APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

ARBOUR

[ar-BORE]

ACADIA

Two unrelated families, using the surnames Harbour and Arbour, are associated with greater Acadia:

Michel, fils, son of Michel Harbour or Arbour and Marie Constantineau, born at Petite-Rivière-St.-Charles, Québec, in c1674, married Barbe, daughter of Acadians Pierre Morin and Françoise Chiasson, in c1700, probably at Québec.  Michel, fils was age 26 and Barbe was 14 at the time of their marriage.  Michel, fils's wife's paternal grandfather, Pierre Morin dit Boucher, had come to French Acadia during the early 1660s, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Acadian pioneers Pierre Martin and Catherine Vigneau of St.-German de Bourgeuil, and settled at Chignecto in the 1670s.  During the late 1680s, Pierre dit Boucher's second son Louis fathered an illegitimate child by Marie-Josèphe, daughter of former Acadian governor Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière de Beaubassin, the seigneur of Chignecto.  As a result of the scandal, the entire Morin family was banished from the colony.  They resettled first at Gaspésie on the northwestern edge of greater Acadia and then moved on to Canada, where they remained.  Barbe gave Michel, fils nine children, eight sons and a daughter.  All of their sons created families of their own on the lower St. Lawrence. 

Second son François married Marie-Jeanne-Thérèse, called Thérèse, daughter of Henri Picoron dit Descôteaux and Marguerite Martin, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, near Kamouraska on the lower St. Lawrence, in October 1740.  Their second son, François, fils, was born in Canada in c1743.  During the 1740s or 1750s, François, père may have taken his family from Canada to the French Maritimes, then a part of greater Acadia.

~

Pierre Arbour dit Carrica, born at Bayonne, France, in c1700, married Susanne Moreau probably in c1721.  They settled at Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north coast of Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, among the first to settle there.  Pierre and Susanne had four daughters and at least three sons, one of whom, Mathurin, married into the Archambault family at Pointe-aux-Trembles, Montréal, in July 1748, so the family may have moved to the St. Lawrence valley years before the Acadian Grand Dérangement.  Son Dominique married into the Pelletier family at L'Assomption, between Montréal and Québec, in August 1755.  One of Pierre dit Carrica's daughters, Isabelle, married into the Turenne family at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in June 1750.  Another daughter, Marie-Thérèse, married into the Savoie family in c1756 during Le Grand Dérangement.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the families' travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

François Arbour, fils, now 45, wife Marie, age 40, and their three older sons--François-Henry, age 18, Louis, age 15, and Frédéric-Édouard, age 13--sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  After a brief respite in the city, they settled at Baton Rouge on the river above New Orleans with the majority of their fellow passengers.  François, fils and Marie had no more children in Louisiana.  The marriage record of François, fils's oldest son François-Henry, dated 27 September 1790, notes that the groom's father was deceased, so François, fils died probably at Baton Rouge during the late 1780s, in his late 40s.  All three of his sons created families of their own, but only one of them, the youngest, seems to have perpetuated the family line in the Bayou State.  

Descendants of François-Henry ARBOUR (1767-?; Michel, François)

François-Henry, eldest son of François Arbour, fils and Marie Henry, born at Le Havre, France, in c1767, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married Marie-Jeanne-Jacqueline, called Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadian François Daigre and his French wife Jeanne Holley, at St.-Gabriel in September 1790.  Jeanne also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  They settled at Baton Rouge, where their children were born.  Their daughters married into the Altazin, Collier, and Lerry families. 

1

Oldest son François-Alexandre, born in c1792, died at age 2 in August 1794.  

2

Charles-François, called François, le jeune, born in c1800 and baptized at Baton Rouge, age 2, in October 1802, may have married Marie Aurore, called Aurore, Leroi or Roy.  Their son François Bonicase was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1842. 

3

Youngest son Jean Pierre died at Baton Rouge, age unrecorded, in April 1806.  

Descendants of Jean-Louis-Firmin ARBOUR (1770-?; Michel, François)

Jean-Louis-Firmin, called Louis and Firmin, second son of François Arbour, fils and Marie Henry, born at Le Havre, France, in c1770, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Poirier and Marie Cormier of St.-Jacques, in April 1793.  Rosalie was a native of Louisiana.  They settled at St.-Jacques, now St. James Parish, where their children were born.  Their daughter married into the Legendre family.  Jean-Louis-Firmin remarried to Susanna, daughter of Anglo Americans George Glover and P. Roberson of Virginia, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1812.  None of his sons seem to have created families of their own, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in c1794, died at age 12 in November 1806.  

2

Louis-Evariste, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in January 1801, probably never married.  

3

Achilles, by his father's first wife, born at St.-Jacques in February 1803, probably never married.  

4

A son, by his father's first wife, died at St.-Jacques in September 1806.  

5

An infant, perhaps a son, by his father's first wife, name and age unrecorded, died at St.-Jacques in December 1806.  

Descendants of Frédéric-Édouard ARBOUR (1772-1848; Michel, François)

Frédéric-Édouard, third son of François Arbour, fils and Marie Henry, born at Le Havre, France, in c1772, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married cousin Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Henry and Marie Pitre of St.-Malo, France, at Baton Rouge in September 1798; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Marie-Rose had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  They remained at Baton Rouge, where their children were born.  Their daughters married into the Delahay and Guerry or Garry families.  Frédéric died at Baton Rouge in March 1848; the priest who recorded his burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Frederick, as he called him, died at "age 80 years," but he was "only" 76.  The great majority of the Arbours of South Louisiana are descended from his older son, who fathered at least half a dozen sons of his own and became a wealthy planter in East Baton Rouge Parish.

1

Older son Frédéric, fils, born in December 1803, married Marie Adeline or Adele, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Daigre and Julie Trahan, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1825.  Their son Frédéric III was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 6 months, in March 1827, Joseph was born in July 1828, Édouard Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, in October 1830, Eugène Ernest, called Ernest in November 1832, Octave Roland or Roland Octave in September 1834, Arthur in c1841, and Oscar in October 1845.  Their daughter married into the Allain family.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 30 slaves--20 males and 10 females, all black except for 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 years to 2 months--on Frédérick Arbour's plantation near Baton Rouge city.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 33 slaves--ranging in age from 65 years to 4 months--on Frederick Arbour's plantation near Baton Rouge city.  In July 1860, he also held 23 more slaves--19 males and 4 females, all blacks except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 80 to 6--in Iberville Parish.  Frédéric, fils died near Baton Rouge in December 1866; the priest who recorded his burial said that Frédéric was 75 years old, but he was "only" 63.  Most of his sons served in the Confederate army, one of them as an officer, another as a sergeant. 

1a

Joseph married Julie, daughter of Charles Maurin or Morin and Céleste Verret, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1851.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near Baton Rouge in August 1859 but died at age 16 months in December 1860, Joseph Charles was born in December 1861, and Henri Antoine in February 1867.  

1b

Frédéric III married Ludoviska or Lodoiska Josephine Marie Adelay, D'Lahay, or De Lahay, probably at Baton Rouge in the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph André Victor Frédéric was born near Baton Rouge in February 1853, Adolphe Joseph in July 1858, and George Édouard in April 1868.   During the War of 1861-65, Frédéric served as a lieutenant in Company D of the 27th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  

1c

Bienvenu married cousin Célestine, daughter of Éloi Martinez and Victoire Heude, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1854; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son George Edward was born near Baton Rouge in June 1857, and John Early in December 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, along with younger brother Octave, Bienvenu served in Company A of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish, which fought in Mississippi and Louisiana.  

1d

Ernest married Emma, daughter of André D'Lahay or De Lahay and Marie Anne Vigoureux, perhaps a sister of his brother Frédéric III's wife, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1854. Their son William Ernest was born near Baton Rouge in February 1860.  

1e

Octave married Caroline or Carrie Gayle in a civil ceremony probably in East Baton Rouge Parish in December 1860, and sanctified the marriage at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1868.  Their son William Roland was born near Baton Rouge in December 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Octave served as corporal and fifth sergeant in Company A of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish, which fought in Mississippi and Louisiana; when the Miles' Legion was disbanded, he served as a sergeant in Company I of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which also fought in Louisiana and Mississippi.  In May 1865, Octave surrendered with his regiment at Gainesville, Alabama.  

1f

Arthur was single and a lawyer living in Baton Rouge in June 1861 when he enlisted in Company B of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish; he was 20 years old at the time of his enlistment.  His regiment fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, so he was one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Arthur was not part of the 7th Infantry for very long, however.  In early October 1861, he was sent to a hospital in Richmond, Virginia.  His illness or injury must have been serious, because in early November, after he was examined by a medical board, he was discharged from Confederate service for disability.  Arthur married Oliva, daughter of fellow Acadian Gilbert Comeaux and his wife Adeline Gallagaher, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1868. 

2

Younger son Albery Gustave was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in June 1829, and may have married Marguerite Zenon.  Their son Alphonse was born near Baton Rouge in May 1856. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

A number of families with the surname Harbour, evidently not kin to François, fils of Canada, greater Acadia, and France, also settled in South Louisiana.  Judging from the the number of slaves they held during the late antebellum period, some of them were as wealthy as the Acadian Arbours of East Baton Rouge Parish:

Adonegy or Adonager Harbour married Anna Dalton or Queremos.  Their daughter Anna married Anglo-American John Harelson of Virginia at Baton Rouge in September 1806.  Their daughter Sally married Anglo-American Louis Gardner at Baton Rouge in January 1806.  Adonager probably was Anglo-American himself.  

Samuel, son of Thomas Harbourt and Jeanne Doldon, married Lucinda, daughter of Anglo American Benjamin Burnett, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1819. 

In July 1850, P. H. Harbour held 11 slaves on his Ascension Parish farm.  Ten years later, in June 1860, he held 9 slaves on his farm in Ascension's Seventh Ward.  

In August 1850, Pleasant J. Harbour owned 47 slaves on his Pointe Coupee Parish plantation, and 34 slaves on his East Feliciana Plantation, northeast of Baton Rouge.  

At the same time, John A. Harbour held 47 slaves on his East Feliciana Parish plantation.  

In June 1860, Wm. H. Harbour owned 7 slaves on his Pointe Coupee Parish farm.  

In August 1860, B. T. Harbour owned 8 slaves on his East Baton Rouge Parish farm.  

CONCLUSION

François Harbour or Arbour, fils was born in Canada in c1743.  His paternal grandmother was an Acadian Morin whose family had been exiled from French Acadia during the 1680s after one of them scandalized the community of Chignecto.  François, fils's family may have moved from Canada to greater Acadia, from which the British deported them to France, or François, fils may have gone to France on his own after the war with Britain finally ended.  He worked as a caulker in the mother country.  At Le Havre in November 1765, he married Marie, daughter of Acadians Joseph Henry and Christine Pitre.  Marie gave François, fils five sons, two of whom died young.  In 1785, François, fils and Marie took three of their teenage sons to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, and settled in the Baton Rouge area, where all three sons married fellow Acadians.  

Only one of François, fils's sons, the youngest, seems to have perpetuated his line of the family.  The great majority of Arbours in South Louisiana are descended from François, fils's grandson, Frédéric, fils, born at Baton Rouge in December 1803, who married Acadian Adeline Daigre at Baton Rouge in July 1825.  He and his wife had at least six sons, most of whom created families of their own in the Baton Rouge area.  During the antebellum period, Frédéric, fils and his sons became successful planters.  In 1850, Frédéric, fils owned 30 slaves in East Baton Rouge Parish.  A decade later, he held 56 slaves on two plantations in East Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes. 

At least four Arbours, three of them sons of Frédéric, fils, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, one of them as an officer.  Frédéric III, a resident of East Baton Rouge Parish, married, and the father of several children, enlisted as a second lieutenant in Company D of the 27th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, in March 1862.  He was promoted to first lieutenant the following June and fought with his unit at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1862-63.  After the Confederate surrender at Vicksburg in July 1863, Frédéric III, along with thousands of other Southerners, was sent home on a parole of honor.  In September 1862, Frédéric III's younger brother Bienvenu, who also was married, enlisted at Baton Rouge in Company A of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish but which contained a number of soldiers from Baton Rouge.  Miles' Legion served in Louisiana and was part of the Siege of Port Hudson in the spring and summer of 1863.  Bienvenu missed the siege, however.  He was captured at the Comite River, north of Baton Rouge, in early May 1863 and held by the Federals at Mobile, Alabama, until they paroled him at Grant's Island, near Mobile, at the end of May.  Brother Octave also served in Company A of the Miles' Legion Infantry, but his service with the unit was more praiseworthy.  He, too, was married when he enlisted in Company A at Baton Rouge in September 1862.  He was promoted to corporal a few weeks later, and then to fifth sergeant in March 1863.  After the surrender of Port Hudson in July 1863, members of Company A of the Miles' Legion served in Company I of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, Octave Arbour among them.  He remained a sergeant and surrendered with his unit at Gainesville, Alabama, in May 1865.  Arthur Arbour, a young lawyer from Baton Rouge, also served in a Louisiana Confederate unit, but his relationship to the Arbour brothers is not revealed in the church and civil records.  In June 1861, at age 20, Arthur enlisted in Company B of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, which became a part of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, so he was one of Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Arthur followed his company to Virginia, but his service there was cut short by illness or injury.  He was sent to a Richmond hospital in October 1861, and received a medical discharge the following month.  He probably returned to Baton Rouge.  

The war took a terrible toll on the Arbour family's economic standing.  After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal forces controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This included the Arbour holdings in East Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes.  Union navy gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantations houses along the lower river.  

After the war, the Arbours of Baton Rouge had to endure as best they could a free-labor postwar Southern economy. ... 

Dozens of Arbours can be found today in the Baton Rouge area, most of them descendants of Frédéric the planter. ...

The family's name also is spelled Arbot, Arboure, Arbourg, Arboux, Hambourg, Harbour, Harbourg, Harbourgh.  [See Book Ten for the family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, & Pointe Coupee parishes; 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, & Pointe Coupee parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2055, 2402; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 12; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vol. 4; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, "Family" No. 58; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 53-54; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505; White, DGFA-1, 796-97.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
François ARBOUR 01 Aug 1785 BR born c1743, Québec; son of François HARBOUR/ARBOUR & Marie-Jeanne-Thérèse PICORON dit DESCÔTEAUX; deported to France; caulker; married, age 22, Marie, daughter of Joseph HENRY & Christine PITRE, 25 Nov 1765, Notre-Dame, Le Havre, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-82; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called François HARBOURG, with wife & 3 sons; wedding witness, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, Oct 1784; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 45, head of family; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, called Franco ARBOUR, with unnamed wife [Marie], 3 unnamed children [sons Francois-Henry, Frédéric-Edouard, Jean-Louis-Firmin], 7 1/2 units corn, 0 units rice; died probably Baton Rouge before Sep 1790, when he was listed as deceased in son François-Henry's marriage record
François-Henry ARBOUR 02 Aug 1785 BR born c1767, probably Le Havre, France; son of François ARBOUR & Marie HENRY; brother of Frédéric-Édouard & Jean-Louis-Firmin; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; sailor; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & brothers; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 18; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & brothers; married, age 23, Marie-Jeanne-Jacqueline, called Jeanne, daughter of François DAIGLE & Jeanne HOLLEY of Cherbourg, France, 27 Sep 1790, probably Baton Rouge
Frédéric-Édouard ARBOUR 03 Aug 1785 BR born c1772, probably Le Havre, France; son of François ARBOUR & Marie HENRY; brother of François-Henry & Jean-Louis-Firmin; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & brothers; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 13; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & brothers; married, age 26, Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of Jean HENRY & Marie PITRE, 11 Sep 1798, Baton Rouge; died [buried] Baton Rouge 18 Mar 1848, age 80[sic] #
Jean-Louis-Firmin ARBOUR 04 Aug 1785 BR, StJ, BR born c1770, probably Le Havre, France; called Louis; son of François ARBOUR & Marie HENRY; brother of François-Henry & Frédéric-Édouard; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & brothers; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 15; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & brothers; married, age 23, (1)Rosalie, daughter of Michel POIRIER & Marie CORMIER of St.-Jacques, 16 Apr 1793, St.-Jacques; (2)Susanna, daughter of George GLOVER & P. ROBERSON of VA, 1 Jul 1812, Baton Rouge

    NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls him François ARBOURG, & lists him with his wife, Marie HERVORY, & 3 sons; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 12, 193, his marriage record, recorded at Notre-Dame, Le Havre, calls him François ARBOUR, "22 yrs. old of Québec, Canada, here for 1 1/2 yrs.," calls his wife Marie HENRY, "24 yrs. old, de St.-Michel en Acadie, here for 1 1/2 yrs.," gives his & her parents' names, says all parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, but gives no witnesses to his marriage; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 53-54, Family No. 104, calls him François HAMBOURG, says he was born in c1743 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' names, says his mother & both his wife's parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of son Louis-Nicolas, baptized 26 Jun 1774, Archigny, godson of Louis-Nicolas de PERUSE des CARTS & Marie-Sophie DEBOUX de VILLEMORT, died age 9 & buried 19 Dec 1782, Archigny, & son Louis-Joseph, baptized 3 Jun 1778, Archigny, godson of Louis-Joseph JAUNON, surgeon, & Victoire DOUCET; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 207, the marriage record of Charles HENRY, a relative of his wife, & Marie LEBLANC, calls him Francois ARBOURE & Francois HARBOURG, & shows that he signed his named to the marriage document, indicating literacy; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 34-35, calls him Francois ARBOURG, calfat, age 45, on the embarkation list, Franco ARBOURG, on the debarkation list, & Francois HARBOURG, calker, age 45, on the complete listing, says he was in the 17th Family aboard Le Beaumont with his wife & 3 sons, details his marriage, calling him Francois HAMBOURG & giving his & his wife's parents' names but no place of marriage, & details his son Francois's marriage in LA but gives no place of marriage.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 526.  

If he was an Acadian, why was he born in Québec?  For his paternal grandparents' & parents' names & marriage information, see White, DGFA-1, 796, which calls the family HARBOUR (ARBOUR), says his father was the second child & second son of Michel, son of Michel HARBOUR (ARBOUR) & Marie CONSTANTINEAU, born at Petite-Rivière-St.-Charles, Québec, on 25 Oct 1674, & Barbe, daughter of Pierre MORIN & Françoise CHIASSON, born in Acadia in c1686, so François, fils's paternal grandparents were Acadians.  François, fils's father was born & baptized at Pointe-aux-Trembles, Québec, on 5 Jan 1705, & married Marie-Jeanne-Thérèse, daughter of Henri PICORDON dit DESCÔTEAUX & Marguerite MARTIN, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, Québec, on 9 Oct 1740.  François, fils was born in Canada in c1743, so one wonders if his family left that colony during the 1740s.  Were Francois, fils & his family deported to France from the French Maritimes in 1758-59?  He would have been 15 years old at the time of that deportation.  When did his father go to the French Maritimes?  His connection to greater Acadia is based on pretty thin stuff here.  He may simply have been a French Canadian who went to Le Havre on his own in the early 1760s & was not an Acadian exile, though, as previously indicated, his paternal grandparents were Acadians. 

Where was St.-Michel in Acadia? 

Where did he & his family live in France before 1773, when he appears in Poitou?  Certainly Le Havre, where he married Marie HENRY in Nov 1765, & the priest who recorded the marriage noted that the couple had resided in Le Havre for 1 1/2 years.  Perhaps Francois, fils lived in Cherbourg before then, where 2 young ARBOURs, Guillaume, born in c1749, & Chrysostôme, born in c1750, died in Dec 1758 & Jan 1759 respectively.  See Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 12, which, unfortunately, does not give the parents' names of the 2 deceased ARBOURs.  Can we assume that Guillaume & Chrysostôme died from the rigors of deportation?  Judging by the dates of their deaths, that's a safe bet.  We can only guess their kinsmen with François ARBOUR, fils of Québec, hence the careful language in the family history.

Youngest son Louis-Joseph did not accompany his family to LA in the summer of 1785, so he probably died at Nantes before Sep 1784, when the Spanish counted the Acadians in France, & Francois ARBOUR & his wife had only 3 sons on the listing.  Louis-Joseph would have been only 6 in Sep 1784. 

The marriage record of son François-Henry, dated 27 Sep 1790, in BRDR, 2:20 (SGA-14, 15), says that the father of the groom was deceased at the time of the wedding, so François, fils would have died in his late 40s.  

02.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls him François-Henry [ARBOURG], & lists him with his parents & 2 brothers; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2402, calls him Francois ARBOUR, & says he was born c1770; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 34-35, calls him Francois-Henry, son [François ARBOURG's] fils, marin, age 18, on the embarkation list, Francisco, su [Franco ARBOURG's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Francois-Henry HARBOURG, his [Francois HARBOURG's] son, sailor, age 18, on the debarkation list, says he was in the 17th Family aboard Le Beaumont with his parents & 2 brothers, & details his marriage in LA but does not give his or his wife's parent's names or the place of marriage; BRDR, 2:20, 218 (SGA-14, 15), his marriage record, calls him Francisco ARBOUR, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says both fathers were deceased at the time of the marriage, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Jean B. DUPUY, Juan Carlos TULLIER, & Francisco Alexandro DAIGLE (his brother-in-law).  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 526.  

Interesting note:  As teenagers, François-Henry & Jeanne sailed to LA on the same ship; their families, in fact, are next to one another on the passenger list of Le Beaumont, family nos. 16 & 17.  The ARBOURs went to Baton Rouge with most of the other immigrants aboard Le Beaumont.  The DAIGLEs also went to Baton Rouge but by 1788 had moved to Manchac/St.-Gabriel, just downriver.  This did not deter young Francois-Henry from marrying Jeanne, whom he may have known, & loved, since their childhood in France.

Although his marriage was recorded at the St.-Gabriel church, he probably was married in the Baton Rouge district where he lived.  Baton Rouge did not have a church of its own until 1793, so priests from St.-Gabriel would officiate at baptisms, weddings, & funerals there until it did.  

03.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls him Frédéric-Édouard [ARBOURG], & lists him with his parents & 2 brothers; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 34-35, calls him Frédéric-Édouard, son [Francois ARBOURG's] fils, age 13, on the embarkation list, Federico, su [Franco ARBOURG's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Frederic-Edouard HARBOURG, his [François HARBOURG's] son, age 13, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 17th Family aboard Le Beaumont with his parents & 2 brothers; BRDR, 2:20, 378 (SJO-3, 21), his marriage record, calls him Frederico ARBOUR, calls his wife Rosa HENRY, gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were "of Havre de Grass" & hers "of San Malo," that they had to secure a dispensation of 3rd degree of consanguinity, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Maximiliano HENRY [her brother] & Francisco ARBOUR [his brother]; BRDR, 7:14 (SJO-11, 75), his death/burial record, calls him Frédérick ARBOUR, age 80 years, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 526. 

Note that Frédéric's maternal grandmother was a PITRE & that his wife's mother was a PITRE.  

04.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls him Jean-Louis-Firmin [ARBOURG], & lists him with his parents & 2 brothers; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 34-35, calls him Jean-Louis-Fermin, son [François ARBOURG's] fils, age 15, on the embarkation list, Juan Luis, su [Franco ARBOURG's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Jean-Louis-Firmin HARBOURG, his [François HARBOURG's] son, age 15, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 17th Family aboard Le Beaumont with his parents & 2 brothers; BRDR, 2:20, 600 (SJA-2, 19 & 20), the record of his first marriage, calls him Luis ARBOUR, gives his & his wife's parents'  names, says his parents were from Havre de Grace, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Pedro PORIE (probably son of Joseph & first cousin of the bride), Rosalia ANRRY (probably Louis's future sister-in-law, who also was a cousin), & Juan Carlos ARSENO; BRDR, 3:22, 367 (SJO-3, 125), the record of his second marriage, calls him Firmin ARBOUR, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says his wife's parents were from VA, & that the witnesses to his marriage were Juan GEDERIE & Thomas LOSADA.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 526.  

How did a boy from Baton Rouge meet a girl from St.-Jacques, which was 2 districts downriver?  This is especially remarkable since her parents did not come to LA aboard one of the Seven Ships of 1785, like Louis's family did, but had reached LA in Feb 1764 & Feb 1765, 20 years earlier.  

He is called "Cadet" in the death/burial record of an unnamed son, dated 27 Sep 1806, in BRDR, 3:21 (SJA-4, 28).  

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