APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

BOUTIN

[boo-TANH]

ACADIA

Joseph, also called Jean, son of perhaps Jean Boutin and Susanne Rocheteau of Québec, born in c1676 perhaps at Québec, was a 25-year-old fisherman at Port-Royal in 1701 He married Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Lejeune dit Briard and Marie Thibodeau, at Port-Royal in c1708.  They moved to La Hève on the Atlantic side of the peninsula and then to the Minas Basin, where they settled at Pigiguit, but they did not remain there either.  Joseph was 76 years old when he was counted at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, with his youngest son Paul in April 1752.  Île Royale was part of greater Acadia and was controlled by the French at the time, so Joseph evidently had taken his family there in c1749 probably to escape turmoil in British Nova Scotia.  The census taker at Baie-des-Espagnols said that Joseph lived "Alone in a small house his children built for him," and that "He makes hand barrows and other small things for his own amusement."  Jean-Joseph died at Baie-des-Espagnols either just before or at the beginning of Le Grand Dérangement.   He and Marie-Marguerite had eight children, including six sons.  Their two daughters did may not marry, but five of their sons created families of their own:

Oldest son Jean-Joseph, fils, born at Minas in April 1710, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Pitre and Françoise Babin, in c1731.  They lived at Pigiguit and then followed his father and brothers to Baie-des-Espagnols probably during the 1740s.  In April 1752, a French official counted Joseph at Baie-des-Espagnols.  The census taker said that Joseph, a ploughman, was age 42, that his wife also was age 42, and that they lived with eight children:  Joseph III, age 20; Euphrosine, age 18; Ambroise, age 15; Bernard, age 13; Paul le jeune, age 9; Marie, age 6; Anne, age 5; and Michel, age 1.  The census taker noted that their "land was verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost [Des Herbiers was the King's commissioner, or commandant, for Île Royale, and Prevost was the colony's financial commissary]."  Joseph, fils died on Île Royale in June 1755 of an abcès qui a crévez dans le corps (an abscess that burst in his body).  

Eustache, also called Antoine, born at Minas in January 1712, married Agathe, daughter of François Viger and Marie Mius, in c1734 and also moved to Île Royale in the late 1740s.  In April 1752, a French official counted Antoine, who he called Boulin, and his family at Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale.  The census taker said that Antoine was a ploughman, age 40, wife Agathe, who he called Bige, also was age 40, and that they were living with five children:  Jean-Baptiste, age 17; Qualier, age 12; Angélique, age 9; Joseph, age 7; and François, age 5.  The census taker also noted that the family had been "Three years in the Colony come September," that "They have rations for 33 mos., and that their "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."

Pierre, born probably at Minas, married Marie-Marcelle, daughter of Claude Trahan and Marie Tillard, in c1745 and also moved to Île Royale, where he died in 1751 or 1752 on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  His widow remarried to Jean Pineau.  

Charles, born probably at Minas in c1723, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Paul dit Gravois Guédry and Anne Mius d'Azy of Mirliguèche, in c1746 and settled at Baie-des-Espagnols.  In April 1752, a French official counted Charles and his family at Baie-des-Espagnols.  Charles, called a ploughman, was age 29, his wife, called Josèphe, was age 28, and they lived with three children--Jean-Charles, age 5; Olivé or Olivier, age 3; and Marie-Françoise, age 3 months--and Josèphe's sister Eleine, age 28.  The census taker also noted that their "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."  Charles died in the late 1750s or early 1760s during Le Grand Dérangement.  

Youngest son Pierre-Paul, called Paul, born probably at Minas in c1727, married Ursule, daughter of Augustin Guédry and Jeanne Hébert of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, probably at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, in November 1750.  They settled near brother Charles at Baie-des-Espagnols.  In April 1752, a French official counted Paul and his family there.  Paul, described as a ploughman, was age 25, his wife, called Eustache, was age 21.  They had no children but were living with Pierre Guédry, "their brother," age 11.  The census taker also noted that their "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."

[For more of this family in pre- and post-dispersal Acadia and Canada, see Book Three]

By 1755, descendants of Joseph Boutin could be found on Île Royale and perhaps at Pigiguit.  

~

Other Boutins lived in greater Acadia before Le Grand Dérangement, but only descendants of Joseph the fisherman emigrated to Louisiana:

Jean-François, son of Sieur Joseph Boutin and Jeanne Leroy, probably not kin to Joseph the fisherman, became a merchant like his father.  Jean-François lived for a time at St.-Pierre-de-la-Martinque in the Caribbean, but he also took up residence at Louisbourg on Île Royale.  He married Marguerite-Catherine, daughter of Sieur Jean Milly-Lacroix, at Louisbourg in October 1751.  Their son François was born at Louisbourg probably in the early 1750s.  

Jean-Baptiste Boutin, probably no kin to Joseph and Jean-François, was born at Louisbourg in c1736.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails in the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Only one family of Acadian Boutins emigrated to Louisiana.  Pierre-Paul, called Paul, Boutin, age 50, wife Ursule Guédry, age 37, four children--Marguerite, age 15, Joseph, age 14, Susanne, age 5, and Paul, fils, age 3--and Pierre-Paul's older brother Charles's children Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, age 18, and Marie-Françoise, age 16, came to Louisiana in July 1767 with the second contingent of Acadians from Maryland.  Spanish authorities sent them a new community, St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, also called St.-Gabriel de Manchac, on the river above New Orleans.  Ursule was pregnant when they reached New Orleans; soon after they reached the colony, she gave birth to another daughter--Marie-Julienne, born in February 1768 probably at St.-Gabriel and baptized at New Orleans the following April.  The Boutins did not remain at St.-Gabriel for very long; during the early 1770s, Paul took his family to the Opelousas District.  

Nephew Olivier Boutin settled at nearby Ascension, where Spanish officials counted him on the east side of the river in August 1770.  He may have died at New Orleans in February 1773, in his early 20s.  One wonders if he married. 

Niece Marie-Françoise Boutin married Alonso, son of Juan Antonio Segobia or Segovia of Haenne, Spain, at St.-Gabriel in April 1768.  Alonso was a corporal in the Seventh Company of the Louisiana Battalion serving at nearby Fort St.-Gabriel.  Marie-Françoise died in New Orleans in February 1773, about the time that her bother Olivier died; she was only 22 year old and may have died from the rigors of childbirth.   

After the early 1770s, Acadian Boutins disappear from the river settlements.  

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Paul Boutin left St.-Gabriel on the river in the early 1770s and took his family to the Grand Coteau area of the Opelousas District, where some of their Guidry kin, also living on the river, soon joined them.  Paul's daughter Marguerite, recently married to a Savoie at St.-Gabriel, followed her family.  Paul and Ursule had another daughter in Louisiana--Marguerite-Louise, born near Grand Coteau in c1771--but no more sons.  Marguerite-Louise married into the Leger family.  The Opelousas census of 1777 hints that Paul had recently remarried to Madeleine Digrist, probably Ducrest; she would have been 42 years old that year, and he would have been 50; she gave him no more children.  Paul, père died near Grand Coteau in February 1801; he was 74 years old.  Both of his sons by Ursule Guidry married, but only his younger son, Paul, fils, had sons of his own.  Oldest daughter Marguerite died a widow near Grand Coteau in October 1828, in her late 70s.  Daughters Susanne-Catherine and Marie-Julienne probably died young.  Youngest daughter Marguerite-Louise died in Lafayette Parish in March 1834, in her early 60s.  

Joseph BOUTIN (c1753-1796; Joseph)

Joseph, elder son of Pierre-Paul Boutin and his first wife Ursule Guédry, born probably at Baie-des-Espangols, Île Royale, in c1753, followed his family to Lunenburg,/Mirliguèche, Nova Scotia, to George's Island, Halifax, and to North Carolina and Pennsylvania during Le Grand Dérangement.  In the early 1760s, he followed them to Maryland and then to Louisiana in 1767.  In the early 1770s, he followed his parents from St.-Gabriel on the river to the Opelousas District, where, at age 37, he married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Trahan and Madeleine LeBlanc, in July 1790.  Joseph died near Grand Coteau in November 1796; he was only 46 years old.  He and his wife had no children, at least none who appear in local church records, so his family line died with him.  

Descendants of Paul BOUTIN, fils (c1764-1832; Joseph)

Paul, fils, younger son of Pierre-Paul Boutin and his first wife Ursule Guédry, born at Baltimore, Maryland, in c1764, followed his family to Louisiana in 1767.  In the early 1770s, he followed his parents from St.-Gabriel on the river to the Opelousas District, where he married Anne-Spesse, daughter of German Creole Jean Teller, also called Taylor, and Marie-Madeleine Heindsman of Pennsylvania and Maryland, in July 1790, the same day his older brother Joseph married.  Paul, fils and Anne also settled near Grand Coteau in what became St. Landry Parish.  Their daughters married into the Barbe, Commins, Hirzel or Hurtzel, Lalonde (French Canadian, not Acadian), Mayer, Miller, Olivier (French Creole, not Acadian), and Stelly families.  Paul, fils died at his home on Prairie des Femmes, near Grand Coteau, in February 1832; he was 67 years old.  All of the Acadian Boutins of South Louisiana descend from Paul, fils and two of his sons, who also married German Creoles.  During the antebellum period, in fact, none of Paul's descendants married fellow Acadians, which was not unusual for small Acadian families in the old Opelousas District. 

1

Oldest son Paul III died probably at his father's home near Grand Coteau, age unrecorded, in September 1794.  

2

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born near Grand Coteau in September 1795, married fiirst cousin Élisabeth, called Lise, daughter of German Creoled Christophe Gatt and Marie Madeleine Teller/Taylor of Pont de la Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1819; Élisabeth's mother was Baptiste's maternal aunt. Baptiste and Élisabeth's son Jean Baptiste, fils, called Baptiste, was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in October 1820, Dupréville in May 1826, Pierre in June 1830, Théophile in January 1840, and Duclosel in November 1844.  Their daughter may have married into the Nelson family.  Jean Baptiste, père died near Grand Coteau in February 1852; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was 66 years old when he died, but he was "only" 56.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 4 slaves--2 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 25 to 1--on Elizabeth Boutin's farm; this may have been Jean Baptiste's widow Élisabeth Gatt's slaves  

Jean Baptiste, fils married Aimée, Amelia, Émelia, Melia or Media Brousse or Bruce at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1848.  Their son Jean Joseph was born near Grand Coteau in March 1850, Pierre le jeune in December 1851, and Paul le jeune in December 1853.  Baptiste died by March 1867, when Émelia remarried at Abbeville, Vermilion Parish (the recording priest called her a Broussard). 

3

Joseph le jeune, born near Grand Coteau in September 1796, married Iréné or Uranie, daughter of German Creoles Frédéric Miller and Marie Victoire Mayer, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1819.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1820, Joachim in January 1825, and Paul le jeune in October 1829.  Their daughters married into the Avil, Bergeron (French Creole, not Acadian), Duplechin, and Mathieu families.  Joseph le jeune died near Grand Coteau in July 1857; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 54 years old when he died, but he was 60. 

Paul le jeune married Marguerite Azolide, Chrysolide, or Isolite, daughter of François Mathieu and his Acadian wife Marie Clotilde Trahan, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1850.  Their son Louis Despalière, called Despalière, was born near Breaux Bridge in February 1851, Paul Despanet near St. Martinville in May 1855, Joseph Thelesmar in February 1857, and Aristide near Breaux Bridge in September 1860 but died at age 7 in August 1867. 

During the War of 1861, Despalière, despite his tender age, was listed as a conscript from St. Martin Parish.  Despalière married cousin Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Trahan and Aspasie Manceau, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1870. 

4

François-Hippolyte, baptized at Opelousas, age 8 months, in October 1802, died probably near Grand Coteau in October 1803.  He was only a year old.  

5

François-Alexis, called Alexis, born near Grand Coteau in August 1803, died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in July 1819.  He was a month shy of 16 years old.  

6

Youngest son Raphaël Vital, born in St. Landry Parish in December 1810, died near Grand Coteau in April 1820.  He was only 9 years old.  

Other BOUTINs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Boutins on the western prairies with known Acadian and French Creole lines of the family there:

Simon Boutin married Pélagie Landry.  Their son Adrien was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 10 months, in July 1831.  

René Boutin's son Ambroise Robert died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, age 7 or 8 months, in April 1860.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not bother to give the mother's name.  

Terville Boutin's son Jean Baptiste died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, age 3, in August 1863.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the mother's name.  

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived in the late 1760s, Boutons and Boutins came from France to Louisiana, where they became known as French Creoles, and settled at New Orleans or on the German Coast above the city:  

Canadian Guillaume Boutin was one of the first residents of Iberville's Fort Louis-de-la-Louisiane, at Old Mobile, in 1702.  He was a carpenter.  In August 1704, he married one of the Pélican girls, Louise-Marguerite Housseau.  Their first child, born the following year, was among the many newborns who did not survive.  Their son Nicolas was born two days before Christmas in 1707.  Guillaume, though a fellow Canadian, became a thorn in the side of Commander Bienville, who imprisoned and even shackled him more than once. 

Mathurin, fils, son of Jean-Mathurin Bouton and Françoise Portier of La Valle, Angers, France, married Marianne, daughter of Evra De Roche of Strasbourg, France, and widow of Jean Louis of Natchez, at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast in April 1747.   

Jean-Baptiste, Mathurin's brother, married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of François Saucie or Arkansas, at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast in August 1745.  Jean-Baptiste and Anne moved upriver to Pointe Coupée by the late 1760s.  Their son Charles-Hyacinthe was born at St.-Charles in September 1748, and Nicolas at Pointe Coupée in November 1769.  Their daughters married into the De Sage, Dufaux, Gallien, and LeTournau families. 

Thomas Boutin, a carpenter, married Marie-Louise Onesse.  Their daughter Rosalie was born at New Orleans in December 1755.  

Nicolas, fils, son of Nicolas Bouton, père and Marie-Anne Roche, married Marie-Agnès, daughter of Celin Gaspard, at New Orleans in January 1779.  

Another Thomas, this one son of Pierre Boutin and Cadec Bienvenu of Duras, near Bordeaux, France, died at New Orleans in July 1794; he was only 35 years old.  The priest who recorded Thomas's burial said nothing of a wife.  

In July 1801, Modeste Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of Pierre-Marin Lenormand and Jeanne-Charlotte dit Boutin of New Orleans, married Joseph-Marie, son of Acadian René Landry, at Attakapas on Bayou Teche. 

~

During the antebellum period, Boutins and Boutons, either French Creoles or Foreign French, were living in South Louisiana communities or came to New Orleans from France:  

Father Henry Boutin, a Frenchman, was the curé, or pastor, of Ascension church, present-day Donaldsonville, from September 1803 until March 1808, when he drowned in Bayou Lafourche while delivering the last sacrament to an ill parishioner.  He of course left no wife and children.  He was only 40 years old when he died and was buried in the church cemetery at Assumption, down bayou from Ascension. 

Pierre Boutin of Paimboeuf, the port for Nantes, France, died in Assumption Parish in June 1838; he was 46 years old.  The priest who recorded Pierre's burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  

Nathan Boutin, also called Bouton, perhaps one of the Boutons of St. Charles and Pointe Coupée, married Elizabeth S., called Betsey, daughter of Anglo-American John Kershaw, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in August 1828. 

F. Bouton, a 24-year-old female native of France, occupation recorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Medemseh out of Bordeaux, France, in December 1851.  

In June 1860, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 4 slaves--2 males and 2 females, 3 blacks and 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 25 years to 6 months--in Dr. D. F. Boutin's household in the Fourth Ward of the city of New Orleans.  

CONCLUSION

Though the Boutins were a large family in greater Acadia, but they were a small one in Louisiana.  Only a single family of Acadian Boutins--that of Pierre-Paul, called Paul, from Pigiguit and Île Royale, along with a nephew and a niece--came to the colony from Maryland in 1767.  Paul and his family settled at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans with the other 1767 arrivals.  The nephew settled at nearby Ascension but did not create a family of his own.  In the late 1760s or early 1770s, Paul took his family to the Opelousas District, where they remained.  Paul Boutin had two sons, but only one of them had sons of his own.  This son, Paul, fils, married a German Creole, who gave him six sons, but only two of them created their own families, and they, too, married German girls.  One of Paul, fils's sons settled near his father's homestead on Prairie des Femmes near Grand Coteau.  The other son moved east to upper Bayou Teche and settled near Breaux Bridge. 

Boutins and Boutons came to the colony decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived.  One of them, in fact, a Canadian, was among the first residents of Iberville's Fort Louis-de-la-Louisiane at Old Mobile in 1702.  Most of the non-Acadian Boutin/Boutons came later and settled on the German Coast above New Orleans.  A few settled in the city.  One family moved upriver to Pointe Coupée and flourished for a time, but the number of French Creole Boutin/Boutons never came close to the number of Acadian Boutins who lived on the western prairies. 

Judging by the number of slaves they owned on the eve of the War of 1861-65, the Boutins of St. Landry and St. Martin parishes participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  Only one Acadian Boutin, Élisabeth of St. Landry Parish, perhaps Élisabeth Gatt, widow of Jean Baptiste Boutin, père, appeared on a federal slave schedule, in 1860; she held four slaves.

Only one member of the Acadian branch of the family seems to have served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  The name of Despaliere, teenage son of Paul Boutin le jeune, appears on an undated list of St. Martin Parish conscripts, but no unit is associated with the boy's name.  He may never have put on a butternut uniform and taken up arms for the Southern Confederacy.  Two French-Creole or Foreign-French Boutons appear in the records of actual Confederate units:  I. W. Bouton served as a private in the 2nd Company of the 8th Battalion Louisiana Heavy Artillery.  He was captured and paroled at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863.  Jules or Jacob W. Bouton served as a sergeant in Company C of the 14th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  J. W. was a native of Mississippi and was a 25-year-old clerk residing in New Orleans when he enlisted in June 1861.  Other than a seven-month-long detail in the ordnance department in 1864, Sergeant Bouton was present with his company during its entire time of service and surrendered with Lee's army at Appomattox Courthouse in April 1865.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Bota, Botan, Boten, Boutain, Bouttain, Butten.  [See Book Ten for the family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources:  1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Orleans & St. Landry parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1346-47, 2004, 2437; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 253; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 3:39; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 1b, 2, 3, 5(rev.); De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:47; Fortier, Louisiana, 1:52; Guidry, "Guédrys Exiled to North Carolina"; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 51-52; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Higginbotham, Old Mobile, 568; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218, 239; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 5;  <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 35; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 161, 763; White, DGFA-1, 264-65; White, DGFA-1 English, 58.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Joseph BOUTIN 01 Jul 1767 StG, Op born c1753, probably Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale; son of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN & his first wife Ursule GUIDRY; brother of Marguerite, Marie-Julienne, Paul, & Susanne-Catherine; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, 1754; imprisoned on George's Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC aboard Providence, Dec 1755, age 2; moved to PA, c1760; on list of Acadians in PA, Jun 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; moved to MD, c1764; arrived in LA 1767, age 14; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Joseph BOTA, age 14, with parents, siblings, & orphan Maria BOTEN; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1774, unnamed, with parents & siblings; in Opelousas census, 1777, age 22[sic], with parents & siblings; in Opelousas census, 1785, unnamed, with father, stepmother, & siblings?; in Opelousas census, 1788, Grand Coteau, called Joh., with 1 male, no woman, 2 slaves, 50 cattle, 11 horses, 26 arpents next to his father; on Opelousas militia list, Jul 1789, fusilier, called Joseph BOUTIN; married, age 37, Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Isidore TRAHAN & Madeleine LEBLANC, Tuesday, 27 Jul 1790, Opelousas; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, with no wife, 1 white male, & 2 female slaves, next to his father & brother; died [buried] Opelousas Saturday, 26 Nov 1796, age 43
Marguerite BOUTIN 02 Jul 1767 StG, Op born c1752, probably Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale; daughter of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN & his first wife Ursule GUIDRY; sister of Joseph, Marie-Julienne, Paul, & Susanne-Catherine; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, 1754, imprisoned George's Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC aboard Providence, Dec 1755, age 3; moved to PA, c1760; on list of Acadians in PA, Jun 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; moved to MD, c1764; arrived LA 1767, age 15; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Margarita, age 15, with parents & siblings; married, age 21, Jean dit Valois, son of Charles SAVOIE & Françoise MARTIN, 3 Nov 1773, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Marguerite, age 13[sic, probably 25], with husband & 2 daughters; in Opelousas census, 1788, Bellevue, unnamed, with husband & 11 others; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, unnamed, with husband & 15 others; died Grand Coteau 13 Oct 1828, "age about 78 years," buried the next day "in the parish cemetery"; succession record dated Nov 1828, St. Landry Parish courthouse
Marie-Françoise BOUTIN 03 Jul 1767 StG, NO born c1752, Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale; daughter of Charles BOUTIN & Marie-Josèphe GUIDRY; sister of Pierre-Olivier; niece of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN; at Baie-des-Espagnols Apr 1752, age 3 months; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, 1754; imprisoned George's Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC aboard Providence, Dec 1755, age 4; moved to PA, c1760; moved to MD, c1764; arrived LA 1767, age 16, with the family of her uncle; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Maria BOTEN, orphan, age 16, with family of [uncle] Pierre BOTA/Pablo BOTAN; married, age 17, Alonso, son of Juan Antonio SEGOVIA and Theresa BAHENE of Haenne, Spain, & corporal of the Spanish troops at St.-Gabriel, 4 Apr 1768, St.-Gabriel; died [buried] New Orleans 22 Feb 1773, age 22
*Marie-Julienne BOUTIN 08 Jul 1767 StG, Op? arrived LA Jul 1767, in utero; born Feb 1768, probably St.-Gabriel; baptized 16 Apr 1768, New Orleans; daughter of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN & his first wife Ursule GUIDRY; sister of Joseph, Marguerite, Paul, & Susanne-Catherine; moved to Opelousas District?; in Opelousas census, 1774, unnamed, with father & siblings?; probably died young
Paul BOUTIN 05 Jul 1767 StG, Op born c1764, Baltimore, MD; son of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN & his first wife Ursule GUIDRY; brother of Joseph, Marguerite, Marie-Julienne, & Susanne-Catherine; arrived LA 1767, age 3; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Pablo BOTA, age 4, with parents, siblings, & orphan Maria BOTEN; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1774, unnamed, with parents & siblings; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Pierre[sic], age 12, with parents & siblings; in Opelousas census, 1785, unnamed, with father, stepmother, & siblings?; in Opelousas census, 1788, Grand Coteau, called Paul BOUTIN, son, with 1 male, no woman, 0 slaves, 30 cattle, 5 horses, 26 arpents near his father; on Opelousas militia list, Jul 1789, fusilier, called Paul BOUTIN; married, age 26, Anne-Spesse of PA, daughter of Jean TELLER/John TAYLOR & Marie-Madeleine HEINDSMAN, Tuesday, 27 Jul 1790, Opelousas; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, called Paul BOUTIN, son, with wife [Anne-Spesse], 1 white male, 2 white females, & 0 slaves, next to his father & brother; died Prairie Des Femmes, Grand Coteau area, St. Landry Parish, 26 Feb 1832, age 67, a widower; succession record dated 7 Mar 1832, St. Landry Parish courthouse; one of the author's maternal ancestors~~
Pierre-Olivier BOUTIN 04 Jul 1767 StG, Asc, NO? born c1749, Pigiguit or Île Royale; called Olivier; son of Charles BOUTIN & Marie-Josèphe GUIDRY; brother of Marie-Françoise; nephew of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN; at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, Apr 1752, called Olivé, age 3; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, 1754; imprisoned George's Island, Halifax, Sep 1755; exiled to NC aboard Providence, Dec 1755, age 6; moved to PA, c1760; moved to MD, c1764; arrived LA probably 1767, age 18; in Ascension census, 1770, left [east] bank, age 21, head of "family" number 77, listed singly; died [buried] New Orleans 22 Feb 1773?
Pierre-Paul BOUTIN 06 Jul 1767 StG, Op born c1727, probably Minas; called Paul; son of Joseph BOUTIN & Marie-Marguerite LEJEUNE dit Briard; moved to Île Royale, 1749; married, age 23, (1)Ursule, daughter of Augustin GUIDRY & Jeanne HÉBERT of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, 9 Nov 1750, Louisbourg; at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, Apr 1752, called Paul BOUTIN, ploughman, age 25, with wife Eustache[sic] GUÉDRY age 21, no children, & brother-in-law Pierre GUÉDRY, age 11, with notation, "The land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost"; moved to Lunenburg/Mirliguèche, NS, 1754; imprisoned George's Island, Halifax, Sep1755; exiled to NC aboard Providence, Dec 1755, age 28; moved to PA, c1760; on list of Acadians in PA, Jun 1763, called Paul BOUTIN, with wife Ursulle & 6 unnamed children; moved to MD, c1764; arrived LA 1767, age 40; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Pierre BOTA & Pablo BOTAN, age 48[sic], head of family number 28, assigned farm number 49, with wife Ursula age 37, sons Joseph age 14, Pablo age 4, daughters Margarita age 15, Susana age 6, & orphan [niece] Maria BOTEN age 16; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1774, called Polle BOUTIN, no age given, with an unnamed wife & 3 unnamed children, 0 slaves, 10 cattle, 4 horses & mules, 0 swine; married (2)Madeleine DUCREST; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Paul, age 52[sic], head of family number 88, with wife Magdelon DIGRIST age 42, sons Joseph age 22, Pierre age 12, daughter Anastasie [probably Marguerite-Louise] age 6, 0 slaves, 38 cattle, 0 horses, 40 hogs, 0 sheep; in Opelousas census, 1785, called Paul, with 4 unnamed free individuals, 3 female slaves; in Opelousas census, 1788, Grand Coteau, called Paul BOUTIN, with 1 unnamed male, no woman, 1 slave, 40 cattle, 12 horses, 8 arpents near son Paul & next to son Joseph; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, called Paul BOUTIN, father, with no wife, 1 unnamed white male, & 1 female slave, between sons Joseph & Paul; died [buried] Opelousas, Wednesday, 25 Feb 1801, age 74; succession record dated 7 Mar 1832, St. Landry Parish courthouse; one of the author's maternal ancestors~~
Susanne-Catherine BOUTIN 07 Jul 1767 StG, Op? born 17 Dec 1761, probably Philadelphia, PA; baptized 24 Jun 1762, Philadelphia; daughter of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN & his first wife Ursule GUIDRY; sister of Joseph, Marguerite, Marie-Julienne, & Paul; on list of Acadians in PA, Jun 1763, unnamed, with parents & siblings; moved to MD, c1764; arrived LA 1767, age 5; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Susana BOTA, age 6, with parents, siblings, & orphan Maria BOTEN; moved to Opelousas District?; in Opelousas census, 1774, unnamed, with father & siblings?; probably died young

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 12, calls him Joseph BOUTIN; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2437, calls him Joseph RICHARD dit BOUTIN, says he was born in 1727 but gives no birthplace, & that he was son of Alexandre RICHARD & Marie LEVRON of Port-Royal; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-1: 103-04, 772 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A: p.30), his marriage record, calls him Joseph BOUTIN, calls his wife Marie-Jeane/Jeanne TRAHAN, gives his & her parents' names, says his parents were Paul [BOUTIN] & Ursule GUIDRY, provides the day of the week as well as the day of the marriage, & says the witnesses to his marriage were ___ DEBORDE, Jean TRAHAN, J. GUIDRY, & Rensuval MIRS(?)[sic]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:104 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.31), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph BOUTIN, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433; De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 1, 39; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 24.   

His birth year is based on the age in the Spanish report of 1767, not the Opelousas census of 1777.  

Arsenault, cited above, is confusing Joseph RICHARD dit BOUTIN & Joseph, older son of Pierre-Paul BOUTIN.  This is revealed by his claiming that Joseph RICHARD dit BOUTIN married Jeanne TRAHAN in c1750.  Note that Joseph, son of Pierre-Paul, married Marie-Jeanne TRAHAN at Opelousas in 1790.  Where did Arsenault get his information?  I follow the primary sources here.

02.  Wall of Names, 12, calls her Marguerite BOUTIN; BRDR, 2:170, 666 (ASC-1, 125), her marriage record, calls her Marguerite BUTEN, calls her husband Jean SAVOY, gives her & his parents' names, says her parents were "of St. Gabriel at Manchac," his parents were "of Acadia," & that witnesses to her marriage were Joseph BUTEN [her brother] & Jean-Charles COMO; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-C:96 (GC Ch.: v.1, p.20, #139), her death/burial record, calls her Marguerite BOUTIN, widow of dec. Jean SAVOY, says she died "age about 78 years," that she was "buried ... in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-C:96 (Opel.Ct.Hse.: Succ.#477), her succession record, calls her Marguerite BOUTIN m. Jean SAVOY, but does not give her parents' names or list any children.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433.   

She must not be confused with her younger sister Marguerite-Louise, who was born in LA & is therefore not on this list.  That they were different people can be seen in their respective marriage records & in the baptismal records of their children.  For example, on 19 Oct 1788, Salome SAVOIE, daughter of Jean SAVOIE & Marguerite BOUTIN, was baptized at Opelousas.  A few months later, on 12 Jul 1789, Michel LEGER, son of Michel LEGER & Marguerite-Louise BOUTIN, was baptized at Opelousas.  See Hebért, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:514, 702.  

03.  Wall of Names, 12, calls her Marie-Françoise BOUTIN, & lists her separately; BRDR, 1b:28, 170 (PCP-3, 249; PCP-4, 25), her marriage record, calls her Marie-Francoise BOUTIN, "native of Acadia," calls her husband Alphonse SEGOBIA, "native of Haenne, Spain, Corporal of the Spanish troops of the St.-Gabriel Post of Manchac," gives her & his parents' names, says both her parents were deceased at the time of the marriage, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph GIMENEZ, Marie MORIN, & Anne BERGERON.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:47; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433.  

Her marriage was recorded in Point Coupée because there was no church at St.-Gabriel until the early 1770s.  Judging by her age at the time of her death, she probably died in childbirth.  Her husband Alonso's second marriage record in NOAR, 3:177, 276 (SLC, M4, 2), calls him widower of Maria (BOTEN?), & says he was corporal of the Seventh Company of the Louisiana Battalion.  The Catalina LAMBERT he married in New Orleans on 6 Feb 1777 probably was not Acadian.  

04.  Wall of Names, 12, calls him Olivier BOUTIN; NOAR, 3:35 (SLC, F1, 19), perhaps his burial record, gives no first name, only a last name, BOUTIN, & says that he was "native of Acadia."   See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:47; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 7.  

He & his younger sister were the only survivors of their immediate family to make it to LA.  He probably came in with relatives in 1767. 

None of the other Acadian BOUTIN fit the date of the burial record cited above, so this probably was him.

05.  Wall of Names, 12, calls him Paul BOUTIN; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:104, 737-38 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A: p.31), his marriage record, calls him Paul BOUTIN, calls his wife Anne-Spesse TELLERE, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were J. DESBORDES & Fercole MILLER; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 3:82 (GC Ch.: v.1, p.30), his death/burial record, calls him Paul BOUTIN, says he was 67 years old when he died, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 3:82 (Opel.Ct.Hse.: Succ.#583), his succession record, calls him Paul BOUTIN from Prairie des femmes, but does not give his parents' names, mention a wife, or list any children.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433; De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 1, 39; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 24.  

His birth year is based on a compromise of the ages given in the Spanish report of 1767 & the Opelousas census of 1777.  The age given in his burial record nails it. 

His wife's information is from her family's records in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:737-39.  Her family was German & anglicized their name perhaps in PA or MD before coming to LA.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218.   

06.  Wall of Names, 12, calls him Pierre-Paul BOUTIN; White, DGFA-1, 265, calls him Paul & gives his birth year.  See also De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives, 2A:47; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218; De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 1, 39; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 24; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433. 

Was the Magdelon DIGRIST found with him in the 1777 Opelousas census a new wife?  Most likely, but where is their marriage record?  Taking the age given for her in the 1777 census--42--one gets an estimated birth year of c1735.  A burial record for "Mrs. Paul BOUTIN, "inhabitants[sic] of this Post [Opelousas]," dated 20 Aug 1788, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:104 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.8), says BOUTIN's wife was 57 years old when she died, giving an estimated birth year of c1737 (compared to Ursule GUIDRY's estimated birth year of c1730).  So who was Madeleine DIGREST, born in c1736?  Was her actual name Madeleine DUCREST?  

07.  Wall of Names, 12, calls her Susanne BOUTIN.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 218; De Ville, Mississippi Valley Mélange, 1, 39; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 433.   

What happened to her in LA?  Did she live long enough to accompany her family to the Opelousas District?

08.  Not in Wall of Names because of the circumstance of her birth.  NOAR, 2:31 (SLC, B6, 21), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie Juliens BOUTEINS, gives her parents' names, says her godparents were Juliens ANTOINE "(same as Julian DUENAS [?], who signs)" & Mary LENDRY, & that she was born in "cir. Feb. 1768." 

If she was born in Feb 1768, she would have been conceived the previous May, which means her mother was a couple of months pregnant with her when the family reached LA in Jul 1767, hence her inclusion on this list. 

What happened to her in LA?  Did she live long enough to accompany her family to the Opelousas District?

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