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in February 1866; he would have been 40 years old that year. 

Louis married Alida, daughter of fellow Acadians Clément Mire and Estelle Breaux, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1870. 

2

Clerville, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 4 months, in August 1827, married fellow Acadian Carmelite Hébert probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Louis O'Neil was born in May 1859.  Clerville likely remarried to fellow Acadian Marguerite Landry in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1868.  They settled near Youngsville. 

3

Clémile was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 6 months, in May 1832.  During the War of 1861-65, Clémile, with brothers Aladin and Désiré, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

4

Aladin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 6 months, in March 1836.  During the War of 1861-65, Aladin, with brothers Clémile and Désiré, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry.  According to once source, Aladin "died at home, on Furlough, fall of 1862."  The same source, however, shows him wounded at Vicksburg on 27 June 1863.  Aladin married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Comeaux and Marguerite Granger and widow of John Bell, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1865.  Their son Lucien was born near Youngsville in January 1867.  Aladin remarried to Céleste Ozea, called Ozea, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Osémé Boudreaux and Amelina Cormier, at the Youngsville church in January 1868.  Their son Joseph Osémé was born near Youngsville in November 1869. 

5

Youngest son Désiré was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, Désiré, with brothers Clémile and Aladin, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry. 

Descendants of Sylvain Célestin DUBOIS (1805-; ?, Olivier)

Sylvain Célestin, seventh son of Jacques-Olivier Dubois and Marie-Madeleine Michel, born at Assumption in September 1805, married Rose Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Élisabeth Landry and widow of Jean Pierre Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1826.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  

Aurelien was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1830. 

Descendants of Hubert Zenon DUBOIS (1810s-1856; ?, Olivier)

Hubert Zenon, called Zenon, eighth and youngest son of Jacques-Olivier Dubois and Marie-Madeleine Michel, born probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s, married Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pierre Landry and Adélaïde Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1827.  They moved to lower Bayou Teche probably in the late 1840s.  Zenon died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1856; the priest who recorded his burial said that Hubert Zenon was 42 years old when he died, but he probably was older; his succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in May 1859. 

1

Older son Drosin, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 4 1/2 months, in July 1832, married Valérie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Boudreaux and Marie Zeline Landry, at the Vermilionville church in May 1852.  Their son Césaire was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1853.  Drosin remarried to French Creole Ophelia Dartes and settled probably in St. Mary Parish.  Their son Pierre Neuville was born in March 1861.  Drosin died in November 1866; the New Iberia priest who recorded the burial did not bother to give any parents' names, mention a wife, or even give Derosain's age, as he called him, at the time of his death; Drosin was only 34 years old; his succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, later in the month, so he probably had settled in that parish. 

2

Younger son Joseph Homere was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1850. 

Other DUBOISs on the Western Prairies

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link some Dubois in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Désiré Dubois married Acadian Céleste Broussard in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1825.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marrelienne Dubois married Acadian Théoville Guidry in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Dubois is a common name in France.  Members of the family came to colonial Louisiana over half a century before their Acadian namesakes arrived.  Most settled at New Orleans:

Joseph Dubois died at New Orleans in July 1724.  He was only about 14 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give his parents' names.  

François Dubois, a master cooper from Daubord near Rochfort, France, died at New Orleans September 1725.  He was 62 years old.  

Marie-Jeanne Dubois, wife of former sergeant of Swiss troops N. Jacquet, died at New Orleans in May 1733.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names, her birthplace, or her age at the time of her death.  

François Dubois married Jeanne ____ and settled at Pointe Coupée.  Their daughter Augustine married Pierre, son of Jacques LePorche of Pluneret, Vannes, France, at Pointe Coupée in September 1737.  

Jean-Baptiste Dubois of Issoudon, Berry, France, was a soldier when he came to New Orleans in 1741.  After his discharge from the army in 1747, he moved to Natchitoches Post on Red River, where he married fellow Issoudon native Marie-Jeanne-Josèphe Clairemont in 1751.  They settled at Grand Écore, above the post, where two of their sons--Jean-Baptiste-François and Antoine-Philippe--remained.  A third son, Valentin-Jean-Baptiste, married to Rose Chelette of the German Coast, settled downriver near Rapides Post, now Pineville, across from Alexandria, in the late 1780s.  In April 1815, a few months after the Battle of New Orleans, Jean Baptiste, son of François Dubois of the Natchitoches area, died from illness "at the home of Michel Prudhomme ... near the church" at Opelousas.  Jean Baptiste was on his way home from military service; he was only 18 years old.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Rapides Parish counted 13 slaves on Valentine Dubois's farm.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Winn Parish counted 16 slaves living in 2 houses on Valentine Dubois's farm.  In October 1860, the federal census taker in Natchitoches Parish counted 7 slaves living in 3 houses on Samuel P. Dubois's farm. 

Gabriel-Joseph Dubois, a broker, married Louise-Élisabeth, called Élisabeth, Bonnier probably at New Orleans in the 1740s.  He served as a militia officer and burgher of the city.  Their son Nicolas-Gabriel was born at New Orleans in December 1750.  Their daughters married into the Carriere, Delalande de Ferrieres, and Oro families.  

A Dubois was one of the purchasers in the public auction of Jesuit properties at New Orleans in July 1763. 

An unnamed male infant whose Dubois father was a mason died at New Orleans in December 1773.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the parents' names, only the surname.  

An unnamed male infant, surname Dubois, died at New Orleans, age 8 months, in April 1785.  

Basile Dubois married ______.  Their son Jean-Baptiste was baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in April 1785.  

Roselin Dubois died in New Orleans at age 3 in December 1788.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names.  One wonders if she was a daughter of Acadian Jacques-Olivier Dubois.

Pierre, native of New Orleans, son of Antoine Dubois of Mobile and Jeanne Martin, married Madeleine, daughter of  Jean-Francois or Francois-Jean Ardi of Burgundy, France, probably at New Orleans by the early 1790s.  Madeleine also was a native of the city.    

Charles Dubois of Illinois died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1794.  He was only 22 years old and still a bachelor.  

Pierre Dubois married Marie LeBlanc probably at St.-Jacques.  Their daughter married into the Primeaux family and settled in the Atakapas District.  

Françoise of Fort Pitt, later Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jean Dubois, died at New Orleans in September 1799.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give her age at the time of her death.  

Guillaume-Germain, son of Guillaume Dubois and Louise Durel of Briquebet, Normandy, France, and living at Baton Rouge, married Esther, daughter of Acadian Bonaventure LeBlanc and widow of Pierre Longuépée, at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville in May 1801.  Their daughter married into the Hébert and Morales families.  Guillaume Germain died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1815; he was 50 years old.  

.

Two French Duboiss, one from Paris, the other from Brittany, came to Louisiana during the late colonial period and settled not at New Orleans or on the river above the city but in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley and on the western prairies near their Acadian namesakes, complicating the family's genealogical picture in those areas.  Many of their children and grandchildren married Acadians:

Descendants of François DUBOIS (?-)

François, son of André Dubois and Marguerite Mothe of Paris, married Madeleine-Marguerite, daughter of Acadian Eustache Bertrand and widow of Moïse LeBlanc, at Ascension in August 1792.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Duroche families.  François's younger son, the only one who married, moved down bayou to Lafourche Interior Parish, and François's grandsons moved farther down into the Terrebonne country. 

1

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in July 1793, probably died young.  

2

Younger son François-André, born at Ascension in January 1798, married Geneviève Derocher or Durocher in the early 1820s.  Their son François Urbin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1821, Jean Maxime Isidore in December 1822, Étienne Telesphore, called Elese or Ellis, in December 1827, Joseph Apollinaire Léon, called Apollinaire, in July 1829, Pierre in April 1832, and Gabriel Abraham in February 1843.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Chiasson, Henry, LeBoeuf, and Rodrigue families.  Their sons settled in Terrebonne Parish.  

2a

Jean married Adeline, 14-year-old daughter of Acadian Charles Bourg, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1847.  Their son Joseph François Augustin was born in Terrebonne Parish August 1850, and Joseph Dominique in August 1859. 

2b

Ellis married Eulalie, daughter of German Creole Auguste Pichoff, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1856.  Their son Célestin Euphrosin was born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1858, and Ludger Briel in March 1861. 

2c

Apollinaire married Celina, daughter of Damien Martin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1858.  Their son Lubin Sylvanie was born in Terrebonne Parish in March 1861. 

2d

Gabriel married Susanne Nede probably in Terrebonne Parish in the late 1860s.  They settled near Montegut.  

Descendants of Pierre DUBOIS (c1768-)

Pierre, age 29, resident of Attakapas for 4 years and of Louisiana for 12 years, with no family in the colony, son of Vincent Dubois and Jeanne Gourdel of Lo, Vanes, Brittany, France, married Julienne, daughter of French Creole Jean Dartes of Castres, Bordeaux, at Attakapas in April 1797.  They settled on lower Bayou Teche and then, in the 1810s, on the lower Vermilion.  Their daughters married into the Broussard, Pivauteau, and Trahan families.  Pierre's succession records were filed at the St. Martinville and Vermilionville courthouses in October 1822 and June 1823; he would have been in his early 50s.  Most of his six sons married, and most took Acadian wives.  Many of his grandsons moved south to Vermilion Parish, and many of them also took Acadian brides. 

1

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Attakapas in March 1802, married Acadian Adeline or Adélaïde Trahan in the 1820s.  Their son Pierre III was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1829, Ursin le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 22 months, in October 1835, Lessin at age 6 months in June 1836, and Adrien was born in January 1844.  Their daughters married into the Bozance, Bourg, Hébert, Libersat, and Montault families. 

1a

Ursin le jeune married French Canadian Célanie Istre in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1855.  Their son Jules was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1859, and Ursin, fils near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in January 1870. 

1b

Pierre III married Acadian Élise, called Lise, Landry at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in February 1858.  Their son Ulgère was born near Abbeville in December 1859, Eugène in March 1860, Oscar in December 1861, Théogène in July 1862, and Philemon was baptized at the Abbeville church, age 3 months, in July 1866. 

1c

Lessin married French Creole Rosalie Dronet at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in November 1859.  Their son Lessin, fils was born near Abbeville in August 1866. 

1d

Adrien married Elmire, daughter of Acadian Philemon Landry, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in May 1869. 

2

Ursin, born at Attakapas in May 1804, died at the home of Nestor Tesanier in St. Martin Parish in November 1826.  Ursin was only 22 years old and probably did not marry.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, the following January.  

3

Philemon, born in St. Martin Parish in December 1808, married Sylvanie, daughter of Acadian Pierre Paul Thibodeaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in July 1834.  Their son Lasty was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 5 months, in April 1838, and Alcide was born in July 1841.  Their daughters married into the Brasseaux, Broussard, Frederick, and Landry families.  

Lasty married Acadian Emma Landry at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in January 1859.  Their son Joseph Amédée was born near Abbeville in December 1863, and Louis Philemon in March 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Lasty served in Company A of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in the southwestern parishes, which fought Jayhawkers in Louisiana late in the war.  

4

Lucas, born in St. Martin Parish in February 1811, married Angélique, daughter of Acadian Éloi Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1832.  Their son Delma was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in March 1834, Justilien was born in Lafayette Parish in June 1836, and Lucas, fils in August 1842.  Their daughter may have married a Landry cousin.  

5

Alexis, born in St. Martin Parish, in June 1816, died in St. Martin Parish in June 1852.  He was only 36 years old.  The priest who recorded his funeral called him "Mr. Dubois."  Alexis evidently did not marry.  

6

Youngest son Rosémond, born in St. Martin Parish in March 1819, married Melite, daughter of French Canadian François Primeaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1841.  Their daughter married into the Leleux family.  Did Rosémond father any sons? 

~

Duboiss, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, came to the Bayou State during the antebellum period.  Many remained at New Orleans, but some settled in predominantly-Acadian communities on the river and the prairies:  

Louis Dubois of Paris died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1812.  He was only 38 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  

Pierre Dubois married Cécile Demouchet or Desmouchelles.  Their son Joseph was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1810.  Later in the decade, they were living in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

J. F. Dubois, a 33-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Mississippi out of Bordeaux, France, in February 1823.  

____ Dubois, no first name recorded, a 20-year-old Frenchman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Jerome out of Bordeaux in February 1823.  

____ Dubois, no first name recorded, a 40-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Corinne out of Bordeaux in December 1825.  

James Duboist, a 36-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Messenger out of Havana, Cuba, in January 1829.  

Sophie Dubois, a 30-year-old Frenchwoman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Josefa out of Campeche, Mexico, in April 1829.  

M. Dubois, a 21-year-old Frenchwoman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Ernest Hynard out of Le Havre, France, in December 1836.  With her was 3-year-old Ch. Jos. Dubois, probably her son.  

A. Dubois, a 37-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Republican out of Le Havre in October 1838.  On the same ship was Jean Dubois, a 25-year-old farmer from France.  

____ Dubois, no first name recorded, a 40-year-old laborer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vaillant out of Bordeaux in November 1838.  

Jean Bapte. Dubois, a 19-year-old Frenchman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Andrew Scott out of Le Havre in December 1838.  

Octave Dubois, a 17-year-old rentier from Toulouse, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cardinal de Cheveruse out of Bordeaux in February 1839.  

Virginia Dubois, a 28-year-old Frenchwoman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oceana out of Le Havre in June 1841.  

P. Dubois, a 23-year-old tailor from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Bordeaux Packet out of Bordeaux in February 1843.  

Jean Dubois, a 28-year-old Frenchman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Echo out of Le Havre in March 1843.  

Magdalena Dubois, a 57-year-old spinster from France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oregon out of Le Havre in May 1843.  

Charles Lemichel Dubois married German Creole Marie Louise Malbrough.  Their son Charles Guillaume was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1845.  

Const. Dubois, a 30-year-old seamstress from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Mary out of Matagorda, Texas, in May 1845.  

_____ Dubois, no first name recorded, a 22-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Ferrière out of Bordeaux in June 1847.

Nicolas Dubois married Acadian Marie Rosella, called Rosella, Godin.  Their son Vincent Nicolas was born in Ascension Parish in July 1847, and Bernard Dorisini in August 1850.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted a single slave--an 11-year-old black female--on Nicolas Dubois's farm.  In 1860, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish again counted only a single slaves--a 28-year-old black male--on Nicolas Dubois's farm in the parish's Ward 7.  

Auguste Dubois married Madeleine Grandpré probably at Baton Rouge in the late 1840s.  

Paul Vincent Duboi, a 49-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Pie IX out of Havana in February 1849.  

Octave Dubois, a 27-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Alkinaar out of Le Havre in February 1849.  

Richard Dubois, a 42-year-old cooper from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Laure out of Bordeaux in April 1849.  

Richard Dubois of Libourne, Department of La Gironde, France, died in Ascension Parish in June 1849.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give his age, his parents' names, nor mention a wife.  One wonders if he was the Richard Dubois who arrived in New Orleans the previous April.  

L. Dubois, a 30-year-old Frenchwoman and farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Pyramid out of Liverpool, England, in June 1850.  

Mme. Eliza Dubois, a 46-year-old Frenchwoman, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Union out of Vera Cruz, Mexico, in August 1850.  

Pierre Dubois, a 38-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Zanons or Zazons out of Le Havre in December 1851.  He was heading for Texas.  

Claude Dubois, a 27-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Windsor Fay out of Le Havre in May 1852.  

Théophile Dubois's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in June 1852.  

Céleste Dubois died near Baton Rouge in October 1856.  She was 50 years old.  The priest who recorded her burial did not give her parents' names or mention a husband and children.  

Marie Louise Sophie, widow of Laurent Dubois, died at New River, Ascension Parish, in July 1858.  She was 83 years old.  

Constantin Furrate, called Furrate, Dubois married Marie Azema Rodrique.  Their son Émile died near Convent, St. James Parish, age 10, in October 1858.  Their daughter Marie Constance Furrate, called Constance Furrate, married Augustin, son of French Creole Justin Fontenot, at the Convent church in April 1859; Augustin's mother was a Cormier.  Their daughter Marie Louise married Louis Joseph, son of Jean Francoise Balot, at the Convent church in June 1865.  

Auguste, son of Olivier Dubois and Célestine Pintado, married Mary, daughter of Innocentio Bulnez, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1864.  Both Auguste and Mary were natives of East Baton Rouge Parish.  They probably had married civilly.  Their son Auguste, fils had been born near Baton Rouge in September 1857, Joseph in May 1859, Martin Davis had been baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in June 1861, Jean Marie Ulysse was born in June 1865, and Ernest in July 1869.  

Jules Dubois married Louise Henriette Goujon and settled near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche by the mid-1860s. 

Jean Dubois married Acadian Hélène Gaudin.  Their son David Joseph, called Joseph, was born in Ascension Parish in September 1866 but died at age 9 months, 9 days, in July 1867.  

Charles, son of Ulysse Dubois and Evelina Lopez "of New Iberia," married Cécile, daughter of Jules Sellier, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1869.  Was Ulysse also "of New Iberia"?

CONCLUSION

The presence of both Acadian and non-Acadian Duboiss in many South Louisiana communities created a complex genealogical mix for this family.  Duboiss came to Louisiana as early as the 1720s, but their Acadian namesakes did appear until late in the colonial period.  

The only male Acadian Dubois who came to the colony was a young bachelor who arrived aboard one of the Seven Ships from France in 1785 (but his connection to greater Acadia has not been established by this author).  He married a fellow exile from France soon after he reached New Orleans and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  All Duboiss of South Louisiana who may be Acadian are descended from Jacques-Olivier of Cherbourg, France, and his many sons, who either remained on the Lafourche or moved to the western prairies during the 1820s.  By the late antebellum period, Jacques-Olivier's descendants in the western parishes rivaled in numbers their cousins in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley.  None of Jacques-Olivier's descendants appear to have settled on the river before the War of 1861-65.

Most of the Duboiss of Louisiana, however, are French Creole or Foreign French, not putatively Acadian.  Many settled at New Orleans.  One family settled along the Cane and Red rivers near Natchitoches early in the colonial period.  Others settled in predominantly-Acadian communities around Baton Rouge, along the Acadian Coast, in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, and on the western prairies.  Many of these French Creoles, especially on the prairies, married Acadians.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Duboiss of South Louisiana, both Acadian and French Creole, with one exception, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  No Acadian Dubois appears on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860.  The family's only substantial slaveholder in Louisiana was French Creole Valentine Dubois, who held 13 slaves in Rapides Parish in 1850 and 17 slaves in Winn Parish a decade later.  

Dozens of Duboiss, both Acadian and French Creole, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  At least five of them died in Confederate service. ...

The war took a heavy toll on the Dubois' economic status, no matter where they settled.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the lower Mississippi.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  On the western prairies, Federal armies marched three times through the Teche/Vermilion country and burned and pillaged many farms, some of them no doubt owned by Duboiss.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area, adding to the family's misery. ...

The family's name also is spelled Dobois, Duboid, Duvois.  [See Book Ten for the "Acadian" family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension & Rapides parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, Natchitoches, & Winn parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 524, 534-35, 1561, 2088, 2189, 2475; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 165; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:173-74, 2:98, 88-89; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Delaney, "Chronology of the Deportations"; Hall, 26th LA Infantry, 162, 164; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 121-22; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; McMichael, Atlantic Loyalites, 10; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 28-29, 67; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 27; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 242, 283, 561; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 61-62, 163; White, DGFA-1, 553-55; White, DGFA-1 English, 117.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Jacques-Olivier DUBOIS 01 Nov 1785 Asp born & baptized 17 Jan 1766, Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France; called Jaco or Jacos; son of Olivier DUBOIS & Marguerite VALLOIS; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with stepfather Zacharie BOUDRAU, mother, & stepbrothers; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 14[sic], traveled with mother & stepfather's family; married, age 19, Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph-François MICHEL & Anne DAIGLE, 24 Nov 1785, New Orleans, soon after they reached LA on separate ships; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 22, with wife Marie age 23, no children, 6 arpents, & 10 qts. corn; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 25, with wife Marie age 25, son Joseph age 3, daughter Marie-Luce age 1, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 15 qts. corn, 0 horned cattle, 0 horses, 4 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 33, with wife Marie age 32, sons Joseph age 9, Éloy age 7, Antoine age 5, daughters Henriette age 3, & Melanie age 1, 3/50 arpents, 0 slaves
Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS 02 Aug 1785 BR, Asp born c1757, perhaps Cap-Sable; daughter of Joseph DUBOIS & Anne MICHEL; transported from Cap-Sable to Halifax, fall of 1758; deported from Halifax to England, & England to Cherbourg, France, Nov 1759-Jan 1760, arrived Cherbourg, 10 Jan 1760, age 2; sailed from Le Havre to St.-Malo aboard ship Le Joseph, arrived St.-Malo 1 Jul 1768, age 11; at St.-Servan, France, 1768-70; married, age 16, (1)Jean-Baptiste-Amand, son of Pierre DAIGLE & Madeleine GAUTREAUX, 9 Jan 1770, St.-Servan; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Margueritte DUBOIS, with husband & 1 unnamed son; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 29, widow, head of family; married (2)Charles-Benoît, son of Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite GAUTREAUX of Grand-Pré, & widower of Marie LEBLANC, Sep 1787, probably Baton Rouge; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, unnamed, with husband & 2 unnamed others; moved to Lafourche valley; married, age 34, (3)Marin, son of Honoré GAUTREAUX & his first wife Marguerite ROBICHAUX, & widower of Gertrude BOURG, 30 Jan 1792, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Margarita ANGEDUBOIS, age 40[sic], with husband, 1 DAIGLE son, 1 GAUTRAUX daughter, 1 GAUTRAUX stepson, & 2 GAUTRAUX stepdaughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Margueritte, age 41, with husband, 1 GAUTREAU son, 1 GAUTREAU daughter, 1 GAUTREAU stepson, & 1 GAUTREAU stepdaughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Margueritte, no surname given, age 42, with husband, 1 GAUTREAUT son, 1 GAUTREAUT daughter, 1 GAUTREAUT stepson, & 1 GAUTREAUT stepdaughter; died [buried] Assumption 17 Jun 1817, age 60, a widow

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 39 (pl. 10L), calls him Jacques DUBOIS fils a la femme [of Zacarie(sic) BOUDROT], & lists him with his stepfather, mother, & a BOUDROT stepbrother; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2475, the LA section, calls him Jacques DUBOIS, says he married Marie MICHEL but gives no date or place of marriage or any parents' names, says they lived at Donaldsonville, & that their children were Anna-Marie, born in 1787, & Joseph in 1788; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 212, his baptismal record at Trés-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, calls him Jacques-Olivier DUBOIS, calls his father Olivier DUBOIS, matelot, that is, sailor, & Marguerite VALLOIS, & says his godparents were Jacques DE LAUNE & Dorothée GODET; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 27, Family No. 49, calls him Jacques DUBOIS, gives his stepfather & mother's names, & details his family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 68-69, calls him Jques DUBOIS, fils à la femme [of Zacarie BOUDREAU], age 14, on the embarkation list, does not include him on the debarkation list, calls him Jacques DUBOIS, son of the wife [of Zacharie BOUDROT], age 14, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 13th Family aboard L'Amitié with his stepfather, mother, & a stepbrother; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile, 62-63, under Lista parcial de vientitres casamientos acadianos arregalados par Navarro, 20 novembre 1785 [Partial List of 23 marriages Navarro arranged on 20 November 1785], A. Marriages celebrated on 20 November 1785, calls him Jacques DAVOIR, says he was from L'Amitié, calls his wife Marie MICHEL, says she was in the 60th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi, &, calling him Jacobo DUBOIS, native of Normandy, France, details his marriage, calls his wife Maria MIGUEL of St.-Malo, & gives his & her parents' names; NOAR, 4:104, 210 (SLC, M5, 43), his marriage record, calls him Jacobo DUBOIS, "native of Normandy in France," calls his wife Maria MIGUEL, gives his & her parents' names, calls his parents Olivier DUBOIS & Margarita VALO, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Vicente LLORCA & Josef MARTINEZ.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1777-98, 47, 135, 160. 

The baptismal record of one of Jacques's daughters, Escolastica Melania, or Scholastique-Mélanie, dated 13 September 1796, in BRDR, 2:249 (ASM-1, 74), calls her paternal grandparents Olivier DUBOIS & Margarita VALOIS, "Acadians," but where did they live in Acadia?  Was his mother an Acadian, or was she a Frenchwoman?  According to Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 27, 155-56, Families No. 49 & 281, she was born in c1738, place unrecorded, parents unnamed, & was a "resident of the Parish of Saint-Nicolas of Nantes" when she married Zacharie BOUDROT at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in Sep 1782.  She had married her previous husband, Acadian Étienne TERRIOT, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in Nov 1780.  Jacques's baptismal record at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, cited above, names his parents & calls his father a sailor; it does not give their nationality.  That Jacques was born in Cherbourg in early 1766 & that his godparents were Acadians does not "prove" that his parents also were Acadians who came to the mother country from one of the Maritime islands in the late 1750s; they could have been natives of France whose neighbors in Cherbourg just happened to be Acadian exiles.  White, DGFA-1, 201, profile of Zacharie BOUDROT, says Jacques's father Olivier was his mother's second husband, not her first.  Arsenault, Généalogie, cited above, does not help, so we eagerly await Stephen A. White's DGFA-2, which will document Acadian marriages from 1715-80 & perhaps provide the answers to our questions.  So far, this researcher has not established a direct link between Jacques-Olivier & greater Acadia. 

As his baptismal record, cited above, demonstrates, the age given for him on the passenger list of L'Amitié is off by years.

The dit Jaco or Jacos can be found in his son Sylvain's second marriage record, dated 31 Oct 1826, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-C:253 (Laf.Ch.: v.1, #54; Laf.Ct.Hse.: Notatrial Acts: v.5, #701).

02.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls her Margueritte-Ange DUBOIS veuve Jean DAIGRE, & lists her with a son; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 283, Family No. 346, calls her Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS, says she was born in c1757 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, calls her father Joseph DUBOIS, details her first marriage, says "On July 1, 1768, Joseph DUBOIS, Anne MICHEL, his wife and their children: Marguerite, Louis-Marie and Marie-Blanche DUBOIS arrived at St.-Malo from LeHavre on the ship, Le Joseph," & that her father's family resided at St.-Servan from 1768-70; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 67, Family No. 135, calls her Marie-Blanche DUBOIS, gives her mother & stepfather's names, & details her family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Chatellerault, 28-29, Family No. 58, calls her Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS, says she was born in c1754 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, details her first marriage, including her first husband's parents' names, includes the birth/baptismal record of son Jean-Louis DAIGLE, baptized 25 Oct 1774, Pouthume, Châtellerault, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s, noting that in the convoy to Nantes her husband was "absent"; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls her Margueritte-Ange DUBOIS, veuve Jn DAIGRE, age 29, on the embarkation list, calls her Margarita Angela DUBOI, que queda en el Hosp, on the debarkation list, calls her Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS, widow of Jean DAIGLE, age 29, on the complete listing, says she was in the 34th Family on the embarkation list & the 35th Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with a son, & details her first marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, says they married in 1770 but gives no place of marriage; BRDR, 2:250, 320 (ASC-2, 43), the record of her third marriage, calls her Margarita Angel DUBOIS, does not give her or her husband's parents' names, says "all natives of Bayou Lafourche," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph GRANGER & Luc LANDRY; BRDR, 3:279 (ASM-3, 125), her death/burial record, calls her Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS, age 60 yrs., wid. of Martin GAUDREAUX, but does not give her parent's names or other husbands' names.  See also McMichael, Atlantic Loyalites, 10; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 57; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 501.

The baptismal record of son Charles-Auguste GRANGER, dated 25 Apr 1790, in BRDR, 2:332 (ASC-5, 39), calls her Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS, res. Valenzuéla, which was in present-day Assumption Parish.  The marriage record of son Jean-Louis DAIGLE, dated 26 Aug 1799, in BRDR, 2:216 (ASM-2, 43), calls her Margarita ANGEBOIS of Poitou, France.  

Where did her family live in greater Acadia before Le Grand Dérangement?  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 283, & Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 121, say that her younger sister Louise-Marie was "born December 16, 1759 on the English transport which left Halifax and disembarked at Cherbourg on January 14, 1760."  This is our clue.  According to Paul Delaney's "Chronology of Deportations and Migrations of the Acadians, 1755-1816," <acadian-home.org>, on 17 Jan 1760 occurred the "Disembarkation at Cherbourg, France, of the Acadians from Cap-Sable, recently arrived in England and coming from Halifax (deported on November 10, 1759)," so this was them.  The family most likely had lived at Cap-Sable. 

Was her first husband a sailor?  Why else would he have been absent when she & her son traveled from Châtellerault to Nantes in Dec 1775?

[top of page DUBOIS]

Copyright (c) 2007-17  Steven A. Cormier