APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

CLOUÂTRE

[CLUE-ott]

ACADIA

Pierre Cloistre dit Clouâtre, a gunsmith, reached Acadia from France by 1722, the year he married Marguerite, daughter of André LeBlanc, one of the pioneers of the Minas settlement.  Pierre and Marguerite settled at Grand-Pré and had at least a dozen children, including five sons, all born at Minas:  Louis in August 1724, Georges in November 1727, Dominique in May 1729, Pierre-Sylvain in c1740, and Joseph in c1750.  Their daughter Marie-Josèphe was born in April 1723, Anne in March 1744, and Marthe-Marie July 1746.  Daughter Anne's marriage record calls her a native of "St. Jean, Acadia," so the gunsmith and his wife may have lived on French-controlled Île St.-Jean during the 1740s.  Only one of Pierre and Marguerite's sons seems to have married before Le Grand Dérangement:  Third son Dominique married Françoise, daughter of Claude Boudrot, fils and Catherine Hébert, probably at Minas in c1750.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Hébert family at Grand-Pré in October 1747.   [See also Book Three]

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Most, if not all, of the Acadian Clouâtres who came to Louisiana arrived in early 1768 from Port Tobacco, Maryland, with the large party led by brothers Alexis and Honoré Breau of Pigiguit.  After an unfortunate confrontation with the colonial governor, Antonio de Ulloa, Spanish troops escorted the Breau clan, including the Clouâtres, to the new Acadian community of Fort San Luìs de Natchez on the river far above Baton Rouge, where they had not wanted to go.  In 1769, after a revolt against Ulloa ousted the unpopular governor, his successor, General Alejandro O'Reilly, allowed the Breaus and their kin at Natchez to settle where they wanted.  None of them, including the Clouâtres, remained at Natchez.  They moved downriver to the Acadian Coast communities of San Gabriel or St.-Jacques, where Acadians from Maryland had settled in 1766 and 1767: 

Marguerite LeBlanc, age 62, widow of Pierre Cloistre dit Clouâtre, came with four adult children--Pierre-Sylvain, age 27, Anne, age 23, Marthe-Marie, age 21, Joseph, age 18, and perhaps son Louis, age 43.   Marthe died at Fort San Luìs de Natchez of illness and was buried in the fort's cemetery on 30 April 1768.  Anne married Bernard, son of Antoine Capedeville and Catherine Larcosse or Cousan of Ste.-Foix, Morlaas, Béarn, France, surgeon-major of Fort San Luìs de Natchez, and widower of Anne Arosteguy, probably at Fort San Luìs in December 1768.  They settled at San Gabriel after Spanish officials released them.  

Cécile Breau, age 30, widow of Georges Clouâtre, came with three of her children--Joseph le jeune, age 7, Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, age 6, and Charles, age 3.  Madeleine married cousin Amand, son of Jean-Baptiste Breaux, at St.-Jacques in July 1779; she was only 17 years old.  She died at St.-Jacques in December 1800, in her late 30s.  

Four, perhaps, five lines of Acadian Clouâtres arose on the river, but only two of them survived to perpetuate the name in the Bayou State.  Of those two lines, one of them left the river in the early 1800s and settled in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley:

Descendants of Louis CLOUÂTRE (1724-?)

Louis, eldest son of Acadian progenitor Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in August 1724, was deported to Maryland along with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755.  He was counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763, when he would have been in his late 30s.  The colonial census mentioned no wife, so he must have married after July 1763, in his 40s.  He may have come to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 (his widowed mother and a number of his siblings were in that party) and followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring and then to St.-Gabriel, downriver, in 1769.  He married fellow Acadian Marguerite Landry probably at St.-Gabriel.  Evidently they had no sons, but two of their daughters, Marie-Anne and Marguerite, born probably at St.-Gabriel, married into the Flore, Morales, Prosper, Schlatre, and Suire families, so at least the blood of this line of the family survived.  After her remarriage at St.-Gabriel in May 1802, Louis's Marguerite followed her husband, French Creole François Suire, to the Opelousas District, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where she died in April 1803, perhaps from complications of childbirth.  Louis's daughter Marie-Anne remained on the river. 

Descendants of Pierre-Sylvain CLOUÂTRE (1740-1798)

Pierre-Sylvain, fourth son of Acadian progenitor Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in March 1740, was deported to Maryland along with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755 and counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763.  He came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768; his widowed mother and a number of siblings were in that party.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring and then to St.-Gabriel, downriver, in 1769, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudreaux and Madeleine Hébert and widow of Joseph Landry, in the 1770s.  He and his wife were counted on the "left bank ascending" at St.-Gabriel in 1777.  Their daughter married into the Blanchard and Dupuis families.  Pierre died at St.-Gabriel in May 1798; the priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was 60 years old when he died, but he was "only" 58.  He and his wife had no sons, so this family line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Descendants of Joseph CLOUÂTRE l'aîné (c1750-?)

Joseph, fifth and youngest son of Acadian progenitor Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in c1750, was deported to Maryland along with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755 and counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763.  He came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768; his widowed mother and a number of siblings were in that party.  He followed them to Fort San Luis de Natchez that spring and then to St.-Gabriel, downriver, in 1769.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Dominique Babin and Marguerite Boudreau, at St.-Gabriel in June 1780, and remarried to Élisabeth-Marie or Marie-Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Thibodeaux and his second wife Élisabeth Boudreaux, at St.-Gabriel in February 1787.  All of his children were by his second wife.  Their daughters married into the Babin Bergeron, and Pitre families.  In the late 1810s, his oldest son established a new center of family settlement in the Bayou Lafourche valley.  Joseph's other married son and his daughters followed, some of them moving down the valley to Bayou Terrebonne.  

1

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by his father's second wife, born at St.-Gabriel in December 1789, married Marie Henriette, called Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Molaison and Marie Gautreaux of Lafourche, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1818.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

2

Louis le jeune, by his father's second wife, born at St.-Gabriel in January 1798, was living in Terrebonne Parish when he married Marguerite Elmire, daughter of Pierre Victor Chatagnier and his Acadian wife Marie Modeste Hamon of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1837.  They settled in Terrebonne Parish.  

3

Youngest son Pierre Treville, by his father's second wife, born at St.-Gabriel in October 1804, probably died young.  

Descendants of Joseph CLOUÂTRE le jeune (c1760-1841; Pierre dit Clouâtre)

Joseph le jeune, elder son of Georges Clouâtre and Cécile Breau and nephew of Louis et al., was born in Maryland in c1760.  He was counted with his parents at Port Tobacco in July 1763.  He came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768; his mother, now a widow, two of siblings, and other Clouâtre kin were in that party.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring.  Meanwhile, his mother remarried to fellow Acadian Charles Gaudet at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques in May 1768.  In 1769, Joseph followed his stepfather and his mother to Cabanocé, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Marie-Madeleine Richard, in c1785.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Melançon families.  Joseph remarried to Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Louvière and Isabelle Melançon, at St.-Jacques in February 1801.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in February 1841; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 87 years old when he died, but he probably was "only" in his early 80s.  Just half of his six sons created families of their own.  Like their father, they remained in St. James Parish.  One grandson moved upriver to Pointe Coupee Parish, but the others remained in St. James.  

1

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in October 1786, probably died young.  

2

Olidon, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in May 1789, probably died young.  

3

Michel, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in August 1791, married Marcellite, sometimes called Manette, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Bourgeois and Scholastique Arceneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in May 1815.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in St. James Parish at birth in February 1816, Michel, fils was born in February 1817, Félix in September 1821, Edward in April 1824, Drosin Clément, called Clément, in Ascension Parish in April 1826, and Clairville was born posthumously near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1834 but died at age 5 in October 1839.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Rome families.  Michel died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1834; the priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was 45 years old when he died, but he was 43.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 5 slaves--3 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 28 to 2--on Wdw Mel Cloitre's farm in the parish's Eastern District; this was Michel's widow, Marcellite Bourgeois.  

3a

Félix died near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1849.  He was only 27 years old and did not marry.  

3b

In July 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted a single slave--a 9-year-old mulatto male--on Drauzin Cloitre's farm in the parish's Eastern District.  Drosin Clément married Céline Odile, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Pierre Désiré Letulle and his Acadian wife Amelie Boudreaux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in November 1851.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born near Convent in July 1853, and Félix le jeune in March 1855.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish again counted a single slave--this time a 13-year-old black female--on Clément Clouatre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the Left Bank.  Clément died near Convent in October 1868; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Clément died at "age ca. 35 years"; he was 42.  His wife gave birth to a daughter only four months before his death. 

4

Georges-Jérôme, called Jérôme, from his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in November 1799, married Émelite, called Melite, another daughter of Amand Bourgeois and Scholastique Arceneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1818.  Their son Jérôme, fils, also called Evariste, was born in St. James Parish in October 1818, Joseph le jeune in November 1819, Sylvain, called Sylvanie, in January 1822, George Livingston was born in 1830, and Amand Théogène, called Théogène, was baptized at the Convent church, St. James Parish, age 10 months, 25 days, in June 1835.  Their daughters married into the Berthelot and Bourgeois families.  Jérôme, père died near Convent, St. James Parish, in November 1847; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jérôme was 50 years old when he died, but he was 48.  In June 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 2 slaves--a 27-year-old black female and a 1-year-old mulatto female--on Widlow Jérôme Clouatre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the Left Bank; these probably were Jérôme's widow, Émelite Bourgeois's, slaves  

4a

Joseph le jeune married Marie Ezilda, called Ezilda, daughter of Nicolas Rome and Eurasie Webre, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1849.  Their son Léon Joseph was born near Convent in July 1851.  Their daughter married into the Duhon family.  Joseph le jeune remarried to French Creole Virginie Berthelot, widow of Émile Favrange, at the Convent church in February 1860. 

4b

Sylvanie married cousin Marie Scholastique, called Colastie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Estival Bourgeois and his Creole wife Véronique Keller, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1849, the day after his older brother Joseph married in the same church; Sylvain and his wife had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Sylvain was born near Convent in December 1849, Florian in September 1851 but died at age 20 months in June 1853, Joseph le jeune was born in February 185[4] but died at age 6 months the following August, and Adam Fulgence was born in September 1863.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted 2 slaves--a 40-year-old black female and a 14-year-old black female--on Sylvanie Clouâtre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the Left Bank.  

4c

Evariste married Clara Marguerite or Marguerite Clara Chutz probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  Their son Jérôme III was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1855, and Jean Uranus in January 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Evariste may have served in Company F of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  

4d

Théogène married Marie Anne Victorine, called Victorine, daughter of Louis Isidore or Isidore Victor Letulle and Berthilde Legendre, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1857.  Their son Louis Jérôme was born near Convent in March 1858, Arthur Stanislas in March 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Amand Théogène served in the 5th Battery Louisiana Artillery, also called the Pelican Artillery, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  He remarried to Eugénie Lucenty at the Donalsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1870. 

5

Joseph Marcellin, called Marcellin, from his father's second wife, born in St. James Parish in September 1808, married Philomène Gilchrist, sometimes Gilbert, a native of Alabama, in either Alabama or St. James Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  Their son Pierre Adam, called Adam, was born in St. James Parish in January 1844 but died the following May, and Joseph Elphége, called Elphége, was born in September 1846.  

Elphége married Ernestine Fourroux in St. John the Baptist Parish and settled at Lucy and Edgard. 

6

Youngest son Joseph Drosin, by his father's second wife, born in St. James Parish in January 1812, may have died young.  

Descendants of Charles CLOUÂTRE (c1765-1802; Pierre dit Clouâtre)

Charles, younger son of Georges Clouâtre and Cécile Breau and nephew of Louis et al., was born in Maryland in c1765.  He came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768; his mother, now a widow, two of siblings, and other Clouâtre kin were in that party.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring.  Meanwhile, his mother remarried to Charles, son of Acadian Jean Gaudet, at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques in May 1768.  In 1769, Charles followed his stepfather and his mother to Cabanocé, where he married Marianne, sometimes called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Arceneaux and Judith Bergeron, in January 1786.  Their daughters married into the Frederick, Hakle, and Selvis families.  Charles died at St.-Jacques in January 1802; the priest who recorded his burial said that Charles was 45 years old when he died, but he was closer to 37.  Their only son never married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  A daughter, Marie-Marin, wife of Charles Frederick of Sweden, followed her husband to the western prairies. 

Bélisaire, born probably at St.-Jacques in c1801, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1831.  He was only 30 years old when he died and did not marry.  

Other CLOUÂTREs on the River

Local church and civil records make it difficult to link some Clouâtres on the river with known lines of the family there:

Augusto Cloâtre served as a witness to Joseph Clouâtre le jeune's second marriage at St.-Jacques in February 1801.  Who was Augusto?  

Marie-Euphrosine, daughter of Jacques Clouâtre, died at age 15 months near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1811.  The priest who recorded the girl's burial did not give her mother's name.  Who was her father Jacques?

Madame Clouâtre died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, age 82, in August 1816.  The priest who recorded the good woman's burial did not give her full name, her parents' names, or mention a husband.  

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

During the early antebellum period, Clouâtre brothers from the river moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, creating a second, smaller center of family settlement:

Descendants of Joseph CLOUÂTRE, fils (1789-; Pierre dit Clouâtre)

Joseph, fils, eldest son of Joseph Clouâtre and his second wife Élisabeth-Marie or Marie-Élisabeth Thibodeaux, born at St.-Gabriel in December 1789, married Marie Henriette, called Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Molaison and Marie Gautreaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1818.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Dantin, Gaspard, Gautreaux, and Laperouse families.  Some of Joseph, fils's children settled in Terrebonne Parish. 

1

Oldest son Joseph III, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1832, married Philomène, daughter of Zedeon Calahan and his Acadian wife Cléonice Boudreaux, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1865.  Their son Ferdinand Joseph was born near Chacahoula in February 1869. 

2

Joseph Viléon was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1834.  

3

Joseph Claiborne, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1836, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1851.  He was only 15 years old.    

4

Pierre married Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Pitre and Rosalie Naquin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in December 1858.  

Descendants of Louis CLOUÂTRE le jeune (1798-; Pierre dit Clouâtre)

Louis le jeune, second son of Joseph Clouâtre and his second wife Élisabeth-Marie or Marie-Élisabeth Thibodeaux, born at St.-Gabriel in January 1798, was living in Terrebonne Parish when he married Marguerite Elmire, daughter of Pierre Victor Chatagnier and his Acadian wife Marie Modeste Hamon of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1837.  They also settled in Terrebonne Parish.  Their daughter married into the Echete family. 

1

Oldest son Louis Amédée was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in January 1840.  

2

Émile Marcel was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in June 1841.  

3

Youngest son Marcellin Jackson was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in August 1844.  

CONCLUSION

The Clouâtre family was a small one in Acadia; it was only in its second generation when British forces deported them from Minas to Massachusetts and Maryland in 1755.  The Clouâtres in Maryland came to Louisiana in early 1768 with the large party from Port Tobacco led by brothers Alexis and Honoré Breau of Pigiguit.  Spanish governor Ulloa forced the party to settle at remote Fort San Luìs de Natchez, across the river from present-day Natchez, Mississippi, but in 1769, after Ulloa's ouster, the Clouâtres moved downriver to St.-Gabriel and St.-Jacques, where other exiles from Maryland had settled in 1766 and 1767.  A number of Clouâtre lines were started in those settlements, but only two of them survived.  One of the St.-Jacques lines, that of Joseph le jeune, was especially prolific.  During the early antebellum period, two of Joseph le jeune's cousins moved from their native St. Gabriel to the Bayou Lafourche valley and established a second center of family settlement.  Their descendants moved down to the Bayou Terrebonne area, some of them settling near Chacahoula.  No Clouâtre family put down roots on the western prairies before the War of 1861-65, though at least two Clouâtre wives may have lived there during the late colonial and early antebellum periods. 

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the antebellum period, the Clouâtres of St. James and Terrebonne parishes participated only peripherally in the South's plantation economy.  According to the federal census slaves schedules of the late antebellum period, one of them in St. James held more than five slaves at any one time, and their cousins in the Lafourche-Terrebonne valley held none, at least none who appeared on the federal slave schedules in 1850 and 1860. 

According to state and Confederate service records, only two Clouâtres served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861.  Judging by their dates of enlistment, they probably were conscripts.  Both of them survived the war, which was not kind to their home parishes.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every farm and plantation their forces could reach.  Meanwhile, Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Lafourche and Terrebonne valley, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Chiadtre, Cloac, Cloat, Cloate, Cloatre, Cloeta, Cloistre, Clouac, Clouain, Clouard, Clouatte, Clouet, Colaitre, Collaitre, Colloite, Collouer, Collouette, Colluete, Coloitre, Colonot, Colouet, Colwat, Couatre, Coulaitre.  [See Book Ten for the family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, St. James Parish; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, St. James Parish; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1136-37, 2459-60; Brasseaux, ed., Quest for the Promised Land, 133; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 93, 99, 153, 182.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne CLOUÂTRE 01 Feb 1768 Natz, StG born 1744, perhaps Île St.-Jean, baptized 27 Mar 1744, Grand-Pré; daughter of Pierre CLOISTRE dit CLOUÂTRE & Marguerite LEBLANC; sister of Joseph, Louis, Marthe-Marie, & Pierre-Sylvain; exiled to MD 1755, age 9; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Anne CLOÂTRE, with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1768, age 23; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Ana, age 22, with widowed mother & siblings; married, age 24, Bernard, son of Antoine CAPDEVILLE & Catherine LARCOSSE or COUSAN of Ste.-Foix de Morlaas, Bern, Switzerland, surgeon-major of Fort San Luìs de Natchez, & widower of Anne AROSTEGUY, 31 Dec 1768, probably Fort San Luìs de Natchez
Charles CLOUÂTRE 02 Feb 1768 Natz, StJ born c1765, probably Port Tobacco, MD; son of Georges CLOUÂTRE & Cécile BREAUX; brother of Joseph & Marie-Madeleine; arrived LA 1768, age 3; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Carlos, age 2, with widowed mother, siblings, & orphan Joseph BRAUX; moved to Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west], called Charles CLOÂTRE, age 4, with mother, stepfather Charles GODET, & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Charles, no surname given, age 12, with mother, stepfather Charles GAUDET, full siblings & half siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with stepfather, mother, & others; married, age 21, Marianne, called Anne, daughter of Jean ARCENEAUX & Judith BERGERON, 30 Jan 1786, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St.-Jacques 27 Jan 1802, age 45[sic]
Joseph CLOUÂTRE l'aîné 03 Feb 1768 Natz, StG born c1750, probably Grand-Pré; son of Pierre CLOISTRE dit CLOUÂTRE  & Marguerite LEBLANC; brother of Anne, Louis, Marthe-Marie, & Pierre; exiled to MD 1755, age 5; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Joseph CLOÂTRE, with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1768, age 18; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Joseph, age 18, with widowed mother & siblings; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, left bank ascending, called Jausephe a C[L]OUÂTRE, bachelor, age 18[sic], with 10 cattle, [0 horses?] 12 hogs, 18 fowl, 6 arpents; married, age 30, (1)Marguerite, daughter of Dominique BABIN & Marguerite BOUDREAUX, 3 Jun 1780, St.-Gabriel; married, age 37, (2)Élisabeth/Isabelle-Marie or Marie-Élisabeth/Isabelle, daughter of Olivier THIBODEAUX & his second wife Élisabeth/Isabelle BOUDREAUX of Chepoudy, 11 Feb 1787, St.-Gabriel
Joseph CLOUÂTRE le jeune 04 Feb 1768 Natz, StJ born c1760, MD; son of Georges CLOUÂTRE & Cécile BREAUX; brother of Charles & Marie-Madeleine; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Joseph CLOÂTRE, with parents, sister, & orphan Joseph BRAUX; arrived LA 1768, age 8; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Joseph DUANTE, age 7, with widowed mother, siblings, & orphan Joseph BRAUX; moved to Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Joseph CLOATRE, age 9, with mother, stepfather Charles GODET, & siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Joseph CLOITRE, age 15[sic], with mother, stepfather Charles GAUDET, full siblings & half-siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with stepfather, mother, & others; married, age 24, (1)Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste POIRIER & Marie-Madeleine RICHARD, c1785, St.-Jacques; married, age 40, (2)Félicité, daughter of Charles LOUVIÈRE & Isabelle MELANÇON, 12 Feb 1801, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St. James Parish Feb 1841, age 87[sic]
*Louis CLOUÂTRE 08 17?? Natz?, StG born & baptized 22 Aug 1724, Grand-Pré; son of Pierre CLOISTRE dit CLOUÂTRE  & Marguerite LEBLANC; brother of Anne, Joseph, Marie-Marthe, & Pierre-Sylvain; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Louis CLOÂTRE, with widowed mother & siblings; married Marguerite LANDRY, probably 1760s; settled St.-Gabriel
Marie-Madeleine CLOUÂTRE 05 Feb 1768 Natz, StJ born c1762, probably MD; called Madeleine; daughter of Georges CLOUÂTRE & Cecile BREAUX; sister of Charles & Joseph; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Magdelaine CLOÂTRE, with parents, brother, & orphan Joseph BRAUX; arrived LA 1768, age 6; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Magdalena, age 5, with widowed mother, brothers, & orphan Joseph BRO; moved to Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Magdeleine, no surname given, age 7, with mother, stepfather Charles GAUDET, & brothers; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Magdelaine CLOITRE, age 15, with mother, stepfather Charles GAUDET, full siblings & half siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with stepfather, mother, & others; married, age 17, Amand, son of Jean-Baptiste BREAUX & his second wife Marie-Rose LANDRY, 5 Jul 1779, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St.-Jacques 2 Dec 1800, age 38
Marthe-Marie CLOUÂTRE 06 Feb 1768 Natz born & baptized 19 Jul 1746, Grand-Pré; daughter of Pierre CLOISTRE dit CLOUÂTRE  & Marguerite LEBLANC; sister of Anne, Joseph, Louis, & Pierre-Sylvain; exiled to MD 1755, age 7; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Maria & Marthe CLOÂTRE [a double listing?], with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1768, age 21; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Maria, age 20, with widowed mother & siblings; did not marry; died [buried] Fort San Luìs de Natchez 30 Apr 1768, age 21
Pierre-Sylvain CLOUÂTRE 07 Feb 1768 Natz, StG born 13 Mar 1740, baptized next day, Grand-Pré; son of Pierre CLOISTRE dit CLOUÂTRE & Marguerite LEBLANC; brother of Anne, Joseph, Louis, & Marthe-Marie; exiled to MD 1755, age 13; in report of Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Pierre CLOÂTRE, with widowed mother & siblings; arrived LA 1768, age 27; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Pedro CHIADTRE ?[sic], age 26, with widowed mother & siblings; moved to St.-Gabriel; married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Pierre BOUDREAUX & Madeleine HÉBERT, & widow of Joseph LANDRY, probably 1770s, St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, left bank ascending, called Piere a CLOUÂTRE, age 48[sic], with unnamed wife [Madeleine] age 40, 9 cattle, [0 horses?] 12 hogs, 20 fowl, 6 arpents; died St.-Gabriel 7 May 1798, age 60[sic]

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 14, calls her Anne CLOÂTRE; BRDR, 1a(rev.):48 (SGA-3, 26a), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Anne CLOUÂTRE, gives her parents' names, calls her father armurier, says her godparents were Michael APART & Anne LEBLANC, & that her father signed the baptismal document; BRDR, 1b:30-31, 36-37 (PCP-4, 33; PCP-3, 268), her marriage record, calls her Anne CLOUÂTRE, "native of St.-Jean, Acadia," calls her husband Bernard CAPDEVILLE, "native of the parish of Ste. Foix de Morlas en Beard (Morlaas, Bern, probably intended), Berne Switzerland, surgeon-major of the Fort St. Louis of the Natchez, widower of Anne DE CHIGERAIL[AROSTEGUY]," gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were Jean CLOUÂTRE and Marguerite LEBLANC, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Pierre CLOUÂTRE [her brother] & ____ CLAUSSE.  

Was she born on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, as her marriage record hints?  The church at Grand-Pré was named after St.-Charles, not St.-Jean.  

Her marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée because that was the closest church to San Luìs de Natchez during the latter settlements brief existence.  

Beginning in Jun 1775, Bernard CAPDEVILLE begins to appear in the church records of St.-Gabriel community.  See BRDR, 2:174-75.  Perhaps when the CLOUÂTREs, along with other members of the BREAUX clan, left San Luìs de Natchez in 1769, he may have gone with them to St.-Gabriel.  His death/burial record calls his parents Antonio CAPDEVILLE & Catalina COUSAN of Martasi, France.  See BRDR, 2:174 (SGA-8, 25, #136).  If the age given for him in the burial record is correct, he would have been born in c1723.  This means he would have been about age 43 when he married Anne AROSTEGUY in New Orleans in early 1766.  Ship's surgeon or not, he probably was a widower when he married her, though the church record in New Orleans says nothing of a previous wife.  We will assume here, then, that Anne CLOUÂTRE was his second wife.  

02.  Wall of Names, 14, calls him Charles CLOÂTRE; BRDR, 2:22, 192 (SJA-2, 1), his marriage record, calls him Carlos CLOETA (CLOUÂTRE) of New England, calls his wife Ana ARSENO, does not give either his or her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Miguel GODE & Maria ARSENO; BRDR, 2:192 (SJA-4, 19), his death/burial record, calls him Carlos CLOUÂTRE, husband of Mariana ARCENAUX, says he was 45 years old when he died, but does not give his parents' names.  .

His wife parents' names can be found in daughter Marie-Francoise's birth/baptismal record, dated 15 Feb 1801, in BRDR 2:193 (SJA-3, 210).

03.  Wall of Names, 14, calls him Joseph CLOÂTRE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2460, calls him Joseph CLOÂTRE, says he was born in c1758, son of Pierre [CLOÂTRE] & Marguerite LEBLANC, details his marriages, including both wives' parents' names, says his second wife's parents were from Chipoudy, & that he settled at Saint-Gabriel-d'Iberville; BRDR, 2:50, 192 (SGA-4a, 25), the record of his first marriage, calls him Joseph CLOUÂTRE, gives his & his wife's parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Bernard CAPDEVILLE [his brother-in-law] & Jean-Baptiste ALLAIN; BRDR, 2:192, 694 (SGA-14, 8), the record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph CLOUÂTRE, calls his wife Isabel TIBODAUX, gives his & her parents' names, but does not mention his first wife or name any witnesses.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 153; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 12. 

His estimated birth year is from the age found in the Spanish report of Feb 1768, not the St.-Gabriel census of 1777, which Arsenault obviously followed.  If he had been born in c1758, it would have been in MD, not at Minas.    

All of his children were from his second wife.  

04.  Wall of Names, 14, calls him Joseph CLOÂTRE; BRDR, 2:192, 508 (SJA-2, 53), the record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph CLOÂTRE, "widower of Maria POIRIER of Acadia," calls his wife Félicitas LOUVIERRE, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Augusto CLOÂTRE & Luis GODIN; BRDR, 6:157 (SJA-4, 69), perhaps his death/burial record, calls him Joseph CLOUÂTRE, says he was 87 years old when he died, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife..  

His first wife's parents' names can be found in the baptismal record of son Jorge Geronymo, that is, Georges-Jérôme, dated 5 Jan 1800, in BRDR, 2:192 (SJA-3, 189).  But where is the record of his first marriage?  

Who was Augusto CLOÂTRE, one of the witnesses to his second marriage?

The burial record cited above could be that of his uncle Joseph l'aîné, not his.  Thanks to the recording priest's flakiness, it is difficult to tell.  

05.  Wall of Names, 14, calls her Madeleine CLOÂTRE; BRDR, 2:146, 193 (SJA-1, 49a), her marriage record, calls her Marie-Magdelaine CLOITRE of Acadia, calls her husband Herman BREAU of Acadia, gives her & his parents' names, says her father was deceased at the time of the marriage, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Éstienne MELANZON & Baptiste LANDRY; BRDR, 2:192 (SJA-4, 17), her death/burial record, calls her Magdalena CLOUÂTRE, wife of Armando BEAUX, says she was 38 years old when she died, but does not give her parents' names.  

06.  Wall of Names, 14, calls her Marthe CLOÂTRE; BRDR, 1a(rev.):49 (SGA-3, 39a), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marthe CLOUÂTRE, gives her parents' names, says her godparents were Joseph JANDEIN or JANDIN, who signed the baptismal record, & Marie LEBLANC, & says that her father signed the document, too.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 153; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436. 

Her middle name is from the Spanish report of Feb 1768.  The British report in MD, Jul 1763, indicates that there may have been 2 separate daughters named Marie & Marthe, or it may be a double listing of one person, Marthe-Marie.  Wall of Names will be followed here until I find corroboration that there were 2 separate daughters.

For her death & burial, see Brasseaux, ed., Quest for the Promised Land, 133, Piernas to Ulloa, dated 3 May 1768, in which the commander of Fort San Luìs de Natchez writes:  "There are no other incidents to report, except the death from illness of Marthe [LE BLANC] CLAUTRE, the twenty-year-old daughter of Margarita CLAUTRE, a widow.  She [Marthe] was buried in the fort's cemetery on April 30." 

07.  Wall of Names, 14, calls him Pierre CLOÂTRE; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2460, calls him, first, Pierre CLOÂTRE, says he was born in 1740, son of Pierre CLOÂTRE & Marguerite LEBLANC, & that he died at Saint-Gabriel-d'Iberville in 1798, & Patrice CLOÂTRE, born in c1750, that he probablement was son of Pierre CLOÂTRE & Marguerite LEBLANC, that he married Madeleine BOUDREAUX in c1752, that he settled at Saint-Gabriel-d'Iberville, & lists only one child, Marie-Madeleine, born in 1773 but gives no birthplace; BRDR, 1a(rev.):49 (SGA-13, 4b), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Pierre-Silvain CLOUÂTRE, gives his parents' names, calls his father Me. armurier, says his godparents were Silvain DUPUY & Marie-Josèphe CLOUÂTRE [his oldest sister], & that his father signed the baptismal document; BRDR, 2:194 (SGA-8, 23, #123), his death/burial record, calls him Pedro CLOUÂTRE of Acadia, says his parents were Juan [CLOUÂTRE] & Maria LANDRY, that he was 60 years old when he died, but mentions no wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 153; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 12.  

His middle name is from White, DGFA-1 English, 47.  Where did Arsenault get the name Patrice?

His wife's name also can be found in various baptismal & marriage records in BRDR, 2:193-94.  

08.  Not in Wall of NamesBRDR, 1a(rev.):49 (SGA-2, 52), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Louis CLOISTRE, gives his parents' names, & says his godparents were Hyacinthe-Louis-Alexander GARY, who signed "(priest writes Alexandre Louis Hyacinth de GARENBRAND)" & Marguerite LEBLANC.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 153.

The marriage record for one of his daughters, Marguerite, dated 6 Aug 1797, in BRDR, 2:669 (SGA-14, 23, #84), says that the bride's parents, Luis [CLOITRE (CLOUÂTRE)] & Margarita LANDRY, were "of this Parish."  Thus, Louis CLOUÂTRE lived at St.-Gabriel during the late colonial period, hence his place on this list.  

So when did he come to LA?  He is not on the list of 1768 settlers at San Luìs de Natchez with the rest of his family, nor does he appear in the St.-Gabriel census of 1777.  See Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777.  When & where did he marry Marguerite LANDRY?  When did she come to LA?  Did they come to LA together, or did they marry in LA?  If they came to LA together, were their daughters Marguerite & Marie-Anne with them, or were the girls born in LA?  

So many questions.  I need a CLOUÂTRE family historian to help me here. 

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