APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

ALLAIN

[ah-LANH]

ACADIA

Pierre Allain de La Motte, from the village of Mamers in the Maine region of France, arrived at Port-Royal in c1685 and served as the King's clerk in the colony.  The name of his wife, whom he married in the year of his arrival, is unknown.  They had three children at Port-Royal:  Pierre, fils, François, and Marie, who married into the Guestre family, place unrecorded, in May 1729.  Pierre, fils, who became a merchant at Port-Royal, evidently did not marry.  Probably after the British captured Port-Royal in August 1710, the family moved to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, and settled at Louisbourg.

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Louis Allain, a blacksmith, born in c1654, probably not kin to Pierre the King's clerk, also arrived at Port-Royal in c1685.  In July 1687, Louis was given permission by the seigneur of Port-Royal, Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, to build a sawmill near the settlement, which he also operated.  A tributary of lower Rivière-au-Dauphin, on which Port-Royal was located, took its name from Louis--Rivière Allain.  Around 1690, Louis married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry.  Louis died at Annapolis Royal in June 1737, in his early 80s.  His only daughter married into the Gauthier dit Bellaire family.  His son-in-law, Joseph-Nicolas, called Nicolas, Gauthier dit Bellair, became a wealthy Annapolis valley merchant whose estate on haute rivière, Bellaire, provided his dit.  During King George's War of the 1740s, Nicolas joined the Acadian resistance against the British, for which Marie and their son Nicolas, fils, spent time in the Fort Anne dungeon.  In 1749, his fortune gone, Nicolas took Marie and their children to Île St.-Jean, where the French compensated him with two pieces of property on Rivière-du-Nord-Est.  He died there in April 1752, age 63.  Marie did not remarry. 

Louis's only son Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine LeBlanc and Marie Bourgeois, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1717 and settled at Minas.  Pierre's oldest son Louis le jeune moved to Petitcoudiac, but his younger sons--Pierre, fils, Joseph-Antoine, Benjamin, and Jean-Baptiste--remained at Minas. 

[For more of this family in pre- and post-dispersal Acadia and Canada, see Book Three]

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Charles Allain, born in c1700, not kin to Pierre or Louis, married Renée Mercier in c1721 and settled the next year on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  In 1725, he took his wife and two daughters to the French fortress of Louisbourg on Île Royale.  

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Pierre, fils, son of Pierre Alain and Françoise Le Perchoix, born at St.-Pair, bishopric of Coutances, Normandy, in c1710, was not kin to the other Allains of greater Acadia.  Pierre, fils married Thérèse Bornic, widow of Philobert Le Coudy dit Lafontaine, in August 1734 probably on Île Royale.  They settled at Lorembec, near Louisbourg, where two of their children were born:  Jeanne in c1736 and Pierre-Louis in c1740.  Daughter Jeanne married into the Destroismaisons dit Picard family at Berthier, Canada, in January 1765. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

[For the family's travails during the Great Upheaval, see Book Six]

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Pierre, fils and his family, along with two related Hébert families, came to Louisiana with other Acadians from Maryland in the summer of 1767.  The Spanish governor, Antonio de Ulloa, sent the new arrivals upriver to St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, where the Spanish had just built a new fort; the community also was called Manchac for the bayou that formed the district's northern boundary.  Living at St.-Gabriel placed the new arrivals close to the first contingent of Acadians from Maryland who had come to the colony the year before.  Those Acadians had settled at Ascension and Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, just downriver from St.-Gabriel.  

Pierre Allain, fils, age 44, and his wife Catherine Hébert, age 39, brought five children with them to the colony--Jean-Baptiste, age 16, Marguerite, age 15, Simon, age 7, Pierre III, age 3, and infant Bibianne.  Pierre, fils and Catherine had two more children at St.-Gabriel, both daughters--a second Marguerite, born in October 1771, and Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, in March 1774.  Oldest daughter Marguerite married Pierre dit Pitre, son of fellow Acadian Abraham Landry of Ascension, at St.-Gabriel in January 1773.  Bibianne married Moïse, son of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Foret, at St.-Gabriel in 1790.   Youngest daughter Madeleine married cousin Bénoni, son of Francois Hébert, at St.-Gabriel in December 1793; church authorities granted the couple a "dispensation ... for kinship" in order to marry.   All three of Pierre, fils's sons married fellow Acadians and created families of their own.  Pierre, fils died at St. Gabriel in December 1807; he was 85 years old.  Some historians believe that he was the Acadian exile who brought to Louisiana the Grand-Pré church registers that survived Le Grand Dérangement; today, the precious volumes are housed in a climate-controlled room in the archives of the Baton Rouge diocese.  

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste ALLAIN (c1751-1791; Louis, Pierre)

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, eldest son of Pierre Allain, fils and Catherine Hébert, born at Grand-Pré in c1751, soon after his parents married, followed them into exile in Maryland, came with them to Louisiana in July 1767, and settled with them at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, on the river above New Orleans, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians René Blanchard and Marguerite Thériot, in c1780.  All of their children were born at St.-Gabriel.  Their daughter married into the Rivas family.  Jean-Baptiste died at St.-Gabriel in March 1791; he was only 40 years old.  The St.-Gabriel priest who recorded his burial noted that he was "major domo" of the church.  

1

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born at St.-Gabriel in October 1782, married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadian Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1807.  Their son Pierre Ursin, called Ursin, was born in Iberville Parish in April 1811.  

Ursin married cousin Emilie, daughter of his uncle Jean Baptiste Allain, fils and Marguerite Céleste Guidry and widow of Pierre Miremont, probably in Iberville Parish, date unrecorded.  Ursin died at the home of Célestin Roth, Iberville Parish, in December 1858; the priest who recorded his burial said that Ursin was "a local person" and was 51 years old when he died, but he was 47.  He seems to have fathered no sons, so his line of the family died with him.  

2

Landry, born at St.-Gabriel in May 1787, died at St.-Gabriel, age 3, in August 1790.

3

Bernard-Sosthène, also called Sosthène-Bernard, born at St.-Gabriel in September 1789, married cousin Apollonie, daughter of fellow Acadian Victor Blanchard and Marie Madeleine Richard, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1817; Apollonie's father was a nephew of Bernard's mother.  Their son Bernard, fils was born in Iberville Parish in August 1821, and Jean Zenon in April 1823 but died the following November.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Blanchard families.  

Bernard, fils married Euphémie, daughter of Louis Édouard Guitteau and Joséphine Pignoux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1842, and remarried to Marie Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Dupuy and Sophie Daigle, at the St. Gabriel church in August 1846.  Their son Sosthène Bernard le jeune was born in Iberville Parish in July 1847, and Antoine Roger in December 1848.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 18 slaves--10 males and 8 females, 16 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 55 to infancy--owned by "Blanchard Allain," which was probably Bernard Sosthène and his wife Apollonie.  At age 39, Bernard, fils remarried--his third marriage--to Henrietta Anne, daughter of Trasimond Richard and Uranie Pujol, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1861.  

Sosthène Bernard le jeune, by his father's second wife, married Ann Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Arvillien Braud and Anne Selina Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in January 1868. 

4

Youngest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born posthumously at St.-Gabriel in July 1791, married Marguerite Céleste, called Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Firmin Guidry and Marguerite Landry, at St. Gabriel in August 1806.  Their son Jean Derosin, called Derosin or Drauzin, was born in Iberville Parish in April 1807.  Jean Baptiste, fils remarried to Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Firmin Landry and Ludevine Babin, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1811.  Their son Jean Baptiste Aimé was born in Iberville Parish in September 1825.  Their daughters married into the Allain, LeBlanc, and Miremont families.  Jean Baptiste, fils died in Iberville Parish in January 1834; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was 55 years old when he died, but he was only 43.  

4a

Derosin, by his father's first wife, married Marie Dartille, called Dartille, daughter of fellow Acadian Abraham Hébert and Ludevine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1826.  Their son Jean de Valcourt was born in Iberville Parish in June 1827 but drowned in Bayou Plaquemine at age 15 in July 1842.  Their daughter married into the Picou family.  Derosin remarried to Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste Landry and Clémence Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1837.  Their son or daughter, J.G.W., died at age 4 months in February 1838, and son Jean Baptiste Sosthène was born in Iberville Parish in November 1842.  Derosin remarried again--his third marriage--to Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadian Olivier LeBlanc and Madeleine Braud, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1852; Derosin was 45 years old.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Bruly St. Martin Ward 11, Assumption Parish, counted a single slave--a 17-year-old mulatto female--on Wm. Drauzin Allain's farm.  

4b

Jean Baptiste Aimé, by his father's second wife, married Odile, daughter of Alexander Étienne Reine of St. James Parish, at the St. Gabriel church in July 1844.  Jean Baptiste Aimé died in Iberville Parish in June 1848; he was only 22 years old and fathered no sons.  

Descendants of Simon ALLAIN (c1760-1809; Louis, Pierre)

Simon, second son of Pierre Allain, fils and Catherine Hébert of Grand-Pré, born at Baltimore, Maryland, in c1760, followed his parents to Louisiana in July 1767 and settled with them at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Babin, in July 1785.  All of their children were born at St.-Gabriel.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and LeBlanc families.  Simon died at St. Gabriel in October 1809; he was 49 years old.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste le jeune died at St.-Gabriel 2 days after his birth in August 1786.  

2

Janvier, born at St.-Gabriel in January 1790, married Elise Mary, Marie Elizabeth, or Mary Eliza, called Elizabeth, daughter of Jean Louis Bouche, Boush, or Bush and Hélène Hamilton, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in January 1817.  Their son Joseph Clément, called Clément, was born in Iberville Parish in November 1817 but died at age 2 in October 1819, Albert was born in April 1819, another Clément in November 1821 but died at age 3 in January 1825, Louis Sylvain, called L. S., was born in February 1827, Louis Sylvestre in December 1832, Simon Ernest, called Ernest, in January 1835, Victor Amédée, called Amédée, in March 1837, and Faustin Alcée, called F. Alcée and F. A., in October 1844.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Daigre, and Gallaugher families.  Janvier died in Iberville Parish in June 1852; he was 62 years old.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge parish, counted 7 slaves--4 males and 3 females, 2 blacks and 5 mulattoes, ranging in age from 46 to 4--on Janvier Allain's farm.  One, perhaps two, of his sons settled on Bayou Lafourche. 

2a

Albert married Marie Elisa or Eliza, called Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Lazare Landry and his Creole wife Marie Céline Lambremont, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1842.  Their son Albert Numa was born in Iberville Parish in November 1842, and Louis Dustine or Dutisne in November 1845 but died at age 4 in April 1850.  Albert remarried to Arzelia, daughter of Joseph Barthélemy Ramouin and his Acadian wife Amelie Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1852.  Their son Joseph Guy was born in Iberville Parish in October 1852 but died at age 7 months the following May.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 38-year-old black female--on Albert Allain's farm.  

2b

Louis Sylvain married Clara E., daughter of Henri Knobloch and his Acadian wife Rosalie Guidry of Lafourche Interior Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1851.  They remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

2c

During the War of 1861-65, Ernest served as a sergeant in Company E of the 4th Louisiana Infantry, so he, too, probably settled on Bayou Lafourche.  

2d

Victor Amédée married Virginia Carmelite, daughter of Acadian Denis Daigre and his Anglo-American wife Geneviève Buckner, "at" the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1863.  

2e

After serving as first sergeant of Company H of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in Louisiana and Mississippi, Faustin Alcée, married Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Gilbert Comeaux his wife Adeline Gallaugher, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1865.  F. Alcée, as the recording priest called him, remarried to Léontine, daughter of fellow Acadians Frédéric Arbour, fils and Adeleine Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1868.  Their son Frédéric Vincent was born near Baton Rouge in August 1870. 

3

Simeon, born at St.-Gabriel in September 1797, died in Iberville Parish in June 1837.  He was only 39 years old and probably did not marry.  

4

Jean-Julien, called Julien, born at St.-Gabriel in June 1802, married Marie Alphonse Hortense, called Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in March 1827.  Their son Julien, fils was born in Iberville Parish in October 1832, an infant son, name unrecorded, died in April 1835, and Alphonse was born in August 1846 but died at age 15 months in December 1847.  Their daughter married into the Redditt family from Tennessee.  Julien, père died in Iberville Parish in August 1849; he was 47 years old.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 3 slaves--a male and 2 females, all black, ages 35, 20, and 5--on Hortense Allain's farm; this was Julien, père's widow, Hortense LeBlanc.

Julien, fils married Marie Dina, called Dina, daughter of Foreign Frenchman François Dupuy and his wife Françoise Rose Desbains, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1858.  Their son Antoine Arthur was born near Plaquemine in May 1861, and Joseph Charles in February 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Julien, fils served as first sergeant of Company D of the 27th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

5

Youngest son Victor, or Victorin, born at St. Gabriel in April 1807, married Marie Françoise Aimée, called Marie Aimée and Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Braud and Marie Geneviève Daigre, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1830.  Their son Victorin, fils was born in Iberville Parish in April 1834, and Simon Émile in July 1839.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Landry, and Rivière families.  Victorin, père died in Iberville Parish in July 1845 and was buried in St. Raphael's cemetery; he was only 38 years old.  

5a

Victorin, fils married distant cousin Armina, daughter of Rosémond Lambremont and his Acadian wife Clementine Braud, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1856.  Their son Victorin Antoine was born in Iberville Parish in September 1857, Rosémond Nemours in July 1859, and twins Joseph Olivier and Pierre Marcellin in August 1861.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 22-year-old black female--on "Victorian" Allain's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Victorin, fils served as a courier in Company I of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  According to family tradition, he visited his home near Bayou Goula as often as he could and was nearly captured by Yankee patrols on at least two of these visits.  

5b

Simon Émile married Mary Josephine, daughter of Ulger Baugnon and Lavinia Marionneaux, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1867. 

Descendants of Pierre ALLAIN III (c1764-c1790; Louis, Pierre)

Pierre III, youngest son of Pierre Allain, fils and Catherine Hébert of Grand-Pré, born at Baltimore, Maryland, in c1764, followed his parents to Louisiana in July 1767 and settled with them at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville.  He married Geneviève-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand-Paul Gautreaux, at nearby Ascension in February 1786.  Their children were born at St.-Gabriel.   Pierre III died by July 1792, when his wife remarried at St.-Gabriel; he would have been in his late 20s.  

1

Older son Pierre IV, born at St.-Gabriel in February 1787, died in St. Gabriel Parish March 1818.  He was only 31 years old and probably did not marry.  

2

Younger son Pierre Landry, called Landry, born at St.-Gabriel probably in the early 1790s, married fellow Acadian Rosalie Templet, probably in the early 1810s.  Their son Célestin was born near Baton Rouge in September 1813.  Their daughters married into the Bourque and Lejeune families.  Landry remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Daigre and Marie Henry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1818.  Their son Apollinaire was born in Iberville parish in January 1822.  Their daughter married into the Thibodeaux family.  

Célestin married Marie Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Braud and his Creole wife Jeanne Le Tullier of West Baton Rouge Parish, probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1836.  Their daughter married into the Tuillier family.  Célestin died in West Baton Rouge Parish in September 1837; he was only 24 years old and fathered no sons, so his line of the family may have died with him. 

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Other ALLAINs on the River

Area church records make it difficult to link some Allains on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there: 

Héloise Allain married Anglo American John Ellsworth at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Marie Amelie Allain married Anglo American Joseph Ellsworth, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Joseph a brother of John? 

Célestine Allain married French Creole Paul Ricard at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in May 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

An Acadian Allain from Iberville Parish settled on Bayou Lafourche during the early 1850s, creating a new center of family settlement:

Descendants of Louis Sylvain ALLAIN (1827-1878; Louis, Pierre, Pierre, fils, Simon)

Louis Sylvain, also called L. S. and Sylvain, fourth son of Janvier Allain and Marie Elizabeth Boush of Iberville Parish, born in Iberville Parish in February 1827, moved from the river to Lafourche Interior Parish when he came of age.  He married Clara E., daughter of Henri Knobloch and his Acadian wife Rosalie Guidry, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1851.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Ward 7, Lafourche Parish, counted 7 slaves--3 males and 4 females, 5 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 38 years to 3 months, living in 1 house--on L. S. Allain's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Louis Sylvain served as a corporal in Company E of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  His younger brother Simon Ernest also served in that company.  Louis Sylvain may have remarried to Amanda, daughter of Louis Bush and Hélène Hamilton, at the Thibodaux church in January 1866; she would have been his maternal aunt!  Louis Sylvain died in Lafourche Parish in 1878; he was only 51 years old.  

1

Older son Louis Hamilton, by his father's first wife, was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1860.  

2

Ernest, by his father's second wife, was born near Baton Rouge in October 1869. 

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Other ALLAINs in the Lafourche/Terrebonne Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Allain in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Rebecca Allain married Anglo American Joshua Stewart in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in March 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

The Allains of Acadia were not the only, nor the first, Allains to come to Louisiana.  Others came decades before them and lived at Old Biloxi, Old Mobile, and New Orleans during the colonial period:

Pierre Allain or Alain, a Canadien who came to Louisiana with Iberville, was on the roll of the first recruits at Fort Maurepas, Biloxi, dated 25 August 1699, so he was among the very first "settlers" of French Louisiana.  He worked as a taillandier in the colony and married Marie-Catherine Philippe, one of the "Pélican girls" from France, at Old Mobile, then part of French Louisiana, in the early 1700s.  Their daughter Marie was born in late August 1709 but died soon after her birth. 

"For the 1725-1725 winter expedition from New Orleans to this rich lowland [on the St. Francis River of Arkansas], Guillaume Allain hired himself to an experienced Canadian hunter named Sieur Lefebvre.  His wages consisted of 200 francs cash, forty pounds of tallow, fifty pounds of meat, four pots of bear grease, and half of the pecans that he could gather.  When he fell sick on the journey and replaced himself with François Le Moyne, however, Allain's employer refused to pay the terms of their agreement." 

A 35-year-old Alain, first name unrecorded, native of Plouvaux, Brittany, France, died in the "hospital for the poor" at New Orleans in January 1773.  

A "very young child," son of Baliriano Alain and Céleste Dural, "residents of this city," died at New Orleans in April 1803. 

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A prominent Allain family came to the colony several decades before Pierre Allain, fils of Grand-Pré arrived from Maryland in 1767.  These French Creole Allains settled at Pointe Coupée and Baton Rouge, not far from where their Acadian namesakes would put down roots.  

Descendants of Jean-François ALLAIN, fils (c1703-1782)

Jean-François, fils, born in c1703, son of Jean-François Allain, pére and Marie Certain of La Tortiniere, Touraine, France, came to Louisiana by July 1738, when he married Marie-Augustine Aussy or Haussy, widow of Antoine Anotiaux, at Pointe Coupée.  Most of their children were born at Pointe Coupée.  Their daughters married into the Avert, Gerard, and Trenonay families.  In late 1769, Spanish Governor Ulloa appointed Jean-Francois, fils as commandant of the Pointe Coupée District and captain of the district's militia; sons Jean-Francois III and Augustin served as militia lieutenants before also becoming captains.  Jean-Francois, fils died at Pointe Coupée in April 1782; he was 79 years old.  He received the signal honor of being buried inside the church, near the baptismal font, of St.-Francois of Pointe Coupée.  Only his two older sons survived childhood, but they married and had sons of their own who perpetuated this line of the family.  One line remained in Pointe Coupee Parish, while the other line settled just downriver in West Baton Rouge Parish, where several of its members owned large plantations during the antebellum period.  

1

Oldest son Jean-François III, called François or Fois, born at Pointe Coupée in March 1739, married Marie-Françoise, also called Anne, daughter of Pierre Ricard, at Pointe Coupée in October 1761.  Their son Pierre was born at Pointe Coupée in September 1762, Zenon, also called Zeno, was baptized at Pointe Coupée in December 1775, and Sosthène was born in January 1792.  Their daughters married into the Allain, Dubroca, Morgan, and Patin families; one daughter married an Allain first cousin!   François, called Fois by the priest who recorded his burial, died at Pointe Coupée in November 1805; he was 67 years old. 

1a

Pierre married French Creole Marie Pauline Duplessis probably early in the 1800s.  Their son Fergus Duplessis was born in East Baton Rouge Parish in October 1808, and Pierre Théophile, called Théophile, in June 1810.  Their daughters married into the Lobdell and Verret families.  

Théophile married Aspasie, daughter of French Creole Joseph LeBlanc de Villeneuve, in a civil ceremony probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the late 1830s.  Their son Villeneuve François was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1838, Alexandre Pierre in March 1844, Daniel Albeo, called Albeo, in July 1848 but died at age 4 in April 1853, Pierre Théophile, fils was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1854, and Charles James in October 1855.  Their daughter married into the Freret family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 39 slaves, ranging in age from 60 to 2, on Théophile Allain's plantation.  

During the War of 1861-65, Villeneuve François served in the 5th Company of the Washington Battalion Louisiana Artillery, raised in New Orleans, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky, Georgia, and Alabama.  

During the War of 1861-65, Alexandre Pierre served in the same unit as older brother Villeneuve.  

Fergus married cousin Adèle, daughter of Étienne Grandpré, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1838; Adele's mother was a daughter of Paulin Allain; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Jules Duplessis was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1845, Henry Fergus near Baton Rouge in March 1848, and Guillaume Louis near Brusly in December 1856.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 12 slaves--6 males and 6 females, all black, ranging in age from 80 to 2--on Furgus Allain's farm.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 22 slaves, ranging in age from 60 to 3, living in 8 houses, on P. Fergus N. Allain's plantation.  The same census taker counted 18 more slaves--ranging in age from 60 years to 4 months, living in 8 houses--on Fergus Allain's farm.  

1b

Zenon married Félicité, daughter of French Creole Alexandre Coussotte of New Orleans, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1810, and remarried to Marie Adélaïde, daughter of Louis Charles L'Oiseau and widow of Jean Jacqueneau of Haiti, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1815.  Their son Zenon, fils was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in June 1816.  They may have had a son named François Ricard, born in c1817.  Zenon, père died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in June 1856; he was 80 years old.  

Zenon, fils married Marie Evelina or Eveline, called Evelina, daughter of Acadian Magloire LeBlanc, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1835.  Their son François Edgar was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in April 1838, Louis Adolphe was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 4 months, in January 1840, Augustin, a twin, was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1842, Félix Adam Sauveur in February 1848, and Camille Octave in November 1849.  Their daughter married into the Bernard du Montier (French Creole, not Acadian) family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave--a 50-year-old black male--on Zenon Allain's farm; this was probably Zenon, fils, whose farm was next to his father-in-law Magloi LeBlanc's farm, which held only 2 slaves.  Zenon, fils remarried to Zéolide, daughter of Augustin Seguin, at the Brusly church in May 1854, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Augustine, another daughter of Augustin Seguin, at the Brusly church in April 1857; Zéolide and Augustine's mother was a Longuépée.  

Augustin married first cousin Marie Ludivine or Udivine, daughter of French Creole Agricole Bernard du Montier, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1866; Ludivine's mother was Augustin's paternal aunt, Augustine Allain, so they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Augustin Louis was born near Brusly in September 1870. 

Camille Octave married fellow Acadian Joséphine Emérante Landry.  Their son Arture Emil, probably Arthur Camille, was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1870. 

François Ricard married Pauline Lofiton, probably at Baton Rouge in the 1830s.  Their son Pierre Émile was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1847.  Their daughter married into the Dubroca family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 6 slaves--all females, 5 blacks and 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 44 to 14--on F. R. Allain's farm; this was François Ricard.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 13 slaves, ranging in age from 50 to 2, living in 6 houses, on Francois Allain's farm.  François Ricard may have died in West Baton Rouge Parish in November 1867; the priest who recorded his burial noted that François was about 60 years old when he died.  

1c

Sosthène married Delina Decuir probably in the 1820s.  Their son Evariste was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the 1820s.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 113 slaves, ranging in age from 65 to infancy, on Sosthène Allain's plantation.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 158 slaves, ranging in age from 80 years to 2 months, living in 30 houses, on Sosthène Allain's plantation.  

Evariste married Apolline, Dellina, or Pauline, daughter of Thomas Giddens or Guidene, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1844.  Their son Paul Telesphore was born near Baton Rouge in June 1845, and Hippolyte was baptized at the Baton Rouge church at age 2 months in April 1848.  Evariste remarried to Adeline Céleste, daughter of Jean Jacques L'Official, at the Baton Rouge church in July 1853.  Their son Prosper was born near Baton Rouge in January 1855 but died at age 3 1/2 in July 1858, and Joseph Levinsky, also called Evariste, was born in October 1856 but died at age 18 months in March 1858.  Evariste remarried again--his third marriage--to Mary P. Bird at the Baton Rouge church, or at least by a Baton Rouge priest, in July 1863; he was in his 40s.  Their son Joseph Sosthène was born near Baton Rouge in November 1864.  

2

Augustin, born in September 1742, married Charlotte Julie, another daughter of Pierre Ricard, at Pointe Coupée in April 1766.  Their son Victorin was born at Pointe Coupée in December 1768 but died at age 8 in September 1776, Augustin-Paulin-Florentin, called Paulin, was born in September 1773, Valérien in November 1775, Evariste in December 1777 but died in June 1778, Terence was born in February 1788, an infant son, name and age unrecorded, died in October 1789, and Sosthène was born in November 1792.  They also had a son named François le jeune.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc de Villeneuve (French Creole, not Acadian), Hopkins, and Perrin families.  Augustin died in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1808; he was 65 years old.  

2a

Paulin married first cousin Hedwige, daughter of his uncle Francois Allain, at Pointe Coupée in October 1793.  Their son Valérien le jeune was born at Pointe Coupée in October 1794.  Their daughters married into the Grandpré and Patin families.  Paulin died in Pointe Coupee Parish in October 1812; he was only 39 years old.  

Valérien le jeune died near Baton Rouge in October 1859.  He was 65 years old and may not have married.  

2b

Valérien married Céleste or Célestine, daughter of Frenchman Martin Duralde of Cambo-les-Bains, France, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1798; Céleste was a native of St.-Louis, Illinois, now Missouri.  Their son Valérien, fils was born at Atakapas, later St. Martin Parish, in October 1799, a son, a "very young child," name unrecorded, was buried at New Orleans in April 1803, and Angel died in East Baton Rouge Parish at age 18 months in August 1813.  Their daughter married into the Dubroca family.  Valérien remarried to Helen Asure probably at Baton Rouge in the late 1810s.  Their child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in August 1823.  Valérien, père died in France in August 1844 and was buried at Baton Rouge the following November; the priest who recorded his burial noted that Valérien died "at a very advanced age"; he was 68 years old.  

Valérien, fils married Brigitte Decuir.  Their daughter married into the Thomas family.  Valérien, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1843; he was only 44 years old; he probably fathered no sons.  

2c

François le jeune married Pérrine Louis probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in the 1800s or 1810s.  Their son François, fils was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in c1815, and Preval François also in the 1810s.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 6 slaves--4 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 55 to 1--on François Allain's farm.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Pointe Coupee Parish counted 5 slaves--3 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 48 to 5--on François Allain's farm.  

Preval François married Caroline Dormeneau in a civil ceremony probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in the early 1830s.  Their son François Preval was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in July 1835, Joseph Albert in January 1838 but died at age 6 in December 1843, a child, perhaps a son, died 2 days after its birth in October 1845, and Joinville was born in c1846 but died at age 4 in August 1850.  

François, fils married Eugenie, daughter of Francois Honoré, in a civil ceremony in Pointe Coupee Parish in December 1835, and sanctified their marriage at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in April 1862 .  Their son François Alceste was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in March 1837, and Hubert in November 1842.  François, fils died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1865, but his burial services were not held until December 1866; the priest who recorded his burial noted that François was about 50 years old when he died.  

Hubert married Virginie, daughter of Jean Baptiste Tounoir, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1866.  Their son François Arthur was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1867, and Joseph in March 1869.  

2d

Sosthène married cousin Azélie Allain probably in the 1820s.  

2e

Terence died in Pointe Coupee Parish in May 1858.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Terence was 48 years old when he died, but he may have been 70 and still a bachelor.  

3

Pierre-Joachim, born at New Orleans in December 1750, died in Pointe Coupée at age 4 in September 1754.

4

Youngest son René-Francois, born at Pointe Coupée in November 1755, died at age 5 months in May 1756.  

.

Several Allains from Pointe Coupee and West Baton Rouge Parish probably were descendants of Jean-Francois, fils, but church and civil records obscure the relationship:   

Césaire, fils, son of Césaire Allain, père, whose surname also was spelled Holenne, Olengue, and Olin, from Pointe Coupee, married Azélie, called Zélie, daughter of French Creole Joseph Bergeron, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1831.  Césaire, fils died by January 1839, when his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse.  

Édouard, also called Maximilien, Allain married Célanie or Cydalise Barras probably was in Pointe Coupee Parish in the 1840s.  Their son Édouard, fils was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in November 1848. 

Honorine, daughter of Joseph Allain and Désirée Marie Marthe, married Laurans, son of William Julien, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in June 1859.  

Auguste Allain married Cornelie Lilles and settled near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, by the mid-1860s.  

Marie Georgina Allain gave birth to son Victor Adonis in Pointe Coupee Parish in c1859.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism in February 1867 did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  

~

Other Allains who lived in South Louisiana during the antebellum and immediate post-war periods cannot be linked by church and civil records to either the French-Creole or Acadian branches of the family:  

Jean Allain died in Ascension Parish in October 1841.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Jean died at "age 58 yrs."

Aurelien, son of Jean Allain and Calixte Guillory, married cousin Marie Anne, daughter of Evariste Guillory and Nancy Ford, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1845.  Their son Aurelien, fils married double cousin Marceline Guillory at the Opelousas church  in January 1867. 

Charles LaClair Allain or Alin married Catherine Bethune.  Their son Joseph William was born near Charenton, St. Mary Parish, in August 1850, and Daniel Thomas in March 1860.  

Joseph, son of Joseph Allain and Claire Carlin, married Louise, daughter of Antoine Mendoza, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in April 1850.  

In July 1850, the federal census taker in Ward 4, Municipality 1, Orleans Parish, counted a single slave--a 15-year-old male mulatto--in V. Allain's household 

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ward 3, Municipality 1, Orleans Parish, counted 8 slaves--2 males and 6 females, 5 blacks and 3 mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 to 4--in V. Allain's household.  The census taker in Ward 5 of the same municipality counted a single slave--a black female, age 31--in Valery Allain's household.  

In August 1850, the federal census taker in St. Charles Parish counted 9 slaves--1 male and 8 females, 2 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ranging in age from 40 years to 1 month--on Dr. P. Allain's farm.  

In September 1850, the census taker in Ward 7, Municipality 1, Orleans Parish, counted 3 slaves--a male and 2 females, all mulattoes, ages 33, 6, & 3--in a Widow Allain's household, and 5 slaves--2 males and 3 females, 3 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 40 to 4--in another Widow Allain's household. 

In June 1860, the federal census taker in New Orleans's Ward 4 counted 5 slaves--1 male and 4 females, ranging in age from 48 to 17, both of whom had run away--owned by Rosine Allain.  The federal census taker in the city's Ward 6 counted 2 slaves--both female, both mulatto, ages 4 & 1--in Augustin Allain's household, 3 slaves--2 females, 1 male, all black, ages 50, 17, and 6--in D. Allain's household, a single mulatto female slave, age 18, who had run away, owned by Marek Allain, and 6 slaves--2 males and 4 females, all mulatto, ranging in age from 60 to 6, all of whom had run away--owned by V. Allain.  

Hélène Alain gave birth to son Timoléon Marie near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in December 1870. 

~

Other Allains who lived in South Louisiana during the antebellum were a result of the family's participation in the South's peculiar institution:  

Marie Louise Allain of Pointe Coupée, a quarte libre, daughter of Marie-Anne Duchesne, married Hildervert Le Melle, also a quarte libre, at Opelousas in July 1802.

Augustin Allain freed François, a mulatto slave, "for his services" in September 1803; François was 36 years old.  By 1819, François himself had become a slave holder.  In that year, he sued Colonel Robert Young in a Feliciana Parish court for "illegally and wrongfully" killing the 30-year-old male "griffe" Regis, of whom, according to the court record, François was "the true and sole owner."  François asked for $2,000 in compensation for his loss.  François lost the suit and appealed the ruling, but lost the appeal as well.  François married Josine Doumamelle.  Their son Jean married quatre libre Calixte, daughter of Jean Baptiste Guillory, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1811.  Jean and Calixte's daughters married into the Frette or Verret and Renin families.  Jean and Calixte's son Auguste Jean married Elisa or Élizabeth, daughter of Louis Ardoin, Jardoin, or Jodouin, at the Opelousas church in June 1842.  Jean and Calixte's son Aurelien married cousin Marie Anne, daughter of Evarsite Guillory, at the Opelousas church in August 1845.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 5 slaves--1 male and 4 females, all blacks, ranging in age from 62 to 1--on the Widow Jean Allain's farm; this was Calixte Guillory.  

CONCLUSION

When a family of Acadian Allains from Grand-Pré came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767, an Allain family was well established in Pointe Coupée, a French-Creole enclave on the river above New Orleans.  Jean-François Allain, fils of Touraine, France, was appointed commandant of the Pointe Coupée District in February 1770.  His two older sons, Jean-François III and Augustin, who married sisters from the prominent Ricard family, also served as officers in the Pointe Coupée militia.  Jean-François III and Augustin went on to create sturdy branches of their family tree.  Jean-François III's sons moved downriver to West Baton Rouge Parish, while Augustin's sons remained in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Jean-François III's youngest son, Sosthène, held 113 slaves on his West Baton Rouge Parish plantation in 1850.  Ten years later, the federal census taker counted 158 slaves in 30 houses on Sosthène's holdings in the parish.  Two of Jean-François III's grandsons also owned dozens of slaves on their West Baton Rouge plantations in the decade before the War of 1861.  Augustin's sons and grandsons owned only a hand full of slaves on their humble Pointe Coupee farms.  

The Acadian Allains who arrived in 1767 settled at San Gabriel, downriver from Pointe Coupée, in what became Iberville Parish.  Pierre Allain, fils and his wife, Catherine Hébert, brought five children with them from Maryland--two daughters and three sons.  Like his Pointe Coupée namesake, Pierre, fils of Grand-Pré was a shaker and a mover in his community.  A dozen years after British forces attempted to destroy all vestiges of Acadian life in Nova Scotia, Pierre, fils still carried with him two of the precious Grand-Pré church registers, which the Acadians gave to the San Gabriel priest.  All three of Pierre, fils's sons created families of their own, but only the lines of his two older sons survived the test of time; the line of the youngest son seems to have ended in the late 1830s.  

With few exceptions, Pierre, fils's grandsons remained in Iberville Parish, on both sides of the river.  On the eve of the War of 1861-65, one of his grandsons held 18 slaves.  Other grandsons owned fewer slaves on their humble Iberville farms.  Two grandsons moved upriver to the Baton Rouge area.  Two more left the river and moved to Bayou Lafourche, where one of them held seven slaves on the eve of the war.  Many members of the family, however, held no slaves at all.

At least 20 members of both the French-Creole and Acadian branches of the Allain family served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  None of them served as officers, but a number of them were corporals and sergeants.  Two great-grandsons of Pierre, fils the Acadian served as first sergeants of their companies, one while still in his teens.  Extant military records show that all of the Allains in the Confederate army survived the war.  

The war took a terrible toll on the families' economic standing.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This included the Allain holdings in West Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantation houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Alain, Alin, Aling.  The Acadian and French-Creole Allains should not be confused with the Anglo-American Allens who lived in their communities.  [See Book Ten for the Acadian family's Louisiana "begats"]

Sources: 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Iberville, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, & West Baton Rouge parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Assumption, East Baton Rouge, Lafourche, Orleans, Pointe Coupee, & West Baton Rouge parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 391, 1081-86, 1535-38, 1997, 2054, 2401; BRDR, vols. 1a, 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:88; Fortier, Louisiana, 1:53; Harrison Thomas LaTour Genealogical Collection; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Higginbotham, Old Mobile, 365, 382, 390; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 158; Kinnaird, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 157, 159; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 7; "Ristigouche, 24 Oct 1760; "Usner, Lower Miss. Valley before 1783, 174-75, source of quotation; White, DGFA-1, 12-14; White, DGFA-1 English, 3-4.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day civil parishes that existed in 1861 are in parentheses; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Bibianne ALLAIN 01 Jul 1767 StG born Sep1766, probably Baltimore, MD; daughter of Pierre ALLAIN & Catherine HÉBERT of Grand-Pré; sister of Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, Pierre, fils, & Simon; arrived LA 1767, an infant; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Vibiana ALIN, age 10 mos., with parents & siblings; not in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, with the rest of her family; married, age 23, Moïse, son of Jean-Baptiste FORET & Marguerite RICHARD, 12 Apr 1790, St.-Gabriel
Jean-Baptiste ALLAIN 02 Jul 1767 StG born c1751, probably Grand-Pré; called Baptiste, son of Pierre ALLAIN & Catherine HÉBERT; brother of Bibianne, Marguerite, Pierre, fils, & Simon; exiled to MD 1755, age 4; in report on Acadians at Baltimore, MD, Sep 1763, called Jean-Baptiste ALING, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1767, age 16; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, age 16, with parents & siblings; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, called Ba[ti]iste ALIN, bachelor, age 20[sic, actually 26], with 12 cattle, 1 horse, 10 hogs, 14 fowl, 8 arpents; married, age 29, Marguerite, daughter of perhaps René BLANCHARD & Marguerite THÉRIOT, c1780, St.-Gabriel; died [buried] St.-Gabriel 24 Mar 1791, age 40
Marguerite ALLAIN 03 Jul 1767 StG born c1752, probably Grand-Pré; daughter of Pierre ALLAIN & Catherine HÉBERT; sister of Bibianne, Jean-Baptiste, Pierre, fils, & Simon; exiled to MD 1755, age 3; in report on Acadians at Baltimore, MD, Jul 1763, called Marguerite ALING, with parents & brothers; arrived LA 1767, age 15; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Margarita, age 16, with parents & siblings; married, age 21, Pierre dit Pitre of Ascension, son of Abraham LANDRY & his second wife Marguerite FLAN, 11 Jan 1773, St.-Gabriel; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Margueritte ALIN, age 25, with husband, 2 daughters, & orphan Marie ANDRAU
Pierre ALLAIN, père 04 Jul 1767 StG born 22 Nov 1723, baptized 23 Nov 1723, Grand-Pré; son of Pierre ALLAIN & Marguerite LEBLANC; married, age 27, Catherine, daughter of Jacques HÉBERT & Marguerite LANDRY of Grand-Pré, c1750, probably Grand-Pré; exiled to MD 1755, age 32; in report on Acadians at Baltimore, MD, Jul 1763, called Pierre ALING, with wife Catherine ÉBERD, sons Jean Baptiste & Simon, & daughter Marguerite; arrived LA 1767, age 44; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Pedro ALIN, age 44, head of family number 1, assigned farm number 22, with wife Cathalina age 33, sons Jean-Baptiste age 16, Simon age 7, Pedro age 3, daughters Margarita age 16, & Vibiana age 10 mos.; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, called Piere ALIN, age 45[sic, probably meant 54], with unnamed wife [Catherine] age 40, 1 unnamed son [Pierre] age 12, 2 unnamed daughters ages 7 [the second Marguerite?] & 3 [Marie-Madeleine], 18 cattle, 4 horses, 18 hogs, 30 fowl, 6 arpents; died [buried] St.-Gabriel 30 Dec 1807, age 85
Pierre ALLAIN, fils 05 Jul 1767 StG born c1764, Baltimore, MD; son of Pierre ALLAIN & Catherine HÉBERT of Grand-Pré; brother of Bibianne, Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, & Simon; arrived LA 1767, age 3; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Pedro, age 3, with parents & siblings; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, unnamed, age 12, with parents & 2 sisters; married, age 22, Anne, daughter of Amand-Paul GAUTREAUX & Marie LANDRY, 27 Feb 1786, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; died by Jul 1792, when his wife remarried at St.-Gabriel
Simon ALLAIN 06 Jul 1767 StG born c1760, Baltimore, MD; son of Pierre ALLAIN & Catherine HÉBERT of Grand-Pré; brother of Bibianne, Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, & Pierre, fils; in report on Acadians at Baltimore, MD, Sep 1763, called Simon ALING, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1767, age 7; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, age 7, with parents & siblings; not in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, with the rest of his family; married, age 25, Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste BABIN & Isabelle LEBLANC of Baltimore, 17 Jul 1785, probably St.-Gabriel; died [buried] St.-Gabriel 5 Oct 1809, age 50

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls her Bibianne ALLAIN, & lists her with her parents & 4 siblings; BRDR, 2:1a, 7a, 9, 295, 3:11, 331 (SGA-14, 14), her marriage record, calls her Bibiana ALLAIN, gives her & her husband's parents' names, calls his mother Margarita Bibiana KLIEBERT(sic, RICHARD intended), & says the witnesses to her  marriage were Pedro ALLAIN [probably her brother, not her father], Théodore DUGAT, Firmin LANDRY, & Simon BABIN.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 430; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 3.  

The baptismal record of daughter Marguerite Ermelande, dated 2 Dec 1804, in BRDR, 3:330 (SJO-1, 244), calls the mother Margarita Vivien ALLAN.  I have not seen this first name for her anywhere else.  

Bibianne does not seem to be recorded in the St.-Gabriel census of 1777 with the rest of her family.  She would have been 11 at the time; the Spanish census taker noted that Pierre ALLAIN had 2 daughters, ages 7 & 3, in Mar 1777.  Where was Bibianne when the census was taken? 

Her husband Moïse FORET's mother's name was actually Marguerite RICHARD.  

When did she die?

02.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls him Jean-Baptiste ALLAIN, & lists him with his parents & 4 siblings; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2401, calls him Jean-Baptiste ALAIN, says he was born in 1763, & that he was the twin of Simon; BRDR, 2:10 (SGA-8, 16 #74), his death/burial record, calls him Juan Bautista ALLAIN, major domo of the Iberville Church, but does not gives his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 158; Voorhies, J., Some Late-Eighteenth Century Louisianians, 430; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 4.  

The estimated birth year used here is from the 1767 Spanish report.  

His wife's name is from the birth/baptismal records of 6 of his children in BRDR, 2:9-12:  sons Juan Baptista, born in Jul 1781; Pedro, born in Oct 1782; Landry, born in May 1787, died in Aug 1790; Bernardo Sosthenas, born in Sep 1789; daughters Marie-Elyde, born in Sep 1784; & Maria Margarita, born in Jan 1786.  Unfortunately, none of these baptismal records lists the babies' grandparents, so the precise identity of their mother is only speculation.  There were 3 Marguerite BLANCHARDs who settled at St.-Gabriel.  Using the process of elimination, she was probably the one born in c1754 who was counted as an orphan with the family of Anselme BLANCHARD at St.-Gabriel in Jul 1767.  Was she Anselme's sister?  If she was, her parents would have been René BLANCHARD & Marguerite THERIOT, but this is stretching it.  

03.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls her Marguerite ALLAIN, & lists her with her parents & 4 siblings; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2401, calls her Marguerite ALAIN, & says she was born in c1757; BRDR, 2:11, 447 (SGA-4a, 5), her marriage record, calls her Marguerite ALLAIN, says her husband was from Ascension Parish, gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Mathurin LANDRY & Firmain BROUSSARD.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 158; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 430; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 12. 

When did she die?

04.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls him Pierre ALLAIN, & lists him with his wife & 5 children; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2401, calls him Pierre ALAIN, & says he was born in 1723; BRDR, 1a(rev.):10 (SGA-2, 44), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Pierre ALAIN, gives his parents' names, says he was the godson of Pierre LEBLANC & Marie GIROUARD, & notes his father's signature, connoting literacy; BRDR, 3:13 (SGA-8, 43), his death/burial record, calls him Pierre ALLAIN, age 85, but does not gives his parents' names or mentions a wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 158; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 430; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 3.  

The age given for him in the St.-Gabriel census of 1777 seems to be a transposition of his true age, 54.  Arsenault also says that he married Catherine HÉBERT in c1737, but this would have made him only 15, & she, born in c1728, would have been only 9 at the time of the wedding!  Judging by the ages of their older children, à la Arsenault, they were married in c1750, several years before they were exiled to MD.  

An interesting side note:  The author of the Introduction to BRDR, 1a(rev.), John J. Pastorek of Baton Rouge, an authority on the history of the St.-Gabriel settlement, suggests on p. I-2 that the ALLAIN family, that is, Pierre, may have been in possession of the old Grand-Pré church registers at St.-Gabriel when the only entry outside of Acadia was made in the old book, a baptismal note for Pierre ALLAIN's daughter Margarite[sic], made on 29 Jun 1773.  See BRDR, 1a(rev.):9, 2:11.  (It was in this same year, 1773, that the church authorities in New Orleans created a parish at St.-Gabriel.  See Appendix.)  Did the ALLAIN family abscond with 3 of the registers from the church in Grand-Pré during Le Grand Dérangement to prevent them from being burned by the British, carry them to MD in 1755, & then on to LA in 1767?  The historical records do not say who preserved the precious old books, only that they must have gone to MD with the Grand-Pré exiles & then they ended up at St.-Gabriel.  But if it was indeed Pierre ALLAIN who saved the old registers, he would have preserved his own baptismal record but, unfortunately, not the register that recorded his own marriage.  

Also, the notation for his daughter Margarite in the Grand-Pré register says that she was born on 11 Oct 1771 & baptized in Oct 1772, doubtlessly in St.-Gabriel.  This could not have been his daughter Marguerite who came with the family to LA in Jul 1767.  She had been born in c1752 back in Grand-Pré & had married Pierre LANDRY dit Pitre 5 months before the entry was made in the old Grand-Pré register.  Pierre's daughter Marie-Madeleine was born on 20 Mar 1774 & baptized at St.-Gabriel on 17 Apr 1774.  Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, married Bénoni HÉBERT in 1793.  See BRDR, 2:11, 12 (SGA-14, 20 #69).  There are no marriage or burial recordings in the Baton Rouge diocesan sacramental records for the younger Marguerite ALLAIN.  Perhaps she died young, & her burial was not recorded.  She is probably the 7-year-old daughter recorded with her parents in the St.-Gabriel census of 1777, cited above.

Pierre & his family are the first Acadian immigrants to be found on the Acadian Memorial's Wall of Names.  

05.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls him Pierre ALLAIN, & lists him with his parents & 4 siblings; BRDR, 2:1a, 2, 8a, 315 (ASC-1, 169), his marriage record, calls him Pedro ACHERON (sic, possibly ALLAIN intended), "an Acadian," calls his wife Ana GOTREAU, "an Acadian," does not give any parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Pierre ALLAIN & Pierre LANDRY.  See also De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 3.  

Why is he not listed in Arsenault, Généalogie, 2401, with the other children of this family?  

There is no doubt that this Pierre ALLAIN married Anne GAUTREAUX.  His wife's name can be found in the sacramental records of 3 of their children in BRDR, 2:11-12, 3:12:  sons Pierre, born in Feb 1787, & Landry, married in Jan 1818, & daughter Marguerite-Colette, born in Mar 1789.  Unfortunately, none of these sacramental records include the maternal grandparents of the child/person; however, there is a clue as to the identity of the mother, that is, Pierre fils's wife, in the birth/baptismal record of daughter Marguerite-Colette, dated 19 Jul 1789, in BRDR, 2:11 (SGA-11, 38, #138).  The girl's godmother is listed as Margarita GAUTREAU, who had an older sister named Anne.  Their parents were Amand GAUTREAUX & Marie LANDRY.  So, voila, his wife was Anne, daughter of Amand GAUTREAUX.  

06.  Wall of Names, 9 (pl. 1L), calls him Simon ALLAIN, & lists him with his parents & 4 siblings; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2401, calls him Simon ALAIN, says he born in 1763 & was the twin of Jean-Baptiste; BRDR, 2:12, 50-51, his marriage record, calls him Simon ALLAIN of Baltimore, says that the witnesses to his marriage were Francois HEBERT, Pierre ALLAIN (father? brother?), Isaac LEBLANC, & Charles HEBERT, & has the following note from the Pointe Coupee priest:  "the couple came from Manchac [St.-Gabriel] to be married, as there was no priest there"; BRDR, 3:14 (SGA-8, 48), his death/burial record, calls him Simon ALLAIN, age 50 yrs., but does not gives his parents' names or mentions a wife.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 158; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 430.  

He does not appear in the St.-Gabriel census of 1777 with the rest of his family.  He would have been age 17, perhaps old enough to be out on his own, like older brother Jean-Baptiste, who is listed separately in that census, but there is no separate listing for Simon.  

The trip from St.-Gabriel to Pointe Coupée was a fairly lengthy one up the river.  There was a church at St.-Gabriel, built in the mid-1770s, so the community must have been temporarily without a pastor when he married.  There was no church at Baton Rouge, between St.-Gabriel & Pointe Coupee, until 1793.  Why didn't Simon & Marguerite make a shorter trip downriver to Ascension or St.-Jacques to get married?  Were there no priests at those churches, either, in the summer of 1785?  

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Copyright (c) 2006-16  Steven A. Cormier